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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073682/00125
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Title: CLAS notes the monthly news publication of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- College of Arts and Sciences
Publisher: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: February 1999
Frequency: monthly
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Subjects / Keywords: Education, humanistic -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
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General Note: Subtitle varies; some numbers issued without subtitle.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 11 (Nov. 1988); title from caption.
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Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Around the college
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    New program heads
        Page 6
    New faculty
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Grants awarded through Division of Sponsored Research
        Page 10
    Bookbeat
        Page 11
    Note from the chair
        Page 12
Full Text




February 1999


A Research Opportunity
You've probably heard something about
the Provost's new undergraduate research
initiative. My purpose here is to review
the process by which students and faculty
may work together under sponsorship of the
University Scholars Program, the official
name of the undergraduate research initia-
tive that encompasses many UF colleges. I
encourage you to look into this. Please note
that students and faculty from all CLAS
divisions are eligible, humanities through
the natural sciences.
Details of the program are to be found
on the university Web site-www.ufl.edu/
scholars. Please refer students to this site,
where they will find an overall description
of the program, a list of potential faculty
mentors, an application form, and specific
college guidelines. By March 15, students
must have applied, with the support of a
faculty mentor, for one of the 35 awards
assigned to this college. Students may
also apply through other colleges if they are
interested in working with a specific faculty
member in that college.
Students will apply through the aca-
demic departments, each of which will be
permitted to forward up to three selected
applications to the CLAS Office, although
larger departments may make a case for a
slightly larger number, based on the size of
their faculty and the number of applicants.
A College committee will select 35 applica-
tions to be forwarded to the Provost, where
final decisions will be made.
Priority will be given to rising seniors an-
ticipating graduation in Spring or Summer,
2000. The selected students will pursue
scholarly activities under the direction of a
faculty member in summer, 1999 for which
they will receive a stipend of $2,500. Stu-
dents and their faculty mentors will also be
awarded $500 for research expenses, such
as books, travel to conferences, etc.
Following the summer, 1999 research,
students will be expected to continue re-
search under their mentors' direction during
the 1999-2000 academic year, registering
for an appropriate research course each
See Musings, page 12


CLASnotes

Vol. 13 The University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences No. 2


Early Detection of Autism

UF psychologist hopes movement disorders may
prove valid diagnostic marker


Although there is no cure for au-
tism, CLAS psychologist Philip
Teitelbaum hopes that a diagnos-
tic technique his research team is
developing will eventually help
parents and pediatricians seek
treatment for the disorder early
enough to curtail and possibly
even reverse its effects.
"Too often we hear from
parents of autistic children that
despite their early concerns, a pe-
diatrician assured them their baby
was perfectly normal-would
grow up to be the president of the
United States-when in fact, the
child is autistic,"Teitelbaum says.
"It's not until the child is three or
even as old as five, when verbal


or social limitations become obvi-
ous, that diagnosis occurs."
The key to earlier diagnosis, explains the
Graduate Research Professor, is observing
for specific movement anomalies, which he
feels are integral to the disorder. Accord-
ing to Teitelbaum, autistic children learn
to sit up, turn over and crawl in noticeably
different manner than normal children, a
function of the same wiring problem in the
central nervous system that later causes the
social/verbal symptoms commonly associ-
ated with the condition. Since Teitelbaum's
research indicates the possibility of detect-
ing these movement problems at three to
six months of age, autistic babies may soon
be able to receive early treatment therapies
during crucial brain development (zero to
two years of age).
Although researchers have noted move-
ment abnormalities in autistic individuals
before, the current literature on autism
overlooks or denies the possibility that
movement disturbances are a symptom of
the disorder. For example, Bernard Rimland,
a leading researcher in the field, wrote in a
1993 article that it was "ludicrous" to think


ULL


Philip Teitelbaum (right), Jennifer Nye (center) and
Osnat Teitelbaum study home videos of known autistic
children to pinpoint movement disturbances that can
be used for early diagnosis of the disorder.


movement problems were typically involved
in autism.
Teitelbaum became convinced otherwise
several years ago. While studying a gait
disorder commonly found in patients suffer-
ing from Parkinson's disease, he attended a
talk that changed the focus of his research.
"I heard my colleague UF psychiatrist
Ralph Maurer deliver a paper on similari-
ties between the way Parkinsonian adults
and autistic children walk," he explains.
Teitelbaum's curiosity was piqued, and after
he and his wife, Osnat, a movement analysis
expert, examined videos of autistic children,
they felt sure that a movement disorder was
indeed a key component of the condition.
Next, the Teitelbaums advertised in the
monthly publication of the National Com-
mittee on Autism and on the e-mail list run
by the Autism Society of America, request-
ing early videos of autistic children. They
received 17 such videos (shot well before
the children were diagnosed). Together with
doctoral student Jennifer Nye, the Teitel-
baums taped key parts of these videos-the

See Autism, page 8


This month's focus: Psychology








Around the College


DEPARTMENTS


COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS
Linda Lombardino has become a fellow of the Ameri-
can Speech Language and Hearing Association. Of the
association's 90,000 members, only 20 or so achieve this
honor per year.

ENGLISH
Nancy Reisman's story collection House Fires has been se-
lected for the 1999 Iowa Short fictionAward. The University
of Iowa Press will publish the collection later this year.

Stephanie Smith gave a performative reading of her latest
fiction at the Dixon Place Theater in New York City (Soho)
on December 16. Her essay "Suckers" has just appeared in
the journal Differences (10.1).

MATHEMATICS
Phil Boyland gave an invited special session talk entitled
"Isotopy stable dynamics relative to compact invariant sets"
at a meeting of the American Mathematical Society in Win-
ston-Salem in October of 1998.

Scott McCullough gave an invited special session talk
at the Fall South East Sectional Meeting of the American
Mathematical Society in October. The title of his talk was
"Commutant lifting on a two-holed domain."

SOCIOLOGY
In December, Mike Radelet presented a series of public lec-
tures at the University of Westminster Law School in London,
England, where he has been a visiting professor of law since
1995. From there he travelled to Harare, Zimbabwe, where
he represented Amnesty International at the meetings of the
World Council of Churches. Just before Christmas, outgoing
Chief Justice of the Florida Supreme court Gerald Kogan (a
former death penalty prosecutor) was quoted in newspapers
throughout the state praising Radelet's work showing the
inevitability of executing the innocent.

WOMEN'S STUDIES AND GENDER RE-
SEARCH
Sue Rosser gave three invited lectures in Sweden in Septem-
ber: "Gender Bias in Clinical Research" at the Karolinska
Institute in Stockholm, "Gender Differences: Implications
for Research Design and Curricular Practices" at the Nordic
School of Public Health in Goteborg, and "Implications of
Feminist Theories for Genetic Engineering and Reproduc-
tive Technologies" at the Women's Studies Program at the
University of Goteborg.


