• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Tomb raider
 Balancing act
 The secret of my success
 History's keeper
 Back in the game
 Hitting the bricks
 The great outdoors
 Tail-Gators
 First aide
 The spoke in girl
 Muscle man
 My old school
 So long, old friend














Group Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Title: Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073685/00009
 Material Information
Title: Florida news for alumni and friends of the University of Florida
Uniform Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida National Alumni Association
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Publisher: University of Florida National Alumni Association,
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: Fall 2005
Copyright Date: 2000
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 2000)-
General Note: Title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073685
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 44739131
lccn - 00229084
 Related Items
Preceded by: Focus (University of Florida)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Tomb raider
        Page 4
    Balancing act
        Page 5
    The secret of my success
        Page 6
    History's keeper
        Page 7
    Back in the game
        Page 8
    Hitting the bricks
        Page 9
    The great outdoors
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Tail-Gators
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    First aide
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The spoke in girl
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Muscle man
        Page 22
        Page 23
    My old school
        Page 24
        Page 25
    So long, old friend
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text
RECEIVED :O!V 2 9 2005


news for alumni and friends of




Visit the meet-ups
before the matchups



Former EPA head still
safeguards nature



Meet UF's first lady

UNIVE
( FL .6* -


university of florida


I ,


111

















swammtalk ik


Editor
Cinnamon Bair

Assistant Editors
Liesl O'Dell (BSJ '92)
Meredith Cochie (4JM)

Managing Editor
David Finnerty

Contributing Writers
Jaymi Freiden (BSJ '97)
Michael Gannon (PhD'62)
Kristin Harmel (BSJ '01)
Aaron Hoover (MFAS '02)
Gary Libman
Meredith Jean Morton (4JM)
Steve Orlando (BA '86)
Risa Polansky (4JM)
Janis Owens (BA '83)
Jamison Webb (3JM)

Design
University of Florida
News & Public Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
Alumni Association

Published by
University of Florida
Alumni Association

Randy Talbot (BA '75)
Executive Director

Robert Stern
(BSBA '86, JD'90)
President

Florida is published three times a year and
sent free to all alumni, parents and
friends of the University of Florida.
Opinions expressed in Florida do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors
or official policies of the University of Florida,
the University of Florida Foundation
or the UF Alumni Association.

Editorial Staff
352-846-2818
Fax: 352-392-7676

UF Alumni Association
352-392-1905
888-352-5866

E-mail
Florida@uff.ufl.edu

UF Alumni Association Web address
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu

Copyright 0 2005
Florida is printed on recycled paper
and is recyclable.


Must See TV
Love Florida out here in the
Colorado mountains [where]
we need all the Gator news we
can get. Have a minor com-
plaint about "Top 10 Ways To
Reconnect With UF," specifi-
cally No. 2, "Watch TV" (sum-
mer 2005).
First of all, Sharyl Atkisson
(BETel '82) is a national corre-
spondent for CBS News. I had
the good fortune to work with
her in the West Palm market
and then at WTVT in Tampa.
She's the best.
Also, there are many Gators
producing the television we all
watch, including another pho-
tographer-producer Sheryl and
I worked with, Jim Sutherland
(BA '79) of Atlanta, who won a
Peabody award for investigative
journalism.
Dan Earp (BS 79)
Steamboat Springs, Colo.

Think Outside Florida
Don't get me wrong. I think
Florida is a great state, the
University of Florida is a very
good institution, and I am
proud to be a Gator alumnus.


Your publication, Florida, is a
fine one. But how is UF going
to be one of the top public
universities in the country (a
goal we've been talking about
since I attended school there in
the early '80s) when it seems to
be so insular? The feature sto-
ries in the summer 2005 issue
are all about Florida. With that
kind of outlook, we can remain
the flagship university of
Florida, but I don't think we'll
do more.
Gary Yessin (BA '83)
Altamonte Springs


Puerto Rico is
American Soil

We have been members of the
alumni association for some
time now and have enjoyed
your quality and informative
publication, Florida.
In your summer 2005 issue,
you have the article "Coming
to America" on page 5, about
Reneida Leon. It is a great
article about a young Puerto
Rican woman at UF
We are also from Puerto
Rico and were taken aback by
the reference to Reneida as


being "one of UF's 2,700 inter-
national students." Why would
Reneida be considered interna-
tional when Puerto Rico is a
U.S. territory with U.S.-born
citizens, U.S. currency, U.S
Postal Service, with our men
and women fighting and dying
in U.S.-led wars?
Puerto Rico is not interna-
tional as far as the United
States goes it is a part of the
United States as a common-
wealth. Is this classification as
"international" a geographical
distinction purely for statistics?
If so, are students from Hawaii,
Alaska, Guam, St. Thomas and
the like also considered inter-
national?
By the way, two of our
children are UF graduates and
were never referred to as inter-
national.
Ada Montalvo
San Antonio

Send your letter
to the editor via e-mail at
Florida@uff.ufl.edu,
fax 352-392-7676,
or mail to P.O. Box 14425,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425.
Letters may be edited for length.


It's been a century since UF's Gainesville campus opened with 102 students and two unfinished buildings:
Thomas (foreground) and Buckman halls. The 100th anniversary of campus is one of several anniversaries
that will be celebrated in 2006, including the centennials of the UF Alumni Association, the football program,
Gainesville graduations and the College of Education.


2 FLORIDA


(--,





volume 6 number 2 fall 2005




CON flENTS


ON THE COVER
John Arnold
(BS'01, MPH '03) is
among the legions of
Gator fans who flock to
parking lots on football
Saturday for the
time-honored tradition
of tailgating. We
explore UPs culture of
tailgating on page 12.
PHOTO BY KOR PHOTOGRAPHY


FEATURES

10 .................................................................. The Great Outdoors
Carol Browner (BA '77, JD '79) still safeguards the environment
four years after leaving the EPA.
12 ............................................................................ ... Tail-Gators
Gator fans say football games are as much about grilling as gridirons.
16 ............. ...... ........................................................... First Aide
Being supportive of her patients, her family and now UF -
has been Chris Machen's life's work.

IN EVERY ISSUE

ON CAMPUS NEWS ABOUT CAMPUS, FACULTY AND STUDENTS

4 ................................................................. ............ Tom b Raider
Faculty profile: Archaeology professor Michael Moseley
has risen to the top while digging for the past.
5 ......................... .............................................. ............. Balancing Act
Student profile: Christine Browne-Nuiiez
seeks ways for elephants and Kenyans to coexist peacefully.
6 ........................................................... The Secret of My Success
In the Classroom: Business graduates
share their experiences in speaker series.
........................................................................ .... History's Keeper
Proctor's Purview: The late Samuel Proctor,
university historian, was Mr. Florida History.
S .......................................................................... Back in the Gam e
Sports profile: Volleyball player
Amber McCray says it's her turn to serve.
9 ....................................................................... Hitting the Bricks
How well do you know campus and its surrounding areas?

ALUMNI PROFILES

2 0 ...............................................................The Spoke in W ord
Victor Zue (BSEE '68, MSE '69) helps computers decipher our diction.
2 2 ............................................................................ M uscle M an
Kazu Tomooka (BSESS '98) stretches the bodies and skills -
of the Washington Nationals baseball team.

ALUMNI ALUMNI MEMORIES AND HAPPENINGS

2 4 .......................................................... My Old School
UF alumni share their memories.

GATOR TALES

2 7 ................................................................ So Long, Old Friend
A fellow author remembers professor James Haskins.


news for alumni and friends of
the university of florida


fall 2005 3j


(4 F














on c amnITlls


NEWS


ABOUT CAMPUS,


FACULTY AND


STUDENTS


4 FLORIDA


Tomb Raider


ARCHAEOLOGY PROFESSOR
MICHAEL MOSELEY HAS RISEN
TO THE TOP WHILE DIGGING
FOR THE PAST.
Michael Moseley's office is
deceptive.
The bare shelves, the blank
walls, the mundane 9-to-5 feel of it
- sitting inside it, you wouldn't
think the man who works here has
survived earthquakes, weathered
the raging storms of El Nifio, scaled
mountains in the jungles of the
Andes and uncovered the remains
of civilizations long forgotten.
But for 30 years, Moseley has
done just that.


