• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Sport stories
 Gator globetrotter
 Common cents approach
 The cannon incident of 1909
 American Dream
 Hitting the bricks
 A pool of resources
 Reading & riding
 The crowd goes wild
 Hangin' tough
 New life
 My old school
 Slipping the surly bonds of...














Group Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Title: Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073685/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida news for alumni and friends of the University of Florida
Uniform Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida National Alumni Association
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Publisher: University of Florida National Alumni Association,
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: Summer 2006
Copyright Date: 2000
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 2000)-
General Note: Title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073685
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 44739131
lccn - 00229084
 Related Items
Preceded by: Focus (University of Florida)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Sport stories
        Page 4
    Gator globetrotter
        Page 5
    Common cents approach
        Page 6
    The cannon incident of 1909
        Page 7
    American Dream
        Page 8
    Hitting the bricks
        Page 9
    A pool of resources
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Reading & riding
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The crowd goes wild
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Hangin' tough
        Page 20
        Page 21
    New life
        Page 22
        Page 23
    My old school
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Slipping the surly bonds of earth
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text









I Hlt UKU
InFR Wiifl

















swam, Italk


Senior Editor
Liesl O'Dell (BS '92)


Editor
Cinnamon Bair

Assistant Editors
Meredith Cochie (BSJ '06)
Liz Hillaker (3JM)

Managing Editor
David Finnerty

Contributing Writers
April Frawley Birdwell (BSJ '02)
Jerry Block (BBC'51)
Michael Candelaria
Holly Christiansen
Kathy Fleming
Faith Ford
Liz Hillaker (3JM)
Cindy Spence (BSJ '82)
Meredith Jean Morton (BSJ '06)
Carl Van Ness (MA '85)
David Villano (MAMC'86)
Jamison Webb (4JM)
Design
University of Florida
Office of University Relations
Publications Group


UNIVERSITY of
FLORIDA


Florida is published three times a year and
sent free to all alumni, parents and
friends of the University of Florida.
Opinions expressed in Florida do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors
or official policies of the University of Florida,
the University of Florida Foundation
or the UF Alumni Association.

Editorial Staff
352-846-2818
Fax: 352-392-7676

UF Alumni Association
352-392-1905
888-352-5866
E-mail
Florida@uff.ufl.edu

UF Alumni Association Web address
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu
Copyright 0 2006
Florida is printed on recycled paper
and is recyclable.







_2' FLORIDA


Sandhill Cranes
During my time in graduate
school, I lived on 23rd Terrace.
The sandhilll cranes were the
highlight of that location, and
one of my favorite memories of
those days is lying in bed in the
morning and hearing them call
as they came in for a landing. I
really enjoyed seeing the pic-
ture of them on the back cover
of the winter 2006 alumni
newsletter.
Betty Harper (BSF '95, MS '99)
Port Matilda Pa.


Mourning Jim
Haskins
Reading the well written UF
alumni publication is always
educational and entertaining. I
look forward to receiving
it. However, I don't recall hav-
ing been so taken with an arti-
ce as I was the one entitled "So
long, old friend" by Janis Ow-
ens (fall 2005 issue). Her mem-
ories of her friendship with Jim
Haskins were incredible. After
reading it, I wished that I could
have had the privilege of know-
ing him. He must have been
an exceptional human being,


and we need those in our
midst. Bravo to Ms. Owens
and the University of Florida
for embracing such a gentle-
man who imprinted the lives
of others.
Sharon Rymer Mooneyham (BAEd 70)
Lake Butler


An Old Friend
I recently read the letter from
"Sandy" Sanders (BSEE '31)
from Frankfort, Ky. ("My Old
School," winter 2006 issue.)
The letter caught my attention
because I remember my dad,
Ernest Menendez Sr. (BSEE
'31, MSE '34), talking about
a good friend named "Sandy."
My father also talked about
hitchhiking to football games
and wearing the "rat caps."
My dad was from Tampa. My
mother, Helen Menendez, has
talked about Sandy visiting
them in Tallahassee when my
dad was alive. I am wondering
if you are the same "Sandy."
I love UF and all of the tradi-
tion that goes with a great
university. My parents took
me to my first Gator football
game when I was in the sixth
grade. I remember that Larry


Libertore (BSPE '63) was the
quarterback. I was hooked! I
have seen a lot of great Gator
football games; some not so
good ones, too. My brother,
Buck Menendez (BSPE '66,
MPH '67), went to Florida in
the '60s, and then I went to
Florida from 1969-73. Some of
my best memories are going to
Gator games with my dad and
my brother. I still look up at
row 89 in the west stands and
smile in memory of my dad.
Sandy, if you are still alive, call
my mom. She is 92 and doing
great!
Mary Menendez Gray (BAE 73)
Temple Terrace



Send your letters to the editor
via e-mail atflorida@uff.ufl.
edu, fax 352-392-7676 or mail
to PO. Box 14425, Gainesville,
FL 32604-2425. Letters may be
edited for length.




volume 7


number 1


summer 2006


CONY


ENTS


ON THE COVER
Rowdy Reptiles, the
self-proclaimed stu-
dent group of Gator
basketball fanatics, cel-
ebrate at the Stephen
C. O'Connell Center as
UF wins its first national
basketball champion-
ship in school history
on April 3. More than
5,000 fans swarmed to
the center to watch a
live broadcast of the


FEATURES
10 ................................................................................. A Pool of Resources
UF's new Water Institute unites research efforts.
14 .....................................................................................Reading and Riding
Researching a Depression-era literacy project reconnected
Donald Boyd (BA '95) to his past.
16 ................................................................................. The Crowd Goes W ild
UF's basketball championship stirs emotions across the Gator Nation.

IN EVERY ISSUE

ON CAMPUS NEWS ABOUT CAMPUS, FACULTY AND STUDENTS
4 ....................................................................................... Sport Stories
Faculty Profile: Former ESPN executive John Marvel wows journalism students.
....................................................................................... Gator Globetrotter
Student Profile: Brian Bombassaro travels the world to broaden his education.
S........................................................................... Common Cents Approach
In the Classroom: Family Financials class teaches students about money matters.
...................................................................... The Cannon Incident of 1909
UF Flashback: A fable records this early student prank.
........................................................................................... A m erican Dream
Sports Profile: Olympian Nicola Willis lives out her hopes of studying abroad.


'Zi~b


championship game
against UCLA 9 ......................................................................................... Hitting the Bricks
Page 16 How well do you know campus?
PHOTO BY KRISTEN BARTLETT (BSJ 03)

ALUMNI PROFILES
2 0 ..................................... ........................................... Hangin' Tough
Neal Goss Jr. ('44) is the world's oldest hang glider pilot.
2 2 ............... .............................................................................. ... New Life
Kim Hahn's (BSAC '90) conceive magazine was a publication
born of personal misfortune.

ALUMNI ALUMNI MEMORIES AND HAPPENINGS
2 4 ...................................................................................... M y Old School
UF alumni share their memories.

GATOR TALES
27 .......................................................... Slipping the Surly Bonds of Earth
War took Jerry Block (BBC '51) to great heights.



news for alumni and friends of
I t the university of florida


summer 2006 3


26















on c IamTDnIs


NEWS


ABOUT CAMPUS,


FACULTY AND


STUDENTS


SportStories


FORMER ESPN EXECUTIVE
JOHN MARVEL WOWS UF
JOURNALISM STUDENTS.
John Marvel leans back in his
chair inside the Weimer Hall office
that's his for one semester. Nothing
there is his, aside from a couple of
books sprinkled in with the public
relations crisis manuals and white
binders on the shelves.
But the College of Journalism
and Communications students
and professors who crowd into the
doorway most days to joke or listen
to stories from the visiting profes-
sor's days as a sports writer and vice
president of ESPN they're all
Marvel's.
He's got great stories in his ar-
senal. Dream stories for most jour-
nalists. This is a guy who covered
the 1992 Olympics in Spain when
basketball's Dream Team debuted
and helped pioneer the most suc-
cessful sports Web site on the plan-
et, ESPN.com. But more than good


stories or credentials, colleagues and
students say it's Marvel's passion for
the profession that makes people
want to know him.
Passion propelled Marvel's career
from the start. He'd been writing
since high school but was thinking
about law school when he took a
summer job as a sports writer for
the Rocky Mountain News after
college. He loved it.
Like most journalists, he
bounced around the country every
few years, working as a sports writer
and columnist for newspapers in
Houston, Arizona, San Francisco
and Denver. But in the mid-1990s
he gambled on a fledgling medium
for journalism the Internet.
Marvel accepted a position as man-
aging editor of GolfWeb. One year
later, he joined ESPN.com as its
executive editor.
"I looked at the Web like we
were pioneers, the next great jour-
nalism pioneers," Marvel says. "To
me it's not about the medium.


A passion for storytelling drives John Marvel's love of journalism a love he's
been sharing with UF students.