Physics Department to Host Collaborative
Meeting on $500 Million NSF Project

The Physics Department will host a meeting March 4-6 for
scientists from the US and abroad who will be participating
in The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory
(LIGO) experiment. The LIGO project, a $500M effort funded
by the National Science Foundation, is a pioneering effort to
design and construct a novel scientific facility -a gravitational-
wave observatory that will open a new observational window
on the universe. UF is responsible for construction of a major
LIGO subsystem.
Participants in the UF meeting will discuss ideas on im-
proving LIGO detectors, better analyzing data from these
detectors and creating software to look for gravitational waves
from stellar pairs that collapse into one another. Further de-
tails can be found at the conference Web site www.phys.ufl.
edu/~mueller/LSC.html.



Mathematics Department Awarded GTE Grant
The Department of Mathematics was awarded a GTE Focus
Grant in the amount of $30,000 to develop a summer program
for minority students from local high schools. The intent of
the program is to increase students' interest and background in
mathematics, and ultimately to increase the likelihood that they
will major in mathematics or related fields. The program will
include a technology component, including the use of graphing
calculators and the MAPLE symbolic algebra package. Six
one-week modules on mathematics topics outside the usual
curriculum will be presented, including fractals and chaos,
game theory, number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, and
probability. The program will include small group work, plus
some outside speakers.



UF to Host International Particle Physics
Conference in March
The Physics Department is hosting an international confer-
ence on particle physics March 8-11. The conference, titled
"Higgs and Supersymmetry: Search and Discovery," will host
about 100 physicists from around the world to evaluate the
prospects for new discoveries at particle accelerators currently
under construction. Top on the list for particle physicists is the
Higgs particle, which is a key ingredient for objects to have
mass, and Supersymmetry, which allows for all forces includ-
ing gravity to be unified into one. Conclusive results on both
searches are expected within the next 5-10 years. The University
of Florida participates on two large experiments near Chicago
and Geneva which are tackling these issues. Further details
can be found at the conference web site: http://www.phys.ufl.
edu/~rfield/higgs_susy.html.








Around the College


Three CLAS Professors Win One-year NEH
Grants Worth $30,000 Each


R. Allen Shoaf (ENG) will use
his grant to continue working on
a study of autobiography in late
medieval English writing. He
will concentrate, in particular,
on the works of Geoffrey Chau-
cer and Thomas Usk. Shoaf
recently edited and is currently
translating Usk's Testament of
Love (under contract with the
University Press of Florida).


David Pharies (RLL) will use
his fellowship to complete his
current research project, entitled
Etymological Dictionary of Span-
ish Suffixes. The dictionary will
explain the origin and history of
some 350 final elements in Span-
ish, including suffixes transmitted
in popular speech from Latin (-
anza), learned suffixes borrowed
from Latin (-ancia) and Greek (-
ia), and several categories of suf-
fix-like final elements, including
elements of Greek compounds
(-fobia).


Nora M. Alter's (GSS) project
investigates a relatively new
cultural and technological
medium: the essay film. "Like
its literary and philosophical an-
cestor, the written essay," says
Alter, "the essay film is a hybrid
medium located between narra-
tive fiction and historical fact,
truth and artifice. It poaches
across traditional boundaries to
constitute one of the most sig-
nificant, and neglected, forms of
social and cultural commentary,
criticism, and (self) reflection in an age increasingly dominat-
ed by other technologies." Additionally, her project seeks to
bridge the increasing divide between traditional literary studies
and film studies.


1999 Women's Studies
Spring Colloquium

Friday, February 12 4PM
The Department of Sociology & The Center for
Women's Studies and Gender Research present:

Lived Realities and Identity Work in Support Groups
for Battered Women
by Donileen Loseke of University of South Florida.


Wednesday, February 24 3:30 PM
The Center for Women's Studies and Gender Re-
search presents:

Magical Realism or the Fantastic in Enchi Fumiko's
"Wicket Gate": An Investigation of the Japanese
Supernatural
by Yumiko Hulvey of African and Asian Languages
and Literatures at the University of Florida.

Both colloquia will be held in the Ruth McQuown Room,
219 Dauer Hall.
Call 392-3365 for more information.



McQuown Award Deadline Approaching
Undergraduate and graduate women are invited to apply
forthe 0. Ruth McQuown ScholarshipAwards through the
College of LiberalArts and Sciences. These awards honor
UF's female scholars in the humanities, social sciences,
individual interdisciplinary studies (that include social sci-
ences/humanities) and women's studies.
For undergraduates, up to five awards of varying
amounts will be awarded. In past years, awards have
ranged from $500 to $3,000. The deadline for applications
is FEBRUARY 22.
Graduate awards include a $8,000 prize and tuition
remission to a student who has completed at least one
semester of graduate work in CLAS. The deadline is
FEBRUARY 22. A $10,000 award and tuition remission
will honor an incoming graduate student nominated by
the department to which she has applied. The deadline is
FEBRUARY 10. Smaller awards to supplement assistant-
ships will also be given to several current and incoming
students.
The most important criterion is academic achievement
and promise. In addition, the committee may consider
contributions or likely contributions to the student's uni-
versity, local, or larger community. Applications and ad-
ditional information are available in 2014 Turlington Hall.
Two letters of recommendation are required. For more
information, contact CLAS Associate Dean Patricia H.
Miller at 392-6800 or pmiller@psych.ufl.edu.









Mathematics Ups the Ante

Krishnaswami Alladi discusses new initiatives in Mathematics Department


The Department
of Mathematics is
making a concerted
effort to gain in-
creased visibility
for its research. "We
are going to have
enormous activity
in Spring 99," says
department chair
Krishna-swami Al-
ladi.
For starters, the department is initiating
two series of distinguished colloquia, one
in pure and one in applied mathematics.
The distinguished colloquium in pure
mathematics is named after Paul Erd6s,
one of the legends of twentieth century
mathematics, who before his death in
1996 regularly visited UF each spring for
two weeks. "He collaborated with many
UF mathematicians and had a profound
impact on our department," says Alladi.
Rather than maintaining a permanent ap-
pointment, Erd6s criss-crossed the globe
ceaselessly during his 50-year career
to collaborate with other scientists, and
he was especially known for visiting,
encouraging and supporting aspiring
mathematicians, including a young Al-
ladi. The first Erd6s Colloquium will be
given on March 15 by Professor Ronald
Graham (of AT&T), a noted researcher
and speaker and former president of the
American Mathematical Society.
The distinguished colloquium in applied
mathematics is named after Stan Ulam, an
outstanding applied mathematician who