"I'm an archaeologist," Moseley
says. "I play in the sandbox."
A UF professor since 1984 and
current interim chair of the Depart-
ment of Anthropology, which en-
compasses archaeology, Moseley's
frequent forays into the "sandbox"
of South America have brought
him a reputation as one of the
world's top archaeologists.
He attributes part of this success
to his willingness to go against the
popular trends of contemporary
archaeology.
"I generally try to do the type of
research that no one else is doing at
the time," Moseley says. "If every-
one else is doing tombs, I'll do
canals."
Going against the
grain has resulted in
hugely influential
discoveries by
Moseley regarding
the weather system El
Nifio, the importance
of marine resources
in ancient civiliza-
tions in Peru and,
more recently, the
Presence of ritual
drinking halls at
Cerro BaWil, a
mountaintop com-
pound that predates
the Incas.
Built on a mesa
that towers more
than 8,000 feet over
the Peruvian land-
scape, Cerro Bail
and its breweries
served as a rendez-
vous point for the


rival nations of the Wari and the
Tiwanaku, he says. Moseley first
visited the ruins in 1993.
Archaeobiologist Bruce Smith of
the Smithsonian Institute calls
Moseley's findings at Cerro Bail
extremely important. His discover-
ies there are helping archeologists
understand the role of ceremonies
in fostering relationships between
neighboring communities, Smith
says, adding that Moseley's work "is
very highly regarded within the
discipline of archaeology."
Moseley has enjoyed several
honors for his achievements in
archaeology. In 2000 he was elected
to the National Academy of
Sciences, and in August 2003 he
was named a UF distinguished
professor.
It hasn't all been glory, however.
"There are times when you
stumble into things you wish you
hadn't," Moseley says.
He recounts the hostility of a
drunken funeral procession march-
ing down a jungle road in Bolivia,
or how he and his colleagues were
chased by stone-throwing Aymara
villagers, angered when they
wrongly thought they were being
photographed.
Such unpredictability does noth-
ing to deter Moseley from continu-
ing to work in archaeology.
"It's pretty much a lortery," he
says of the science. "You can't be
sure what you're going to get."
Moseley does offer a word of
advice, though.
"Watch out for those Aymaras."
-Jamison Webb (3JM)


micnael Moseley


- -Re -




r W


Muse trol


Stitch by Stitch
Do you quilt? The Florida Museum of Natural History
and the Quilters of Alachua County Day Guild invite
you to participate in an exhibition next summer. The
quilt exhibition will illustrate the natural history of the
state of Florida.
Quilts must
represent
Florida's natural
flora, fauna and
environment
www.flmnh.ul.edu


Voil ..
The Samuel P. Har .
Museum of Art debuted
its new Mary Ann Harn
= Cofrin Pavilion this fall with
an art exhibition, "American
Matrix: Contemporary Directions for the Ham
Museum Collection." The exhibition, which continues
until October 2006, includes "Ode a I'Oubli," a Louise
Bourgeois hand-sewn cloth.
www.harn.ufl.edu


____ON CAMPUS


BalancingAct


CHRISTINE BROWNE-NUNEZ
SEEKS WAYS FOR ELEPHANTS
AND KENYANS TO COEXIST
PEACEFULLY.


Amid lions, hippos and elephants
near Mount Kilimanjaro. Christine
Browne-Nunez works on her
doctorate.
A Fulbright scholar, she sees daily
how people and elephants struggle
to share resources outside Amboseli
National Park along the Kenya-
Tanzania border in Africa. She hopes
her research will offer elephant Christine Browne-Nufiez
management options for the resi-
dents around Amboseli
"Elephant conservation management is a ery political issue," says Bro% wne-Nune,. who is
seeking her doctorate in wildlife ecology and conservation from UF's College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences. "There is a continuum of people ranging from strict protectionists to those who
want elephants completely eliminated."
Her passion for both conservation and culture has driven Browne-Nuncz's personal and
professional life.
Browne-Nuiez. a former Nlissouri schoolteacher, started working with elephants in the
mid-1990s. A volunteer for Teachers for Africa. she worked at an elephant orphanage in
Nairobi, Kenya. here she saw victimized elephants firsthand.
Her experience in Africa encouraged her to pursue a master's degree in human dimensions
of wildlife management at Colorado State Universin. She also worked with the Social, Eco-
nomic, and Institutional Analysis Section of the U.S. Geological Survey, which sparked her
interest in human-wildlife conflicts. That interest led her to UF in 2001 and Kenya in [uly
2004 to pursue her doctorate.
While her doctoral adviser, Susan Jacobson. was aways on sabbatical, Browne-Nufine taught
her Human Dimensions of Natural Resource and Conservation class.
"The students loved her,' says lacobson, a professor in wildlife ecology and conservation.
"She has so much to bring to the table with her experiences in Kenya before she came here.
She was able to put together a great dissertation topic ... it was so timely and important.
Browne-Nunez has learned to speak Swahili and Nlaa and fondly recalls drinking tea inside
the traditional mud-dung homes of the Nlaasai. the primary ethnic group in the area. She also
met her husband. Richard, in Kenya in 1996 while they both served as volunteer teachers.
"We have enjoyed our time in Kenya a great deal and have many fond memories also a
few that aren't so fond, like suffering from amoebic dysentery and parasitic infections." she
says. "''e have made many friends, enjoyed delicious food and explored beautiful places."
She sees her project and time in Kenya as a way to reach both personal and professional goals
"From a professional standpoint, it will make a contribution to the academic arena, conser-
\ation efforts and cross-cultural understanding," she says. "From a personal perspective, work-
ing in Kenya swill fulfill my aspiration to combine my appreciation of culture and the natural
world and to further my pursuit of'building bridges."'
R?.'a Polinsh. (4/M)


fall 2005








ON CAMPUS


Gator Bytes

http//news.ufl.edu/- Get up-to-
date UF news briefs, a featured
snapshot of campus, upcoming
events and more.


http://gatonzone.commnulimedia -
Can't make it to a football game this
year? Get your Gators fix by listen-
ing to the 2-Bits cheer, the march-
ing band play "Go, Gators," coach
commentaries and more.


www.ufbands.ufl.edu/cd.html -
Browse and even order UF band
albums. The UF Band Department's
latest release is "The Art of the
Serenade," featuring the American
Chamber Winds.


http//creatures.ifas.ufl.edu-
Learn about Florida insects, nema-
todes, arachnids and other organ-
isms at this in-depth Web site cre-
ated for agriculture and pest con-
trol professionals.


http//web.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/
promotion/ssaversherbs.htm -
Are you a plant lover? Download
screensavers of vivid plant and
flower images gathered in UF's
Herbariam Specimen Collection.


www.upf.com/index.shtml See
the latest books released by the
University Press of Florida, the
State University System's scholarly
publishing arm.

6 FLORIDA


In the

Classroom




The Secret of My Success


BUSINESS GRADUATES SHARE
THEIR EXPERIENCES IN
SPEAKER SERIES.
It's one thing to sit in a far-away
classroom and talk about the inner
workings of a financial center such
as New York City.
Now a group of alumni and
other professionals are bringing
home the reality.
Throughout this year about a
dozen businesspeople from across
the country nearly all of them
alumni will return to campus to
share their experiences with
Warrington College of Business
finance students as part of the
Finance Professional Speaker Series.
They will take students beyond
books to better understand what's
really going on in finance.
"I felt there were lots of smart
students taking good finance
courses at UF, but the students
were under-placed when they
graduated," says David Brown,
director of UF's Hough Program in
Finance. "The series helps students
learn about a wide range of oppor-
tunities and leverages what they
learn in the classroom."
The series, which was founded
in 2001, is about far more than
lectures. It takes students and pro-
fessionals outside the classroom to


signal mentors.,
UF students are not exposed
CUS AT I1, BUT TiH















to opprtuitis atW large global








discuss trends. Often speakers
spend an entire day with stu-
dents, having lunch and even
offering their services as profes-
sional mentors.
UF students are not exposed
to opportunities at large global
investment banks as frequently as
students who attend universities


near those financial centers, says
Randy Appleyard (BSBA '82),
director of Citigroup Global Mar-
kets in New York and a 2004 series
participant. By bringing profession-
als to Gainesville to discuss their
own experiences and careers, the
series helps fill that gap.
The talks are not limited to
finance students. They are often
widely attended by students
throughout the business school.
Alex Combs (BSBA '04, MSF
'05), an analyst with Bear Stearns,
says he gained great insight when
he attended the series as a student.
"I always felt there was a discon-
nection between the knowledge
gained in classrooms and the
knowledge actually used in the
workplace on a day-to-day basis,"
Combs says. "It was interesting and
helpful to learn about the work I
would actually be doing in the
career path I chose."
This year's speaker series started
in September and will host speakers
as many as four times a month
through February. The series is
supported by the James G.
Richardson Endowment and the
William R. Hough Program in
Finance.
To learn more about the series
and this year's scheduled speakers,
visit www.cba.ufl.edu/msf.
Meredith Cochie (4JM)








ON CAMPUS


Proctor's Purview


History's Keeper
UNIVERSITY HISTORIAN SAMUEL PROCTOR WAS MR, FLORIDA HISTORY.


To those who, over the years, have
enjoyed in these pages the essays of
professor Samuel Proctor (BA '41,
MA '42, PhD '58) abour the
people, periods and events that
have shaped the history of the
University of Florida, it will come
as sad news to learn of his death on
July 10, 2005, following an ex-
tended illness. He was 86 years old.
Born in Jacksonville on March
29, 1919, Proctor was the eldest of
Jack and Celia Proctor's six sons.
He entered UF as a freshman in
1937 and earned bachelor's and
master's degrees in history in 1941
and 1942. During the Second
World War he served in the U.S.
Army at Camp Blanding near
Starke. Returning to UF in 1946,
he began a teaching career that
lasted 50 years. His specialty areas
were the history of Florida and the
history of the South. By his retire-
ment in 1996, he was known affec-
tionately to colleagues, friends and
admirers throughout the state as
Mr. Florida History.
Early in Proctor's career UF


By Michael Gannon (PhD '62)

President J. Hillis Miller appointed
him the university's first official in-
house historian and archivist. In
those capacities he produced the
first history ofthe institution,
which, presented as a dissertation,
won him a doctorate in 1958.
Thirty years later he published his
now classic study: "Gator History:
A Pictorial History of the Univer-
sity of Florida."
As a historian of Florida and the
South, Proctor distinguished him-
self in numerous ways. Author or
editor of six books, he became best
known in publishing for his 30
years as editor of The Florida His-
torical Quarterly, which he raised to
the top rank of stare historical
journals. Under his leadership a
whole generation of Florida histori-
ans gained the nation's notice.
Proctor was co-founder of the
Center for Latin American Studies,
the Center for Jewish Studies, the
Center for Florida Studies, the
Center for the Study of Southeast-
ern Indians, the Spain-Florida
Alliance and the Southern Jewish
Historical Society.