Journalism is about telling stories
and you can tell stories on the Web,
in a newspaper, in a magazine, on
television it's just a different
medium."
Although he was an executive
at ESPN he also held manage-
rial roles with ESPN The Maga-
zine and led an investigative team
there he was still a storyteller.
In 1999, he covered a landmark
baseball game in Cuba between the
Baltimore Orioles and the Cuban
national team. He didn't go there to
cover scores or homeruns, though.
He focused on the lives of Cuban
people and what the game meant
to them.
"I was 25 feet from Fidel Cas-
tro," Marvel remembers. "Regard-
less of what you think about his
politics, this is one of the big politi-
cal figures in world history ... At
the same time (being there) was a
little sad because their economy is
depressed. An American dollar bill
is like gold there."
Marvel left ESPN just before
coming to UF this year as the
college's Freedom Forum distin-
guished visiting professor. He wants
to spend more time reporting and
writing, but after spending the se-
mester at UF, teaching has become
important to him too, he says.
Mike Foley, master lecturer at
the college and former executive
editor of the St. Petersburg Times,
says Marvel tackled teaching with
the same passion that drove him to
the top of his field.
"I think he really cares what the
kids are learning," Foley says. "He
goes above and beyond. I wouldn't
be surprised if he ends up in this
business."
-April Frawley Birdwell (BSJ '02)


SFLORIDA


-- I








ON CAMPUS


Muse um

tMuse roll



Pardon Our Dust
After 16 years of being open, most
of the Samuel P. Ham Museum of
Art galleries are closed for renova-
tions until Sept. 4. In June, however, 01o0
"American Matrix: Contemporary
Directions for the Ham Museum Col-
lection," including pieces by Andy Warhol and Roy
Lichtenstein, opened in the adjoining Mary Ann Ham
Cofrin Pavilion.
www.ham.ufl.edu



Flutter Festival
The Florida Museum of Natural History host its in-
augural Florida Butterfly Festival Oct. 14-15. It will
include a live native butterfly
exhibit, photography
contest, lectures,
nature walks, family-
oriented activities and field trips
to Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, Morningside Nature
Center and Paynes Prairie State Preserve.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu


Gator etrotte
G lobetrotter


BRIAN BOMBASSARO TRAVELS
THE WORLD TO BROADEN HIS
EDUCATION.
Consider Brian Bombassaro a man of
the world
Ber een three semesters spent study-
ing abroad, internships and volunteer
work with globally rninded humanitar-
ian groups Bombassaro has taken his
ULF experience far beyond the borders of
Gainesville.
guess I don't have that much of an
attachment to one place." he says.
A fifth-near senior hith a 3.93 GPA.
Bombassaro has put his nomadic spirit
to good use with the Study Abroad pro-
gram at UF. Originally from Indiana. he
spent the summer of 2004 in Panama.
the fall of 2004 in Brazil and then re-
turned to Panama for the spring semes-
ter of 2005. He spent this summer in Brian Bombassaro's educational travels have taken
Trinidad and Tobago (during the World him to Central and South America, the Caribbean
Cup) before going on to German y. He and Europe.
graduates at the end of the summer.
In Panama, Bombassaro studied business law and Spanish.
Bombassaro says the presence of American culture in Panama- in everything from fast-
food restaurants to popular music made the transition from Gainesville to studying abroad
much easier.
"It wasn't as big a shock as I'd thought it vould be." he says.
While in Panama. Bombassaro interned with The Americas and Caribbean Regional Office
branch of UNICEF. a United Nations agency that prove ides health and education assistance for
children in developing countries.
Compared to Panama. Bombassaro says Brazil is not as influenced by American culture.
During his semester there. ho%%ever, the U.S. presidential election was in full swing, and he
found many Brazilians interested in the outcome.
"The Brazilians follow American politics more closely than most Americans do," he says.
"Every day, somebody was asking me if I was for Bush or Kerry."
Bombassaro works as a peer adviser \,ith the Study' Abroad program and says students con-
sidering a semester abroad shouldn't be concerned about leaving behind friends and fun times
in Gainesville.
"W'hat they find abroad will more than make up for what they miss out on," he says.
Bombassaro plans to continue his studies b'y pursuing a master's in international relations
from the School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C., and a concurrent
master's in international relations and public policy independently at Harvard University and a
Johns Hopkins school in Bologna. Italy.
-Jamison Webb (4JM)


summer 2006 P5|









ON CAMPUS


Gator Bytes

www.youtube.com/
watch?v=CqnVZwXQbQk How
would Albert fare against "The
Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin? It's
the ESPN SportsCenter ad every-
one is talking about.

www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc
- Browse through thousands
of historic UF photographs, oral
histories, Florida laws and other
unique resources at the George
A. Smathers Libraries' new Digital
Collections Web site.

www.connectinggatorsfor-
lOyears.com Celebrate the UF
Alumni Association's 100th anni-
versary, learn about its history and
mark your calendar for upcoming
Gator events.

www.jou.ufl.edu/documentary
- Check out new releases from
UF's award-winning Documentary
Institute and learn where you can
view them.

www.questions.ufl.edu Learn
the answers to UF's most asked
questions, including how to apply
for graduate school, how large is
the average UF class and how to
try out for a sports team.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/TOPIC_
Vegetable_Gardening Start
planning now for your Florida
garden. UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences Extension
Service offers helpful guides and
expert tips.


FROM POCKET CHANGE
TO PENSION BENEFITS, THE
FAMILY FINANCIAL CLASS
TEACHES STUDENTS MONEY
MATTERS.
Today's college students might
do well to ask themselves if they
really need that daily double mocha
latte or those hot new downloads
for their iPods.
According to Jo Turner, pro-
fessor of family and consumer
economics in UF's Department
of Family, Youth and Community
Sciences, $2 a day can make a huge
impact on one's financial prosperity.
In her Family Financial Man-
agement course, Turner gives the
example of what could be called the
snack factor.
"You can spend $60 per month
on things you could do without.
That's $720 per year. If at age 18,
you began saving this $720 each
year for 20 years in a tax-de-
ferred account earning a 10
percent return and leaving
all earnings to earn more,
at age 65 you will have
invested $41,238," Turner
says. "But, your nest
egg would be worth
$540,630 .. we're
only talking about
giving up snacks."
Wise money
management and
long term planning
are just a few of
the topics covered
in the course. In


addition, students set a budget and
analyze their spending. They study
different types of insurance poli-
cies to identify what is and what
is not covered. And students
complete an income tax return for a
fictitious family.
In one group project, students
research and select a stock to fol-
low during the semester. The group
tracks the stock's opening and
closing prices and keeps a watch for
news that might impact the stock's
price. They complete a final report
giving the history of the stock and
whether the group would have
made or lost money if they had
purchased 100 shares and held it
for the assignment period.
Another focus of the class is
credit. Turner covers mortgage
and automobile loans and has her


students compare the cost of credit
from different lenders for different
terms. She also instructs them in
retirement and estate planning.
According to one former stu-
dent, the class is as interesting as it
is eye-opening.
"Dr. Turner presented personal
and family financial material that
has day-to-day meaning and life-
time value," says Lynda Spence
(5AG). "I use what I've learned
from her course on a daily basis."
Although Turner developed the
course for her department, she says
about half the students who take
the class are from other depart-
ments.
She says a financial education
could not be more timely for stu-
dents.
"The savings rate is the lowest
it's been since the Great Depres-
sion," says Turner, a certified
financial planner. "Companies are
folding; pensions are under funded.
The Employee Benefit Research
Institute projects that, if the current
trend continues, by 2030 there will
be a $45 billion shortfall in funds
needed to cover basic expenses for
retirees."
Today's students will be middle
age by then some on the cusp of
their own retirements. Now is the
time, according to Turner, to pre-
pare for the future.
"It is imperative that young
people learn how to manage mon-
ey, how to use credit wisely and
how to save money for emergencies
and retirement."
Holly Christiansen


6 FLORIDA


In the

Classroom



Common Cent$ Approach









ON CAMPUS


UFFlashback

The Cannon Incident of 1909


A FABLE RECORDS THIS
EARLY STUDENT PRANK.
By Carl Van Ness (MA '85)

University history is often recorded
in newspapers, yearbooks, alumni
magazines and official documenta-
tion. But students in 1909 turned
one of their memorable events into
a fable, which they passed down to
students verbally for years after.
"Once upon a time there was a
donkey, a goose and a number of
rats hemmed in an old barn and
forced to drudge their life away
in loneliness. These animals ...
decided to slip out occasionally at
night and have a high old time.
This ruse was successful many
times; but soon the donkey, goose
and rats, becoming more and
more independent as their feeling
of bondage wore off, decided to
break up an animal show... So
on finding farmer Murphree's big
shotgun, the rats promptly fired it,
causing great consternation among
the animals in the show. Also the
great noise woke up farmer Mur-
phree and his fodder pullers, who
immediately set to see who had
fired their gun. They had scarcely


gone 100 yards before they met
the guilty brutes slinking back
to the barn. Farmer Murphree at
once doubled his guard, thus cut-
ting off further expeditions of the
animals, and even to this day by
passing 'E' stall you can hear the
donkey bemoaning his fate in this
way, Woe is me. I have through
foolishness lost what liberty I had!
Woe is me!'"
This fable, told at a meeting of
the Bo Gaior Club in 1910, ap-
pears in an article penned by the
club's secretary Bernard "Beauty"
Langston. The fable teller is
"Chief Bo Gator" Neal Storter
(BSEE '12). The donkey, goose
and rats symbolize the student
body and their barn is Buckman
Hall. "Farmer Murphree and his
fodder pullers" are, of course, UF
President Albert Murphree and
his faculty. His "big shotgun" is a
cannon from the student battalion
arsenal. The Bo Gator meeting is
probably fictional, but the fable
itself is a thinly disguised reference
to an incident that occurred in the
fall of 1909.
The actual event is recounted
in oral history, memoir and family
lore. The accounts differ, but most