served on the Los Alamos atom bomb
project during World War II. Ulam was
a graduate research professor in the UF
math department between 1974 and
1984. "Creating these two distinguished
colloquia is our way of remembering
these great mathematicians and building
on our legacy," Alladi explains. Both
colloquia are to be given by persons of
eminence on topics of relevance to many
disciplines at UF. The first Ulam Col-
loquium, for example, given January 11
by Jim Keener of the University of Utah,
was on "The Mathematics of Sudden
Cardiac Death."
Other events in the spring include the
American Mathematical Society's South-
eastern Sectional Meeting, which will be
held in Gainesville March 12-13. Over
250 attendees from the US and abroad
will participate in 16 special sessions
devoted to various areas of mathematics.
UF Graduate Research Professor John
Thompson and UF Professor Alexander
Dranishnikov will give one-hour invited
addresses at the meeting.
Later in the spring, the mathematics
department will co-sponsor with the
Center for Women's Studies and Gender
Research and the Institute for Fundamen-
tal Theory the visit of Professor Ingrid
Daubechies of Princeton University, a
world authority in the theory of wavelets.
Professor Daubechies will give a popular
lecture on wavelets on April 1 as part


of the Women
in Science pro-
gram.


Ramanujan story spurs interest in math
Good Wi1 Hunting has nothing on Srinivasa Ramanujan
(1887-1920), the legendary Indian mathematician afterwhom
the mathematics department's new journal is named. "What
is special about Ramanujan," says Math chair Krishnaswami
Alladi, "is that he discovered astonishing mathematical results
which provided connections between certain areas of math-
ematics that previously people had not suspected. He was
able to produce these results in succession without any formal
mathematical training. He would get up in the middle of the
night and write down formulas that came to him in dreams."
Convinced that Ramanujan was a genius, English math-
ematician G.H. Hardy persuaded him to come to England to
study and work. During his five years there, Ramanujan's impres-
sive research earned him Fellowship in the Royal Society and
Trinity College. Illness-his "peculiar" diet and habits combined
with what most think was tuberculosis-forced Ramanujan's re-
turn to India in 1919, where he died a year later at age 32. "The
very mention of Ramanujan's name reminds us of the thrill of
mathematical discovery," Alladi says. "Today, we realize that his


1A~


Starting next fall, the department will
conduct two mini-conferences per year.
These conferences will provide excellent
opportunities for math faculty and gradu-
ate students to interact with experts from
around the world and gain greater exposure
for CLAS research.
Currently bringing attention to the
department is The Ramanujan Journal,
created in 1997 by Kluwer Academic
Publishers. Edited byAlladi and co-edited
by UF professor Frank Garvan, thejournal
devotes itself to the publication of papers
in all areas of mathematics influenced by
Srinivasa Ramanujan, a mathematical
"genius" from India, who made startling
discoveries in the early part of this cen-
tury (see inset). With the success of The
Ramanujan Journal, Kluwer Academic
Publishers has initiated a new book series
called Developments in Mathematics, also
with Alladi as editor. This book series will
publish research monographs, contributed
volumes, and refereed conference proceed-
ings, including the proceedings of some of
the mini-conferences at UF.
The mathematics department has an
active applied mathematics program
with several faculty members (Yunmei
Chen, Gang Bao, William Hager, Bernard
Mair, James Keesling, Tim Olson, Shari
Moskow and David Wilson) involved in
cross-disciplinary research. With President
Lombardi's increased emphasis on the
biological sciences, the department will
be opening up a new faculty line in
mathematical biology, expanding
these cross-disciplinary efforts.%


work is more fundamental than Hardy
had ever imagined.....His equations
are now being used to compute pi (the
ratio of the circumference of a circle to
its diameter) to a billion digits!"
Like Good WiII Hunting, Ramanujan's
story attracts a wide audience, and
Alladi thinks the legendary mathema-
tician's appeal can be instrumental in
getting kids involved in math. Alladi's
annual Ramanujan talks to high school
students in India have already resulted
in several students choosing math-
ematics as a career. In fact, one of


these students won the firstAmerican Mathematical SocietyAward
for undergraduate research. "A distaste or a love for math can be
developed very early," claims Alladi. "There's no gray. So we
could do a lot in terms of inspiring students by telling them about
the remarkable Ramanujan, weaving the math into the story to get
their interest going."


I












Studying Self Injury

An interview with CLAS psychology professor Brian Iwata \
Iwata, who studies self-injurious behavior, originated the Florida Center on Self Injury with a
NIH grant he brought with him when he came to UF in 1986 [the Center has been funded by the i
Department of Children and Families since 1990].


Cn: What is self-injurious behavior?
BI: Self-injurious behavior or SIB is a disorder involving re-
peated self-infliction of physical damage, including face hitting,
head banging, biting, scratching, eye poking, chronic vomiting
and the ingestion of dangerous materials. The prevalence of SIB
is highest among individuals with mental retardation and related
developmental disabilities.

Cn: What causes SIB?
BI: Thus far, most research suggests that SIB is a learned be-
havior disorder.

Cn: So the behavior is a response to reinforcers, negative or
positive?
BI: Exactly. When you look at an individual who is bleeding,
you have to do something. So if that individual doesn't have,
say, language to communicate, but learns that every time s/he is
hurt a caring adult will come attend, then that behavior takes on
communicative properties, just as raising a hand would...only in
this case, it's fairly dramatic. Similarly, if one finds oneself in
a very demanding situation like a work situation, which many
individuals with mental retardation are required to participate
in, one may start to engage in a variety of what we call "escape
behaviors," including disruption, aggression, or SIB.

Cn: Is there a profile for the typical person who engages in
SIB?
BI: No. There are no reliable predictors. It occurs across the
age span and the developmental span. Usually SIB begins by late
adolescence, and we've seen it in children younger than a year.

Cn: With the behavior arising so early in some children, do
scientists think there might be a neurochemical imbalance as-
sociated with SIB?
BI: One current hypothesis about the origins of some SIB cases
is based on possible brain disorder involving neurotransmitters, an
area in which one of our new faculty members, Darragh Devine,
specializes. A lot of interesting research is being done in that
area, but a great deal more is needed before any conclusions can
be made about the role of neurotransmitters in the development
or maintenance of SIB.

Cn: Describe the Florida Center on Selflnjury and your work
there.
BI: We are one of very few research programs funded by the
state (most state-funded programs are service oriented), and as
a result we are given a fairly wide latitude for how to conduct
our mission. We have a residential day training component and
a community component. We've been treating SIB residents at
Tacachale [here in Gainesville] for more than nine years and have
treated almost all of the residents there with that problem.