One of his most successful ac-
complishments was the creation in
1967 of the oral history program,
now named for him. The collection
contains 4,000 taped interviews
with Floridians from every walk of
life politicians, business leaders,
civil rights activists, Seminole Indi-
ans, teachers and others. More than
3,300 of the interviews were con-
ducted by Proctor himself.
Not only was he a prominent
member of the scholarly community
at UF, but he also engaged in practi-
cal brick-and-mortar activities. A
leader in historic preservation, he
worked to save the oldest buildings
of the central campus. Another
visible sign of his loving attention to
UF's academic architecture are the
bronze plaques that everywhere mark
and describe UF's oldest and most
significant buildings.
During his career Proctor re-
ceived numerous awards and dis-
tinctions, including the titles distin-
guished service professor of history,
Julian C. Yonge Professor of Florida
History and university historian. In
1998 he was chosen one of the "50
most important Floridians of the
20th century" by The Ledger in
Lakeland. And in July 2004 UF
President Bernie Machen awarded
him an honorary doctorate of pub-
lic service.
Above all, Proctor's colleagues
and friends will remember his fine
personal qualities his devotion
to students, his never failing con-
sideration ofothers, his sunny
disposition and kindly wit. During
the 1990s Proctor and I co-directed
UF's Spain-Florida Alliance, which
made possible faculty and graduate
student exchanges with Spanish
universities. We made numerous
trips together to Spain, in the
course of which I learned another
of Proctor's fine attributes: he could
cajole, charm and amuse any Span-
ish audience without speaking a
word of their language.
It is hard to say goodbye to Sam
Proctor.

Michael Gannon (PhD '62) is a UF
professor emeritus ofhistory and a
longtime colleague ofSamuel Proctor


Kudos
Associate professor of small ani-
mal internal medicine Julie Levy
was named Outstanding Woman
Veterinarian for 2005 by the Asso-
ciation for Women Veterinarians.
Dr. Marco Pahor, an internation-
ally known authority on aging, will
lead UF efforts to improve the
health of older Americans as
chairman of the College of
SMedicine's Department of Aging
and Geriatric Research. Win
Phillips, vice president for re-
search, was appointed to a three
year term to the Committee on the
National Medal of Science, the
nation's highest scientific honor.
The National Endowment for the
Humanities awarded Trysh Travis,
assistant professor of women's
studies, a 12-month fellowship
worth $40,000. Sandra Wilson,
associate professor of environ-
mental horticulture, received the
Teacher Fellow Award from the
North American Colleges and
Teachers of Agriculture. E.T. York,
chancellor emeritus of Florida's
State University System, received
the 2004 Service to American and
World Agriculture Award from the
National Association of County
Agricultural Agents. His former
graduate student, John Bellow
(MS '00, PhD '04), was selected to
receive the Outstanding Doctoral
Research Award at the 12th
IUFRO World Congress in
Brisbane, Australia.


Samuel Proctor


fall 2005 7 T









ON CAMPUS


Florida Facts
Did You Know:

* IN CASE OF EMERGENCY: Of the
21 trauma centers statewide,
only seven have earned Level 1
certification, the highest pos-
sible. Shands at UF won the title
this summer joiningg Shands at
Jacksonville on the list), making
it a primary destination for the
critically injured in North Central
Florida.

* TAG, YOU'RE IT: Since it was
introduced in 1987, UF's specialty
license plate has been one of the
most popular in Florida -
ranking just behind the Florida
panther and dolphin tags, but
well above all other Florida
schools. Almost 292,000 of the
plates have been sold, raising
more than $25 million to benefit
scholarships and academic
advancement at UF.

* FIRST AND GOAL: A former
halfback at Vanderbilt University,
John Tigert maintained a strong
interest in football throughout his
career, including his 19 years as
UF president. His work to create
an athletics grant-in-aid pro-
gram, revise the college football
rulebook and help found the
Southeastern Conference earned
him honors in the College Foot-
ball Hall of Fame in 1970.

* STRIKE UP THE BAND: The UF
Wind Symphony was one of only
14 bands and two from the
United States selected to
perform at the World Association
of Symphonic Bands and
Ensembles' 12" International
Conference in Singapore this
summer.


AFT
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McCray's ump about UF and volle all

higher than (BSR '02), a 1998-2002.:
when she Gator volleyball player.
came in as a "If it hadn't been for vol-
Sfreshman. leyball, I definitely would no
"Her knee be at UF; I would have staved
injury was so se- in T"as closer to my fami y,"
vere; a lot of ath- McCray says. "But volleyball has
leres don't come taken me to places I never dreamed
back from thai," of going, and it's exciting to see
Wise says. where it will take me next.
McCray, 20, says Meredith jean Morton (4]M)
since she was intro-
duced to the sport at age
7, volleyball has been her
life. Having to sir on the
RASEASON ON TH E bench for an entire season
ER A SEASON ON TE was difficult.
EUNES, VOLLEYBALL While injured, McCray bad
YER AMBER MCCRAY the opportunity to learn from
S S ER TUN TO watching all aspects of the game
from the sidelines.
VE. "I wanted to be out there play-
en a knee injuy sidelined Amber ing, and. wanted to contribute to
ray during the spring 2004 off- my team," McCray says. "But by
:rat during the spring 2004 off- SIg arned-so
n, the Garor volleyball player tiere watching, s learned .
gh she was going our in the tmch, iecially how I could best
gosewsoino intiribufe as a player whe. got
e of her college career. ck

..'a" ..e s . .. .o .. .;.. .e ..c I X .. .
oter extensive rehabilitation

ever, McCray is back, as a red- a se dmroher: he r
sophomore, making :up for. ai.itiin her by her"i


It's so amazing to be playing i i i tarte. M a
n,"says the,Texas native, w ho -l tball while attend
e c r h o Juki Junior. College in Texas taught her
tew career highs for kills in the ,:.. -
about sports and team coripetatono
two games of the season. -I. .. *
ators bead.volleyball coach '- aaJo alisma: i
ts itsg"rt" o3 n m t;.gw"s '. .
y Wise confirms McCray's:"" s" "aeU .' ..' ''
back, adding that McCray i.i :':.t t
ked had with het trainers nd % N '
ugh rehabilitation Shesayso. 2 f1 sr : n, -.isn: Am : M. .a1 .
,s ; ':,, .. ...? ., ..


SFLORIDA


































Hitting


the


UF is more than a win-
dow into learning and
culture. Some of the
windows on and around
campus are art unto
themselves. Study these
"high glass" examples and
see whether you can
match them to their
perches. Check your
answers on page 24.




Bricks


ON CAMPUS


Campus

notes

COMING HOME: Longtime Florida
politician Bob Graham (BA'59) is
now more than a UF alumnus. He's
joining UF's faculty. The former
governor and U.S. senator is
working with the College of Lib-
eral Arts and Sciences to estab-
lish the Bob Graham Center for
Public Service. Graham plans to
lecture and teach at both the UF
center, scheduled to open in 2006,
and a similar center in Miami.

NATIONAL PRIDE: Everyone with
a tie to UF is a Gator. All of us
together form the Gator Nation.
That's the theme behind the
university's new marketing cam-
paign that debuted this fall. The
campaign, which kicked off with a
flurry of television and print adver-
tising, is intended to highlight UF's
accomplishments as "The Foun-
dation for The Gator Nation." To
see the new ads, visit
www.urel.ufl.edu/ufcn/gatornation
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
The Foundation for The Gator Nation.

MADE IN CHINA: The UF Center
for International Studies in Beijing
opened this summer, joining a
growing number of U.S. universi-
ties tapping into economically
booming China.

For the latest UF news, visit http//
news.ufl.edu.


fall 2005
























The Great Outdoors
CAROL BROWNER CONTINUES TO SAFEGUARD THE
ENVIRONMENT FOUR YEARS AFTER LEAVING THE EPA.
KRISTIN HARMEL (BSJ '01)
10 FLORIDA









AROL BROWNER (BA '77, JD '79)
GREW UP LOVING THE OUTDOORS.
SHE ALSO DEVELOPED A DEEP
SENSE OF CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY THAT INFLU-
ENCED EVERY AREA OF HER LIFE.
"I knew it was important to give something
back, whether it be to your community, to your
university, to your church or to a program that
helps people," she explains. "I chose a life of
public service."
Browner has made waves, set precedents and
shaped policy that will affect generations to come,
first as secretary of Florida's Department of Envi-
ronmental Regulation and then as the longest-
serving administrator of the national Environ-
mental Protection Agency, where she spent eight
years as a member of President Bill Clinton's
Cabinet.
"When I was young, I was interested in two
things," she says. "I was interested in being a
lawyer because I wanted to be an advocate, and I
was interested in making communities and places
better. I believed I could change the world."
As administrator of the EPA, she oversaw
18,000 people, made it through the cutbacks
urged by then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich and
made major changes to the agency.
"We grew the budget while I was there," she
says. "We set the toughest air pollution standards
in history. We cleaned up more toxic waste sites
than had ever been cleaned up before, and we
really changed the decision-making process of the
agency.
"At every point in the process, it was an
honor," she says. "It was awe-inspiring to make
our country better every day."