Cannons were a common feature of students' mandatory i
UF's early years.


agree on the essential facts. A travel-
ing carnival came to town and over
the protests of university officials
was allowed to pitch its tents across
from the campus. Students who
attended the carnival were swindled
at the games, and fights between
students and carnies flared. Seeking
revenge, the students of Buckman's
E section donated a dime each
toward the purchase of gunpowder
from a local hardware store. With
crushed stones as ammunition, they
hauled two loaded cannons to the
carnival site at night. Only one of
the cannons fired, but it blasted
several holes in the main tent. The
explosion produced the desired
panic inside the carnival, but it also
aroused others on campus. In the
rush back to the dorm a few of the
vigilantes were either recognized or
caught.
The exact date of the episode is
unknown. The faculty Discipline
Committee made its report on
Dec. 8, 1909, but only after meet-
ing daily "until all the evidence
concerning the firing of the cannon
had been secured." In his memoir,
Vice President James Farr states the
investigation took two weeks.
In all, 32 students one-
fourth of the student body were
punished, including some of the
university's "best men." In fact, a
campus building Bryant Hall
- bears the name of one. Six levels
of punishment were meted out to
the miscreants based on their levels
of culpability. The most severe pun-
ishments included short periods of
"close confinement" (i.e. restriction
to their dorm rooms) plus several
months of campus detention. All
were required to pay for damages
to the cannon, but no mention is
made of remuneration to the carni-
val. Farr felt that the carnival "had
got pretty well what they deserved."
The moral of the Chief Bo Ga-
tor's fable was "Don't get caught."

Carl Van Ness (MA '85) is UFs
archivist and historian.


Kudos
Justin Bangs of Orlando, a senior
majoring in political science and
history, is among 40 U.S. students
selected to study for a master's
degree at England's Cambridge
University as a Gates Cambridge
Scholar, a scholarship program
similar to the Rhodes Scholar
program at Oxford University.
Carlton Davis, distinguished ser-
vice professor in food and re-
source economics in IFAS, was
inducted into the George Wash-
ington Carver Public Service Hall
of Fame at Alabama's Tuskegee
University. Physics professors
Jim Fry and Khandker Muttalib
and associate professor Hai-Ping
Cheng were named fellows of the
American Physical Society. John
Klauder, a professor of physics
and mathematics, was elected to
the Royal Norwegian Society of
Sciences and Letters, within the
class of natural sciences. Nancy
Mendenhall (BA '73, MD '80) was
appointed director of the Universi-
ty of Florida Proton Therapy Insti-
tute in Jacksonville. Ivar Mjor, a
professor of operative dentistry,
received the Award of Excellence
from the European Federation of
Conservative Dentistry. Chemistry
professor Weihong Tan and phys-
ics professor Arthur Hebard were
named fellows in the American
Association for the Advancement
of Science. Alexander Wagenaar,
a professor of epidemiology and
health policy research in the
UF College of Medicine, was in-
ducted as a fellow of the World
Innovation Foundation.


summer 2006 7









ON CAMPUS


Florida Facts

* ALL THINGS GREAT AND
SMALL Started as a small col-
lection of minerals, fossils and
human anatomy models atthe
Florida Agriculture College in
1891, the Florida Museum of
Natural History has grown into
the largest museum of its kind
in the Southeast. It now houses
more than 24 million specimens
on the UF campus.
* SOUP'S ON: Gator Dining Ser-
vices, UF's official food service
provider, offers more than 30
eateries on campus, including
two residential dining halls and
a variety of national restaurant
chains such as Wendy's, Sub-
way, Einstein Bagels, Quiznos
and Starbucks.
* BEST-LAID PLANS: The Quad-
rangle renamed the Plaza
of the Americas in 1931 was
intended to be a welcoming,
wide-open swath between Uni-
versity Avenue and an ornate
administration building. Money
and space became a factor,
however: a lack of funding pre-
vented the administrative wing
from being added to University
Auditorium, and Library West
was built on the north end of the
plaza in 1967.
* WE THE PEOPLE: Manning
Dauer (BA '30, MA '31) was a
well-respected professor of
political science at UFfor much
of the 20th century. Among his
contributions to the state were
the development of Florida's
1967 reapportionment plan
and the formulation of Florida's
1968 constitution. Dauer Hall is
named in his honor.


Go,


Gators


American Dream


FORMER OLYMPIC GYMNAST
NICOLA WILLIS UVES OUT
HER HOPES OF STUDYING IN
THE UNITED STATES.
In Nicola Willis' life, dreams be-
come reality.
Beginning her gymnastics ca-
reer at age 5, she longed to
1 compete in the Olympics.


Four-
teen
years later,
she was a
member of the
2004 Olympic
team for her
native Great
Britain.
"For me, going
to the Olympics
was a dream come
true," says Wil-
lis, now 21. "To
work that hard
in gymnastics
all your life and
actually meet your
dream is really amaz-
ing.
After the Olym-
pics, Willis became
a Gator and realized
another ambition: at-
tending college in the
United States.
"It's such a great
opportunity in life,


and I think you should make the
most of everything you can," says
the sophomore of her decision to
attend college away from home.
"You can't give up opportunities
like that."
For many new college students,
living away from home can be
difficult, especially if home is as
far away as Willis' hometown of
Hadleigh, England. However,
Willis had been living on her own
for three
years before
r she came
to Florida. At
15, she moved
to Lilleshall National
Sports Center in Shrop-
shire. England, to train
for international competi-
tion in gymnastics.
"It was hard, and at first
I missed my parents, but I
had other girls around me
who were going through the
same thing, so that helped,"
she says. "We all ended up
being like sisters, close to
each other."
Willis, a fitness and
wellness major, has found
a similar camaraderie in her
Gator gymnastics teammates.
The team has provided a family
away from home for Willis since it
is difficult for her to travel home
for visits with her parents, Allen
and Vivien Willis, and brother
Craig, 18.
"It's hard sometimes being so far
apart. We keep in touch through


e-mail, and they come visit me
sometimes," Willis says.
Willis suffered injuries during
the beginning of her freshman
season and underwent shoulder and
ankle surgeries. She was unable to
compete during her first year at UF,
but overcame setbacks to be part of
the 2005-06 team, excelling in the
vault and floor exercises.
"It's wonderful to have her back
competing," says Rhonda Faehn,
head coach of the Gator gymnastics
team. "She went through a long
road of recovery."
Willis' experience in the Olym-
pics has taught her to focus when
competing, Faehn says.
"Nicola is a true competitor who
can block out anything when she is
competing," Faehn says. "No mat-
ter the circumstance, Nicola's expe-
rience in international competition
gives her something beyond many
of her teammates. It's reassuring to
them knowing that she has the abil-
ity to turn a high-stress situation
into a positive experience."
With her Olympic experience
and the majority of her college
career behind her, Willis acknowl-
edges that many of her life dreams
have already come true.
"Now I just want to do the best
I can in college gymnastics," says
Willis, who would like to be an
elementary school teacher. "While
I'm here, I want to get a good edu-
cation and come out with good
qualifications, and then from there
I'll have to make some new goals."
- Meredith Jean Morton (BSJ '06)


Nicola Willis


8 FLORIDA


































Hitting


the


Math has been called
the universal lan-
guage, and it seems
UF is speaking it
clearly. The campus
makes use of geomet-
ric shapes, angles and
arcs in its buildings,
art and landscaping.
Do you know where
these geometrical
landmarks are?
Check your answers
on page 24.






Bricks


ON CAMPUS


Campus

notes
COMMUNITY SUPPORT: In an ef-
fort to help revitalize East Gaines-
ville, UF opened its Eastside Cam-
pus off Waldo Road this winter.
The $7 million, 12-acre campus
houses technology offices as well
as additional work space for the
College of Engineering.

GRAND REOPENING: After two
and a half years of renovations, Li-
brary West is expected to reopen
this summer. The expanded, state-
of-the-art facility will include
increased seating, enhanced
computer facilities and potentially
its own Starbucks.

A BARGAIN AT ANY PRICE:
UF was rated the second-best
value among public universi-
ties nationwide earlier this year
by Kiplinger's Personal Finance
magazine. UF officials, while ap-
preciative of the designation, say
the low tuition reflected in the
ranking actually hampers UF's ef-
forts to become a top 10 research
university.

