• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 The shark guy
 In her depth
 Life's a stage
 The heart of campus
 Different strokes
 Hitting the bricks
 Sustainable UF
 The tree guy
 Culture club
 Forever mentors
 Spinning a yarn
 House calls
 My old school
 A patriot remembered














Group Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Title: Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073685/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida news for alumni and friends of the University of Florida
Uniform Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida National Alumni Association
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Publisher: University of Florida National Alumni Association,
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: Winter 2006
Copyright Date: 2000
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 2000)-
General Note: Title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073685
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 44739131
lccn - 00229084
 Related Items
Preceded by: Focus (University of Florida)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    The shark guy
        Page 4
    In her depth
        Page 5
    Life's a stage
        Page 6
    The heart of campus
        Page 7
    Different strokes
        Page 8
    Hitting the bricks
        Page 9
    Sustainable UF
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The tree guy
        Page 13
    Culture club
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Forever mentors
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Spinning a yarn
        Page 20
        Page 21
    House calls
        Page 22
        Page 23
    My old school
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    A patriot remembered
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text





L


news


for alumni and friends of the university of florida


Can UF reduce its
environmental impact?




How foreign students
get a linguistic leg up




These UF faculty are
anything but retired

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


stay connected


winter 2006


111





I -


Sswa tal


Senior Editor
Liesl O'Dell (BS '92)

Editor
Cinnamon Bair

Assistant Editors
Meredith Cochie (4JM)
Liz Hillaker (2JM)

Managing Editor
David Finnerty

Contributing Writers
Alisson Clark (BSJ '98)
Kristin Harmel (BSJ '01)
Aaron Hoover (MFAS '02)
Tina Mader Melczarek
Meredith Jean Morton (4JM)
Carl Van Ness (MA '85)
Cindy Spence (BSJ '82)
Jamison Webb (3JM)
Claude Wilson (BSBA '42)

Design
University of Florida
Office of University Relations
Publications Group


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA

Published by
University of Florida
Alumni Association

Randy Talbot (BA '75)
Executive Director

Robert Stern (BSBA '86, JD '90)
President

Florida is published three times a year and
sent free to all alumni, parents and
friends of the University of Florida.
Opinions expressed in Florida do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors
or official policies of the University of Florida,
the University of Florida Foundation
or the UF Alumni Association.

Editorial Staff
352-846-2818
Fax: 352-392-7676

UF Alumni Association
352-392-1905
888-352-5866

E-mail
Florida@uff.ufl.edu

UF Alumni Association Web address
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu

Copyright 0 2006

Florida is printed on recycled paper
and is recyclable.


Happy Anniversary
It has been exactly 100 years
since the state's flagship univer-
sity, the University of Florida,
arrived in Gainesville.
Formally dedicated Sept.
27, 1906, the campus consisted
of two unfinished buildings
and a storage facility located
one mile west of Gainesville. It
offered courses in a limited
number of fields, including
agriculture, the classics and
education. Total enrollment
was 102 students, including 42
students finishing their high
school educations at the insti-
tution.


From those humble begin-
nings, the Gainesville campus
has grown to include 16 col-
leges that educate more than
48,000 students each year. A
sea of buildings covers a cam-
pus that has long since been
surrounded by the ever-grow-
ing community.
The anniversary of the
university's arrival in
Gainesville is one of several
milestones the university will
mark this year. The UF Alumni
Association, the College of
Education and the football
program are celebrating cen-
tennials. The College of De-


sign, Construction and Plan-
ning will conclude its 80' year.
The Plaza of the Americas will
turn 75. The colleges of Medi-
cine and Nursing will mark
their 50' years. The Stephen
C. O'Connell Center will be
25. Even the university's com-
mencement ceremonies will
turn 100 years old this year.
More information about the
various anniversaries and the
storied history of UF can be
found on pages 7, 8 and 26, or
visit www.ufl.edu/history.


rb-




In 1919, 13 years after the University of Florida established its permanent home in Gainesville, the campus
remained rough-hewn in overall appearance. Shown is the university's entrance, located at today's Univer-
sity Avenue and 13th Street.


_2 FLORIDA





volume 6 number 3 winter 2006


CON


ON THE COVER
UF is leading the
charge among
universities nationwide
toward sustainability -
essentially, an effort to
reach an environmental
balance. To learn about
UF's efforts, see
page 10.
ILLUSTRATION: ETHAN LONG


IENTS


FEATURES
10 ......................................................................... Sustainable UF
UF works to use environmental resources more efficiently.
13 ............................................................................ The Tree Guy
Erick Smith (BSF '92) is the protector of UF's Trees.
14 .............................................................................. Culture Club
Foreign students dive into American life at UF's English Language Institute.
16 ..................................................................... Forever M mentors
They may be retired, but these faculty members' dedication to UF is lifrlonig
IN EVERY ISSUE
ON CAMPUS NEWS ABOUT CAMPUS, FACULTY AND STUDENTS

4 ............................................................................ The Shark Guy
Faculty profile: George Burgess (MS '78) helps us understand ocean predators.
5 ........................................ ...................................... In Her Depth
Student profile: Emily Mitchem immerses herself in fisheries research.
S .............................................................................. Life's a Stage
In the Classroom: UF's improve class offers more than ctinU lessons.
S ..................................................................The Heart of Campus
UF Flashback: UF marks 75 years of the Plaza of the Americas.
S .......................................................................... Different Strokes
Sports profile: Savana Kelly broke from family tradition to come out swinging.
9 ....................................................................... Hitting the Bricks
How well do you know campus?

ALUMNI PROFILES

2 0 ...................................................................... Spinning a Yarn
Pietra Rivoli (BSBA '79, PhD '83) uses a T-shirt to explain the global economy.
2 2 ............................................................................ House Calls
John Riley (BA '87) and his wife take their medical practice on the road.

ALUMNI ALUMNI MEMORIES AND HAPPENINGS

24 ........................................................................ My Old School
UF alumni share their memories.

GATOR TALES

2 .................. ....................... .......... .. A Patriot Remembered
Claude Wilson IBSBA '42) salutes friend and roommate John Bennett (BSCE '42).


news for alumni and friends of
the university of florida


winter 2006


113


J_























ShiIrk Ambassador


GEORGE BURGESS
PROMOTES BETTER
UNDERSTANDING OF OCEAN
PREDATORS.
Sharks, says George Burgess, get a
bum rap.
A source of fascination to hu-
mans but maligned by the media,
sharks are simply misunderstood by
most, the director of UF's Florida
Program for Shark Research says.
"We hold in awe any natural
phenomenon that we can't con-
trol," says Burgess, who also serves
as director of the International
Shark Attack File. "We can control
the course of mighty rivers, we can
tear down mountains but in the


sea, one-on-one, we lose when we
confront the shark."
Burgess has spent a lifetime
researching and observing sharks
with the hope of promoting better
public understanding.
"Probably the most important
thing I've done is be an ambassador
for sharks," he says.
An Oklahoma-born Army brat
who was initially afraid of the wa-
ter, Burgess (MS '78) began his
career with the Florida Museum of
Natural History Ichthyology Col-
lection in 1979 and became direc-
tor of the shark attack file in 1988.
He has discovered nine species of
sharks, one bass and an assortment
of smaller fish.
Burgess says he thinks people are


fascinated by sharks due to the
ocean predator's physical superior-
ity. But that superiority has also
resulted in the false impression that
shark attacks are frequent.
"Shark attacks are not an over-
whelming phenomenon," Burgess
says, adding that the odds of being
attacked by a shark are roughly one
in 11.5 million, and that the num-
ber of shark attacks increase only as
human population and beach recre-
ation increase.
Burgess blames what he calls the
"tunnel vision" of the media for the
public's continuing hostility toward
sharks.
He points to the summer of
2001 as a prime example. De-
spite it being a routine summer
for shark activity, Burgess says,
several high-profile shark attacks
- combined with a lack of
other news to keep reporters
busy led the media to dub it
the "Summer of the Shark."
In reaction to the many shark
myths and misconceptions held by
the public, Burgess is working on
his first book, which will present
research on sharks in an accessible
manner.
"I think it's real important for us
to interpret our science for the
masses," Burgess says.
-Jamison Webb (3JM)

To learn more about Burgess' research,
visit www.flmnh. ufl.edu/fish


George Burgess is director of the International Shark Attack File, which is
housed at UF.