Starting Out
After graduating from Southwest Miami Se-
nior High, Browner began working at a law firm
for $100 a week, enough to put her through her
first two years of school at Miami-Dade Commu-
nity College. By the time she was ready to move
on to UF, she had saved enough to concentrate on
her studies.
She also worked part-time at the law school's
Center for Governmental Responsibility, founded
just a few years earlier by former Florida Speaker
of the House Jon Mills (JD '72).
"I encouraged her to go to law school," says
Mills, who hired Browner as a secretary but saw
something special in the dedicated student.
Browner took Mills' advice and went straight
through to law school with plans to become a
civil rights lawyer.
By the time she graduated, however, the envi-
ronment had become a growing passion. She


moved to Tallahassee and began working in
politics.
She was assigned to a committee where she
helped formulate state land acquisition laws for
environmentally sensitive land. Then she got her
political feet wet by working on state legislator
George Sheldon's unsuccessful campaign for Con-
gress. She soon followed her environmental in-
stincts to Washington where she worked with
nonprofit groups on Superfund, the nation's toxic
waste cleanup law.
To learn the legislative process, Browner de-
cided to work for then-Sen. Lawton Chiles



I1 HAD A BELIEF THAT

I SHOULD DO THINGS

I COULD GIVE 110

PERCENT TO AND BE

COMMITTED TO AND

BELIEVE IN. YOU WILL BE

SUCCESSFUL IF YOU

CHOOSE JOBS THAT

CHALLENGE YOU AND

ALLOW YOU TO DO

YOUR BEST."



(BSBA '52, JD '55). Once he retired, Browner
became Al Gore's legislative director in 1989.
In 1990 Chiles became governor of Florida,
and Browner returned at his invitation to become
Floridas Secretary of the Environment a year
later. When Gore was elected vice president in
1992, Browner's long environmental track record
earned the attention of President-elect Clinton,
who was looking for an Environmental Protection
Agency administrator for his Cabinet.
"I got a call to come to Little Rock to inter-
view with the president-elect the night before
Thanksgiving. He was putting together a whole
Cabinet, and he was interested in me," she says.
Clinton announced his first nominations for
the Cabinet his economic team just after
Thanksgiving that year.
"The New York Times called the first round the
'had-to's,'" Browner says. "I was in the second
round of nominations, and the limes called us the


'wanted-to's.' He chose people for the domestic
social issues that really represented his beliefs."
Browner became the second woman to head
the EPA and the first EPA administrator to sit on
a president's Cabinet.
"I actually have my Cabinet chair, which we
bought when it was all over," she says. "As hard as
the work was and as trying as some of the years
could be, especially during the Gingrich years
when we were shut down several times, it was
amazing."
Browner took the toughest action in a genera-
tion to safeguard public health with updated
standards for soot and smog. Every year, the new
standards will prevent 350,000 cases of aggravated
asthma, nearly a million cases of significantly
decreased lung function in children and approxi-
mately 15,000 premature deaths, according to the
EPA. She also took action to help prevent global
warming and protect the country's drinking wa-
ter. She helped protect the natural resources in her
own state by launching an effort to restore the
Everglades, and she increased cleanup of toxic
waste.
"As EPA administrator, Carol proved a dedi-
cated public servant and a strong advocate for
protecting our environment," says Madeline
Albright, former secretary of state during the
Clinton administration and now Browner's busi-
ness associate. "I've always been struck by Carol's
undying commitment to public service and ensur-
ing that the environment doesn't adversely affect
the health of children for generations to come."
Although Browner's term ended when Clinton
left office in 2001, she has stayed involved in
politics. She serves on the board of the National
Audubon Society and remains an outspoken
defender of the environment. She does much of
her environmental work these days through the
Albright Group, a firm Browner and Albright
established to help foster private and government
partnerships worldwide.
In her spare time, Browner, who lives near
Washington, D.C., enjoys being outside in the
environment she's helped to protect. She likes
hiking, biking, gardening and yoga, and she en-
joys spending time with her family son,
Zachary, and husband, Michael Podhorzer.
Browner says her time in Gainesville helped
shape her life and career. She remains involved
with the College of Law and even taught a
seminar for it recently in Costa Rica.
"People always ask me, 'What was your career
plan to get to be a Cabinet member?" she says. "I
didn't have one. I had a belief that I should do
things I could give 110 percent to and be com-
mitted to and believe in. You will be successful if
you choose jobs that challenge you and allow you
to do your best." -w


fall 2005 11









- 7~ ~1


T'


Lz I


12 FLORIDA


A


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ikiii I i


01)
"O 1
3 G"


r


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'011
































FOOTBALL GAMES ARE AS MUCH ABOUT GRILLING AS GRIDIRONS FOR GATOR FANS


BHE FOUR MEN LOUNGED UNDER THE AWNING OF THEIR HUGE
RV, WATCHING FOOTBALL ON A FLAT-SCREEN TV AS THE GIANT
INFLATABLE ALBERT NEXT DOOR LOOKED ON.
ALTHOUGH THE FOURSOME SPORTED ALL THE ACCOUTERMENTS OF
EXPERIENCED TAILGATERS GATOR LOGO FOLDING CHAIRS, GATOR LOGO
WELCOME MAT, COOLER FILLED WITH DRINKS, FLORIDA SHIRTS AND CAPS -
THEIR SHOWING IN TUSCALOOSA, ALA., WAS A SIMPLER AFFAIR THAN USUAL.
WHETHER AT HOME OR ON THE ROAD, THEY NORMALLY HOST A COOKOUT
FOR ABOUT 20 PEOPLE, BUT THIS TIME IT WAS JUST A SMATTERING OF
CHAIRS, A FEW SANDWICHES AND A LOT OF MALE BONDING.

"One game a year it's men only we leave our wives at home," says Daniel
Crapps (BSBA '73) of Lake City, who attended the Alabama game with his son
Josh (JD '04), his brother James (BSBA '73) and his nephew Evan (3Ag).
"This is it. We watch the other college games, eat hot dogs and sandwiches.
We have a good time."
The vignette at the Crapps' RV was one in a sea of Gator-clad motor homes
outside Bryant-Denny Stadium this fall. It's a scene repeated every Saturday
throughout the football season as the Gator Nation, home and away, gathers to
tailgate.


At UF tailgating is a way of life. Often starting on Friday night and lasting
throughout the weekend, Gators flock to every available parking lot within a
few miles of the game to celebrate their team and university.
But it's about much more than the game, tailgaters say. The pre-game and
post-game parties allow them to network with clients, dine on delicious dishes,
spend time with family, catch up with old friends and make new ones.
"My personal philosophy is that family and friends are the most valuable
things in the world," says Gordon "Stumpy" Harris (BA '61, JD '65), a Gator
die-hard whose fleet of orange-and-blue vehicles has transformed tailgating
into an art. "That's what it's all about. Tailgating is such a neat way to spend
time with family and friends."
Tailgating has long been part of the culture of UF.
Michael Gannon (PhD '62), a retired UF history professor, remembers
seeing football tailgating for the first time when he arrived in Gainesville in
1959 as a doctoral student.
"It wasn't as big as it is today," Gannon says. "There were no RVs, no tents.
People just very casually ate and drank out of the trunks of their cars. Back
then, you could take liquor into the stadium, so there was no point in waiting
in the car."
Gannon can't put his finger on a specific moment when tailgating went
from the simple to the extreme. It just seemed to grow incrementally
"There was a growing excitement about the games," he says. "It showed in
intensity with more people wearing orange and blue, more tailgating, more
signs and Spurrier. It continued unabated through Zook and will continue
with Urban Meyer."


BY JAYMI FREIDEN (BSJ '97)

fanl 20 5



















"TAILGATING IS SUCH A NEAT WAY
TO SPEND TIME WITH
FAMILY AND FRIENDS."
-STUMPY HARRIS


Anyone who's been to Gainesville on a football
Saturday knows what Gannon is talking about.
The tailgate parties engulf the campus and spill
over into nearby neighborhoods. They can be as
simple as opening the back of an SUV, setting up
a few folding chairs and munching on a bucket of
chicken from the grocery store. Or they can be
extravagant, held in fancy RVs with satellite
hookups and chefs to prepare the tailgating feast.
Then there's Harris, an Orlando attorney who
has elevated tailgating to another level altogether.
He doesn't mind the hard work that goes into his
elaborate tailgating setup for him, it's a small
price to pay for all that UF has given him.
"I think [the reason I tailgate] stems from
being grateful for having the opportunity to go to
school at UF," he says. "I can attribute a signifi-
cant portion of my happiness and well-being to
my education."
Harris prefers to drive his orange and blue MG
on football weekends, but if the weather doesn't
hold up, he has plenty of backup vehicles in his
Gator-styled "fleet." There's the conversion van
that features a TV and satellite dish. There's also a
Ford F350 pickup truck. Harris used to have a
1976 RV nicknamed "The Motherlode." He
couldn't bring himself to sell it, so
he donated it to the athletics
department to be auctioned off.
"They tease me about getting
an airplane," Harris
laughs. "But I don't think
I'm going to do that."
On the Friday before a
game day, the tailgating opera-
tion moves into full swing. Harris'
son drives to Gainesville in the van
while Harris drives the truck. On
Saturday the Harris contingent
arrives at the Stephen C.


Some fans have turned tailgating into a sport of its own. For instance, Randall White, executive chef at the
Ocala Hilton hotel, competed in a cook-off against a neighboring UF tailgater this fall.