We will now begin working '
more in the community because
prevention or treatment of mild
SIB may significantly reduce
the likelihood of institution-
alization in the first place. We
are currently negotiating with
the Association for Retarded
Citizens (ARC), which of-
fers a variety of services, for
example, pre-school, vocational, and small-group residential
programs, to individuals living in the community.
Part of our mission is the clinical-research program, which
blends service and research, and also provides a context for
training. Seven doctoral students currently work with me, and the
program also forms the nucleus of an undergraduate lab course,
in which we have provided a combination of academic, clinical,
and research experience to over 300 undergraduate students dur-
ing the last six to seven years.
We also serve as a state-wide resource center. If someone in
Pensacola is treating a person with SIB, for example, that person
can call or e-mail us, and we can provide them with information
from our computerized data base, which contains about 2500
references to research on behavior disorders. So if we receive an
inquiry about cigarette butt ingestion (Pica) or chronic vomiting
as behavior problems, we can give that caller an in-depth list of
references, saving him/her weeks or months of research.
Our other component is consultation. When very serious
SIB cases are identified in the State-usually involving prob-
lems related to outplacement recommendations, jurisdiction, or
funding-we are asked to evaluate the case and make recom-
mendations.

Cn: The Florida Center on SelfInjury is widely considered the
best program of its kind in the country. What are your long-term
goals for the Center?
BI: One certain goal is to have a direct impact through the service
we provide, but our larger goal is to produce and disseminate
new knowledge regarding the assessment and treatment of SIB,
which will benefit not only those individuals we serve directly,
but others also. For example, we developed the assessment
procedures that are now considered to be standard in the field.
All of the major clinical research programs in the country who
conduct assessment of SIB use the procedures we developed,
which puts us in a position to be at the forefront in developing
and evaluating new treatment procedures also.

Cn: Sounds exciting.
BI: It is, but it keeps us busy [laughs].k








New Program Heads


Harvey B. Lillywhite (Zoology)
Director of Seahorse Key Marine Laboratory

"The UF Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is located 57 miles west of Gainesville on the Gulf
Coast, three miles offshore from Cedar Key. It is a field station committed to providing (a) sup-
port for multidisciplinary research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists, (b) an outstanding
teaching program in marine related subjects, and (c) support for public education related to marine,
estuarine and coastal resources of the state of Florida. Seahorse Key is part of the Cedar Keys
National Wildlife Refuge and is a strategic location for ecological studies, particularly those
related to environmental change. Research and teaching activities using the Marine Laboratory
facilities include undergraduate projects, masters and doctoral theses, and faculty research con-
nected to a broad range of departments and programs including Zoology, Botany, Fisheries and
Aquaculture, Geology, Environmental Engineering, and Wildlife Conservation."



Jon Reiskind (Zoology)
Coordinator, Biological Sciences Program

"The Biological Sciences Program combines the talents of the Botany and Zoology faculties to
provide undergraduate students with a firm foundation in the biological sciences. It not only
serves all the life science majors at UF, but gives the premed and other prehealth professional
Students their biological fundamentals as well. In addition, it provides non-science students
S the biological background with which they can better fulfill their responsibilities to themselves
Sand their communities, making them more aware of the natural environment and their own
health in a technologically complex world."
Zoology Undergraduate Web Page: http://www.zoo.ufl.edu
Undergrad Biological Sciences Program Web Page: http://www.bsc.ufl.edu




New Faculty

Doreen Blischak joins the UF Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders from Ball
State University, where she was an assistant professor. She received her PhD in speech-language
pathology from Purdue University. Her research focuses on literacy development and use of syn-
thetic speech by nonspeaking individuals. She recently completed a study involving early reading
development and is now conducting a study on the use of synthetic speech to promote spelling
in disabled children. She teaches courses in augmentative and alternative communication. Her
outside interests include hiking, gardening, beach combing and skating.




Marta L. Wayne, an assistant professor of zoology, earned her PhD in molecular population ge-
B netics from Princeton University. Before coming to UF, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at
North Carolina State University. Her research interests include quantitative genetics, molecular
population genetics, and issues of gender and science. As an evolutionary biologist, she is also
interested in how genetic variation is maintained in natural populations for quantitative traits. She
SC "B teaches courses in genetics, evolutionary genetics and core biology. In her spare time, she enjoys
hiking, writing and cooking.








New Program Heads


Harvey B. Lillywhite (Zoology)
Director of Seahorse Key Marine Laboratory

"The UF Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is located 57 miles west of Gainesville on the Gulf
Coast, three miles offshore from Cedar Key. It is a field station committed to providing (a) sup-
port for multidisciplinary research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists, (b) an outstanding
teaching program in marine related subjects, and (c) support for public education related to marine,
estuarine and coastal resources of the state of Florida. Seahorse Key is part of the Cedar Keys
National Wildlife Refuge and is a strategic location for ecological studies, particularly those
related to environmental change. Research and teaching activities using the Marine Laboratory
facilities include undergraduate projects, masters and doctoral theses, and faculty research con-
nected to a broad range of departments and programs including Zoology, Botany, Fisheries and
Aquaculture, Geology, Environmental Engineering, and Wildlife Conservation."



Jon Reiskind (Zoology)
Coordinator, Biological Sciences Program

"The Biological Sciences Program combines the talents of the Botany and Zoology faculties to
provide undergraduate students with a firm foundation in the biological sciences. It not only
serves all the life science majors at UF, but gives the premed and other prehealth professional
Students their biological fundamentals as well. In addition, it provides non-science students
S the biological background with which they can better fulfill their responsibilities to themselves
Sand their communities, making them more aware of the natural environment and their own
health in a technologically complex world."
Zoology Undergraduate Web Page: http://www.zoo.ufl.edu
Undergrad Biological Sciences Program Web Page: http://www.bsc.ufl.edu




New Faculty

Doreen Blischak joins the UF Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders from Ball
State University, where she was an assistant professor. She received her PhD in speech-language
pathology from Purdue University. Her research focuses on literacy development and use of syn-
thetic speech by nonspeaking individuals. She recently completed a study involving early reading
development and is now conducting a study on the use of synthetic speech to promote spelling
in disabled children. She teaches courses in augmentative and alternative communication. Her
outside interests include hiking, gardening, beach combing and skating.




Marta L. Wayne, an assistant professor of zoology, earned her PhD in molecular population ge-
B netics from Princeton University. Before coming to UF, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at
North Carolina State University. Her research interests include quantitative genetics, molecular
population genetics, and issues of gender and science. As an evolutionary biologist, she is also
interested in how genetic variation is maintained in natural populations for quantitative traits. She
SC "B teaches courses in genetics, evolutionary genetics and core biology. In her spare time, she enjoys
hiking, writing and cooking.