4 FLORIDA


on Icarnus


NEWS


ABOUT CAMPUS,


FACULTY AND


STUDENTS








ON CAMPUS


Musei om

Stroll



Shine On
Learn how and why organisms such as vomiting
shrimp, vampire squid, cookie-cutter sharks and
jellyfish (below) create their own light as the Florida
Museum of Natural
History presents
"Glow: Living Lights."
The exhibit, which
opened in January
and continues
through May 29, also explores how scientists use the
phenomenon of bioluminescence for suct tasks as
tracking cancer cells and detecting anthrax.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu


Landscape / Artscape
You don't have to be
inside to enjoy the
Samuel P Harn Museum
of Art and new Mary
Ann Ham Cofrin Pavilion.
Several works have
been installed in the
museum's growing
sculpture gardens.
Among the latest addi-
tions is "Hammering Man" (above) by Jonathan
Borofsky, a gift of the Martin Z. Margulies Foundation.
www.harn.ufl.edu


In Her

Depth

EMILY MITCHEM IMMERSES HERSELF
IN FISHERIES RESEARCH.
Emily' Mlithem hasn't spent a lot of time in
a classroom. Or in her apartment. for that
matter.
instead. the recent zoology graduate
sta s constantly bus studying on Seahorse
Key lith the L iF Marine Biology Club.
working toward her di ing instructor certi-
ficarion near \ilihston, conducting research
at UiF's Department of Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences northwest of Gaineville
or making research excursions across the
state.
"I can't think of the last weekend I was
here [in Gainesville]." NMtchem sass.
Long interested in science and nature.
Nlirchem arrived at UF in fall 2002 unsure
of which field of science she wished to
pursue until she took a marine biology
course. The idea of a largely unkno'. n
world below the waves won her over.
"ly dad is always saying, 'We know
more about the surface of the moon than Emily Mitchem explores the mysteries of the sea
we do about our o%% n oceans." NlMtchem through both her scuba diving and her fisheries
research at UF.
At age 12, with her father, she became a certified scuba diver and has continued diving at
UF. participating in the Academic Diving Program.
She became an undergraduate assistant with the fisheries department, taking part in a num-
ber of activities to help researchers better understand the mysteries of the world's waters.
Last summer, for instance, lMitchem participated in a study of green mussels, a species of
shellfish native to Asia that recently began appearing in Florida waters. Researchers fear the
mussels are damaging reefs and water systems in the Tampa area.
Mitchem visited the ranks of collected specimens at the lab twice a day and joined research-
ers on the Nawrgaror, one of the department's boats, for trips to gather additional data and
specimens.
"We're on the boar, we're in our bathing suits, we're getting tans, we're getting scallops, and
I'm like. 'This is prertt great."' Nlitchem says.
Having graduated in December, NMitchem plans to spend this spring and summer working as a
dj\ing instructor, continuing her research with the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
and traveling with her family. One day she hopes to conduct research at Monterey Bay in Califor-
nia although, just as in her approach to learning, she won't limit herself to one option.
"I'd love to go anywhere," she says.
-Jamison Webb (3JM)


winter 2006 5









ON CAMPUS


Gator Bytes

www.wuftfm.org -Want to hear
the sounds of Gainesville again?
Click the link at the bottom of the
page to listen to WUFT's broadcast
in realtime.

http://news.ufl.edu/- Visit this UF
news Web site and click on the
university's weekly podcast for
online news.

www.admissions.ufl.edu/
annualcosts.html Find out how
much it costs to be a Gator
nowadays.

www.ufic.ufl.edu/
iareciprocall.htm -
Pull out a map and see all the
places our globe-trotting Gators
can go through UF's Study Abroad
program.

www.sg.ufl.edu Check out
student government's revamped
Web site. Click on the links for a
glimpse into student programs
offered.

http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/
collections/special/archives/
seminole/1950/sounds/sounds.htm
- Reminisce while listening to old
band and glee club recordings,
provided by the George A.
Smathers Libraries.

www.registrar.ufl.edu/katrina.html
- See how UF opened its doors to
students affected by Hurricane
Katrina, including UF's enrollment
options for displaced students.


UFS IMPROVE CLASS OFFERS
MORE THAN ACTING LESSONS.
Editor's Note: Magazine intern
Meredith Cochie (4JM) took an
improvisational acting class as part of
her UF coursework last fall. Here, she
shares what she learned.

This semester I hosted my first big
party. The drinks were invisible, the
guests were created from sugges-
tions by the audience and the door-
bell was an assistant yelling "ding-
dong."
When I signed up for the School
of Theatre and Dance's class,
"Improv: Social and Political Is-
sues," I thought I would be learn-
ing a few basic acting skills. In-
stead, I got a new lesson on life.
On the first day of class, I
shrank. I would have to be funny in
front of all these people. I would
have to make great
jokes, perform amaz-
ing scenes and totally
make a fool of my- DA
self. The anxiety was S[
worse than having a HV
huge pimple on my
nose.
We were separated O
into four groups to "e
develop our perform-
ing skills in front of
an audience while
having fun at the l l
same time. We spent PIM
the first hour learn-
ing basic principles of
performance. Speak
loudly. Speak clearly. Don't turn
your back on the audience. Be


UF's Improv class teaches students such as Meredith Cochie, center, to think on
their feet not only on stage, but also in daily living.


HE




0FC!
<.I


aware of your environment. Sounds
like advice my mother would give.
Surprisingly, many of
us were not aware of
ourselves in front of
other people at all.
LlD We all picked up on
BE each other's bad
habits such as hair
1oN swirling and finger-
E nail biting. We
worked for weeks to
break the habits.
We discussed
world events and
worked through
scenes based on con-
troversy and current
issues. We all started
reading the newspa-
per to find topics that would be a
good foundation for a scene. Class-


room conversation was open, and
opinions were shared. We all
learned how to give constructive
criticism a hard skill to learn.
We learned to trust each other
during scenes and help each other
out. If a scene partner was strug-
gling, we didn't shake our head and
walk away. We learned how to just
make the scene move forward.
Now, there is no place like on
my toes.
Outside class, my conversation
improved. I started raising my hand
in other classes. During my job
interviews for this summer, I was
able to think on my feet, answer
questions directly and be confident.
I got the job.
The next party I host certainly
will be a smash.
Meredith Cochie (4JM)


6 FLORIDA


In the

Classroom


Life's a Stage








ON CAMPUS


UFFlashback


The Heart of Campus
UF MARKS 75 YEARS OF THE PLAZA OF THE AMERICAS.
By Carl Win Nes, (MA '85)


The college park is a fixture on the
American campus. It's that open
area that alumni associate with
Frisbees and free speech. It's that
grassy spot where they dozed on
warm afternoons or shared lunch
with friends. Havard has its Yard;
Illinois has its Main Quad; and
Florida has the Plaza of the
Americas.
According to the first UF cam-
pus plan in 1906, the plaza was
conceived as a much larger mall
running south from University
Avenue. It was to be divided by an
administration building; the build-
ing rotunda was to face the south
plaza, while the north plaza was to
contain a fountain. But the scale of
the mall was impractical, and its
classical rotunda conflicted with
architect William Edwards' Gothic-
style buildings, so the 1906 plan
was scrapped.
The plaza as we know it today
was shaped by the second campus
plan of 1920 that called for a large,
open quadrangle stretching 900
feet from University Avenue to the
north side of the University Audito-


rium. At the time, however, the
auditorium was intended to be one
wing of a larger administrative
complex that included a massive
bell tower overlooking the quad-
rangle. Money ran short as Florida's
1920s building boom went bust,
leaving only the auditorium wing as
a reminder of what should have
been built.
In 1931 the quadrangle became
the Plaza of the Americas. Plans
were made a year before to cel-
ebrate the 25' year of the
university's existence in Gainesville
and to launch the first meeting of
the Institute of Inter-American
Affairs, the predecessor to today's
Center for Latin American Studies.
The four-day program culminated
on Feb. 13 when the quadrangle
was named the Plaza of the Ameri-
cas, and 21 live oaks were planted
in honor of the American republics
in existence at that time.
The paths of the plaza have seen
much foot traffic over the years.
Before 1950, however, the rules for
freshmen forbade them from cross-
ing the plaza. Others found the


The Plaza of the Americas, seen here in the 1980s, has long served as a
natharinn ninea


plaza a Friendlier place. For many
years, hungry students on their way
to classes could grab an apple from
an "honor box" for a nickel. On
Valentine's Day 1969, the brick
path that begins at the northeast
corner of the plaza and extends
diagonally to the center was begun.
It's called Friendship Walk, and the
bricks were purchased by student
organizations to help foster a spirit
of campus collegiality.
The construction of Library
West in 196' considerably dimin-
ished the plaza's grandeur. Though
it lost the University Avenue front-
age and about one-third of its
lawn, the plaza remained the epi-
center of campus activity.
Throughout the 1960s and "'Os,
lively debates surrounded the stu-
dent organization tables on the
plaza and local musicians enter-
tained for free. The plaza has also
been the venue of choice for free
speech and protests. The largest
student protest occurred in May
19"0 when 5,000 gathered peace-
fully to honor the students slain at
Kent State. Plaza preachers and the
crowds they attracted became a
feature of the 1980s and '90s.
Today the plaza still features
some of the 1931 live oaks, but
slash pines are now planted in an
effort to be consistent with the site's
ecology in 1906. Traffic patterns
have also shifted. The Turlington
courtyard was recently listed as the
busiest pedestrian thoroughfare in
the state, and most of the tables
and preachers have migrated there.
This gives the plaza a more laid-
back atmosphere. Students congre-
gate in small groups, and the re-
frains of the Hare Krishnas lure
many to their inexpensive lunches,
first served in 1972. The plaza
remains a center of cultural and
intellectual diversity as well as a
place to retreat and relax.


Kudos
Jimmy Cheek, senior vice presi-
dent for agriculture and natural
resources, received the Distin-
guished Educator Award from the
North American Colleges and
Teachers of Agriculture. He was
also named a Fellow of the Ameri-
can Association for Agricultural
Education. History professor and
provost emeritus David Colburn
will serve as chair of the board of
directors for the Florida Humani-
ties Council. Assistant professor
of psychology Manfred Diehl will
serve on the Behavior and Social
Science of Aging Review Commit-
tee of the National Institute on
Aging. Bob Holt, the Arthur R.
Marshall Jr. Chair in Ecology, was
awarded a 2005 Ecology Institute
Prize for his research in terrestrial
ecology. Guido Mueller will co-
chair the interferometry working
group of the Laser Interferometer
Space Antenna international
science team. LISA is an interna-
tional effort that detects low-
frequency gravitational waves.
Psychology professor Carolyn
Tucker was appointed to the Advi-
sory Committee on Minority
Health by the U.S. Secretary of
Health and Human Services.


