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Title: CLAS notes the monthly news publication of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
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Creator: University of Florida -- College of Arts and Sciences
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Around the college
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Condon on computing
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    From a professor's point of view
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Faculty in the news
        Page 10
    Book beat
        Page 10
    Grant awards through Division of Sponsored Research
        Page 11
    From the chair...
        Page 12
Full Text







LA


notes


SI in Vol. 11, N .S. 5S 0 e f Lle t it i Sn


The CLAS Journal


Conflict Resolution Depends on

Relationships and Equality


Just what the world needed, right?
Another journal. Actually, we do think
this one has a niche market that will make
it useful to CLAS alumni, faculty, and
students, but those client groups are the
ones who will be the best judges of its
need. So let us know.
The CLAS Journal is a "virtual" journal
that exists only electronically unless you
choose to copy or download some of its
contents. It does not kill trees, at least not
directly, nor does it consume mailing re-
sources or otherwise burden the US postal
service. With our enormous alumni base
of approximately 50,000 Gators, CLAS
faces serious fiscal problems in trying to
keep them informed with hard copy mail-
ings, each of which costs over $20,000.
But cost savings is not the only reason
why CLAS is moving toward electronic
communications. More important is the
flexibility and immediacy that electronic
journalism permits. Hard copy mailing,
which is cost-limited to twice annually,
serves an important but limited function.
So much goes on in this complex College
that we would like alumni and faculty to
know about on a weekly basis. Our new
electronic newsletter, the CLAS Journal,
permits us to update CLAS news with a
quick turn around time. CLAS events can
be put out on the Web while they are still
current.
We've alerted you previously about
the new electronic directions along which
CLAS is moving. Under Kim Pace's
talented efforts, we've come a long way
over the past few months. First, we'd
like you to check our CLAS homepage
[http:/ /www.clas.ufl.edu], which serves
as the entrance to many different kinds
of information about the College and UF.
Links off the homepage include depart-
ments and centers, the Dean's Office, the


Marian Borg, assistant professor of
sociology, researches social control and
how people resolve conflicts.



Following is an interview with Marian
Borg, assistant professor of sociology.

Your area of research is in social con-
trol, deviance and criminology. What
specifically are you interested in?

I study social control, which I define
as any method people or groups have
of responding to conflicts. There are
many different ways we respond to
conflicts. Some of them are very for-
mal such as the law and then there are
informal ways we deal with disputes
every day. The theory I use to orga-
nize my research identifies five forms


of conflict management. First of all,
people can negotiate a settlement by
talking to each other and trying to
resolve the issue between themselves.
Secondly, they can avoid each other.
Thirdly, they can simply tolerate the
wrong-doing and decide not to take
any action. They can also resort to
self-help which involves using force
or aggression to resolve the conflict.
And finally, they can ask a third-party
to intervene and help them manage
their conflict.

What are the different kinds of third-
party settlement available to people
in conflict situations?

There are three different kinds and
the distinction is based primarily on
how much power that third party has.
Mediators can help solve a conflict
but don't have the power to tell you
how to resolve it. Their role is to help
you communicate. Arbitrators have
a little more power. They usually
listen to both sides and then decide
what should be done. They usually
don't have the power to enforce the
decision, however. Adjudicators, like
judges, listen to both sides and have
the power to make a decision and the
power to enforce a settlement.

Your research also deals with the
reasons why people choose the form
ofconflict management they do. What
are they?

Basically, I focus on how the relation-
ship people have with one another


--See Musings, page 12


This month's focus: Department of Sociology


--See Conflict, page 12







Around the College



DEPARTMENTS


CLASSICS
Gareth Schmeling delivered the 1997
J. P. Sullivan Memorial Lectures at the
University of California Santa Barbara
in April.


COMMUNICATION P&D
Don Williams served as Visiting Pro-
fessor during the fall semester at the
The Linguistic University in Nizhny
Novgorod, Russia.


GEOGRAPHY
Stephen Golant gave the keynote ad-
dress at the annual meeting of the Boston
Society for Gerontologic Psychiatry at
Brandeis University on April 5.



GERMANIC & SLAVIC L&L
Keith Bullivant gave the keynote lec-
ture at the opening celebration of the
80th anniversary of Heinrich Boell at the
German Cultural Center in New York in
April.