O'Connell Center about four hours before kickoff
to set up. Because they're not much for cooking,
they'll typically have their food catered or bring
pre-made dishes. Harris has five parking spaces to
accommodate the number of guests who stop by.
On a busy day, he may entertain up to 250 family
members, friends and business associates.
"I laughingly call it the high social season,"
Harris says.
Bill and Nancy Christian, who have been
tailgating since 1966, also enjoy the camaraderie
of a football Saturday, albeit on a much smaller
scale than Harris. But that doesn't make them any
less faithful to their team. They've missed few
games over the past 29 years.
The Christians, both retired UF staff, staked


out their tailgating spot outside the UF Alumni
Association office 29 years ago. They used to have
an RV, but it became too much to handle, so they
decided to scale down their tailgating operations.
Nowadays, the Christians, along with Nancy's
sister, begin their tailgating around 6:30 a.m.,
sitting in the car doing craft projects, listening to
sports talk radio and reading the paper. Then they
eat lunch and enjoy people watching.
"We visit with all the people who go by,"
Nancy Christian says. "Whether they're for our
team or the opposing team, we welcome them to
the Swamp."
The Christians tailgate for one simple reason:
"We do it because we love the Gators," she
says. "There's no other explanation."


14 FLORIDA


















For Chris McCoun (BSBA '74) the reason
goes a little deeper. His father-in-law, Fred
Montsdeoca (BSPEH '51), was a Gators football
and baseball player, so Gator sports have always
been about family.
"It was a way of life to go to the Gator games,"
says McCoun, who has been tailgating for 31
years. "If we weren't there, something bad had to
have happened."
Montsdeoca felt the same way about Gator
football, even after something bad did hap-
pen. In the late 1970s, Montsdeoca had a
heart transplant, which made it too difficult
for him to get to his row-71 seats in the sta-
dium, McCoun says. But his father-in-law
didn't want to be left out of the magic of a foot-
ball gameday, so he devised his own plan to be
part of the action. Instead of crossing the street
from the O'Connell Center to the stadium at
game time, Montsdeoca would stay in the family's
RV and listen to the games on the radio. In later
years, he watched on satellite TV.
Montsdeoca died in 2003. Up until the week
before he passed away, he was making arrange-
ments so his family could still enjoy Gator foot-
ball games.
"He wanted to make sure I had the parking
passes," McCoun says.
McCoun knows how much his father-in-law
treasured those football Saturdays even when he
couldn't attend the games in person.
"Every Saturday he was in the motor home,
and people would come and see him," McCoun


\ says. "He did that to see
his friends."
When it comes right
down to it, that desire for
community is what drives railgaters
to arrive early and leave late, the Florida fans say.
"Make no mistake, the magnet is to watch the
Gators play football," says Jim Kimbrough (BSA
'61). "But a close peripheral part has become the
fun associated with friends, neighbors and cus-
tomers gathering for good food and fellowship in
the process of yelling, 'Go, Gators!'" ---


Don't feel hke dragging your grill to a game? The
UFAlumni Association hosts Gator Nation Tailgate
parties three hours before every game home or
away. Admission is freefor alumni association mem-
bers, $10 for guests and non-members. To learn
more, visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu.


Tailgating is not just for alumni. Many Students, including the UF men's water polo team, host parties or
roam among the revelers.


Gator Bites

Lking fi: new idearto w the ilgating
throng? Thee two dishes, provided by the
Flo da oat Lie club, r qui to pre an .
.\i:.( I:1'. : W^.-. i:; *..~,,1.-. :




1 (18 o c.) jar barbecue sa




'.it m.brce saue, garlic ande a





..*. .. . p .e .





l1 1 :upsgaarp n cracker cumbs
.. p.lte.. 4 mi te .o . .






cups l a co-u. : : .












1 (14 oz.) can sweetened condensed milk.

Melt the buein a 9 3-inch ba in.. : ,an, .
Sprinkle the gralc. .'bs. in the pan .."
Top witb.h chpocol sjsrbnteraot. chips,
-coconi.t ad p.ca ..do. gently. ..... .. .e
.for25 to 3. : minvi or ..til t. c l for 10".
nmint..es Cainto. suar
...E ..










: ' .' .'; ." .'.i '::i { :' *':':.'' ;.'. : ..;"* '*.''.. *'. f -. .'.: '. .. .. ? ." .'.,' . .;*'
P7,/i Joumnw'g
.

R.-
l'/, pS : bu: .:.:::......... .. . :. : .a...
00: : ::::: i:


fall 2005 115










































"FROM HER POSITION AS FIRST LADY,

SHE GETS TO SEE MANY ASPECTS OF

UF, AND SHE HAS THE ABILITY TO GET

PEOPLE WORKING TOGETHER WHO

OTHERWISE MIGHT NOT DO IT."

BERNIE MACHEN


Fir-st de


FOR THE PRESIDENTS WIFE, BEING SUPPORTIVE OF HER PATIENTS,
HER FAMILY AND NOW UF HAS BEEN HER UFE'S WORK.




OF THE THOUSANDS OF CHILDREN CHRIS MACHEN CARED FOR DURING HER 28-YEAR
NURSING CAREER, ONE OF HER FIRST PATIENTS REMAINS IN HER MEMORY TO THIS DAY.


Machen was working at Cardinal Glennon Memorial Hospital for Children in St. Louis and had been a
nurse barely a year when a newborn came under her care. The boy was ill but improving. Then Machen
came in for her shift one evening and learned the infant to whom she had become so attached had died less
than an hour earlier.
"I was just devastated," she says. "The mother was there ... the baby was still there. I started crying, and
I remember after it was all over, I went to the head nurse and I said, 'I'm so sorry. I lost control.' She was
terrific. She said, 'What better gift could you give to that mom than to show her how you felt about her
baby?' She said, 'Don't ever stop those things.'"
"I've never forgotten that. I thought, 'You know, you just cry along with them.'"
Machen, 59, hung up her white hat nearly 10 years ago. Today, her title reflects a life that is different in
nearly ever)' way imaginable: first lady of the University of Florida.
These days, she and husband Bernie Machen's time and tight schedules are filled with appointments,
social engagements, endless e-mail, cell phone calls and travel.
And yet her nursing roots are as strong as ever. In April Machen spoke at UF's College of Nursing com-
mencement where she told the newly minted class to "remember your patients are part of a family, for
better or for worse. As much as possible, you should reach out to them. It will almost always improve your
outcome."
She's also involved in health-related community activities such as Healthy Gator 2010, part of the na-
tionwide Healthy Campus 2010 initiative that encourages students, faculty and staff to do what's good for
them. Healthy Gator is tentatively scheduled to kick off this fall.
It's that kind of genuine enthusiasm and easy warmth that continues to amaze Bernie Machen.
"She is a 'connector' and has the talent of bringing disparate people and groups together," he says.


BY STEVE ORLANDO (BA '86)
16 FLORIDA












































































is macnen ana ner w4-year-ola Appaloosa, Lippy.


fall 2005 17










"From her position as first lady, she gets to see
many aspects of UF, and she has the ability to get
people working together who otherwise might
not do it."

Cowboys and Indians
Born and raised in St. Louis, Machen was the
second daughter of Frank and Lois Ackerman.
"I had an older sister and a younger sister. I
was in the middle. Keep everybody happy and
referee and all that," she says.
Lois Ackerman was a homemaker who loved
golf. Frank Ackerman owned a pair of gift shops,
Ackerman's Bits of the World, which catered to
people with a taste for what lay beyond Missouri's
rural bounds. To a certain degree the merchandise
reflected his own personality. He left home at a
young age, hopped a freighter in New York City
and spent a year in Norway traveling on a motor-
cycle.
"My dad always wanted to be a cowboy,"
Machen says. "That's where I got my love of the
West. I love cowboys and Indians ... and horses
and mountains."
The Ackermans' neighborhood was an idyllic
one: nine or 10 houses on an unpaved country
lane where neighbors would gather for holiday
cookouts and watch the kids play hopscotch and
jump rope.
"We were outdoors all the time," she says.
"We were in the snow; we were in the heat."
Unlike so many people who are young adults
before they figure out what they want to be when
they grow up, Machen knew by the time she was
12. Her grandmother, Hellen Kissel "Nana" to
Machen helped her land her first job, selling
snacks in the hospital gift shop. Machen then
became a hospital volunteer in those days
known as a "candy striper" and when she was
16 she became a nurse's aide.
"It was just sort of a natural progression," she
says.
When she left home for college, she didn't go
far: She went straight to St. Louis University.
"I thought I might want to go into physical
therapy," Machen says. "Then I hit physics and a
couple of those things. I needed to do something
that had a little quicker reward ... so I switched
into nursing, and it was certainly the right choice
for me."
At St. Louis University she met Bernie Machen,
who was studying dentistry.
"I always think it's sort of a funny story," she
says. "We always laugh that we met in the library
because we're not exactly all that terribly studious.
But I guess Bernie tumed out to be pretty studious."
They met while Chris Machen was studying at
one of those long, old tables with the light run-
ning down the middle. Bernie Machen, ever


direct, came right to the point.
"He came in with a friend and asked me out,
and I said, 'I don't even know who you are,'" she
says. "I said, 'Well, call me, you know, I'd like to
get to know you a little bit first,' something inane
like that.
"He was very nice, he was a gentleman, I
trusted him. He just seemed like a person I defi-
nitely wanted to get to know better," Chris
Machen says. "He'd been on his own for a long
time, and I never had been."
Bernie Machen remembers their first meeting,
too, but what he recalls is Chris Machen as the
"great-looking blonde who was studying hard and
not paying attention to the fellows swarming
around her."
Two weeks after she became the first person in
her family to graduate from college, the Machens
were married.
"Then I left St. Louis," she says, "and we just
started going. "



"MY DAD ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A

COWBOY. THAT'S WHERE I GOT MY LOVE

OF THE WEST. I LOVE COWBOYS AND

INDIANS ... AND HORSES

AND MOUNTAINS."