For the latest UF news, visit http//
news.ufl.edu.


summer 2006 J













r46








IF


-Tr
X..































40.
k..v 0 7 ,













A Pool of



Resources


ADING INTO THE ISSUES
SURROUNDING FLORIDA'S FRESH
WATER SYSTEMS CAN BE TRICKY.
UF environmental engineering sciences pro-
fessor Joseph Delfino, for instance, studies the
chemical interaction of mercury and other pol-
lutants with organic matter found naturally in
Florida's rivers and streams. His research may help
policymakers better regulate industries that release
harmful chemicals into the environment.
But it's no easy task. Like most researchers who
focus on the science and ecology of fresh water
systems, Delfino collaborates with experts in a va-
riety of disciplines: geology, law, fisheries science,


BY DAVID VILL


soil and water sciences, agricultural and biological
engineering, and more.
"It can be an enormous undertaking," says
Delfino. "Just pulling everyone together to write a
grant proposal can be quite a challenge."
That challenge should now become a bit less
daunting. After years of planning, UF has consoli-
dated all water-related research under one um-
brella: the University of Florida Water Institute.
The one-of-a-kind center will apply for funding,
coordinate research projects and provide lawmak-
ers, industry officials and the general public with
a clearinghouse for data and expertise on Florida's
fresh water systems.
Delfino and other water experts expect to
be busy.

ANO (MAMC '86)


summer 2006 11


UF'S NEW WATER INSTITUTE
WILL UNIFY RESEARCHERS
WITH A COMMON VISION:
BRINGING CLARITY TO
ONE OF THE STATE'S MOST
CRITICAL AND COMPLEX
PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES.











"WATER QUALITY AND WATER

QUANTITY ARE CRITICAL ISSUES

FACING FLORIDA TODAY. THE

INSTITUTE WILL ALLOW US TO

FOCUS ATTENTION ON THESE

PROBLEMS IN A WAY WE WEREN'T

EQUIPPED TO BEFORE."

JOSEPH DELFINO


"Water quality and water quantity are critical issues facing Florida today,"
says Delfino. "The institute will allow us to focus attention on these problems
in a way we weren't equipped to before."
University officials first considered the idea of the Water Institute in 1991
following the release of a federal study concluding that water research, more
than other areas, required an interdisciplinary approach. The problem was
most vexing, the study concluded, at large universities where bureaucratic bar-
riers and political turf wars often discouraged collaboration.
Wendy Graham (BSEEN '81), who was recently named director of the UF
Water Institute, was among a small group, along with Delfino, who lobbied for
a central office to coordinate water research.
"A university can be a bewildering place to navigate," says Graham. "We
envisioned a one-stop shop for water expertise."
The idea languished for years, but growing awareness of water-related issues
facing the state drought, flooding, Everglades restoration, salt water intru-
sion, suffocating algal blooms, lake pollution, to name a few helped Gra-
ham and others place the proposal back on the table. Last year UF President
Bernie Machen gave his blessing, noting the "serious challenges to our state's
water resources." And this year the Progress Energy Foundation donated $1.2
million to be the founding sponsor and create the institute's first endowment
fund. State matching funds will enhance this gift.
"It couldn't come at a better time," says Graham, who is also a professor
of hydrology. "We have a lot of water in Florida, but the idea that it can be
pumped, piped and rerouted without affecting the entire system is no longer
accepted. We need to balance human consumption and the needs of the envi-
ronment."
In short, argues Graham and other UF researchers, Floridians must stop
taking its freshwater supply for granted. Water in Florida (and across the Unit-
ed States) is both plentiful and cheap by world standards, but that will change
as demand outstrips supply in a state that expects to add more than 8 million
residents by 2020.
To compound the problem, water managers note, there is a distribution
inequity the sparsely populated panhandle receives the most rainfall while
the fast-growing southern areas receive the least. A 2003 report by the Florida
Council of 100 business group calling for a "system that enables water distri-
bution from water-rich to water-poor areas" was applauded by development
interests in South Florida but widely criticized by residents of North Florida
who are eager to protect a resource they consider their own.
Florida's aquifers, which supply about 90 percent of the state's water needs,
will not meet the demand alone. Florida will increasingly rely on more costly
supplies surface water, brackish ground water and desalinated water.
Jim Cato (PhD '73), a UF professor of Food and Resource Economics and
a member of the Water Institute Faculty Launch Team, says the debates on
water quality and allocation should be a wake-up call for consumers.
"Right now I suspect very few people could tell you how much they pay for
water," says Cato. "But that will change. When water is more expensive con-
sumer patterns will change; they'll have to change."


12 FLORIDA




X* *....


THE CHOICE WILL BE

WHETHER TO ALLOCATE

WATER RESOURCES FOR

URBAN GROWTH OR

FOR FARMLAND.


But residential water consumption accounts
for only 30 percent of the 8.2 billion gallons of
water Florida uses each day. The largest custom-
ers sucking up 48 percent of the total daily
water withdrawals are the state's farmers and
other agricultural interests. Higher costs will
spawn advances in conservation technologies, but
they also may leave policymakers with a difficult
choice, especially in parts of the state where devel-
opment and agriculture collide. The choice will
be whether to allocate water resources for urban
growth or farmland.
The debate is complicated by water quality
concerns. The introduction of phosphorous and
other agricultural nutrients into Florida lakes and
rivers upsets the ecological balance by fueling
algal blooms and the growth of invasive species,
choking out native fish and plant life. Some envi-


ronmental groups say Florida's agricultural in-
dustry should bear more of the cost of Everglades
restoration and other clean-up plans.
Delfino says such complex, multi-layered chal-
lenges a mix of hard science, social science and
public policy underscore the interdisciplinary
demands of water-related research in Florida. The
Water Institute hopes to be the vehicle to bring
clarity to the subject.
"This will allow us to generate more resources,
and to have more people at the University of
Florida getting involved in water issues," he says.
"And by doing that we'll be able to keep Florida's
water story out in front of the public where it
needs to remain." -v*r

To learn more about UF's Water Institute, visit
http://waterinstitute. ufl.edu/.


summer 2006 13


_ _







































Donald Boyd and his hound, Blue.


This Pack Horse Librarian in Kentucky picks up books and magazines left on her previous monthly visit and leaves additional
volumes on subjects as her client may desire.




Reading Riding

Researching a Depression-era literacy project reconnected Donald Boyd to his past.


j HEN DONALD BOYD WAS 18, HIS GRANDFATHER ADVISED HIM TO LEAVE HIS CHILDHOOD HOME IN THE
HILLS OF APPALACHIA AND NEVER RETURN.
BOYD DIDN'T THINK TWICE ABOUT FOLLOWING THAT COUNSEL. HE WENT TO COLLEGE, TAUGHT SCHOOL
AND FOLLOWED A PATH TOWARD PROSPERITY AND EDUCATION UNKNOWN TO HIS GRANDFATHER, AN
ILLITERATE DIRT FARMER WHO NEVER LEFT THE KENTUCKY MOUNTAINS.
THEN, IN A TWIST OF FATE, BOYD'S DOCTORAL DISSERTATION TOOK HIM HOME.
RETURNING TO FLORIDA FROM CHICAGO IN 2003, BOYD (BA '95) STOPPED IN KENTUCKY AT A LITTLE COUNTRY STORE
NEAR HIS CHILDHOOD HOME. ON THE WALL HE NOTICED AN ARTICLE ABOUT PACK HORSE LIBRARIANS, WHO BEGAN TAKING
BOOKS INTO THE HILLS DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION.
"I WAS HOOKED," BOYD SAYS. "THIS WAS SORT OF A LOST PART OF APPALACHIAN HISTORY."

BY CINDY SPENCE (BSJ '82)
14 FLORIDA































Appalachian boys enjoy a new book.