Rats and Taste

by Alan Spector, Department of Psychology


Most of us take the sense of
taste for granted. But if we
were suddenly thrust from the
shelter of civilization into the wilderness,
where foods are not labeled with their
ingredients as they are in the supermarket,
the value of our chemical senses would
perhaps become more apparent.
Animals in the wild use their chemical
senses in a variety of ways, one of which
is to help guide their ingestive behavior.
Taste provides an animal with information
about the chemical composition of food
and fluid, especially regarding compounds
that are not particularly volatile and thus
do not stimulate the olfactory system. If
an animal ingests a relatively novel tasting
food followed by an episode of gastroin-
testinal distress, it will subsequently avoid
eating that same food again. This is true
even if the onset of malaise was delayed
by as much as 12 hours!
This phenomenon is referred to as taste
aversion learning and it serves the very
adaptive purpose of preventing animals
from ingesting potentially toxic substanc-
es a second time; humans are not immune
to such processes and reports of learned
taste aversions to novel tasting alcoholic
beverages are not uncommon.


In addition to using tastes as learned
signals, animals -including humans -are
born with some innate taste preferences
and aversions. Human infants,just hours
after birth, will display characteristic oral
acceptance and rejection reflexes depend-
ing on whether a taste stimulus placed on


the tongue is sweet or bitter. Many toxic
plants are bitter tasting and animals natu-
rally avoid them, whereas many energy rich
foods, such as fruits, are sweet tasting and
actively ingested.
Of course, there is no way to really know
whether animals experience bitterness or
sweetness as humans do (in fact, there is
no way to know whether the experience of
sweetness or bitterness, etc., is exactly the
same in two human observers). This doesn't
mean, however, that the taste sensations of
animals cannot be studied scientifically. A
research area referred to as animal psycho-
physics was developed by psychologists
interested in studying sensory processes in
nonhuman (and thus nonverbal) animals.
These inventive testing procedures have al-
lowed researchers to ask animals questions
about their sensory experiences. Indeed,
these techniques have proven invaluable
in efforts to understand the neural basis of
sensation and perception.
In my laboratory, we apply animal psycho-
physical procedures in experiments aimed
at understanding how the nervous system
represents information about taste stimuli.
Our behavioral microscope, so to speak, is
an apparatus we refer to as a gustometer.
This device is designed for use with rodents
and allows us to deliver small volumes of
taste stimuli and
measure immedi-
ate responses. Us-
ing the gustometer,
we have trained
rats to press one le-
ver in response to
sampling sodium
chloride (NaC1)
and the other le-
ver in response to
r-e and r potassium chloride
e b (KC1). The fact
that rats can per-
form reliably in
such a task implies that they can discriminate
between the respective tastes of these two
physiologically significant salt stimuli. If we
surgically transect the chorda tympani nerve,
which transmits gustatory signals from the
taste buds on the front of the tongue (rats
are anesthetized during this procedure and


carefully monitored postsurgically), the
performance of the rats on this salt dis-
crimination task is severely impaired.
In contrast, if the glossopharyngeal
nerve, which innervates four times as many
taste buds located on the posterior tongue,
is transected, discrimination performance
is entirely unaffected. Both nerves and
their associated taste receptor cells respond
to NaCl and KC1, but it appears that the
way the nervous system uses information
from the two nerves differs.
My laboratory is funded by the National
Institute of Deafness and Other Communi-
cation Disorders (chemical senses research
is a component of this institute's mission)
to study the functional consequences of
gustatory nerve injury and regeneration.
Taste buds, each of which consist of about
50 taste receptor cells forming a bud-like
shape, are distributed in distinct fields in
the oral cavity (front and back of tongue,
palate, and near the larynx). These fields
of taste buds are innervated by four differ-
ent nerve branches. We have developed a
battery of behavioral tasks, each focusing
on a different aspect of taste function that
helps us assess the role of gustatory input
from the different fields of taste buds in
the mouth.
Interestingly, when taste nerves are
severed they have a great proclivity to re-
generate and reinnervate their appropriate
receptor field. When the chorda tympani
regenerates, only 70% of the taste buds
reappear (they disappear upon nerve tran-


See Rats, page 8








A utism continued from page 1

children attempting to master developmen- these babies mi
tal milestones like turning over, walking one arm unden
and crawling-on a optical disc recorder, torso while att
which made careful, blur-free, frame-by- to crawl with
frame movement analysis possible. Using arm (figure 1)
footage of 15 "normal" babies as a control, crawl atypical
they examined and documented the chil- one leg steppil
dren's movements using Eshkol-Wachman the other leg me
Movement Notation (EWMN). EWMN is mally. Simila
a general analysis system in which spherical ment problems
coordinates are applied independently to earlier in tumi
each segment of the body. By distinguish- ("righting," fig
ing between which segments are actively ing.
moving versus those that are being carried Moebius
passively along, a deeper understanding of arched, oval s
abnormal movement is possible. present in a m
The results of their analysis were astound- Teitelbaums ob
ing. Every single autistic child demon- autistic children
strated at least one movement disturbance when a child do
by six months of age. The group published sible indicator
an article in the November 10, 1998 issue condition is nc
of the Proceedings of the
National Academy ofSci-
ences detailing their find-
ings. Osnat, who studied
EWMN with the Noa
Eshkol in Tel Aviv for 20
years, points out that this
is the first time EWMN
has been used in a medical
diagnostic context. "It's a FIG. 1. Asymmetry is common
pioneering use of the tech- in the movement of autistic
nology," she says, "and infants. The autistic child above
may eventually prove drags his right arm underneath
useful in the diagnosis his chest, using only his left am
of other developmental to pull himself forward.
disorders."
Armed with segments
of video, Teitelbaum can demonstrate that the disorder in
among other things, autistic babies have dif- itelbaum attend
faculty supporting themselves to crawl. In (CAN) annual
an ineffectual attempt to move forward, they 17 to present h
may rest weight on their elbows and fore- his theory and
arms, dig their toes in and lift their rumps. and then reveal
Or, struggling to pull themselves along, was autistic: b


Rats, continued from page 7


ght leave
neath the
empting
the free
or may
ly, with
ig while
ves nor-
r move-
are seen
ing over
ure 2), and


FIG. 2. A normal baby (right), turns over by rotating in
corkscrew fashion: first the head, then the torso and legs.,
Not able to right itself by rotation, an autistic infant (left)
arches head and feet upward and then kicks the top leg
forward, rolling over en bloc.