ZOOLOGY
David Evans, started a three-year term
as chair of the Comparative Physiology
section of the American Physiological
Society at the Experimental Biology
meeting in New Orleans.



UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA
CLAS notes is published monthly by the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences to inform fac-
ulty and staff of current research and events.


Dean:
Editor:
Graphics:


Willard Harrison
Lurel D. Ponjuan
Sally Brooks


Anthropology Students Build

Teepees Behind the Hub


Students built two teepees as part of the Plains Indians class taught each
spring by John Moore, professor and chair of anthropology. Their materials
were authentic 17 Lodgepole Pine poles from the Little Rocky Mountains of
Montana and teepee covers made by Cheyenne Indians of Oklahoma. Once the
teepee was finished, there was room for 40 people to sit comfortably and 12 could
sleep there.


HONORS AND AWARDS

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences would like to congratulate the
following faculty members for their achievements and recognition.



* Leslie Anderson (Political Science) received the Howard Foundation
Fellowship from Brown University. She was one of only 9 recipients
out of 160 applicants.


Adcult USA: The Triumph of Advertising in American Culture by
James Twitchell (English) was selected as the winner of the 1996 Ray
and Pat Browne Award in the scholarly mongoraph category.


Pierre Sikivie (Physics) was awarded a Crn.,. ,l,.im Fellowship for
the upcoming academic year.


C. S. (Buzz) Holling received a $1.5M McAuthur Foundation Award
to develop a research network to study the resilience of ecological,
economic and social systems.


Worldwide web http://clas.ufl.edu/clas-
notes







Around the College


CLAS Students are Winning
Awards and Scholarships

Not to be outdone by faculty, our students are receiving
prestigious academic awards and scholarships for their
academic performance. Listed are just some of the recent
student winners.
Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
Elise R. Manning (Chemistry) and Jonathan Wrubel (Phys-
ics) are among 282 students out 1,164 applicants selected
to receive the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships. The award
is designed for undergraduate students in mathematics,
science and engineering. It covers costs up to $7,500 per
year.
Foundation of the Florida Language-Speech and Hearing
Association Scholarship
Teressa Peterson (Communication P & D) and Wayne King
(Communication P & D) received scholarships by the
Foundation of the Florida Language-Speech and Hearing
Association for $2,000 and $1,000 respectively. Students are
nominated by their faculty on the basis of their scholarship
and their potential contribution to the profession.
Robert Long Essay Competition
John Peoples (Philosophy) and Barry C- iM(tih- (Mathematics)
were first and second place winners of the 1996-97 Robert
Long Essay Competition worth $300 and $100 respectively.
The competition encourages students to investigate the
sources, motivations and development of mathematical
ideas in a 15-25 -page essay on the history and/ or philoso-
phy of mathematics.
Leroy Apker Award
Chris Schaffer (Physics), former UF undergraduate, re-
ceived the Leroy Apker Award, the most prestigious award
presented by the American Physical Society. It is awarded
each year for outstanding research contributions by an
undergraduate student.



The eighth annual Public Speaking Students
Forum was held on March 20, 1997. Six speakers
were selected from more than 1,000 students who
were enrolled in the introductory course in public
speaking within the past year. These six students
were nominated by their SPC 1600 (Introduction
to Public Speaking) instructors and presented
speeches on topics of their own choice. Subject
areas included vegetarianism, cigars, racism,
pollution, the importance of exercise, and ~ .1clil I.
The participants in the forum were (pictured
but not in order): Shelley Caracciolo 1st place,
Phillip Greco 2nd place, Mike Giasi 3rd place,
Erin Jenkins, Harry Mihet and Mirri Shah.


Two Faculty Receive NEH
Awards for Their Research

The Division of Research and Education Programs, Na-
tional Endowment for the Humanities, awarded Irma Mc-
Claurin (Anthropology) and Alexander Stephan (Germanic
& Slavic Languages and Literatures) its 1997 Summer
Stipend awards. The purpose of the program is to allow
scholars to devote two consecutive months of full-time
study and research to a particular project by providing
them with stipends of $4,000.