Boyd's research is the first of its kind on the
topic and generated a paper that won an Ameri-
can Library Association prize. Boyd's dissertation
chairman, UF assistant professor Sevan Terzian,
says Boyd stumbled on a topic that allows him to
ask new questions.
"There isn't a ton written about this yet in the
history of American education," says Terzian, who
coordinates the Social Foundations of Education
graduate program. "He's done a wonderful job
of identifying unpublished sources and primary
documents. And he recognizes a good story."
The story of the pack horse librarians begins
in 1936. The Works Progress Administration,
formed to employ out-of-work Americans during
the Depression by hiring them for public works
projects, started the program with a few thousand
dollars. A national campaign seeking book dona-
tions for Appalachia resulted in a collection that
grew to about 1 million volumes.
The pack horse librarians had to supply their
own pack animals and wagons and were sent into
the most remote parts of Appalachia.
"These were local women, rural themselves,
and they filled their saddlebags with books. Oth-
ers loaded books onto a wagon or used rowboats.
The women adapted to their routes of 80 to 120
miles a week, year-round, in all kinds of weather,"
Boyd says.
All for $28 a month.
The women were trained to be sensitive to the
mountain folk, to sit a while and talk. Some even
read the books they delivered. The resistance they
encountered was mostly from men, who didn't
view reading as useful. Some even viewed it as
sinful, so the women often carried Bibles. They
were battling illiteracy of 30 to 40 percent in the


A pack horse librarian (left) reads to an illiterate.


region and found families in which illiteracy had
existed for so many generations that it was simply
accepted.
The women and children wore down negative
opinions of the project, Boyd says. Books on sew-
ing, cooking and farming were popular, as were
"Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" and "Arabian
Nights." Parents encouraged children to check
out books and read to the family.
"This was a dosed society, with resistance and
distrust of new things. It was a place where your
last name meant something," Boyd says.
"But after a while, the kids would stand along
the road waiting for the pack horse librarian to
show up. It was as good as Santa's sleigh," he says.
"I've yet to find an account where the resistance
prevailed."
The hill folk quickly realized advantages to
the program. They passed messages up the hills
and down with the librarians, asking for a doctor
or midwife or sending news of births and deaths.
The patrons also began to realize literacy had
advantages for their children. Railroads were com-
ing, bringing the outside world into Appalachia.
"The requirements for knowledge were about
to change, and the people wanted to adapt," Boyd
says. "Many of these families were ravaged by coal
mining, and giving your child some book-learn-
ing was a chance for your child to stay out of the
mines."
With the U.S. economy surging during World
War II, WPA programs ended. The pack horse
librarians hung up their saddlebags in 1943. At
the end they were serving half a million people in
19 counties.
During his research. Boyd found three pack
horse librarians still alive, along with a 90-year-


These librarians delivered books by horse or mule
to remote Appalachia residents.

old library patron, who showed him a treasured
book wrapped in protective cellophane.
"He told me, 'I don't think I could afford the
overdue fine,'" Boyd says. "In the back, you could
see where it was in solid circulation for four years.
From that, you can draw conclusions about the
popularity of the program."
Although library outreach programs were
missing from Appalachia from 1943 to 1953, the
pack horse librarians had provided a successful
model. When the U.S. road network expanded in
the 1950s, bookmobile funding was approved by
Congress. Pack horse librarians faded into history.
When Boyd stumbled on the topic, he began
an uncertain quest for historical documents. The
90-year-old patron pointed him to Berea Col-
lege in the foothills of Appalachia, where he hit a
research jackpot.
"The archivist's eyes lit up when I asked about
the pack horse librarians," he says. "I ran up a
$200 copying bill in one day."
The college's massive collection on the history
of outreach services to the mountains put the
pack horse librarians into perspective for Boyd.
The painstaking work also took him home.
He realized the people served by the pack
horse librarians were people very much like his
own ancestors. He understood their hardships
because, in many ways, they mirrored his own
when he was a child.
"I know what it's like to grow up in illiteracy
and abject poverty. Growing up I had a can of
marbles, a train set and a stuffed bear. Did it
touch home? Oh, yeah," Boyd says. "I can relate
to these folks and the front porch literacy that was
going on at that time." --pv


summer 2006 15


_ __




















16 FLORIDA


I
































































summer 2006 17


































Oh, What a Night
It was a cacophony in the Stephen C. O'Connell
Center.

GAINESVILLE The orange-and-blue-clad fans
inside the Stephen C. O'Connell Center screamed,
chomped, stomped and cheered. They sang, they high-
fived, they raised the roof.
And the Gator men's basketball team wasn't even
there.
About 5,000 fans surrounded an empty court April 3,
riveted to the huge television screen suspended from the
south rafters that showed their Gators winning the na-
tional championship in Indianapolis.
From the first moment, every basket, every free throw,
every block and rebound was met with raucous, stand-
up cheers. Alberta, the junior varsity cheerleaders, the
Dazzlers and the band had an easy job this crowd was
already pumped.
By game's end, the stands swayed wildly as fans
bounced, danced and embraced in jubilant pandemo-
nium. "Loud" doesn't begin to describe it.
After the game, more than 10,000 fans converged on
University Avenue for an impromptu victory party com-
plete with fireworks, flying toilet paper, flag-waving pole
climbers, revelers and a heavy police presence.
On one block, students lined up to high-five passers-
by. Down the street, band members played as students
around them linked arms and sang "We are the Boys." All
around, students chanted and crowed with celebration.
The street party, which closed more than a half mile
of University Avenue from 13th Street to the President's
House on Second Avenue, stretched into the early morn-
ing without serious incident. It ended only when mount-
ed police intervened to finally clear the street.
Cinnamon Bair


Strike Up the Band
Pep band members both fed and felt the fervor.

The trip to Indianapolis was a whirlwind experience
for lordan McDonald.
First tornadoes ripped through the downtown area as
McDonald and his fellow band members ate dinner.
Then later that night his Gators won the men's na-
tional basketball championship.
"It was just like the most intense experience of my
life," the baritone player says of the trip. "To actually be
there in person was a once-in-a-lifetime experience."
McDonald was among 30 members of the UF Basket-
ball Pep Band who had courtside seats to witness Gator
history. Their spirit-filled performances added to the fan-
fueled revelry that filled the RCA Dome on April 3.
The band members who went to Indianapolis were a
select group. There are three pep bands at UF, and mem-
bership in each is based on seniority. Only the Orange
Band, which consists of the eldest members, got to attend
the Final Four and championship games.
The band flew to Indianapolis with the basketball
team the team members riding in first class, the band
members in coach and was provided with seats at the
game in return for its cheer-inducing courtside perfor-
mances. From the "Jaws" theme to "You Can Call Me
Al," the band played for the team and the fans all night.
"We just love to support the team," says band member
Jennifer Rickerson, who also made the Indy trip. "We're a
bunch of fans just like everyone else."
When the Gators won the championship, the band
went as crazy as everyone else, Rickerson and McDonald
say. Reactions among the band members ranged from
high-fives to hugs to crying to speechlessness. It was dif-
ficult to keep playing for all the excitement.
"It was so surreal," Rickerson says. "Am I really here
watching this?"
Liz Hillaker (3JM)


18 FLORIDA


ATOR FANS


- YOUNG AND OLD IN THEIR

LOGO HATS, APPLIQUED

SHIRTS AND JACKETS, WILD

WIGS, BODY PAINT, BUNKING

COLLAR PINS AND FEATHER

BOAS WHO MADE THEIR

PRESENCE KNOWN. THEY HAD

COME TO DO THEIR PART TO

ENSURE A GATOR VICTORY.





























Road Trip
Students skipped classes, skipped town to
attend game.

Ricky Bell bought his tickets on eBay using his $270 tax
refund.
He endured a 13-hour car ride from Gainesville to India-
napolis with four friends in a Lincoln Continental.
He twice sneaked into the 11th row of the RCA Dome
to join other screaming student Gator fans.
He discovered it was all worth it after the Gator men's
basketball team won the national championship on April 3.
"Everyone was all happy, going nuts," says Bell, a junior
majoring in family, youth and community sciences.
Bell was one of hundreds of students who traveled from
Gainesville to cheer on the team in Indianapolis.
Elizabeth Goddard, a sophomore nutrition major, says
even her professor understood the Gator basketball mania
and held a separate make-up exam for students going to the
championship.
"I just told him, 'Hey, I'm going to the basketball
game,'" she says.
People in Indianapolis weren't used to UF's Rowdy
Reptiles, the avid student Gator basketball fans who rou-
tinely paint themselves and don capes, hats, wigs and other
orange and blue accoutrements, Goddard says. News crews
interviewed them; the other college teams' fans paled in
comparison.
At the championship game there were more Gator fans
than any other fans, Bell says. Every student was on his or
her feet, including Bell and Goddard.
"We stood the whole time," Goddard says.
After the Gators won, fans were hugging, high-fiving,
jumping up and down, laughing, smiling, screaming and
cheering non-stop, she says. The stands cracked and creaked
from the strain of the boisterous celebration.
The excitement didn't end in Indy.
"During the 13-hour drive back, it did not get old say-
ing, 'We just saw the Gators win a national championship,"
Bell says. "It's Great to be a Florida Gator."
Liz Hillaker (3JM)


You Should Have Been There
Fans who flocked to Indy weren't
disappointed.