Carl Van Ness (MA '85)
is UF' archivist.


winter 2006 7









ON CAMPUS


Florida Facts
Did You Know:
* HIGHEST BIDDER: When the
state sought a new campus for
the University of Florida in 1905,
Lake City was a strong candidate
because of its pre-existing col-
lege facilities. Gainesville won,
however, after promising 500
acres, $40,000 in cash and free
water service. The Gainesville
campus opened in fall 1906 with
two unfinished buildings and 102
students.
* HUMBLE BEGINNINGS: The UF
Alumni Association was founded
by the 14-member class of 1906.
One hundred years later, the
alumni association boasts more
than 50,000 members worldwide.
* SCHOOL DAYS: Although it did
not become a college until 1912,
the College of Education can
trace its roots to the all-male
School of Pedagogy established
in 1906 to help relieve a state-
wide teacher shortage.
* MEDICAL PROVIDER: After the
Florida Legislature determined
that Florida needed a public
medical school, Sen. William
Shands (BA'06, LLB '28) lobbied
tirelessly to bring the school to
UF. Thanks to his efforts, the
College of Medicine and the
College of Nursing both cel-
ebrate their 50" anniversaries
this year.
* BUILDING BLOCKS: Originally
founded as the School of Archi-
tecture in 1925, today's College of
Design, Construction and Plan-
ning now encompasses a wide
array of construction-related
disciplines, including building
design, landscape architecture
and urban and regional planning.


Go,


Gators


Different Strokes


SAVANA KELLY BROKE FROM
FAMILY TRADITION TO COME
OUT SWINGING.


proved to be Kelly's game.
"I have tried a lot of other
sports, including swimming, but
they were no fun for me," the 19-
year-old sophomore
criminology major
says. "Softball was
just the one that fit
my personality the
best. I really love
the game."
Kelly joined the
Garor softball team
last season, playing


both shortstop and second base. She
may be new, but her teammates say
she's already made her presence
known including five home runs.
"Savana
brings depth to
our infield," says
O catcher Kristen
Buder, a senior.
S"She doesn't act
like a freshman,
Sand she bleeds
orange and blue.
Her heart is
really at UF, and
it's so apparent
in the way she
plays the game."
That love of
UF was inher-
ited from her
swimming mom, Kelly says.
"My mom knows what it's like
to be a Garor, to be an athlete at
UF, and I grew up being a Gator
fan," she says.
Kelly's family members are even
bigger Gator fans now. The family,
from Fort Lauderdale, bought a
house in Gainesville last year so
Kelly's mom, dad, Brian, and
brother, Justin, 13, could attend
softball games.
"I'm so glad I chose UF," Kelly
says. "During the past year, I have
had some of the best experiences of
my life."
MeredithJean Morton (4JiW)


Savana Ke.ll
Savana Kelly


FLORIDA








ON CAMPUS


UF is filled to the rafters
with architectural beauties
and oddities. Older styles
meet new designs as the
campus grows and ex-
pands. Do you recognize
these two very different
ceilings? Check your
answers on page 24.








Hitting the Bricks


Campus

notes

MAKING CONNECTIONS:
Students will soon have a new
way to hook up in their residence
hall common areas without
need for wires. The housing
department plans to install
wireless computer networks in all
residence hall common areas
beginning this year.


CANCER CARE: Shands
HealthCare and UF's Health Sci-
ence Center plan to construct a
200-bed cancer hospital on the
site of the University Centre Hotel
on Archer Road. Construction,
which is expected to cost $250
million to $300 million, could begin
as early as this year once the
hotel is demolished.


GREEN CAMPUS: UF is the first
university to be named a Certified
Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary
by Audubon International. The
certification reflects UF's efforts
to protect wildlife habitats, man-
age waste and conserve water on
campus.

For the latest UF news, visit
http://news.ufl.edu.


winter 2006 9






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Sustainable UF

As the world strives to use natural and energy resources more efficiently,
UF is forging a path for America's universities to do the same.


GLOBAL WARMING, INCREASED PACE OF EXTINCTION, RAINFOREST DEFORESTATION: MANY OF THE EARTH'S NATURAL SYSTEMS ARE UNDER SIEGE.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HAS A LONG HISTORY AS A SOURCE OF IDEAS FOR HOW TO FIGHT BACK. IT WAS HOME TO ONE OF THE NATION'S
FIRST SOLAR RESEARCH PARKS, BUILT IN THE 1950s. IT WAS A BIRTHPLACE OF THE SCIENCE OF ECOLOGY. AND UF RESEARCHERS ARE KNOWN
INTERNATIONALLY FOR THEIR DISCOVERIES AND ADVOCACY ON BEHALF OF SPECIES RANGING FROM BUTTERFLIES TO SEA TURTLES AND LANDSCAPES RANGING
FROM WETLANDS TO RAINFORESTS.


But in a.longtime effort that moved to center stage last fall, UF is moving
beyond research, scholarship and advocacy. Despite having one of the five
largest enrollments nationwide, the university is becoming a national leader in
a fast-growing movement among colleges and universities toward
sustainability. That means reducing its environmental impact, boosting envi-
ronmental consciousness on campus and otherwise finding ways as the
concept is defined to meet the university's needs today without tapping out
the resources that future students and faculty will need to meet theirs.
"The whole idea is, we have to practice what we preach," says Mark
Hostetler (MS '92, PhD '97), an associate professor of wildlife ecology and
conservation and one of dozens of UF faculty members, students and adminis-
trators behind the initiative.
"All the sustainability knowledge and research is huge on campus, so why
not employ some of this in terms of not only creating sustainable practices and
operations, but also infusing sustainability into our curriculum?"


New Growth
UF's ambitions burst onto the campus scene in late October when Presi-
dent Bernie Machen gave a resounding endorsement to the initiative in a
speech on campus marking National Sustainability Day. The university, he
said, has made a "serious and long-term commitment" toward becoming a
global leader in sustainability.
That will mean both immediate and future action, he said. That winter, UF
sought to reduce electricity consumption, cut waste and purchased gasoline-
saving hybrid cars. It changed policies to buy products from environmentally
conscious vendors for example, wood from vendors engaged in responsible
forestry. And it raised recycling goals, encouraged employees to walk or ride
the bus and asked that all lights, computer equipment and other electronics get
turned off at day's end.
Staffers felt the effects of the policy almost immediately as workers removed
florescent light tubes and reset thermostats. The indoor temperature norm for


BY AARON HOOVER (MFAS '02)


winter 2006 11

















SUSTAINABIUTY IS DEFINED IN THE STRICTEST SENSE AS MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE

PRESENT WITHOUT COMPROMISING THE ABILITY OF FUTURE GENERATIONS TO MEET

THEIR OWN NEEDS. WHEN A PROCESS IS SUSTAINABLE, IT CAN BE OCCUR REPEATEDLY

WITHOUT NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OR UNTENABLY HIGH COSTS.


offices and classrooms now stands at 78 in sum-
mer, 68 in winter.
Machen, working with the UF Faculty Senate
and its committee on sustainability, also created
an Office of Sustainability and launched a search
for a director. And he endorsed long-term goals,
including that the university would produce zero
solid waste by 2015. (That's no easy target, con-
sidering UF recycles 38 percent of its paper, glass,
metal and other waste.) Machen even promised to
dedicate National Sustainability Day each year to
assessing the university's progress.

Getting Green
Although Machen's speech was its most public
moment, UF's sustainability initiative dates at
least to 1997 when a group of student and faculty
volunteers founded an advocacy group called
Greening UE That led to the formation of the
UF Sustainability Task Force, which met for a
year before issuing a laundry list of recommenda-
tions including many endorsed in Machen's
speech in 2002.
In more recent years, UF's first lady, Chris
Machen, has also been a visible promoter of the
initiative.
"It's important because it's the right thing to
do," Chris Machen says. "And UF should be a
leader for this community and for the state."
At the national scale, UF is hardly alone in its
sustainability efforts. In the past decade, about
half the 2,000 colleges and universities nation-
wide have launched programs aimed at environ-
mental education or reducing their environmental
impact or both, says Anthony Cortese, founder
and CEO of Second Nature, a Cambridge,
Mass.,-based sustainability consulting firm.
"It's catching on enormously, and there's been
exponential growth in the interest of colleges and


universities," Cortese says.
But UF has gone further than most, says
Cortese, who has also consulted for UE
For example, with 13 environmentally friendly
"green" buildings either completed or under way,
UF has more such buildings than any other cam-
pus nationwide, he says. Green buildings are
constructed with renewable materials to ultra-
efficient energy standards and are certified under
the national Leadership and Energy and Environ-
mental Design program. UF is also the only uni-
versity to receive the Audubon Society's "Certified
Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary" award for envi-
ronmental stewardship in such areas as wildlife
management and resource conservation.
"Florida distinguishes itself in several impor-
tant ways. First of all, by the comprehensiveness
of the approach," Cortese says. "What I see at the
University of Florida is a fairly sophisticated un-
derstanding of the challenges that society faces
and the role of higher education in meeting those
challenges."