CHRIS MACHEN




Off and Running
Their first stop was Charleston, S.C., where
the Medical University of South Carolina had just
opened a dental school. Bernie Machen took a
position as assistant professor and discovered he
liked the academic life. To advance, though, he
realized he would have to earn more degrees. He
went to the University of Iowa where he earned
his master's in pediatric dentistry and doctorate in
educational psychology.
Chris Machen, meanwhile, continued with
nursing. Up to then she'd worked in what was
known as the "sick nursery," where all sick chil-
dren went. In its newer incarnation, it is known
as the neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. It
was an increasingly specialized field, and Chris
Machen found that her skills were in high
demand.
"I'd go in at 2 to interview and they'd ask me if
I could start at 4," she says. "I could get a job


easily, and I had experience."
Before long, Machen became part of a phe-
nomenon that was relatively rare then, in the '70s,
but growing more common by the day: the work-
ing mother. First came Lee, now 33, then
Michael, now 30, and then Maggie, now 24.
Lee lives in Portland, Ore., with his wife, Julie,
and their son Noah, the Machens' first grand-
child.
"Growing up with mom was great," Lee says.
"She was is the good listener and softer
touch to offset my dad's ultra-objective, here's-
the-answer personality.
"Parenting me in my teens was no small feat,"
Lee says. "She always sided with my choices in
hairstyle and clothing."
Chris Machen's career included teaching nurs-
ing at the University of Iowa and a 12-year stretch
working in the NICU at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill's University Hospital. At
Chapel Hill, Bernie Machen rose from clinical
associate professor in the School of Education to
dean of the School of Dentistry.
Meanwhile, the advances in medical technol-
ogy began to give Chris Machen doubts. She
wondered about the value of saving the lives of
children whose subsequent quality of life might
be less than ideal.
"These kinds of situations separate families -
at all levels. Families separate in those kinds of
situations all the time separate and divorce,"
she says.
When Bernie Machen accepted a job as dean
of the School of Dentistry at the University of
Michigan in 1989, Chris Machen switched from
the NICU to pediatric home health nursing. She
found the new challenge satisfying because, as she
says, "that was a whole different experience, to see
the kids from the NICU who went home."
Bernie Machen became provost at Michigan in
1996. It was then that Machen decided she'd had
enough of nursing.
"Our youngest was 14 or 15, I was working
long hours," she says, "and I just thought, 'I can't
do this anymore.'"
Machen says what she misses most about
nursing is "working with the families, especially
when you're working with an infant." Bonding
with her fellow nurses also is among her most
poignant memories.
Nurses today don't have it easy, she says, but
they certainly enjoy more options in terms of
schedule flexibility and career specialization, not
to mention pay.
"I think it's extremely rewarding. It is hard
work," she says, "and you really do feel you can
make some changes in people's lives."


18 FLORIDA









Back in the Saddle
For all the years Chris Machen has devoted to
others, there's at least one getaway she's set aside
just for herself: horseback riding. Despite her
hectic pace, she still squeezes in time every week
for what she calls "my passion." It's a love that
came to her a little later in life she was nearly
30 when she took up riding lessons but it
proved to be the perfect catharsis.
"It's my psychiatrist's couch," she says. "I love
the social part of it. I love riding with my friends
and just going down the trail."
Machen boards her horse, a 14-year-old Appal-
oosa named Zippy, in Jonesville, just west of
Gainesville. She misses Utah's mountains and big
sky, but Florida holds its own charms.
"You take a live oak and put Spanish moss on
it, especially out in the country," she says, "there's
nothing as pretty as that."
One of Machen's riding partners is Eleanor
Green, professor and chair of Large Animal Clini-
cal Sciences and chief of staff of the Large Animal
Hospital at UF's College of Veterinary Medicine.
When she learned Machen was a "horse per-
son," she knew the university's new first lady had
the right stuff.
"That's how horse people are tireless work-
ers, dedicated, resilient, tenacious, resourceful,
knowledge-seeking, down-to-earth, fair, passion-
ate, compassionate, respectful of life," Green says.
"Just one horseback ride with Chris Machen
convinced me. Chris is all of those things and
more.
"Who else would have ridden a motorcycle in
the [2004] homecoming parade with the presi-
dent and then doubled back to ride her horse in
the parade with her friends on horseback? I felt I
had known Chris all of my life after just one ride
together ... She and President Machen are a hard-
working team who collectively bring enormous
talent to our campus."
Machen uses whatever spare time she has for
walking and reading. She's especially fond of
historical fiction and the works of local writer
Shelley Fraser Mickle.
While her tide may be UF's first lady,
Machen's priority is still being the No. 1 woman
for her family. Just ask son Lee.
During Julie's pregnancy with Noah a couple
of years ago, Julie ended up spending the last
three months on strict bed rest. Lee says Julie
came close to losing the baby, but Machen was
there when she was needed most.
"Mom was at the hospital within hours and
was with us [from Utah] almost every other week
until delivery," he says. "We were terrified, but
she rolled up her sleeves and made it all OK."
After all, that's what nurses do best. 1w


Chris and Bernie Machen


fall 2005















alumni mpfiles


ENCOURAGED BY

PROFESSORS IN
HIS ELECTRICAL

ENGINEERING
CLASSES, ZUE
DECIDED TO
APPLY HIS
EXPERIENCE AND

EXPERTISE TO
COAXING

COMPUTERS,
THEN IN THEIR
INFANCY, TO
UNDERSTAND
SPEECH.


eSpoke i Word

VICTOR ZUE HELPS COMPUTERS
DECIPHER OUR DICTION


Victor Zue didn't have much
trouble learning English when he
came to UF from Hong Kong in
1965. But sounding like an Ameri-
can proved to be frustrating for the
then-18-year-old freshman.
"One of the things I realized is
that, even if you know how to
pronounce all the words, you just
don't sound native," Zue says.
"There is something magic about
the native ability which constitutes
how people of the same country
speak."
It was a life-changing insight.
Encouraged by professors in his
electrical engineering classes, Zue
decided to apply his experience and
expertise to coaxing computers,
then in their infancy, to understand
speech.
Four decades later, Zue (BSEE
'68, MSE '69), a professor of elec-
trical engineering and computer
science at the Massachusetts Insti-
tute ofTechnology, is a renowned
expert in computer speech recogni-
tion and the new field of the hu-
man-computer interface.
"Victor has been one of the true
visionaries who has understood the
big picture and where technology is
going in the future," says Ron Cole,
a professor and director of the
Center for Spoken Language Re-


search at the University of Colo-
rado at Boulder. "He's at as high a
level as you can get."
Zue says teaching computers to
understand speech is difficult be-
cause of the subtleties of how
people pronounce and link words
- differences that seem to require
context to be understood. For
example, "gas shortage" can easily
sound like "gash shortage"; "let us
pray" like "lettuce spray"; "meet her
at Main Street" like "meter at Main
Street."
The rules are clear, but the
sounds are anything but. "These are
things you don't find in
dictionaries," Zue says.
After earning his bachelor's and
master's degrees from UF, Zue
pursued his doctorate at MIT
and joined the engineering
faculty. His first big break-
through came in the late
1970s when he proved that
spectrographs, digital repre-
sentations of the human
voice, could be re-interpreted
to yield coherent sentences.
The revelation demolished
the prevailing psychological
and computer science theo-
ries that said the voice alone
wasn't enough to convey
coherent information.


Zue was his own experimen-
tal model. After thousands of
hours of practice, he wowed
colleagues and visitors with his
ability to resurrect spoken words
from their disembodied graphs.
"It changed the whole perspec-
tive on how much information was
available in the acoustic signal,"
Cole says.
The work was a breakthrough in
the development of voice-recogni-
tion software. Although it remains
imperfect, the software is widely
used today in voice mail systems as
well as by people with speech or
hearing disabilities. Zue also cre-
ated a telephone system that inter-
acts with callers to provide detailed
weather forecasts in 500 cities


20 FLORIDA









PROFILES


"YOU MIGHT BE WINDOW-

SHOPPING FOR SHOES IN

A MALL, AND THE

COMPUTER WOULD

WHISPER INTO YOUR EAR,

THOSE SAME SHOES ARE

20 PERCENT OFF TWO

DOORS DOWN.'"