INDIANAPOLIS Entering the RCA
Dome in Indianapolis felt like melting into a
circle of electric intensity.
The place was filled with expensively dressed
individuals with no hint of a team, LSU fans in purple who
stayed to support their SEC colleagues, and UCLA fans
milling about in baby blue T-shirts.
It was the Gator fans young and old in their logo
hats, appliqued shirts and jackets, wild wigs, body paint,
blinking collar pins and feather boas who made their
presence known. They had come to do their part to ensure a
Gator victory.
And that's exactly what they did. It seemed they were the
only team in town.
The small section of student "Rowdy Reptiles," under
the CBS cameras, led large clusters of orange and blue in
cheer after cheer. Orange. Blue. Orange. Blue. It's great to
be a Florida Gator. We are the boys of old Florida. C'mon
Gators, get up and go.
The fans stood up and sat down. They held their breath
and squeezed each other's hands. They found their friends
and lost their voices.
They never lost faith that, this time, the Gator Nation
would bring it home.
Kathy Fleming


summer 2006 19















alumni profiles


A NIGHT

STRANDED IN A

SWAMP, FOUR

TREE LANDINGS

AND A NEAR-

TANGLE WITH A

MOUNTAIN BEAR

ARE JUST A FEW

OF GOSS' CLOSE

CALLS.


lang in

OCTOGENARIAN NEAL GOSS JR. IS THE
WORLD'S OLDEST HANG GUDER PILOT


Neal Goss Jr. ('44) was soaring over
East Tennessee on what seemed
to be the best flight and what
would later rank among the worst
flights in his 30-plus years of
hang gliding.
Descending from Chattanooga's
Lookout Mountain, the now-re-
tired Panama City dentist had been
in the air for a record three hours
when a thunderstorm darkened his
near-perfect day.
"That's a long time when you're
hang gliding," Goss says, recalling
the flight that still stands as his lon-
gest. "I thought at that time I could
stay three more hours."
Rain poured and lightning cut
through the sky, Goss remembers.
Strong winds were dragging his
glider on a roller coaster, but Goss
thought he had averted disaster un-
til he moved into a turbulent area
of air flow near a line of trees that
pulled him to a crash landing.
He fractured his skull that week-
end but still returned to his down-
town Panama City dental practice
the following Monday.
A night stranded in a swamp,
four tree landings and a near-tangle
with a mountain bear are just a few
of Goss' other close calls.
"That's just part of it," he says.
Nothing especially not age
- is slowing down the former Uni-
versity of Florida boxing and cross
country letterman.
Goss picked up hang gliding


at 54, and at 85, he is still flying
at least once a month at Wallaby
Ranch near Orlando. In 2005,
he earned a spot in the Guinness
World Records for being the oldest
hang glider pilot on record.
Muscled and compact, Goss still
looks the part of a boxer. A grandfa-
ther of eight and great-grandfather
of five, he says he stays fit riding
his bicycle around the Cove area in
Panama City five days a week.
Goss picked up hang gliding, he
says, after reading about the sport
in Reader's Digest. A Fort Walton
Beach man built him a glider, and
he taught himself to fly jumping off
beach dunes.
"I knew I would like it," he says.
After a few test runs at local
beaches, Goss signed
up in 1974 for a hang
gliding meet at En-
chanted Rock in Texas.
"Boy, it was great,"
he remembers, dusting
off the sportsmanship
trophy he brought
home. "They had a
bunch of guys there,
most of them 18 to
22. I was 54. I kind of
stood out different, but
they were nice to me."
Before she died
in 2005, Goss' wife,
Helen, was his biggest
supporter, carting him
and his glider around


on countless flying excursions.
She watched as he leaped from the
500-foot Enchanted Rock that
weekend, and told the story later of
how other pilots asked why Goss
flew straight each time he jumped,
landing in the bushes instead of
following the meet course.
"They asked Helen why I didn't
turn, and she said I didn't know
how to turn," Goss says.
Hang gliding came late in life,
but Goss says his love of flight was
born when he was a kid growing up
in Decatur, Ga.
He figures he was about 10 years
old the day he stopped his bicycle
to admire a Cord automobile, then
had his attentions stolen by a mail
plane overhead.


20 FLORIDA









PROFILES


.;i.~ ~g~'.;:,;l~tx~*`I ~':: *'
~~i~tttttttt~~ .-;~.` "".

.?l;i: r .~ ~:i`h' & .


A magazine article inspired Neal Goss Jr. of Panama City, pictured on his


"I envied that guy (the pilot) so
much," Goss recalls.
In high school, he would catch
rides with local pilots. He went on
to join the Army Air Corps and was
a bombardier during World War II.
From a base in North Africa, Goss
says he flew 50 missions over Italy,
France, Austria and Greece.
Back in the United States,
Goss went to navigator school and
waited for a pilot class to open. He
learned to fly B-25s and B-26s, but
the war was over before he had a
chance to fly overseas.
"I wanted to go over there so
bad and fly," Goss laments.
He has owned several planes
over the years.
Goss returned to college and
eventually went to dental school.
His family had moved to Bay
County when he was 12, and Goss
returned home to set up his prac-
tice.


He worked into his 80s, cover-
ing up the date on his diploma so
patients would not know how old
he was. He jokes that some of his
patients, thinking he would retire
soon, left him for younger dentists
then ended up returning after his
counterparts retired.
Goss' Panama City home is a
shrine to his family and his hang
gliding habit. Metal hang glider
models decorate his living room,
and a poster hanging outside his
kitchen shows a silhouetted glider
with the saying, "To conquer with-
out risk is to triumph without
glory."
Over the years, Goss has col-
lected his share of battle scars. A
framed newspaper clipping in his
living room tells one of his greatest
adventures.
In 1982, Goss and another pilot
were flying across the Florida pen-
insula when Goss had to make an


emergency landing, fearing he did
not have enough altitude to cross
the Withlacoochee River.
"I landed in what I thought
was a field but turned out to be a
swamp,"
Goss says.
Goss walked for a few hours to
reach dry land and stopped when
he encountered palmettos too thick
to traverse. He used his parachute
to shield himself from mosquitoes
through the night. Goss says he
was hoping not to be rescued until
morning, because he feared rescuers
would damage his glider.
He listened to the wildlife in the
night and hoped he would not en-
counter an alligator or a wild boar.
"I heard something moving
around," he says. "I figured it was
an armadillo. I thought that was
the best thing it could be."
The dentist spent about 20
hours in the swamp before he was


rescued by Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
rangers.
Goss keeps his Guinness World
Records certificate in a shipping
envelope from Germany. He ap-
plied for the record about a year
ago on a suggestion from someone
at Wallaby Ranch.
"Somebody else already had it,"
he says. "I hate to take it away."
He has been in correspondence
with the former record holder, who
is 82.
Goss suggests that the same
thing could happen to him.
"Somebody might come along
and find out and they're still fly-
ing," Goss says. "That would be
OK."
Faith Ford

Faith Ford is a reporter for The
News Herald in Panama City. Her
story is reprinted with permission.

summer 2006 21








PROFILES


New


Life


KIM HAHN HAS BIG PLANS FOR CONCEIVE MAGAZINE,
A PUBUCATION BORN FROM HER PERSONAL MISFORTUNE.


"GOING
THROUGH
INFERTILITY,
I REALIZED
I COULDN'T
FIND A SINGLE,
COMPREHENSIVE
RESOURCE TO
SUPPORT ME
ALONG THE WAY
... I WANTED
TO CREATE
SOMETHING
FOR THE
OTHER WOMEN
EXPERIENCING
THE SAME PAIN."
KIM HAHN


Kim Hahn was more than on the
fast track; she was in the lead head-
ing toward the top.
By her early 30s, Hahn was
already senior vice president for
merchant services at Sun Bank. She
was a regular on the corporate jet
and a boardroom juggernaut with
stock options and a six-figure salary.
"Everything came to me very
fast," recalls Hahn (BSAC '90).
During her ascension, though,
something was missing: personal
fulfillment. At home, life wasn't so
grand. She and her husband, Ernie
(BSADV '87), longed to have chil-
dren. In May 1999, their first at-
tempt at in-vitro fertilization failed
less than a month after the death
of her stepmother. There would
be two other futile in-vitro tries
in four years. Confusion turned
to hopelessness and despair. She
turned to therapy.
"I felt devastating pain," she
says.
Hahn learned from her coun-
selor that she was suffering from an
early midlife crisis caused by grief.
In her hectic executive world, she
was forced to pause and reassess
life, including her priorities, goals
and dreams.


Those simple steps were perhaps
the smartest moves she ever made.
In 2004 Hahn co-founded con-
ceive magazine, America's first pub-
lication aimed at women who want
to start a family. Hahn initially had
the idea in 2000 and finally took
action in 2003 while continuing
to work at what had become Sun-
Trust Bank, where she had climbed
to chief financial officer for the
state of Florida. The magazine was
launched in partnership with Rob
Clarkson, another SunTrust ex-


ecutive who experienced difficulty
starting his family, despite the fact
that neither had publishing experi-
ence.
The national quarterly provides
information about women's health
and fertility, various methods of
conception and adoption oppor-
tunities, as well as the decision to
remain child-free. The spring 2006
issue, for example, contained a
special section about miscarriage
and an article about improving
marital sex life. The magazine also


22 FLORIDA









PROFILES


After years of fertility treatments, Kim Hahn and her husband, Ernie, adopted Taylor Ann, now 5. Kim Hahn founded
conveive magazine soon after.


offers emotional support to women
by consulting noted professional
experts and sharing the insights
and experiences of others who have
faced the same challenges.
Hahn, who since has adopted
a 5-year-old daughter, created a
winning magazine despite long
odds. While most magazine efforts
don't get past year one, according
to industry data, conceive magazine
attained "Top 30 Most Notable
Launches of 2004" status. Per-issue


circulation exceeds 200,000 copies
in the United States and Canada.
This fall, magazine distribution
begins in Australia, and there are
licensing discussions for a Greek
version. Additionally, a conceive-
themed show is available from
VoiceAmerica live via the Internet
and for podcasting.
"I don't ever want to hear again
that 60 percent of magazines fail in
the first year," says Hahn.
Like a publishing veteran, Hahn


recites the pertinent numbers about
potential readership:
* More than 61 million American
women are currently of child-
bearing age.