Growing Change
Indeed, working toward sustainability requires
something of a sea change, not only in how
people think but how big institutions do business.
"I think the biggest challenge for everyone is
to change our habits our way of practicing
everything we do," says Kim Tanzer, chair of the
Faculty Senate and a member of the Sustainability
Task Force.
Charles Kibert, a UF professor of design,
construction and planning and founding member
of Greening UF, cites energy use as a good ex-
ample of how progress will require institutional
change. Reducing electricity consumption on
campus, a major future goal, is only partly achiev-
able through building green buildings, retrofitting


buildings and other bricks and mortar changes,
he says.
"We have to put incentives in place," he says.
"How do we incentivize operational units and
academic departments to save energy? One an-
swer is you give them their money to pay their
bills. If they don't have enough at the end of the
year, they have to take it from somewhere else. If
they have excess, they can keep it."
Others, typically working in Sustainability
Task Force subcommittees, are pondering changes
to UF's curriculum. As Hostetler notes, UF has
long required general majors to complete certain
core courses in physics, biology or other sciences.
"Why not have an environmental or
sustainability requirement that would be institu-
tionalized across the board?" Hosteder says.
Indeed, sustainability's most ardent proponents
view it as going far beyond shrinking an
institution's environmental footprint.
In their view, sustainability encompasses not
only environmental concerns but social issues
such as paying employees living wages, as well as
charitable or service concerns such as providing
community aid. And they believe that it should
be infused into every element of the university, in
effect working to change the consciousness of
faculty and students no matter how diverse or
seemingly unrelated their fields.
As Cortese says, "What I would like to see in
the future is for every graduate to come out un-
derstanding how to live their lives personally and
professionally in a way that has only the most
positive social, economic and environmental
impact." -*"


Learn more about UF's sustainability efforts at
www.sustainable.ufl.edu


t2 FLORIDA












































The Tree Guy

ERICK SMITH IS THE PROTECTOR OF UF'S TREES.

Trees may not talk, but they do have a voice at the University of Florida.
Erick Smith (BSF '92) is UF's urban forester responsible for thousands of
trees shading the university's 2,000-acre Gainesville campus. He serves alter-
nately as the university's resident tree educator, defender, doctor, evangelist,
planter and on occasions when a tree is sick or dying reluctant execu-
tioner.
"My job is to provide good information so the university can make good
decisions with respect to trees," Smith says.
On a campus of students adorned with creative clothing, Smith stands out.
He's the tall guy wearing the wide-brimmed straw hat and silently contemplat-
ing the canopy.
Spotted thus, he may be responding to a call from an office worker con-
cerned about the health of a tree outside a window. Or he could be reviewing
the site for a planned building hoping to reduce the number of trees that need
to be cut, or figuring out where and what species of new trees to plant in an
open space.
Smith, 38, is the first to fill his position, created five years ago after UF
officials became concerned that no one was charged with caring for the cam-
pus' estimated 183 exotic and native tree species.

Branching Out
When he first arrived in the operations section of the physical plant divi-
sion, some of his colleagues were skeptical. "I didn't know if he was needed,"
says Marry Werts, groundskeeping superintendent.


But Smith gradually proved himself.
"I can tell you this, he's been an asset," Werts says. "He was actually the guy
that opened my eyes up to the use of native plants on campus."
Smith is among a growing number of urban foresters. But the position is
highly unusual at universities, says Michael Goergen, executive vice president
and CEO of the Society of American Foresters.
"Every campus in the country should have an urban forester like Erick, and
in fact many cities should as well," Goergen says. "The reason is that people
really love trees."
And how. Three years ago, Sue Wagner (BSJ '81), director of promotions
for UF's WUFT-TV, noticed a large oak seemingly dying from the top down
outside her first floor window in Weimer Hall, the journalism building.
Smith's investigation revealed a malfunctioning steam heating pipe was literally
cooking the shumard oak's roots.
The call came too late to save the tree, but the pipe was repaired.
"We didn't have anybody to call for the longest time," says Wagner, a pro-
fessed tree lover. "But Erick, you call him and he responds right away."
Smith often helps save trees. Several times, his work has prompted planners
to reconfigure where they put new buildings and patios.
Planners nudged Gerson Hall to avoid having to cut down an old longleaf
pine championed by Smith and others. And they reshaped a sunken plaza just
south of Keene-Flint Hall in response to his concerns that their original plans
would cause root damage to one of UF's most majestic longleafs, a towering
beauty thought to be more than 200 years old.
Smith also loses some battles. For example, his efforts to save another an-
cient longleaf pine that was leaning over an electrical substation came to
naught after planners insisted the tree posed a serious threat.

His Roots
Smith didn't grow up hoping to devote his life to trees. He spent his first
years at UF majoring in mechanical engineering. As a junior, he was sitting in
a class in thermodynamics when the trees outside the window seemed to
beckon. Idly, he wrote "forestry" on the top of his nores.
"At that point in time, I didn't even know it was a profession. It was like an
epiphany," Smith said.
After discovering UF's school of forestry, Smith dropped out of engineering
classes and changed his major, graduating in 1992. He volunteered in the
Peace Corps and worked as a forester in both the public and private sector
before coming to UF.
His work has made Smith intimately familiar with campus trees.
His list of notables include an Ogeechee lime near Phelps Laboratory
known among senior grounds crew members as the "Tom Petty Tree" because
Gainesville native Perty planted it during a brief stint on the UF crew more
than 30 years ago.
Smith can also identify a large sycamore called the "moon tree" because it
was grown from a seedling carried to the moon aboard Apollo 14. And anyone
fighting a sore molar may be interested in the toothache tree, the bark of
which will numb the gums. Campus trees span local natives such as laurel oak
and southern magnolia to exotics such as Japanese maki yew and wild
date palm.
UF is known for its enormous live oaks. But Smith says most if not all the
oaks were likely planted after UF's first buildings went up in 1905.
It is the remaining few longleaf pines, remnants of vast old growth forests
once covering the Southeast, that predate the university, he says. Careful ob-
servers will note that many of these tall, graceful grandfathers lean to the south.
Anyone can read the doorway inscriptions on UF's oldest buildings, but
Smith may be the only person on campus who can interpret the historical tale
of the leaning longleafs.
"These trees were bent over during a hurricane in the 1930s," he says.
"That's their memory of it they've stayed that way ever since."
Aaron Hoover (MFAS '02)


winter 2006 13
i--- -


















Culture

FOREIGN STUDENTS DIVE INTO
AMERICAN LANGUAGE AND
CUSTOMS AT UFS ENGLISH
LANGUAGE INSTITUTE.




IKE OTHER NEW ARRIVALS, STUDENTS ON THIS TOUR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA LOOK ANXIOUS, EXCITED AND A BIT BEFUDDLED. CLUTCHING THEIR
CAMPUS MAPS, THEY TRY TO KEEP UP WITH TOUR LEADERS TROY LOCKER
AND LAMIA ELACHABI, WHO POINT OUT COMPUTER LABS, LIBRARIES, DINING HALLS
AND BUS STOPS.


(Below) Victoria Chang, an ELI
student, and her husband,
Feng-Chi Chang, a master's
student.


The rush of information can be
daunting for any new student, but
for this group the experience is all
the more overwhelming because it's
in English.
Representing a dozen countries
from Thailand to Turkey, these 65
students have come to UF's English
Language Institute for a four-
month intensive language program.
ELI students don't take regular UF


classes, but rather a customized mix
of English grammar, pronuncia-
tion, reading/writing, listening/
speaking and American culture.
Their educations begin the mo-
ment they arrive: From now on,
the only time they'll hear their
native languages is when they call
home. Even the 20 students from
South Korea are banned from
speaking their native language
among themselves, a rule they flout
on the campus tour.
"There's always a little bit of
cheating in the first week," says
Loker, the cultural immersion
program assistant. "We'll crack
down on that soon."
In their flip-flops and T-shirts,
some charting on cell phones, the
ELI students blend in with the rest
of the students in Turlington Plaza,
and they share many of the same
concerns.
"I am going to get lost, for
sure," confides one.
"Can I get football tickets?"
wonders Jose Dominguez, an ac-
countant from Argentina who is
here to polish his English skills


before pursuing an MBA.
Dominguez represents one
category of ELI students profes-
sionals who feel that learning En-
glish will further their careers back
home. Most students, however, are
college-age, learning the language
as a prerequisite toward entering an
American college.

Cultural savvy
The institute serves 300 stu-
dents a year, most from Brazil,
Colombia, Japan, Korea and Saudi
Arabia, with Taiwan, Thailand and
Venezuela also well represented.
Some students already live in the
United States but want to feel more
comfortable speaking English.
Patricia Gonzalez, an ELI gradu-
ate from Colombia, needed English
training to pursue an advanced
dental degree in her home country.
"Even in Colombia, all of the
textbooks are in English," she says.
''Being confident and fluent in
English is important."
With English classes available all
over the world, why would students
come all the way to Gainesville to


BY ALISSON CLARK (BSJ '98)


Photography by KOR Photography


14 FLORIDA

































(From left) Beki Robbins (4LS), Paul Natiu, Hyang Jim Jee and Jill Lederman (4JM) get to know each other at an English
Language Institute picnic at Lake Wauburg.


learn the language? Noreen Baker.
ELI's cultural immersion coordina-
tor, says the interaction with native
speakers is a major draw.
"Students who go through an
intensive English immersion pro-
gram tend to be more successful
when they attend a university than
the ones who study at home. They
have that cultural savvy," Baker says.
Although they're required to
start speaking English right away,
ELI students enjoy a protective,
nurturing environment the staff
helps find apartments and open
bank accounts, and even leads a
tour through the bewildering
American grocery store. On the
walking tour, Elachabi and Loker
guide new students through the
chaos of campus. In the bustling
courtyard ofTurlington Plaza, the
group falls into a hush as buses and
bikes whiz past.
"They're quiet right now, but in
a couple of weeks, that will
change," Elachabi says. Elachabi is
one of the ELI's language assistants,
UF students who interact on an
informal level with the students,
allowing them to practice English
without worrying about making
mistakes. Language assistants are
also a touchstone for the students
when they're homesick or having


difficulry adjusting to the American
culture.
"If students develop the right
kind of relationships with their
language assistants, they are the
first people the students turn to
with problems like that," Baker
says.
Language assistants lead stu-
dents in weekly activities from
cooking classes to soccer games.
Weekends are for outings to the
Kennedy Space Center or Universal
Studios, as well as volunteer activi-
ties at nursing homes or with Habi-
tat for Humanity. The most popu-
lar activity by far is Coffee Talk, a
weekly conversation session at
Starbucks with language assistants.
"The atmosphere of drinking
coffee and chatting is something
most people can relate to," Baker
says, noting that coffee drinking is
a cross-cultural experience.
For Gonzalez, conversing with
the language assistants showed her
how far she had come with her
English and how far she had to
go.
"You get confident talking to
the other students in the program.
They're all foreign, so they tend to
talk slowly and use simple words,
as opposed to native speakers," she
says.