VICTOR ZUE



worldwide. His accomplishments
have won him attention in the
popular press as well as the scien-
tific press, with The Economist,
Business Week and Discover maga-
zines all covering his research and
ideas.
"He has great high-level vision
in putting things in perspective,
and he is often able to see impor-
tant issues that others don't see or
are ignoring," says Jim Glass, a
senior research scientist in Zue's


group and a frequent co-author of
scientific papers.
Zue continues his work on the
speech problem, taking breaks now
and then to pursue hobbies such as
cooking Chinese food and playing
classic rock in an MIT faculty
band, the Invaders. But in recent
years he has broadened his profes-
sional scope. Among other posi-
tions, he co-directs MIT's Com-
puter Science and Artificial Intelli-
gence Laboratory, the largest com-
puter science laboratory in the
world.
There, he's working to revolu-
tionize how people and computers
interact. Today, Zue says, people
tend to approach computers as
though approaching an altar. The
PC is a separate, distant and inac-
cessible entity. In his vision of the
future, the interaction will be much
less formal. People will talk and
otherwise enjoy natural relation-
ships with omnipresent computers
in many shapes and forms.
Zue chairs the steering commit-
tee of Project Oxygen, MIT's
much-publicized effort concerning
so-called "pervasive" human-cen-
tered computing. Among other
things, Oxygen researchers have
developed a device called "Cricket,"
a kind of indoor GPS that tracks


Victor Zue


and relays information about a
user's location. Hospital workers
might use such devices to help
locate patients and one another, but
retailers may be interested as well,
Zue says.
"You might be window-shop-
ping for shoes in a mall, and the
computer would whisper into your
ear, 'those same shoes are 20 per-
cent off two doors down,'" Zue
says.


After 40 years, it might seem
that Zue would have developed a
prescription for successful re-
search. But he says the most
important discoveries tend to be
more a matter of serendipity
than science.
"Oftentimes the best things
that are developed are the ones
that are done unintentionally,"
he says.
-Aaron Hoover (MFAS '02)


fall 2005 21








PROFILES


Muscle

KAZU TOMOOKA STRETCHES THE BODIES AND
SKILLS OF THE WASHINGTON NATIONALS
BASEBALL TEAM.


It's two hours before game time
in an almost empty Dodger Sta-
dium in Los Angeles. Near the first
base dugout, Washington Nationals
players stand in rows for condition-
ing drills led by strength and condi-
tioning coach Kazuhiko Tomooka.
Tomooka (BSESS '98) is just 5
feet 7 inches tall and weighs 165,
but when he barks a command, the
rows of taller and much larger
players jump.
During batting practice 30
minutes later, Tomooka stands in
the outfield retrieving balls for the
pitchers. He discards his baseball
glove and drops to one knee to
stretch the legs of a pitcher lying
face down on the grass. He then
pushes the pitchers through wind
sprints from right field to center
field.
These public parts ofTomooka's
job don't reveal the majority of his
work, which occurs behind the
scenes: long hours of paperwork,
organizing workouts, stretching
players' muscles and designing
individualized training programs.
For most night games in Wash-
ington, he arrives at RFK Stadium
at noon and leaves about 11 p.m.
While the game is played, he
stretches players who feel tight,


especially those who pinch hit or
enter the game as defensive replace-
ments. His work continues after the
game. His individualized training
programs are designed to build
players' strength and flexibility and
to reduce the chance of injury
throughout their grueling 162-
game schedule.
Tomooka also devises off-
season training programs for
players. To find out how players
are doing, he calls them or visits
them in places as far away as the
Dominican Republic.
Tomooka, 33, joined the former
Montreal Expos in 2002. The team,
now reborn as the Nationals, re-
turned baseball to the nation's
capital after a 34-year absence.
Perhaps it's fitting that Tomooka
is in the capital he's living the
American Dream.
Just 10 years ago he was a Japa-
nese college student who spoke no
English and knew nothing about
American athletic training.
He was looking at Japanese
methods, however, and questioned
whether Japanese athletes were
using the most successful ones. To
answer that question he took a big
risk: In March 1995 he flew to San
Francisco and studied English for


an




four months before enrolling in
UF's athletic training program.
"At that time I wasn't scared," he
says. "I was trying to do whatever I
wanted to do. But if I think right
now about what I did, I'm scared. I
should have been afraid."
Arriving in Gainesville, he says,
"I didn't speak any English. I didn't
know what to do. That was a tough
time."
But former UF professor Hal
Lerch, now at Sam Houston State
University in Texas, explained the
program to him.
"Every time I had a problem, I
went to him and he gave me an-
swers," Tomooka says. "That
helped a lot."
By the end of the academic year,
his English improved considerably.
He transferred the general educa-
tion courses he took at Tokyo's
Rikkyo University and was about to
graduate in 1998.
He had planned after graduation
to return to Tokyo and work in
Japanese professional baseball. He
even had a plane ticket. But before
he graduated, he earned a one-week
spring training internship with the
Florida Marlins. The opportunity
developed into a year-long intern-
ship, followed by a full-time job


"I DIDN'T SPEAK

ANY ENGUSH.

I DIDN'T KNOW

WHAT TO DO.

THAT WAS A

TOUGH TIME."

KAZU
TOMOOKA


22 FLORIDA









PROFILES


K.aZU IomooKa


when general manager, Dave
Dombrowski, now with the Detroit
Tigers, hired Tomooka as assistant
strength and conditioning coach.
He worked for the Marlins for
three years before the team was sold
in 2002, and the new owners fired
the medical staff. Tomooka then
accepted an offer to work for one
year as the strength and condition-
ing specialist for the Montreal
Expos.


Tomooka's arrangement with
the Expos was to end in 2003
when Montreal, suffering from
poor attendance in a small
market, expected to be shut
down as part of major league
baseball's plans to reduce itself
by two teams. Plans changed,
however, and the team moved
to Washington, D.C., instead.
The franchise took Tomooka
with it.


"Kazu is a tremendous asset to
our organization, and it isn't just
limited to the regular season," says
Jamey Carroll, an infielder for the
Nationals. "He also helps with our
off-season workouts and gives us
training manuals so we can come to
spring training in shape and
healthy and handle a 162-game
season.
Carroll says Tomooka puts
working hard above everything else.


But Tomooka says that attitude is
the only way he has reached his
goals.
"If you work hard, anything is
possible," he says. "I had an in-
ternship at a high school when I
was at [UF]. My supervisor told
me, 'You can't get a job in the
U.S. You're not good enough.'
But I just kept trying, so my
dream came true."
Gary Libman


fall 2005 23




r'i~. .-~.
~ F~ ~
re -
1


A "t
'*11


iifalumni I


HITTING THE BRICKS

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 9:


"Synapse" is the centerpiece
to the Evelyn E & William L.
McKnight Brain Institute's
front entrance; "The Binding
of Isaac" is part of a series of
four stained-glass windows
created by Kenneth Treister
for Hillel's Norman H. Lipoff
Hall.


24 FLORIDA


My Old School

Please join us in a walk down memory lane. We welcome your letters and photographs at Florida@uff.ufl.edu or at Florida
magazine, P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425. Photos can be scanned and returned upon request.


I entered the College of Law in
fall 1939 having received an AB
degree (history and political sci-
ence) from Stetson University that
spring, which included a year of
law (as electives). Believe me, the
law school wasn't into women! Two
weeks before the fall semester, I
made a round trip of 250 miles
(from Kissimmee) to arrange for
approved housing for women and
was told I'd have to come back
when school started to get that
information ... Until I received my
LLB (nowJD) degree in spring
1941, I had to sign an affidavit
each semester that I was female,
over 21, and could not get the
course I wanted at another state
university (Florida State College for
Women). I was the only girl in my
class.
Decorum wasn't in the vocabu-
lary of most of the boys as a group.
Until my brother entered law
school a year after I did, I would
not eat in the cafeteria amid the cat
calls and other noises. In classes
there was a lot of foot shuffling as I
came into class. Cornelia Otis
Skinner interrupted a monologue
(as a guest entertainer at the univer-
sity) to tell the boys she was leaving
if they didn't know how to behave.
When I played tennis across cam-
pus there were always several boys
hanging out of a dorm window
with remarks I preferred to ignore.
Number-drawing for the draft
occurred the last year. Morale fell
apart because so many of the boys
were ROTC members and knew


they would be early picks for the
draft. A number of students quit
going to classes. Dean Harry
Trusler and others of the faculty
spoke at a called meeting, lecturing
the class about the value of staying
in school. The times had a sobering
effect on the school.
But for the record, I had a great
time. I wasn't one of the boys, but I
never lacked for tennis or dancing
partners. I was always part of a
study group. I doubled for all kinds
of female witnesses in moot court
trials. I developed lifelong friends
- and a husband. I received a ring
from the president of the class on
graduation day (surprising a lot of
people, particularly Ila Pridgen
[LLB '43], who as Dean Trusler's
secretary, knew everything.) Because
my brother had enlisted in the Air
Corps and was due to report to
MacDill Field (Tampa) in several
weeks, Al Graessle (BA '41, LLB
'41) and I married two weeks after
our graduation.
Fast forward, he practiced law in
Jacksonville for 20 years and was a
circuit judge (4" Judicial Circuit)
for another 20. We produced five
children, of which our two sons are
UF graduates: Bob (BA '89) and
Bill (JD '85). Bill clerked for Justice
Ray Ehrlich (BS '39, LLB '42) for
many years on the Florida Supreme
Court. Our daughters are graduates
of Northwestern, Auburn, Ohio
Wesleyan and FSU. Judge Graessle
died in 1984.
Lois Thacker Graessle (LLB '41)
Jacksonville