* Approximately 43 percent of
those women have not yet had
their first child.

* Many of the remaining 57 per-
cent will be planning to enlarge
their families.


*It is estimated that at any given
time 11 million couples are
thinking about getting preg-
nant.

Hahn says her magazine has a
niche all to itself.
"Going through infertility, I
realized I couldn't find a single,
comprehensive resource to support
me along the way. I spent hundreds
of hours seeking information and
three years of counseling to deal
with my own frustrations. I wanted
to create something for the other
women experiencing the same
pain," she says.
Clarkson says success wouldn't
have occurred without dogged
determination and an Oprah
Winfrey-esque "no-means-next"
resilience.
"[Hahn] always looks at a situ-
ation and asks many questions and
will turn over every stone in order
to come up with the desired out-
come," he says. "If you want to be
successful, you can't stop until you
have what you need. Kim is a prime
example of this and will never quit
until she has exhausted every av-
enue.
Hahn calls it passion, which she
has mixed with business acumen
first honed in UF classrooms.
"It's very difficult to start a
business. You need the knowledge,"
says Hahn. "But having business
knowledge isn't all it takes. It takes
passion to get people to listen."
Hahn, who turned 40 in March,
isn't finished attracting attention.
With the magazine's editorial and
advertising staff in New York, she
is working on broad-brand expan-
sion in an Orlando office suite that
serves as global headquarters.
In her words, devastation has
given way to dividends.
"The grief I felt more than six
years ago has turned into the great-
est journey of my life," Hahn says.
Michael Candelaria


summer 2006







'17 ,L '1
L
-r _d*


'A2


ufallmnii


HITTING THE BRICKS

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 9:


Concentric semicircles form
the seats of the Reitz Union
Amphitheatre; the straight
angles of "Water Sculpture"
in front of the University
Gallery on 13th Street create
interesting paths for trickling
water to follow.


My Old School
Please join us in a walk down memory lane. We welcome your letters and photographs at Florida@uff.ufedu or at Florida
magazine, PO. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425. Photos can be scanned and returned upon request.'


I entered UF in September 1960
even though my parents had told
me they would buy me a new car
and clothes if I would stay in Fort
Pierce and go to Indian River Ju-
nior College. However, UF was
like a second home to me. My two
older sisters had attended 1953-
56, and my parents and I (I was
11 in '53) would frequently make
the six- to seven-hour drive from
Fort Pierce to Gainesville to visit or
bring them home for holidays.
Being the smart girls my sisters
were, it didn't take them long to
figure out the best place to meet
boys (other than the library) was
the restaurant/cafeteria across from
the boys' dorms the "C.I." (Col-
lege Inn). So from 11 on, that's
where we usually ate when we
didn't eat in the university cafeteria.
Of course, the C.I. was not fre-
quented by many female students.
After my move into Mallory dorm
and meeting nearby dorm mates,
I said in conversation to my "big
sister," Carol Leahy from Miami,
that my parents and I were going
to have dinner at the C.I. A look
of shock and dismay came over her
face nice girls don't eat there, she
said to me. Well, I responded, I've
been eating there since I was 11,
and they had the best and cheapest
food in town. A hamburger basket
was 35 cents. Needless to say, that's
where we went, and I continued to
eat there frequently until its waning
days.
I graduated on schedule in 1964
and have many fond memories of
my years there. It was still small


enough to feel comfortable but big
enough for a small-town girl like
me.
The faculty in my major, liberal
arts, was superb and challenging. I
received an education that I con-
sider superior to many schools of its
kind in that day.
I enjoyed performances by
many of the noted entertainers of
the early '60s: the Kingston Trio,
Shelley Berman, Johnny Cash, Ray
Charles, Peter Paul and Mary, to
name a few. Even the Hootenanny
TV program broadcast from UF!
r It was a great college to grow up
in, and I'm glad I did.
Rosalia Sexauer Dorsey (BA '64)
Boone, N.C.

I graduated in journalism in "71
summa cum laude when the "J-
School" was in the basement of the
old stadium. My memory was the
total feeling of security. My senior
year I lived in Landmark Apart-
ments in Sin City and never had
a car. We would walk out to busy
Southwest 13th Street and hitch-
hike to and from campus with zero
fear night or day. (My daughter,
Avery, UF class of'08, absolutely
would not do that now.) Another
highlight of senior year was being
featured in the Alligator as a proac-
tive Gator Girl. On the serious side,
I remember the candlelight march
in front of the ROTC Building
after the Kent State incident.
My advertising degree served me
well. I went straight to the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution (one month
after graduation) where I have been


for 34 years in various management
positions.
- Marcia Caller Jaffe (BSADV 71)
Atlanta

I remember getting off a
Greyhound bus in Gainesville after
a 12-hour ride from Miami. I had
landed in Miami from Havana,
Cuba, that day in September 1958
and was a 17-year-old boy scared to
death. Ivan Putman, the adviser to
foreign students, met my bus and
took me to my room in Thomas
Hall.
It had been a terrible day from
the moment I cleared Immigration
and Customs at the Miami Airport.
After taking English in Cuba and


As a student, Marcia Caller Jaffe says
she often hitchhiked from her apart-
ment in "Sin City" to campus.


24 FLORIDA


r"C" N
2u
~i '". $
i+
SI "Iti
J
'r


..









believing that I could speak the lan-
guage, I did not understand a word
that anybody said to me that day.
Registration took place in the
old Florida Gym. If it had not
been for a couple of friends from
my high school in Cuba who were
sophomores at the university, I
would never have made it through
the process. I ended up with a
7:40 a.m. class every day and the
worst schedule in the history of the
school.
Everything seemed so big and
classes were very difficult, especially
some of the lectures in humanities
and American institutions. A group
of us would study with an English-
to-Spanish dictionary to understand
the chapters. Believe me, I was ready
to go back home in those days. But
the people were very friendly and
helpful, and as time went by and
I got settled as a college student,
things became very enjoyable and
rewarding: visits to the College Inn
on University Avenue to eat din-
ners that cost about $1.25; football
games at the old Florida Field that
were free with the activity card; an
occasional beer at the old Burger
House next to the C.I.; not to men-
tion the time we painted the SAE
lion and had to- run for our lives
when some fraternity member saw
us do it.
I will never forget the good times
and the proud times we had as we
formed the International Student
Organization, known as the ISO,
which at the time of my graduation
in 1963 had more than 260 mem-
bers. It became a very important
part of student government's politi-
cal picture because of the block of
votes we delivered as a group.
The changes in my life dur-
ing my years at UF were amazing.
That scared 17-year-old became an
executive vice president of a major
corporation in the United States.
The girl that I met walking down
the Plaza of the Americas in 1960
became my wife of 44 years, and
our lives have been wonderful and
exciting.
I owe a lot of this to the times
spent in Gainesville at the univer-
sity its teachings and its chal-
lenges and hope that the young
generation of students derives the
same rewards that I did as a student


in such a great university. I will be
a Gator forever and will cherish the
years spent there.
Ramon Fuentevilla (BSA '63)
Palos Verdes Estates, Calif

19741 Construction in Florida was
very slow and I was in Orlando
with Norma, my wife, and two
kids and a somewhat questionable
future. A huge decision was made
to sell the house, pack up all we
owned, and go to UF to get a de-
gree in architecture to go with my
engineering degree. Unfortunately
for my desire to design grand build-
ings, but fortunately for my career,
during my first year I met the ul-
timate snake charmer, Bris Brown
of Building Construction School
fame. The good doctor convinced
me to jump to his master's pro-
gram. This proved to be a great
choice on my part, one that opened
up doors for me to manage projects
around the world, from performing
art centers to baseball stadiums to
petrochemical complexes. Thanks
again, Bris.
What a great time to be in
Gainesville. Gator Growl; Patti La-
Belle concerts; In & Out hamburg-
ers (to be eaten before the grease
hardened); two great seasons with
the Rugby Club, with one ending
up where we were SEC champs
(Dan Carter remember the road
trips in the 1966 Econovan?); kids
hiding out on campus during their
summer breaks while I went to
school (boy, what a different time
we live in now); Sunday meals at
Red Lobster (when we could afford
it other days we had tuna help-
er!); lots of drive-in movies. Norma
sacrificed much with some long
hours working at Maas Bros (I've
tried my best to even it out and
thanks once again, dear.). Looking
back, we're amazed at: how well our
family unit adjusted to a minimalist
living style, how much fun we had,
the good caliber of the folks we
shared the experience with, and the
positive effect the education had on
my future.
It's been 30 years since gradu-
ation, and all I can say to the folks
that did not go to school at UF in
the 1970s: You missed a good time,
and, oh yeah, a good education.
Tim Ackert (MBC 76)
Miami


summer 2006 25









UFALUMNI I


Homecoming 2006
Gator Growl" Ticket Order Form

81st Annual Gator Growl
"Relive the Tradition"
Friday, Oct. 6 7 p.m. Florida Field

Homecoming Pregame Barbecue
Saturday, Oct 7 21/2 hours prior to kickoff Stephen C. O'Connell Center


UF Alumni Association dues-paying
members SHOULD NOT use this form.
A priority order form will be mailed to mem-
bers.
Photo copies of this order form are
accepted. Orders not in full compliance
with special restrictions listed below will be
returned.
Important restrictions: Orders must be
received no later than Sept 5.
If you wish adjacent seating, mail all
order forms together with payments (including
the $4 handling/postage fee for each order
form) and indicate to whom the tickets should
be sent


Telephone and fax orders are not ac-
cepted. No refunds or exchanges.