later in walk-


mouth (flat lower lip and
haped upper lip) is also
umber of the children the
served on video. "Not all
n have it," he says, "but
es have it, we feel it's a pos-
of autism." And since the
ticeable in autistic infants
as young as one month
old, moebius mouth
may prove to be one of
the very earliest signs
of the disorder.
An important break-
through came for the
group in January of
this year. Teitelbaum
was sent early home
video footage of twins,
e and was told one of
them had been diag-
S nosed with autism. It
was the first time the
group was given the
opportunity to predict
an unknown situation. Te-
ded the Cure Autism Now
conference in LA January
is findings. He explained
methods to the audience
ed which child on the video
oth of them, one severe and


the other much less so. The mother of the
twins, who had been sitting in the back of
the room, stood and said in disbelief, "you
are exactly right." Although one of the boys
was critically affected by the disorder, she
explained, it had later become apparent
that the other was mildly autistic, too. "It
was an exhilarating moment," remembers
Teitelbaum.
Of course, the group still needs to prove
that movement disorders are an accurate way
to diagnose, but Teitelbaum is optimistic.
"If we do a trial using video tapes of 10
autistic children and 20 normal children,
all of whom are anonymous, and we're
able to pick 10 out of 10-even nine out of
10-with no false positives, then we have
a valid predictive method."
With the recent spate of publicity they've
received on their important findings (an arti-
cle in the New York Times, a feature on Good
Morning America and an upcoming segment
on 20-20), the group is hoping to attract
funding for the production of a diagnostic
video. "It will be a self-explanatory 'stand
alone' video for people all over the world to
use to understand and recognize some of the
movement disturbances associated with au-
tism," explains Teitelbaum. "We hope it will
help parents screen their kids for autism so
they can get professional help more quickly,
and that it will become required viewing for
pediatricians as well."%


section). Nevertheless, salt discrimination performance returns
completely to normal. Actually, nerve regeneration is not as novel
an event as it may seem for the gustatory system. Taste receptor
cells have a life cycle of about 14 days, so that every couple of
weeks you have a completely different complement of taste buds.
It remains somewhat of a mystery how the system maintains per-
ceptual stability in light of the ever-changing connections that are
being formed between the nerve fibers and the taste receptor cells.
In any event, animal models of nerve regeneration will ultimately
be critical in the development and evaluation of treatments that
promote recovery of function in humans sustaining sensory nerve
damage in general.


I am privileged to serve as the Assistant Director of the newly
formed University of Florida Smell and Taste Center (UFSTC); Dr.
Barry Ache, an internationally renowned olfactory scientist from
the Whitney Laboratory, is the Director. Our charter members are
from various campus departments in the Colleges of Liberal Arts
and Sciences, Medicine, Engineering and from IFAS. The primary
mission of the Center is to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion
and collaboration on chemical senses research.
I am excited by the prospects that the Center offers, and I en-
courage interested faculty in the College to please contact me for
more information.%








Impeachment and Beyond


by Richard S. Conley, Department of Political Science


As I prepared to commence my academic career at the
University of Florida last summer, never could I have
imagined that my first semester as a presidency
scholar would include the extraordinary events of only the
second impeachment trial in the history of the nation. When
the Senate trial of President Clinton finally concludes, we
will be confronted by a series of challenges. We will need to
reflect carefully on the implications for the institution of the
presidency, the precedents set by the impeachment, and the
historical legacy of first Democratic president since FDR to
win election twice in this closing century.
Central to the future of our chief executives is the independent
council statute which Congress will be tasked with revising
or scrapping this year, particularly if the situation of divided
partisan control of the presidency and Congress persists in an
environment of heightened partisan conflict in our nation's
capital. Kenneth Starr's investigation of President Clinton was,
of course, launched under the aegis of this law. The intent of the
statute was to address the very genuine question of whether the
Justice Department can objectively and impartially investigate
alleged misconduct of the president. Moreover, President Nix-
on's firing of Archibald Cox as the Watergate tragedy unfolded
underscored the potential abuse of executive authority in the
absence of an independent investigatory mechanism.
Many scholars have now come to view the independent
council statute as seriously flawed. Critics point to Starr's four
year long quest into the president's affairs, shifting as it did
from subject to subject, as the culmination of a potential for
"politics by other means." The president's detractors, however,
are quick to point out that the investigation might have ended
much sooner had Clinton not chosen to deceive his staff and
the public for over seven months.
Whatever the case, in a democratic polity process is as
important as outcome. Congress must not lose sight of this
axiom as legislators look back upon the intent of the statute,
reflect upon its utilization during Clinton's two terms, and
debate what changes should be made to the law. How we
arrived at the point of impeaching a president is every bit as
critical as how allegations of high crimes and misdemeanors
are ultimately adjudicated in a Senate trial. Whether future
occupants of the White House are Democrats or Republicans,
open-ended investigations of our chief executive risk paralyz-
ing presidential leadership and damaging the legitimacy of
the institution. Moreover, a real danger that may emerge from
the impeachment quagmire is the delegitimization of future
investigations, before they even begin, into wrongdoing that
can threaten the very nature of our constitutional system. The
allegations of illegal campaign contributions to candidates on
both sides of the aisle in 1996 is but a single example.
Scholars must similarly wrestle with the factors that have
guided the impeachment proceedings. In crafting our repub-
lican structure of government, the Founders sought to insulate


our institutions from public A
opinion. But public opinion
has played an incontrovertibly
important role in the process.
It may be argued that the Re-
publicans' pursuit of the case
against Clinton reflects a disre-
gard for public sentiment. Yet
the strong partisan response
by House and Senate Demo-
crats seems largely driven by
Clinton's public approval rat-
ings, which are indubitably tied
to the strength of the economy. The question naturally arises
as to whether a president accused of the same misconduct
would face a different fate than probable acquittal in light of
low public approval and a faltering economy. And while the
Founders certainly anticipated that the affair of impeachment
would constitute a process more political than truly juridical,
would they approve of an outgoing Congress levying charges
against a sitting president and leaving the trial to a new set of
legislators? The Federalist Papers do not provide adequate
insight.
For the moment, the impeachment morass seems to have
solidified the rampant apathy of the American electorate, at
least if voter turnout in 1998-lower than any other mid-
term election since 1942-was any indication. But what of
Clinton's legacy? Presidential scholar Michael Nelson argues
that Americans have regarded the presidency as "savior" in
Roosevelt, "Satan" in Nixon after Watergate, and "Sampson"
in the weak leadership legacies of Ford and Carter. Talking
to friends, relatives, and colleagues, I find elements of each of
these models in evaluations of Clinton's two terms. What is
striking is the degree to which opinions of Clinton are often
so polarized. For some, Clinton is a brilliant politician who
fudged the truth and exercised poor personal judgment but
who positioned the Democratic party to take advantage of the
new realities of the global economy. For others he represents
a habitual philanderer and a duplicitous politician who lacks
a moral compass, seeking to preempt the Republican agenda
out of pure opportunism.
Such polarity may reflect the crossroads that America has
reached in terms of expectations for our chief executive: Do
we desire policy leadership, symbolic and enlightened moral
leadership, or some combination thereof? The answer to this
question may tell us much about the nature of presidential
politics in the next century. Perhaps the most critical element
in Clinton's legacy is whether that metaphorical bridge to the
next millennium sets our national discourse on a path of civility
and consideration or vacuous, partisan acrimony. As with the
seemingly intractable Senate trial at the time of this writing in
late January 1999, the jury is still out on that question.%









(through Division of Sponsored Research)

December 1999 Total $ 1,179,355


Grants




Investigator Dept.