In the spring of 19701 was a
freshman and dating a sophomore,
Peter MacNamara (BA '73, JD '76,
LLMT '77). I went to dinner to
meet his family for the first time
and was the object of a very embar-
rassing joke by his brother, Tom
MacNamara (BA '73, JD '75), who
was a freshman.
When April 1 was approaching,
I decided to give Tom a taste of his
own medicine. I called him at his
dorm and, using a disguised voice,
told him I was the secretary to UF
President Stephen O'Connell
(BSBA '40, LLB '40), who wanted
to see him. When Tom inquired as
to the purpose of the meeting, I
said it was something the presi-
dent wanted to speak with him
about privately. I made an "ap-
pointment" with him to meet with
President O'Connell at 10 a.m. on
April 1. A few days later I called
Tom back to confirm his "appoint-
ment." All that week Tom was
telling everyone about his appoint-
ment and was wondering why he
was being called in.
As I later learned, at the ap-
pointed hour Tom arrived at the
president's office and advised the
staff he had an appointment initi-
ated by the president. After some
puzzlement by the secretary, she
escorted him in, and Tom and
President O'Connell looked expect-
antly at each other for a while, each
expressing wonder why they were
meeting. At some point President
O'Connell put two and two to-
gether and he began to laugh, re-


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minded Tom that it was April Fools'
Day, and said they were the object
of a practical joke. So as not to be a
total waste of time, the two of them
smoked a cigar before Tom left the
office. Yes, Tom immediately figured
out who did this to him, and there
was a retaliatory prank.
Decades later, after I had been
practicing commercial litigation for
almost 20 years, had married Tom's
brother, Peter, and was serving on
the UF Law School Alumni Coun-
cil, I sat next to retired President
O'Connell at a Gator football game.
I figured that enough time had
passed to safely "fess up." As I
started to tell him the story, he
jumped in and said, "So you were
the one who played that April Fools'
joke!" Fortunately, he had a good
sense of humor about it. Tom and I
called a truce to our practical jokes,
but we each still get a chuckle out of
it every time we tell the story.
-M. Therese "Terry" Vento
(BSJ 74, JD 76)
Coconut Grove

When I started at UF in 1939,
I took my bicycle as my only form
of transportation since not too
many students had automobiles
back in those days. I left my bike in
front of Fletcher Hall, and on many
occasions it disappeared. Lots of
fellows running late used it to get to
class and forgot to return it. Some-
times it would be gone for as long as
a week before I found it or it turned
up or somebody brought it back.
One of the fellows that used it
on several occasions was a member
of the football and boxing teams.
Needless to say, I didn't complain to
him about taking it. I never worried
about losing my bike because the
honor system meant something in
those days. In fact, scattered around
the campus were boxes of apples
and you could buy these on the
honor system as I remember,
they cost a nickel.
Allen Huff (BSBA '47)
Melbourne


SUFALUMNI


Otto the Robot, the mascot for the College of Engineering, made regular
appearances at the annual Engineering Fair in the 1950s.


As a freshman in 1952, I lived in
what were called the "cardboard
castles" dorms. These were one-
story buildings built out of a gray
material that looked like cardboard.
They were located where the bas-
ketball arena is now located. There
was a guy who lived in our dorm
who gave out free four-cigarette
packs of Marlboro cigarettes. The
company sent him boxes of these
cigarettes to give to fellow students.
This got me starting to smoke
cigarettes. Within a short time I
was up to smoking a 20-cigarette
pack of cigarettes that I had to
purchase.
In 1961 my dentist loaned me
the British Royal College of Sur-
geons Report on smoking and
health. That booklet convinced me
to stop smoking cigarettes. It was
very hard to quit and took me
about six months of off-and-on
smoking to finally kick the habit.
-Joe Rabb (BSBA '56)
Jacksonville


Two of my most vivid memories
of UF involve Johnson Hall.
The first is climbing the stairs of
Century Tower to watch as Johnson
Hall burned.
The second happened before
Johnson Hall was remodeled, and
the "Rathskeller" was still in the
basement. My roommates and I
went to the "Rat" to see a band that
featured two beautiful, blond twin
girls as the lead singers.
The band was more than 90
minutes late, so all of us passed the
time emptying bottles of beer
served at the "Rat." As the hour
grew later, the crowd grew more
restless until everyone started bang-
ing their empty bottles on the
tables and shouting for the show to
get started.
Finally, the house lights went
out and the band kicked off the
show.
We pushed the tables to the
sides of the room and started danc-
ing recklessly.
Midway through the first song,
the crowd became silent and turned
toward the middle of the room. I
looked back to see a student who
had removed his prosthetic leg and
was playing air guitar with it.
It was only a momentary silence
the show went on.
John O'Harra (BSISE '92)
Lawrenceville, Ga.


fall 2005 25




















The University of Florida is now serving Pepsi.

That's a reason to celebrate .


A* Pepsi is proud to support
the minds, hearts and taste buds
of the University of Florida.



UNIVERSITY OF
001 -iF LORIDA


26 FLORIDA
26 FLORIDA


ijE &Igsleied ile mTorkj ol PepdCo
A


-----


V- I -








I GATORTALES


So lonlg,d frid.


OL By Janis Owens (BA'83)


JAMES HASKINS (1941-2005),
A UF PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH,
DIED THIS SUMMER AT AGE
63. HE WAS THE AWARD-
WINNING AUTHOR OF MORE
THAN 100 BOOKS, INCLUDING
CHILDREN'S BOOKS SUCH AS
"BLACK MUSIC IN AMERICA"
AND POPULAR NOVELS SUCH
AS "THE COTTON CLUB,"
WHICH INSPIRED THE 1984
MOVIE.


An old friend of mine, Jim
Haskins, died in Manhattan on
June 6. Haskins and I go back a
long way, back to my student days
at UF when he and I regularly
knocked heads in assorted required
English classes primarily
Children's Lit and Folklore. Most
of our conflicts stemmed from the
fact that I was fresh off the turnip
truck from Jackson and Marion
counties and new to black folk in
general, especially black professors.
I was given to addressing my ques-
tions to him in the form of racial
generalities, as in: "What do you
people think of Jesse Jackson?"
which nearly drove Haskins insane.
Born to upper-class African-
American society in Demopolis,
Ala., not far from where my Gran-
nie was born, Haskins spent his
early life participating in civil rights
marches and his latter days study-
ing jazz. Much of the character of
Gabriel Catts in my book, "The
Schooling of Claybird Catts" or
at least in his role as teacher -
comes from my memories of
Haskins' in-your-face style of teach-
ing and his continual ragging that
we discover our own history and
not be content with what we read
in the official texts.
After not seeing Jim for years, I
published my first novel. Since he
was a prolific writer of biography, I
sometimes ran into him on the lit
circuit, where he told everyone I
was a star pupil who made straight
As 'a rare fiction on his part, as
he never gave an A that I remem-
ber, and certainly not to me. But he


was proud of my success and never
afraid to pass on more of his hard-
headed advice, not about writing as
much as life in general.
A vociferous defender of the
underdog minorities, children,
the handicapped he had no
qualms taking on any offender.
One of my fondest memories of
Jim is of a literary gathering several
years ago when he and I and a few
other writers were sitting in a con-
versation pit at a gala dinner in Bay
County. A lady on a walker came
up and spoke to me over the back
of the sofa about my latest book.
Without rising, I discussed it
briefly, then returned to our own
conversation. Apparendy, I hadn't
given the lady the respect Haskins
thought I should, given that she
was on a walker and not able to
navigate the couches. He fixed me
with his old deadly eye and told me
in a frosty voice, "Miss Owens -
they buy books, too," meaning the
handicapped.
I could have strangled his skinny
neck as I had meant no disrespect,
but he was undoubtedly right I
should have stood and given the
lady my full attention. Instead of
strangling him, I made a point of
finding her later that evening and
offered a longer answer. Haskins
was right: she was (and is) a very
bright and articulate reader, some-
one worth raking the time to know.
So here's to an did campaigner
for human dignity who taught me a
fenw things about good manners and
Euro-centrism and folklore. Grace
and peace, old friend. I pray the


light of the Lord will shine about
you on your new journey, and
you'll be rewarded for your golden
heart and timely rebukes with a 20-
room mansion overlooking a jazz
club in heaven.
Janis Owens is a Southern gothic
author whose books include "My
Brother Michael" "Myra Sims"and
"The Schooling of Claybird Catts. "
She lives in Newberry.



AN ENDOWMENT IS BEING
CREATED TO HONOR JAMES
HASKINS' UFE AND WORK.
Donations will support two new
UF programs: the James Haskins
Visiting Scholar Fellowship in
African American Studies and the
George A. Smathers Library's James
Haskins Collection in African
American Literature. To learn
more, contact Cynthia Butler at
352-846-3447 or
cbuder@uff.ufl.edu, or Sandra
Melching at 352-392-0342 or
sfmelching@uflib.ufl.edu.


fall 2005 27
























ring those for the UF Alumni Association, Gator football and
Sconuon and annecte
GansvleBack to College





iFeb. 23-22
fooReturn to campus and enjoy an educational encounter as
the celebrate special anniversaries across campus includ-





ing those for the UF Alumni Association, Gator football and
the colleges of education, medicine, nursing, and design,
construction and planning.


Spring Weekend





April 21-22

Enjoy a concert by the LandSharks, the Orange and Blue
football scrimmage and an alumni barbecue. In addition,
the Silvents or Society, which recognizes alumni upon the 25th
anniversary of their graduation, will induct its charter
members.


8th Annual International Gator Day
May 20
Join members of Gator Clubs and special interest groups
as they take part in community service projects world-
wide.














FLORIDA
NON-PROFIT ORG.
University of Florida Alumni Association u.s. POSTAGE
Emerson Alumni Hall PAID
P.O. Box 14425 PERMITNo.682
Miami, FL
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425
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*****Ir t*m*ECRLOTItB-OtO
259-105-7 P12 2035
tMrs. Dale B. Canelas
University of Florida
212 Libw
PO Box 117001
Bainesville FL 32611-7001




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