The University of Florida, the UF Alumni
Association, the University Box Office and/or
Florida Blue Key are not responsible for lost or
stolen tickets.

Gator Growl@ may not be suitable for
children. Parental discretion is advised.
Mail to: University Box Office,
J. Wayne Reitz Union, Gator Growl*,
P.O. Box 118505, Gainesville, FL 32611-8505


NAME


ADDRESS


CITY STATE ZIP
TELEPHONE

Gator Growl* (no limit) x $19 = (includes tax)
Barbecue (no limit) x $8* = (includes tax)
Postage/handling (per order form) + $4 =
= Total

] Check or money order enclosed (Please make payable to the University of Florida)


Charge to: 0 VISA O MasterCard


Expiration date


CARD NUMBER

CARDHOLDER'S SIGNATURE

O Special need for people with disabilities, check here. Please describe the
accommodation needed.



For special assistance, please call (352) 392-1671, ext. 400

* $10 day of the game

FOR OFFICE USE ONLY DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SECTION
Section Row Seats

Barbecue Hold


26 FLORIDA


Reasons to Attend

Gator Growl This Year


Everyone will be there.
Gator Growl is the world's
largest student-run pep rally.
More than 40,000 watched
the 2005 show, which featured
comedian Wayne Brady.

OYou can relive your
college days.
Who performed at Gator Growl
when you were at UF? Bob
Hope? Bill Cosby? Jerry Seinfeld?
Were you here for the infamous
Robin Williams show?

SO It's tradition.
Sponsored by Florida Blue Key,
Gator Growl has been part
of UF since 1932. It was an
outgrowth of student pep rallies
that took place in homecoming's
early years and has long included
student skits as part of its
entertainment.

OYou'll be in town for
homecoming anyway,
right?
Gator Growl is just one
event to be enjoyed during
the homecoming weekend.
You won't want to miss the
homecoming parade, the alumni
barbecue, the Gator Nation
Tailgate at Emerson Alumni
Hall or the football game against
Louisiana State University.

OOrdering tickets is easy.
Use the attached form to
purchase your tickets today.


To learn more about Gator Growl 2006, including
who the headline entertainment will be,
visit www.gatorgrowl.org.








I GATORTALES


Slipping the



Surly Bonds of Earth

JERRY BLOCK PLANNED TO BUILD THINGS. WAR, HOWEVER, TOOK HIM TO GREATER HEIGHTS.
By Jerry Block (BBC '51)


The University of Florida ROTC
Department had slated several
senior cadets for a demonstration
ride in an Air Force T-29 aircraft.
I looked forward to the occa-
sion since I had never been in an
airplane before. A couple of the
ROTC instructors had flown the
two-engine airplane to the Gaines-
ville airport to pick us up. When
the aircraft got up to altitude,
each one of us was invited to sit in
the co-pilot's seat and get a little
"stick time." I pushed the control
column forward and the aircraft
went down. I pulled it back and the
aircraft went up. I said to myself,
"Hey, I think I can do this."
The military had never been
in my plans. In my senior year I
received a draft notice. The Korean
War was going hot and heavy, and
I was 22 years old. It was a war
that changed the lives of many of
us. Picked up on the street corner
in downtown Gainesville, I was
trundled off to Jacksonville for my
physical. Before the sun went down
I was certified for a much different
career than I had ever imagined.
Back on campus, I hurried down
to the Air Force ROTC unit to see
if they would take me. They said
yes. Better in the air than on the
ground, I thought.
I graduated with a degree in
building construction and was im-
mediately called to active duty. My
plans for a master's degree were put
aside. I was assigned to a construc-


tion unit at Eglin Air Force Base
(east of Pensacola in Valparaiso).
Having heard many stories about
military snafus, I was surprised that
I would be assigned to a function
that I had been trained for.
There were several pilots in the
unit, and they would fly on the
weekends to maintain their profi-
ciency. I went with them whenever
I could and accumulated more
stick time. It was not that long after
World War II, and some of the "silk
scarf" aura was still around. It was
just the right mix of adventure and
romanticism for a green 22 year
old.
That's when I decided to go to
pilot's school. I put in my applica-
tion just before Christmas leave,
and when I returned from home,
there were orders on my desk to
report to San Angelo, Texas, for
pilot training.
I will never forget that first ride.
It was called the dollar ride. I never
knew why but it was generally an
orientation ride with the instruc-
tor doing the flying. After flying
around in gentle turns, the instruc-
tor rolled the airplane upside down
-i' and said, "You've got it!" The nose
fell through the horizon, and in
an instant we were going straight
down. (The rule is: when things
on the ground get bigger; you are
going down. If they get bigger-
real fast, you are going down very
fast.) I pulled back on the stick and
nearly blacked out from the g-


forces as the aircraft went through
the vertical. I was scared out of my
wits, and the momentary sensation
of being weightless was disconcert-
ing. I later learned that this episode
had a name the split-S. As we
walked back to the flight shack, the
instructor said, "Why didn't you
scream and holler like the rest of
them?" I said I would have, but my
breakfast was halfway up my throat.
Maybe he just kept me on because I
didn't throw up all over the cockpit.
If someone had told me that a few
months after graduation I would
be upside down in an airplane over
West Texas, I wouldn't have be-
lieved it.
In a few weeks I soloed, and a
year later I got my wings. It was
more exciting than pouring con-
crete slabs. We came from all over.
My classmate and best friend was a
journalism major from the Univer-
sity of Oklahoma. Along with us in
West Texas were some French Air
Force students. At their invitation
we held our 52nd year reunion in
Toulouse, France, in September
2005. If you had been there, you
would have heard some more flying'
stories better than mine. Now,
pouring concrete slabs is exciting.

Jerry Block retired from the U.S. Air
Force as a colonel. He and his son
co-founded Block Environmental a
' Southern Clfornia environmental
consulting and engineering firm. He
lives in Gig Harbor, Wash.


summer 2006 27


Jerry Block







:


Installed in 2003, the bronze statue of Albert and Alberta in front of Emerson Alumni Hall have
become a favorite spot for posing photographs, especially at graduation and before sporting events.


J UNIVERSITY of

FLORIDA
University of Florida Alumni Association
Emerson Alumni Hall
P.O. Box 14425
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425


www.ufalumni.ufl.edu


*"*********ECRLOT**B-O10
307-000-0 P41 7318
MR. IAMES R. CLIFTON '89
UNIUERSITY OF FLORIDR
7 SIIAiTH
PO BOX 117007
6801INESUILLE FL 32611-7007
I I till t111111111 A III I ,ItIllII I A 11 I111 1111 1


NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
PERMIT No. 682
Miami, FL


; Y :
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- ~~~
: -. .
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. : ~';'
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Stay


Connected

Gator Nation Tailgates

Home Games at Emerson Alumni Hall
Sept. 2 vs. Southern Mississippi
Sept. 9 vs. Central Florida
Sept. 23 vs. Kentucky
Sept. 30 vs. Alabama
Oct. 7 vs. Louisiana State (homecoming)
Nov. 11 vs. South Carolina
Nov. 18 vs. Western Carolina

Away Games
Sept. 16 vs. Tennessee
Knoxville Convention Center, 701 Henley St., Knoxville, Tenn.
Oct.14 vs.Auburn
Nov. 4 vs. Vanderbilt
Nov. 25 vs. Florida State
Leon County Civic Center, 505 W Pensacola St., Tallahassee
Gator Nation Tailgates start three hours prior to kickoff unless
otherwise noted. All home Gator Nation Tailgates take place
at Emerson Alumni Hall, 1938 W. University Ave., and are
sponsored by the UF Alumni Association.

Black Alumni Weekend
Sept. 1-3
For information, e-mail Virginia Horton at vhorton@uff.ufl.edu
or call 888-352-5866, option 2.


Grand Guard Reunion
Nov. 16-18

For information about these and other alumni association pro-
grams, including local Gator Club events, visit the UF Alumni
Association Web site at www.ufalumni.ufl.edu or call 888-352-
5866 or 352-392-1905. E-mail questions to ufalum@uff.ufl.edu.


o




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