Corporate...$116,194
Katritzky, A. CHE Glaxo 3,800
Katritzky, A. CHE Mult Comp 1,258
Katritzky, A. CHE Solutia, Inc 65,000
Severy, L. PSY Unipath, Ltd 35,684
Hollinger, R. SOC Mult Sources 2,890
Marks, R. STA San Antonio Spurs 7,562


Award Title


Compounds for biological screening.
Software research support.
Succinimide chemistry.
Couple acceptability of the clearplan fertility system.
Security research project.
Spurs recruiting model building.


Federal...$940,303
Stratford, B.
Burns, A. ANT C


Gustafson, B.
Colgate, S.
Hudlicky, T.
Richardson, D.
Eyler, J.
Yost, R.

Shoaf, R.


AST
CHE
CHE


DC


NASA
DOE
NSF


CHE NSF
CHE DOA

ENG NEA


Martin, E. GLY NSF


Perfit, M. GYL
Fradd, S.
Brown, W., Jr.CSD


NSF

DOE


Sapienza, C. CSD US Navy
Rowland, N. PSY NIH

Spector, A. PSY NIH


Spector, A. PSY
Pharies, D. RLL
Levy, D.
MoegensburgZOO


Foundation...$30,663
Dermott, S. AST UF
Channell, J. GLY JOI


Bjorndal, K.
Bolten, A. ZOO

Other...$46,725
Caviedes, C. GEO
Scicchitano, M. POL
Bjorndal, K.
Bolten, A. ZOO
Emmel, T. ZOO

State...$59,506
Shenkman, E.
Wegener, D. CSD
Leverty, L.
Scher, R. POL


Misc Donors
State of Georgia


70,468 Adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) among adult
patients of an inner city HIV clinic.
28,050 Optical properties of irregular dust particles: experiment and theory.
25,000 Acoustic resonance spectrometer.
125,000 Biocatalytic conversion of aromatic waste to useful compounds.

110,000 Gas-phase chemistry and spectroscopy of mental complex ions.
22,000 Analysis of human and host animal emanations for the presence of attractants
to hematophagous diptera.
30,000 Thomas Usk's The Testament of Love and the Testimony of History: The Will to
Witness in 14th Century English iv; ,1,,,
66,906 ND isotope investigation of North Atlantic deep water population over the
past 25,000 years and education in geology.
42,966 Temporal and spatial variations in mid-ocean magmatism and crustal accretion.

63,000 Creating Florida's multilingual global work force: Policies and
practices for promoting biliteracy.
10,442 Respiratory function during speech production at 1000 FSW.
150,749 Physiologic mechanisms affect by perinatal NaC1 level project 3 of program
proj: Influence of early salt diet.
90,975 Project 2: Effect of perinatal salt exposure on taste function program project:
Influence of early salt diet.
68,094 Assessment of peripheral gustatory function.
30,000 Etymological dictionary of Spanish suffixes.

6,653 Are extractive reserves ecologically benign? Fruit harvest and frugivore
communities.


3,150 Dissertation fellowships.
12,153 Geomagnetic field intensity and paleoenvironmental proxies from sediment
drifts.

15,000 Sea turtle conservation.


1,275 Miscellaneous donors.
10,450 Survey design and analysis in Georgia community indicators.


Mult Sources 15,000 Sea turtle research.
Misc Donors 20,000 Miscellaneous donors.


FHKC


26,905 Healthy kids program evaluation 1997/98.


32,601 A proposal to develop the Center for Community Development and
Enhancement.


Agency






PROCEEDINGS OF THE
TWENTY-SITII CONFERENCE
OF THI
NORTH AMERICAN
THERMAL ANALYSIS
SOCIETY
Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth
Conference of the North Ameri-
can Thermal Analysis Society,
September 13-15, 1998, Cleve-
land, Ohio.
Edited by Kathryn Williams
SEEMBiER i--I, IM (CHE)
CLVEVLAND, OHIO


The Amazon River Forest: TheAma~onRiverF rest.
A Natural History of Plants,
Animals, and People
Nigel J.H. Smith (GEO)
Oxford University Press

(from book jacket)
In this book, geographer Nigel
Smith reviews the natural histo-
ry of the area from the people's
perspective, offering a large-
scale portrayal of the culture
of the region not found in most Nil mh
books on Amazonia. The book
investigates how the ways in which people make a living are
entwined with religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as with
nature. Smith challenges the notion that the Amazon basin
is a demographic void and a cultural backwater, arguing that
the region, densely settled in the past, could again become
a prosperous agricultural area. He points out that the local
inhabitants' knowledge of the basin's natural history is a vi-
tal-and sorely overlooked-resource for sound economic
development. Topics explored include ecological, cultural,
and socioeconomic issues surrounding animal husbandry,
domestication of game, annual cropping, agroforestry, and
the gathering of forest products. Examining the historical
dimensions of various land uses, Smith suggests practical
ways to develop the floodplain that enhance, rather than
destroy, biodiversity.

Excerpt: Psy
Experience has shown that intensifying S
food production in Amazonia with heavy
reliance on machinery and purchased
chemicals for crop protection is risky.
The low prices that basic staples fetch
in the market endanger any farming
with crops that require heavy invest-
ment. Much can be learned about how
traditional food-producing systems are
changing on the floodplain in response
to the growing market for staples in
towns and cities. Some of the low-
cost strategies employed by small
farmers could probably be modified to
increase yields without damaging the
environment.