Gaining confidence
The final stop on the campus
tour is the Reitz Union, where
students can get haircuts, plane
tickets and frozen yogurt.
Dominguez gapes at the array of
restaurants.
"My university in Argentina
was just rooms for classes. It was
not like this," he says. "At home,
going to university is not very
different from high school. Here it
is very different."
At the bookstore, students ad-
mire Gator sweatshirts and stare at
the giant photos of campus scenery
lining the walls. It's all a bit over-
whelming, but in a few weeks,
Elachabi says, they'll be navigating
campus and the language -
with greater confidence.
For Gonzalez, who completed
her ELI courses in 1998, English
proficiency was a huge professional
advantage. A year after returning to
Colombia, she was accepted into
UF's licensing program for foreign-
trained dentists. With the English
skills she learned at the ELI, she
found employment as a dental
assistant two weeks after coming
back to the United States.


Jong Hyeop Ahn, an ELI student



"A lot of immigrants who are
professionals in their own countries
have to work maintenance and
restaurant jobs when they come to
the United States, jobs that don't
require a lot of talking," she says.
"Because of the ELI courses, I felt
much more confident in my En-
glish." -w'

Want to learn more? The English
Language Institute's Web site is
www. eli.ufl.edu.


winter 2006 15























Forever



Mentors

Many UF faculty don't slip away quietly into retirement. Their
dedication to UF lasts a lifetime.


IViaeUUlyi L.UUMiur


"A UNIVERSITY'S REPUTATION IS
MADE ON ITS GRADUATE STUDENTS."
MADELYN LOCKHART


UEROME MODELL IS IN THE OFFICE WEEKDAYS BY 6:30 A.M. AND LEAVES
AFTER DARK. ON A GIVEN DAY, HE MIGHT ANESTHETIZE SIX PATIENTS IN
THE MORNING AND GIVE A LECTURE IN THE AFTERNOON. THEN THERE'S
HIS RESEARCH INTO A NEW ANESTHETIC AGENT. AND EVENINGS ON CALL.
This is retirement?
Officially, Modell retired from UF's College of Medicine on Dec. 31, 2000. But for Modell, retirement
means doing the same things he has done since he arrived on campus in 1969, only for free.
"I'm not about to go sit out in the pasture," says Modell, who raises horses with his wife, retired pediat-
ric anesthesiologist Shirley Graves, on their farm in Micanopy. "How long can we sit in a rocking chair and
stare at each other?
"But you notice," he adds, "I don't have a coat and tie on."
Graves and Modell are among hundreds of retired professors who have a hard time cutting the orange
and blue ties that bind.
Some, such as chemist George Butler, continue to mentor students and younger faculty members. Oth-
ers, such as epilepsy expert B.J. Wilder, make gifts to ensure the research they conducted can be continued
by others.
Professor emeritus Jack Ohanian, past president of Retired Faculty of the University of Florida, says
nearly all the retirees within the group are keenly interested in campus matters. About 400 retired faculty
members belong to the group, which meets monthly to hear speakers ranging from the Gator baseball coach
to the provost. Ohanian, whose career spanned the tenure of seven UF presidents starting with J. Wayne
Reitz, says group members enjoy their campus connection.
The retirees represent a behind-the-scenes force that gets things done across campus. For some, it's a
matter of wrapping up loose ends. For others, such as former graduate school dean Madelyn Lockhart, it's a
matter of if you want something done you do it yourself.


BY CINDY SPENCE (BSJ '82)
16 FLORIDA


























































bninrey braves ana jerome wioaeii


Lockhart spent decades juggling budgets and counseling graduate stu-
dents. When retirement rolled around, she knew right where the gaps were
and reached into her pockets to help.
"The most important thing [doctoral] students need is exposure to people
in their profession. Yet, there was no money to send them to professional
meetings," Lockhart says.
So Lockhart established a $100,000 endowment with a state match of
$50,000. The fund sends two to four graduate students each year to profes-
sional meetings.


"The effect is not just on the graduate student, but on the ability of the
department to attract good graduate students," Lockhart says. "A university's
reputation is made on its graduate students."
That done, Lockhart turned to another pressing need, assistance for women
finishing their dissertations. She set up the Madelyn Lockhart Fellowship,
recognizing that the challenges women doctoral candidates face haven't
changed much since her days as a student.
"You're finished with all your coursework, and here you are with nobody to
supervise you and so many things to do at home with a husband and children,


winter 2006 ii









PROFESSOR EMERITUS JACK OHANIAN, PAST PRESIDENT OF

RETIRED FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, SAYS NEARLY

ALL THE RETIREES IN THE GROUP ARE KEENLY INTERESTED IN

CAMPUS MATTERS. OHANIAN, WHOSE CAREER SPANNED THE

TENURE OF SEVEN UF PRESIDENTS STARTING WITH J. WAYNE REITZ,

SAYS GROUP MEMBERS ENJOY THEIR CAMPUS CONNECTION.


George and Josephine Butler

and you don't have the peace and
quiet to finish your dissertation,"
Lockhart says. "I remember sitting
at a typewriter with a child pulling
at each sleeve. Most women will get
up from the typewriter to take care
of the children, and there goes the
degree."
Lockhart who retired in
1996 but says, "sometimes I don't
think I ever did [retire]"- saw
needs in other places, too. She
supports UF's libraries, African
Studies, Women's Studies, the
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
and the Butterfly Rainforest at the
Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory. A big fan of libraries,
Lockhart suggests that others who
want to help but don't know how
consider investing there.
"In Library East, there are car-
rels that can be used for research
space, and a carrel naming is only
$5,000," Lockhart says. "It's impor-
tant for a library to have good
support to attract faculty and stu-
dents. The Internet is no substitute
for a library."
The retirees' generosity some-
times comes on top of a career that
went beyond the call of duty.
Butler, for instance, brought great
renown to UF with a ground-
breaking discovery more than 50
years ago in the field of polymer
chemistry. Former student Ken


Wagener (PhD '73) says he was
honored to take over as the Butler
Professor of Chemistry in 1984
following Butler's retirement.
Butler's role as polymer
chemistry's biggest booster contin-
ued well into his retirement,
Wagener says.
"He is the true sage adviser, and
perhaps his contribution is greatest
in his effect on people," Wagener
says. "His fame is international in
our field, but he is unassuming. He
is tremendously respected by the
students, and the ones who have
known him personally are the most
fortunate of all."
The Butler professorship comes
from an endowment by Butler and
his wife, Josephine. The fund also
supports graduate fellowships and
an annual lectureship series, in
which a world authority in polymer
chemistry comes to UF for a
month to give 10 to 12 lectures
and mingle with students. The
endowment ensures that the repu-
tation for excellence Butler started
continues for generations to come.
Butler set UF's course for the
future in another way, too, with the
university's first external research
grant.
"Back then, the chairman of the
chemistry department was worried
about the legality of a research
contract with the government,"
Butler says. "I remember sitting
under a tree talking to the dean of
the law school about the shenani-
gans of doing government research
on campus.
The grant, in 1948, was for
$10,000. Today, UF brings in $500
million a year in external research.
As doctors, Modell, Graves and
Wilder have seen the benefits of the
increase in UF's research funding.
Their decisions to support UF after
their retirements were easy to
make, they say.
Wilder and his wife, Eve, gave
$2 million to UF's McKnight Brain
Institute. With a state match, that


18 FLORIDA


Jack Ohanian













AFTER DEVOTING A LIFETIME TO RESEARCH AND

TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY, WILDER HOPES FOR A

BREAKTHROUGH BY A FUTURE UF DOCTOR.


established $4 million for the B.J.
and Eve Wilder Center for Excel-
lence in Epilepsy Research. After
devoting a lifetime to research and
treatment of the ravaging disease,
Wilder hopes for a breakthrough
by a future UF doctor.
Modell and Graves have set up a
$2 million trust to establish two
professorships, one in veterinary
anesthesiology and another in
pediatric anesthesiology. They too
have supported the Brain Institute,
as well as research in the College of
Veterinary Medicine. Graves says
her approach to her retirement in
2001 is more laid-back than her
husband's.
"I looked forward to retirement,
after getting up at 5 a.m. for so
many years," Graves says. "I can
walk with the dogs in the morning
and write poetry."
But Graves also discovered a
knack for fundraising. Aiming to
establish an associate professorship,
her early success led her to shoot
for a full professorship in anesthesi-
ology. Graves and Modell kicked
off the fundraising with $50,000
and so far have attracted 230 other
donors to the endowment, which
will reach $1 million with a state
match.
Modell and Graves say their
support for the College of Veteri-
nary Medicine stems from first-
hand experience. With 21 horses
- including two world champions
- 25 head of cattle, dogs, ducks
and chickens, they have called on
UF veterinarians to treat a range of
ailments from glaucoma to assorted
surgeries.