Bookbeat


White Women's Rights: The
Racial Origins of Feminism in
the United States
Louise Michele Newman (HIS)
Oxford University Press


WOMENNS
. RIGHTS:,


(from book jacket)
White Women's Rights offers 'i
a persuasive and entirely new
analysis of the race-based un- .
derpinnings of American femi- 'I, i ,.
nist thought between the 1850s
and the 1920s. While previous
scholarship had highlighted the
ethnocentrism of certain 19th centuryAmerican women
orfeminists, Newman demonstrates that feminism itself,
as a set of ideas, had an intrinsically racial component.
Her argument is original, complex and subtle.

Excerpt:
Prior to the demand for domestic training, all mothers
regardless of class or ethnic background, potentially
had been equals in their mothering because mothering
had been understood as a "natural" quality inherent in
womanhood, not a skill to be taught and learned. In
demanding training for motherhood (and training for
teachers to train mothers), Beecher introduced a new
class hierarchy among women--creating new categories
of better and worse mothers. Moreover, Beecher's
demands for domestic reform and the professionaliza-
tion of motherhood introduced new racialized divisions
among white, immigrant, and black women, since many
groups--including enslaved, immigrant and Native
American women--were automatically excluded from
Beecher's conception because they did not have the
kind of homes Beecher conceived as the foundation for
"woman's political authority.


hology Staff


The Psychol-
ogy office staff
includes Diana
Wiliamson, Sec-
retary (left), and
.. Cheryl Phillips,
--: Office Manager
.'. :-" (right),.








Musings, continued from page 1

semester. A research journal should be
maintained by the student to detail schol-
arly progress and to serve as the basis for
regular student-mentor updates. Exactly
how this is done may differ considerably
within the disciplines.
The culmination of the research ex-
perience will involve participation in the
University Scholars Symposium to be
held in April, 2000, at which students may
summarize the results of their research,
either in 20 minute oral presentations or by
means of poster displays. A distinguished
panel of faculty will serve to review and
evaluate the student presentations. After
the symposium, a luncheon will be held for
students, parents, and mentors, hosted by
Provost Capaldi and featuring an address
by President Lombardi. It should be a
grand event.
Some of you will recognize that the
University Scholars Program is an elabora-
tion of the CLAS undergraduate research
program that currently involves many
faculty and students. An immediate dif-
ference to be recognized is the financial
element. Deeper pockets in the Provost's
office permit built-in rewards and incen-
tives for the participants in the University
Scholars Program.
Our undergraduate students are among
the best in the country by almost any mea-
sure of quality. Having these outstanding
students work with our top-notch faculty
provides the basis for high expectations in
undergraduate research. It is a formidable
combination. We should be pleased and
flattered that the university has chosen to
highlight and extend this program, based
on the many proven benefits our students
obviously have derived from their research
participation.
Working with undergraduates one-on-
one can also be very stimulating to the
faculty. True, it requires considerable ef-
fort on behalf of the mentor, but the reward
is great. Students learn, often for the first
time, that knowledge doesn't just come
out of books. It is exciting to see them
develop new knowledge in their research,
an experience not soon forgotten by faculty
or students.





Will Harrison,
Dean



Note from the Chair


Marc Branch, Department of Psychology

T he Psychology Department may be science
the most diverse, with respect to the when spe;
range of research interests of its ing of ph,
faculty, in the College of Liberal Arts and ics, chei
Sciences. We currently have 41 active full- istry, a
time faculty. To illustrate the broad range biology, o
of issues that are being studied, let me de- can speak
scribe, very briefly, the interests of several the "uni
of the faculty. These descriptions, coupled of psych'
with the more lengthy reports of research by ogy" wh
Psychology faculty found in this issue, may discuss
give you a taste of our diversity, the interr
Dr. Lise Abrams is studying cognitive specialtie,
processes related to verbal memory with of the "un
a special emphasis on aging. Dr. Dolores ciples and
Albarracin is conducting research, supported not confli
by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), example,
on what makes persuasive communications include vi
effective, especially those communications And the la
related to AIDS and its prevention. Dr. Dar- starting p
ragh Devine is conducting research on the Similarly,
molecular biology of self-injurious behavior interaction
as well as neurophysiological studies related to the acti
to specific morphine-related receptor sub- simple, bN
types. Dr. Timothy Hackenberg is studying, ertheless
in both humans and non-humans, the factors what is kn
that influence decisions between short-term mechanism
and long-term outcomes. Dr. Brian Iwata, provide a
in a state-funded project, studies ways of more cor
diagnosing and treating self-injurious behav- Thi
ior in persons exhibiting mental retardation. just a bri
Dr. Benjamin Karney studies the factors that wide rang
lead to stability or instability in long-term, in the Psy
intimate relationships (like marriage). Dr. ditional t
Neil Rowland, with funding from NIH, stud- undergrad
ies neurophysiological processes related to of faculty
ingestive behavior. Dr. Carolyn Tucker has the Psych
research programs both on issues related 114 PSY.
to coping with medical treatment and on faculty tr
methods for producing achievement in dis- their rese;
advantaged children. Dr. Robin West, with dergradua
NIH support, is conducting research aimed about wha
at discovering ways to assist the elderly in research-
minimizing effects of cognitive declines.
The brief listing above reveals research
ranging from what cells in a test tube are do-
ing, to what kinds of very simple behavioral -
processes exist in animals, up to studies of .i-
groups of humans. One may justifiably ask,
how can all those activities be thought of as CL!
belonging to a single discipline? There are by t
Scik
those who would suggest that they cannot, ofc
or ought not, be thought of as one discipline. Dea
I disagree. The core that holds the Psychol- Edit
ogy Department together is that all of us are Ass
focused, in one way or another, on behavior. Gra
Just as one can speak of the "unity of the


ak-
ys-
m-
nd
ne
of
ty
ol-
en
ng
relationships among research
s in the discipline. The concept
ity of the sciences" is that prin-
Stheories of one discipline may
ct with those of the others. For
the laws of chemistry must not
olations of the laws of physics.
ws of physics can provide useful
points for analyses in chemistry.
theories about complex social
ns that cannot be reduced simply
ons of neurons in the brain or to
sic learning process, must ney-
not include features that violate
aown about the more elementary
ms. And basic mechanisms can
starting point for analyses of
plex issues.
is issue of CLAS notes contains
ef, incomplete snapshot of the
se of research being conducted
chology Department. Two ad-
iings are of note, especially to
uates. One, a complete listing
research interests is available in
ology Department office, Room
Two, virtually all psychology
y to involve undergraduates in
arch programs, so interested un-
tes are encouraged to learn more
it is going on in the department,
vise, and to get involved.%



UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA
\S notes is published monthly
he College of Liberal Arts and
fences to inform faculty and staff
current research and events.
in: Will Harrison
or: Jane Gibson
t. Editor: Ronee Saroff
phics: Gracy Castine