"It's our way of giving back.
Our loved animals gave us a strong
reason to support the college,"
Graves says.
Modell points out that the
National Institutes of Health's
focus on human ailments some-
times overlooks veterinary research.
Modell, a courtesy professor of
large animal clinical sciences,
spends a chunk of his time teaching
anesthesiology to veterinary students.
"The veterinarians and students
are very hardworking, very dedi-
cated," Modell says. "What they do
is technologically several years
behind what we do in humans
primarily because they can't buy the
equipment."
Modell and Graves echo the
sentiments of other retirees who
look back fondly on their years at
UE
"I had worked in other places
when I came here in 1970," Graves
says. "But the minute I walked into
the operating room here and onto
the faculty, I felt like I came home
to a family."
Modell agrees, and says working
with students is almost like being a
parent: "You stimulate them, guide
them, give them opportunities."
And like most senior members
of a family, UF's retirees have
plenty to give.
"The university's retired faculty
members have a wealth of knowl-
edge to offer," says Lockhart. -*'

To support other UF faculty or learn
about President Bernie Machen's
Faculty Challenge Initiative,
visit www.uffufl.edu/FacultyChallenge.


B.J. Wilder


THE RETIREES' GENEROSITY SOMETIMES COMES ON TOP OF A

CAREER THAT WENT BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY. BUTLER, FOR

INSTANCE, BROUGHT GREAT RENOWN TO UF WITH A GROUND-

BREAKING DISCOVERY MORE THAN 50 YEARS AGO IN THE FIELD

OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY.


winter 2006 19
L ----















alumni rofil es










S i11n11 Yam

PIETRA RIVOLIS T-SHIRT ILLUSTRATES
FREE TRADE AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMY.


"THE STORY IS

ABOUT HOW

POLITICS AND

MARKETS AND

ECONOMICS

KIND OF

COMBINE IN THE

LIFE OF A SINGLE

PRODUCT...

THAT'S WHAT I

HAD A CHANCE

TO SEE

FIRSTHAND."

PIETRA RIVOLI


20 FLORIDA


Ann Brashare's novel "Sisterhood of
the Traveling Pants" spawned a
blockbuster movie, a few sequels
and a dedicated following of young
readers. But before Brashare's jeans
went on their journey, another item
of clothing took a more important
trip and this one was real.
For her book "The Travels of a
T-Shirt in the Global Economy,"
economist Pietra Rivoli (BSBA '79,
PhD '83) followed the "life" of a $6
T-shirt from first stitch to rag pile.
To write the book, she journeyed to
a Texas cotton field, a Chinese
textile factory, a trade summit in
Washington and a used-clothing
market in Africa, all along explor-
ing the ins and outs of interna-
tional trade through the
shirt's life story.
"The story is about
how politics and mar-
kets and economics 4
kind of combine in the
life of a single product,"
says Rivoli, 48, an asso-
ciate professor at
Georgetown University's
McDonough School of
Business. "That's what I
had a chance to see first-
hand."
Her book has been
praised as a moving, well-
written narrative of the life


of the T-shirt itself and of the hu-
mans intertwined with its creation
and survival. Rivoli "has mined a
subject known for dry polemics and
created an engaging and illuminat-
ing saga of the international textile
trade," states one New York Times
reviewer.
But then, Rivoli has a knack for
putting a new spin on tired topics,
colleagues say.
"Pietra is one of the most popu-
lar finance professors at George-
town, and one of the toughest,"
says Elaine Romanelli, director of
Georgetown's Global Entrepreneur-
ial Studies Program. "Students love
her because she puts so much effort


Pietra makes it so immediately
relevant and consequential."
Bought in spring 1999 from a
discount bin at a Fort Lauderdale
Walgreens, the T-shirt in her book
features a bright parrot sitting in a
palm tree and the words "Fort
Lauderdale." The shirt itself is not
remarkable, but, as the book illus-
trates, its life is extraordinary. The
idea for the book came to her in
1999 during a student rally on the
Georgetown campus.
"This was a time when there was
a lot of discussion about trade,
international economy, poor people
vs. rich people, globalization, etc.,"
Rivoli says. "I saw this woman
speaking, saying that maybe your
clothes were made by a licle child
in India; maybe they were made by









PROFILES


trade. Where do your clothes come
from?"
Rivoli decided to find out -
and to make her investigation a tale
that went beyond the clothes them-
selves. She wanted to make the
issue of global trade accessible to
everyone. The ensuing journey
spanned three continents.
"I really was trying to follow the
T-shirt," Rivoli explains. "I wanted
my travel to parallel its lifespan as
closely as I could."
She began in Shanghai, China,
at the factories where yarn is spun
and fabric made and sewn. From
there, Rivoli went to a cotton farm
in west Texas "I had a good idea
that my shirt's cotton had come
from there because I know how
much Texas cotton is sold to
China," she says. The T-shirt also
took her to Washington, D.C.,
where trade policies are created to
govern the cotton's exportation to
China and the T-shirt's importation
to Miami. "I then spent time in
New York, which is where I became
interested in the used-clothing
trade and what happens when we
throw clothes away," she says. The
trek ended half a world away, in
Tanzania, where the T-shirt would
have ended up if donated to Good-
will Industries International.
But Rivoli hadn't, in fact, do-


nated her shirt. Instead, she uses
the famed T-shirt when she lectures
about the incredible journey of
everyday clothing. "I'm paranoid
about losing it now," she admits.
More than a simple tale of a travel-
ing T-shirt, the book chronicles the
complicated trade and political
issues that swirl through the history
of a seemingly simple piece of
clothing.
"I think I went in with a stan-
dard business professor set of
views," she says, "which are gener-
ally very pro free trade. Then, when
I finished the project, I realized that
was a pretty simplistic view. There
were a lot of ways by which the
rules of the world economy are
stacked against people, and this was
something I hadn't appreciated. We
have rules stacked against the poor
cotton farmers and the garment
workers in China, for example.
"The main thing I learned is
that many of the debates we have
are very oversimplified. Even this
very simple product has a very
complicated story to tell."
The success of the book -
already in its third printing and a
finalist for the Financial Times and
Goldman Sachs Business Book of
the Year Award surprises Rivoli.
"It's been such a thrill," she says.
"I just hope that people who had


Pietra Rivoli


their opinions set can develop a
more nuanced view of this compli-
cated world of international trade."
Rivoli's favorite professor from
her time as a student at UF, Roy
Crum, believes the book will do
just that.
"Unlike most treatises on the
subject that are partisan from one
or the other perspective, Pietra
gives fair treatment to both sides,
identifying which arguments are
valid and which are inflated rheto-
ric," says Crum, now director of
UF's Center for International Eco-


nomic & Business Studies.
Rivoli's colleague and friend,
Romanelli, also speaks glowingly of
the book.
"It's a classic in the making," she
says. "Even as the hot economic
issues of today's business bestseller
lists and the particular features
of modern globalization change,
the questions Pietra explores so
smartly, so dispassionately, and so
personally will remain the pertinent
questions."
Kristin Harmel (BSJ '01)


winter 2006 21









PROFILES


House C

JOHN RILEY AND HIS WIFE TAKE THEIR Cl
MEDICAL PRACTICE ON THE ROAD


Doctors who make house calls, like
milkmen who leave bottles on the
doorstep, fell out of favor back
when Hollywood still made movies
in black and white. Now, a UF
alumnus and his wife are reviving
the old-fashioned practice with a
twist of modern technology.
Drs. John Riley (BS '87) and
Theresa Treep operate Hoosier
Housecalls in Noblesville, Ind.
Each uses a specially outfitted SUV
to make calls, carrying laptop com-
puters and Palm Pilots along with
their stethoscopes and thermom-
eters. Riley treats adults, mostly
seniors and patients who can't easily
get to a doctor's office. Treep is a
pediatrician. Together, they have
roughly 750 patients.
"You actually get to know the
patients and their families. They're
less 'the patient with hypertension'
and become more people with
hobbies and interests," Riley says.
"If you're treating hypertension
every day, it's better to find the
patient interesting because the
medicine for that isn't all that inter-
esting. The patients are as reward-
ing as the medicine."
The couple launched the mobile
practice in 2002 after becoming
disenchanted with traditional clin-
ics. Riley, for instance, says he felt


pushed to see more patients at
shorter intervals. The emphasis was
on economics, not patient care.
Constance Row, executive direc-
tor of American Academy of Home
Care Physicians, says that's a com-
mon complaint among physicians.
"Doctors turn to house calls as a
way to practice medicine the way
they were taught," she says. "Many
physicians are frustrated by seeing
25 patients a day. They know eld-
erly patients require more time and
need more attention. Eventually,
they seek an alternative to what
they see as a rat race."
For Riley and Treep, another
reason to start Hoosier Housecalls
was even more personal.
"Part of what has driven this
business is that our youngest son is
disabled. We saw the need to de-
liver care to people who are unable
to get to the doctor's office," Treep
says. "We weren't sure at first that
we'd be able to do it. Would there
be reimbursement? Would people
be able to afford it? It became very
clear for John's patients there
were people calling left and right,
'It'd be so nice if we didn't have to
take mom and dad out of the
house.'"
With their mobile clinics,
Riley and Treep provide the same


care a patient receives at a doctor's
office. Riley's nurse even rides
along on most calls. To make the
mobile office practical, the doc-
tors rely on technology, some of it
designed by Riley. Patient charts
are stored on computers, elec-
tronic copies of every document
are kept and Palm Pilots are
loaded with the Physician's Desk
Reference. Riley even wrote a
software package for his wife that
allows her to enter children's
growth statistics graphically.
Treating people in their homes
has unexpected benefits, Riley and
Treep say. For instance, patients are
more relaxed, and if the doctors are


"PART OF WHAT HAS DRIVEN
THIS BUSINESS IS THAT OUR
YOUNGEST SON IS DISABLED.
WE SAW THE NEED TO
DELVER CARE TO PEOPLE

WHO ARE UNABLE TO GET TO
THE DOCTOR'S OFFICE."


JOHN RILEY


"MANY
PHYSICIANS ARE
FRUSTRATED BY
SEEING 25
PATIENTS A DAY.
THEY KNOW
ELDERLY
PATIENTS
REQUIRE MORE
TIME AND NEED
MORE
ATTENTION.
EVENTUALLY,
THEY SEEK AN
ALTERNATIVE TO
WHAT THEY SEE
AS A RAT RACE."

CONSTANCE
ROW


22 FLORIDA









PROFILES


Drs. John Riley (BA '87) and Theresa Treep with their son, Danny.


running late, their patients don't
need to wait in a reception room.
Then there are the surprises.
"One time we had the local
newspaper going out with us on a
house call. When we got to the
house, the husband with
Alzheimer's disease and the pet dog
were running down the street. We
had to catch both of them and


return them home while the pho-
tographer was clicking pictures,"
Riley says.
Steve Mattingly of Carmel, Ind.,
says he is pleased with the treat-
ment his family has gotten from
Hoosier Housecalls.
"He [Riley] takes the time to
talk to you. It's not, 'Wait here for
eight minutes, see the doctor for


four minutes, then leave.' He will
spend almost an hour with you,"
Mattingly says. "If he needs you to
lie down, you lie down on your
couch. There's no waiting in a
waiting room with lots of sick
people. If there's any sickness, it's
because you're sick."
Best of all, Mattingly says, he's
enjoyed getting to know Riley on


more than a patient-doctor level.
"Most docs don't have time for
humor," he says. "With John's
house calls, there's always time for
humor. He never gets serious; the
stress is off. Even with my dad in
the nursing home, he teases him a
little. That makes you feel like
everything's fine."
Tina Mader Melczarek


winter 2006 23
















bfalhmnni
IA 0


HITTING THE BRICKS

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 9:


Wooden beams adorn the
inside of the Keene Faculty
Center in Dauer Hall; sun-
shine flows through a skylight
at the new UF&Shands Or-
thopaedics and Sports Medi-
cine Institute on 34'h Street.


My Old School

Please join us in a walk down memory lane. We welcome your letters and photographs at Florida@uff.ufl.edu or at Florida
magazine, P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425. Photos can be scanned and returned upon request.


I recently read an article in a
national magazine about all the
_problems college students today are
" having with cars on campus no
parking places and numerous fines
for illegal parking.
It made me reminisce back to
my days as a student in 1927-31
when cars were not a problem.
There were only about 10 student
cars on campus then, and we
walked everywhere we wanted to
go. How did we get out of town for
weekends? We simply hitchhiked
since it was a much safer and differ-
ent world.
All freshmen in those days were
called "rats" and wore orange and
blue "rat caps" all the time on
campus. All anyone had to do to
get a ride was go to the corner of
University and 13' with his "rat
cap" on and wait to be picked up.
On Friday afternoon there would
be a crowd going away for the
weekend and all freshmen and
upper classmen wore "rat caps" as a
form of identification. Rides
worked on the honor system with
first-come, first-picked up and
latecomers simply waited their
turn. If the offer wasn't going as far
as needed, you'd simply turn it
down and the next in line might
accept.
One memorable weekend I can
remember an old man pulling up in
a 16-cylinder Cadillac sedan. He
was going to Tampa where my
friend and I wanted to go. We
climbed in and bragged on such a
fine car, and all of a sudden he


asked, "Would you like to drive it?"
Did we ever!
The other great pickup was
when my roommate and I were
going to Chicago to get a summer
job. Another nice man stopped for
us and when we asked how far he
was going, he replied, "To Atlanta."
That made our day, and he even
bought us supper that night. The
next ride got us as far as Nashville
where an aunt and uncle bought
me a train ticket to Chicago.
Memory escapes me as to what
happened to my friend.
College life was quite different
back then, and hitchhiking pro-
vided many wonderful experiences
and some not so wonderful. But at
least we didn't have any problems
with car parking on campus.
J. L. "Sandy" Sanders (BSEE '31)
Frankfort, Ky.

I graduated from high school in
California and we moved in the
summer of 1960 to South Daytona.
My parents bought a brand new
house in South Daytona's Golf
View subdivision next door to the
Dimmicks. The Dimmicks had a
daughter named Carla who was a
senior at Daytona Beach Mainland.
When Carla graduated, she went
directly to Gainesville and lived in
Yulee Hall.
I graduated from Daytona Beach
Junior College in June 1962 and
came to UF in the fall as a junior.
My junior year I didn't see much of
Carla. She was a sophomore and had
a boyfriend. But in my senior year


the boyfriend had left school, and I
had a car. So Carla and I began
eating dinner together since I could
drive downtown and escape campus
food. One place I remember was
"Larry's Wonder House." At 97 cents
plus tax, I could afford the New York
strip steak. Carla and I were not
dating; we each paid for our own
food.
Friday, Nov. 22, chag ed every-
thing. President Kennedy \\as assas-
sinated. As I look backtat our reac-
tions on campus, they seem
strange. I recall a walk ("march")
down University Avenue from
campus to the square in downtown
Gainesville and back to campus. I
don't recall any speakers or signs,
just a large number of students
walking to town and back. I know
that classes were suspended for at
least one day, maybe for the fu-
neral. I also seem to recall some
special church services. (I was
watching TV and eating lunch in
the university cafeteria when Jack
Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald live
on camera.)
Somehow the Kennedy assassi-
nation turned a platonic relation-
ship into romance. Soon after Nov.
22, I kissed Carla for the first time,
sitting in my red sports car in the
parking lot at Yulee. I proposed in
Beta woods before the end of the
semester and we were married Aug.
6, 1964. Forty-one years, two kids
and five grandchildren later, we are
still married.
Billy Rhodes (BAE '64)
Titusville


241 FLORIDA









UFALUMNI


Hitchhiking was once a way of life for UF students hoping to attend athletic events, visit far-away sweethearts or go home
for break. Would-be riders simply donned their rat caps to advertise their student status and stuck out their thumbs.
"On any highway near Gainesville may be seen one or two students waiting for rides," the Associated Press reported in
1926. "'Bumming' has been raised to a dignified position, and no student considers himself too 'elite' to hail a car."


A good roommate and helpful
veterans was how it was with me in
the fall of 1947. Orientation told us
we were special, "as more high
school students registered this se-
mester than World War II veterans."
I don't know how that made us
special, but I believed everything
that senior told us.
My room assignment was in a
Quonset hut just south of campus.
With the luck of the draw, Buzz
Cooper was my roommate. Just a
great guy, a good student, but he
had an odd avocation. Buzz would
go catch snakes in Paynes Prairie
and sell them.
I told a classmate we had 114
snakes in our room. His disbelief
and response caused me not to
repeat that again.
Our Florida magazine carried a
letter last winter about two students
catching and selling snakes. I
glanced at the author it was
George Cooper (BSA '58). This is
too much of a coincidence. George
must be Buzz's younger brother?
Maybe a cousin? Sure would like to
get in touch with Buzz.
The veterans were admired by all
on campus. I recall thinking of
them as older gentlemen. Those I
had the pleasure of coming in con-
tact with were a calming influence.
Maybe it was a bit like having my
father around, telling me to behave
myself or I should be studying more
and such.


UF being a land grant college, I
was enrolled in ROTC. The
sergeant major sent for me while I
was marching in that vacant field
west of Murphree Hall and the
handball courts. I had signed up in
the Marine Reserve on a special
program for high school seniors -
I learned I could not belong to
both ROTC and the reserves. A
resignation was prepared and sent
to the Marines.
Well, Korea happened. The
Marine Corps refused to recognize
my resignation and sent for me,
then the Miami Draft Board said to
report. Actually, I sort of felt special
except for my poor mother. The
Marine Corps won.
Back in college two years later, I
was married with one child and a
full-time job. I tried to be a role
model for the young students as
best I could. I tried, but it wasn't
the same.
Buzz Cooper, come, let's catch
some snakes in my grove, and bring
your cousin George.
Niles Cooney ('51)
Fort Pierce


When you start college in 1942
but don't graduate until 1949,
explanations are usually necessary
for teasing friends! World War II
was the interruption that slowed
down my educational processes.
In 1942 I enrolled at UF and


promptly joined the Army Re-
serves. I was called up in 1943 and
left to start my military life at
Camp Blanding. While there, the
"powers that be" sent me for train-
ing in Paris ... Paris, Texas, that is.
After eight months, I was shipped
overseas and spent the next two and
a half years in France, Germany,
Belgium, Holland and England.
In 1946 I was discharged and
returned to my home in Coral
Gables. In June I married my Ponce
de Leon High School sweetheart,
Mildred (Mel) Andre, and we
moved to Gainesville. The only
apartment we could find was in
Waldo. Remember, this was the
year when all the married veterans
who decided to continue in college
at UF returned to the campus and
housing was at a premium.
After four months of commut-
ing from Waldo and eventually
trying out two tiny apartments near
the campus, we finally got into
Flavet Village. Our $26-a-month
apartment was great (as long as we
remembered to put the "NEED
ICE" sign in the window every
other day for delivery to our ice
box), and we could walk to most of
our activities. My wife worked in
the business office for George
Baughman. Her salary and my GI
Bill allotment kept us solvent.
Those were penny-pinching days,
though, and when I learned I could
get paid if I went into ROTC, I


joined up and received my commis-
sion as a second lieutenant in 1948.
I had been a corporal when I was
discharged in 1946 and had no
intentions of ever being in the
service again. I decided to stay in
the Reserves and went to summer
camp and the required weekend
drills until age 62 when I retired as
a major.
When I graduated in 1949 with
a bachelor's degree in business
administration, I accepted a job
with the Insurance Company of
North America (since merged with
Connecticut General and now
called CIGNA) as an auditor. I
retired in 1986. During those years
we started in Orlando, transferred
to New Orleans, then to Atlanta, to
Tampa and finally back to Atlanta
where we have lived for 40 years. It
has been 56 years since graduation,
but I still have a big orange and
blue spot in my heart for Gator
Country. Although our years at UF
were very different from today's
"normal" college life, Mel and I
have wonderful memories of that
post-war time and remember with
pride being there at the beginning
of the phenomenal growth of UE
Harry Burress (BSBA '49)
Atlanta






winter 2006








UFALUMNI


Ways to Tell the UF Alumni Association is 100

a) It has a new logo.
SA special 100th anniversary logo will appear on mailings and 100 YEARS
brochures throughout the year. UNIVERSITY OF
0 It has 49,986 more members than when it started.
SFounded by the 14-member class of 1906, membership has grown
exponentially in a century until it's now more than 50,000 lR I
members strong. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
0 Emerson Alumni Hall has replaced Uncle Dud's 1906 2006
T College Inn as "the place to be on game day."
Each fall the UFAA sponsors "Gator Nation Tailgate" parties that begin three hours before
Each home football game. To learn more, or to find out about away game parties,
visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu.
It's no longer necessary to send smoke signals to find your classmates.
The UFAA offers a variety of ways to reconnect, including the new online networking tool,
the Gator Nation Network. Learn more at http://gnn.ufalumni.ufl.edu/.
SIt's on its 83rd president.
Past UFAA presidents have included U.S. senators Spessard Holland and Charles Bennett,
Florida Lt. Gov. Buddy MacKay, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner and UF
President Stephen O'Connell.
O A rat cap is no longer your only option for showing your colors.
Today there is enough Gator paraphernalia to clothe and accessorize the entire Gator Nation
and then some. Your UFAA membership card can earn you discounts when purchasing Gator
merchandise check www.ufalumni.ufl.edu and click on "Membership" to learn about
benefits.
O It's been honoring 50-year graduates for more than 50 years.
Originally created to honor graduates of UF's parent institutions, the Grand Guard started
honoring 50-year graduates of UF in 1955. The Silver Society, honoring 25-year graduates,
has now joined its ranks. To learn about either program, including upcoming reunions, visit
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu and click "Reunions & Events."
O It has a much larger office.
Formerly located in a small office within the J. Wayne Reitz Union and then in a corner of
the UF Foundation, the UFAA moved three years ago into spacious Emerson Alumni Hall at
1938 W. University Ave., across from Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. Stop by on your next visit to
Gainesville alumni and friends are always welcome.
O It offers far more than tailgating parties.
In fact, the UFAA is offering 100 events in honor of its 100th anniversary.
For details, visit www.connectinggatorsfor100years.com
SIt has almost 100 Gator Clubs worldwide, including one near you.
Founded in the 1920s as county alumni clubs, Gator Clubs soon spread beyond Florida and
around the world. To find out about your local club and its activities, visit
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu and click "Gator Clubs."
To learn more about the UF Alumni Association's anniversary, visit www.connectinggatorsforl00years.com.


266 FLORIDA








GATORTALES


A 0


Patriot
Remembered

By Claude Wilson (BSBA '42)


John Bennett (BSCE '42) and I
were roommates and best of friends
at UF. We lived in Thomas and
Fletcher halls while I studied busi-
ness and John studied engineering.
At UF John was enrolled in the
ROTC program, and upon gradua-
tion he was called to active duty.
He received his basic training at
Camp Belvoir in Virginia. Thereaf-
ter he transferred to flight school
and quickly earned his wings.
It was the start of an extraordi-
nary and colorful military career.
John, a native of Miami who later
received a master's degree in aero-
nautical engineering from Califor-
nia Institute of Technology, proudly
served in the U.S. Air Force for 30
years. His exploits and adventures
were many.


John Bennett


In 1949, for instance, John was
an exchange officer stationed at
RAF West Raynham in Norfolk,
England, flying Meteors and Vam-
pires and teaching his squadron
low-altitude flying at high speeds.
The British government received a
complaint from local farmers, ask-
ing to halt the training because it
was upsetting their chickens. The
letter was posted on the squadron
bulletin board, but the training
continued.
In 1952 John was in the Korean
War, flying missions out of Japan
and Korea. Over Korea enemy anti-
aircraft guns hit his plane and tore
a large hole in his right wing. For-
tunately, the missile did not ex-
plode. With his skillful handling of
the controls, he was able to fly the
damaged aircraft back to a South
Korean air base.
John loved to fly and qualified
as first pilot in an alphabet soup of
airplanes: the F-51, F-80, F-82, F-
89, F-86, F-84, F-100, F-101, F-
104, B-26, B-25, B-17, C-45, C-
47, PT-19, T-6, LP and the Cana-
dian F-100.
One of John's greatest military
successes came in 1958 when he
helped stand down a Communist
threat to Formosa, now known as
Taiwan.
In the summer of 1958 John


was stationed at Hamilton Air
Force Base. He and his wife, Doris,
were on a camping trip at Lake
Shasta in Northern California when
the Chinese Communists an-
nounced they would occupy the
offshore islands of Quemoy and
Matsu in the Formosan Straits.
President Dwight Eisenhower
immediately ordered John's squad-
ron to Formosa as a show of force.
The Lockheed F-104 jets in
John's squadron were crated and
flown to Formosa. He packed his
bag, flew to Formosa and assumed
command of the squadron.
In Formosa John met with that
country's president, Chiang Kai-
shek. John's squadron of jets pa-
trolled the skies over Formosa, but
they were never challenged by the
Communists.
The show of force succeeded. At
the end of three months, the entire
squadron was transferred back to its
home base in San Francisco.
In 1959 John was presented
with a plaque by the officers of the
83' Fighter Interceptor Squadron
for his success in Formosa and for
his squadron's setting th official
altitude and speed records under
his command: the world altitude
record was set at 91,430 feet, while
the world speed record was set at
1,404 mph.


Claude Wilson


In addition to John's many
flying assignments, from 1964 to
1967 he was assigned to the U.S.
NATO headquarters in Paris with
the Defense Advisors Office where
he worked with the representatives
of the NATO countries.
John, who retired as a colonel,
and I maintained our friendship
throughout our lives and careers,
up until the day he died in Colo-
rado Springs, Colo., on April 8,
2004. He was true to his country to
the very end.

Claude Wilson operates Wilson and
Tatham Insurance Inc. and lives in
Miami.


winter 2006 271









Meet the



Coaches

Join your local Gator Club as it welcomes UF football coach
Urban Meyer and several assistant coaches for a series of
Gator Gatherings throughout Florida and parts of the
Southeast. Visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu to learn more or to
check for schedule updates.


Gatherings with Urban Meyer
Date Gator Club
3/13 Capital Area
3/25 Marion County
4/1 Atlanta
4/26 Polk County
4/29 Volusia County
5/1 Manatee/Sarasota
5/2 Tampa/Pinellas
5/3 Central Florida
5/15 Miami
5/16 Broward County
5/17 Palm Beach County
7/29 Jacksonville/Jax Beaches


Each winter a large gathering of sandhill cranes from as far away as Canada flocks to UF's Beef
Teaching Unit on 23rd Terrace in Gainesville. The annual visit, which will last until spring, has caused
the field to be nicknamed "Sandhill Farm."


Location
Tallahassee
Ocala
Atlanta
Lakeland
Daytona
Bradenton/Sarasota
Tampa/St. Petersburg
Orlando
Miami
Fort Lauderdale
Palm Beach
Jacksonville


Gatherings with assistant coaches
Date Gator Club Location
5/11 Lake County Leesburg
5/11 North Florida Lake City
5/12 Northwest Florida Pensacola
5/12 Treasure Coast Fort Pierce
5/18 Big Lake Okeechobee
5/18 Brevard County Melbourne
5/19 Southwest Florida Fort Myers
5/23 Historic St. Augustine St. Augustine
5/26 Hernando/Pasco/Citrus Spring Hill

www.ufalumni.ufl.edu


Coach
Drayton
Hevesy
Heater
Gonzales
Holliday
Strong
Addazio
Mattison
Mullen


FLORIDA
University of Florida Alumni Association
Emerson Alumni Hall
P.O. Box 14425
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425


RECEIVED '5,R 0 1 2006



***t*staECRLOTi*B-010
259-105-7
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University of Florida
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Bainesville FL 32811-7001


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Miami, FL


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