Stephan's project is titled "Literature and the Nazi State:
Exiled Writers of the German Foreign Office 1933-1945."
He will conduct a book-length study of the extensive
materials in the archives of the German Foreign Office
involving German writers exiled by the Nazis between
1933 and 1945. He hopes to shed light on the treatment of
such intellectuals as Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Bertolt
Brecht and Lion Feuchtwanger by Nazi authorities.



McClaurin's project is titled "'Alone Am I': A Biography
of Leanita McClain." She hopes to make progress toward
the completion of a biography of Leanita McClain, a suc-
cessful, young black journalist for the ChicL go Times who
committed suicide in 1984. The work will be based on
extensive interviews with Leanita's family, friends and
colleagues and an analysis of her journalistic and personal
writings. The work will also examine the multiple cultural
contexts of work, community and personal life which
Leanita had to negotiate in order to illustrate how the
social matrix of race, class and gender combine to affect
individual lifestyle and life choices.


!I


I A









Contraception, Reproduction Are As Much

Men's Responsibilities As Women's


Reproductive issues aren't just
women's issues said William Mar-
siglio, associate professor of sociol-
ogy, who has just written a book,
Procreative Man, to be published by
New York University Press this fall.
He explores men's perspectives on
conception, contraception, abortion,
pregnancy and childbirth.
"The basic idea of the book was
to explore men's diverse experiences
with reproductive issues of one sort
or another," he said. "I place procre-
ative issues within a sociohistorical
context while also suggesting that
we need to think about fatherhood
issues from a broader perspective,
one that predates actual concep-
tion."
His research focuses on men's life
experiences, from sex to procreation
to actual fatherhood. By getting men
to see themselves as procreative
beings, he believes they'll be en-
couraged to take fatherhood more
seriously. This includes respecting
their female partners and making
better decisions before conception
even occurs.
"I advocate programs that in-
crease men's sense of respect to-



"Early in the next

century men are likely

to have more contra-

ceptive options which

will alter how couples

can negotiate this is-

sue."

-William Marsiglio
Associate professor of
sociology


wards their female partners," he said.
"To the extent men have greater respect
for their partners, I think they will
make certain decisions such as whether
or not to have unprotected sex or to talk
to their partners ahead of time to make
sure they're on the same wavelength
concerning pregnancy and abortion."
Another area Marsiglio focuses on
is the future of contraception and how
men will have more options available
to them in preventing unwanted preg-
nancies.
"Early in the next century men are
likely to have more contraceptive op-
tions which will alter how couples can
negotiate this issue," he said. "To the
extent that there's a wider and less gen-
der-biased set of contraceptive devices,
I think the kind of discussions couples
are going to have are going to be very
different from what they've had in the
past."
Marsiglio is just one of many re-
searchers studying fatherhood. The
area began growing in popularity in
the mid-1980s and received an endorse-
ment from the federal government
when President Clinton created the
National Fatherhood Initiative in 1995.
The result has been a greater awareness
of social policy affecting men's rights as
fathers and their responsibility to their
children.
"There's been an enormous amount
of political inertia behind this move-
ment," he said. "There is also a variety
of social movements that are address-
ing fatherhood issues whether it be
the Promise Keepers, the Nation of
Islam or the father's rights movement.
Fatherhood is very much en vogue."
Not everyone agrees with some of
these social movements. Many femi-
nists feel that most men involved in the
father's rights movement say they want
rights to help raise their children but
aren't willing to back up their words
with action.
"They argue that many of the fol-
lowers are just using a kind of rhetoric


, .

I|
*1


William Marsiglio, associate professor
of sociology, researches fatherhood and
men's experiences with reproduction.
His upcoming book, Procreative
Man, is due out this fall.


to demand certain kinds of rights
without any kind of moral respon-
sibility," he said. "Their argument
is that these men are only asserting
themselves because they want to
maintain a sense of power. They
want to control the decisions that
affect the child but don't really have
the child's best interest at heart."
Marsiglio feels each side of the
controversy has valid arguments
and addresses the issues of gender
politics in his book.
"I take a more balanced view and
feel feminists have overstated the
case in some situations," he said.
"While there are some men within
these groups for whom the feminists
accusations are correct, there are
many fathers who do have genuine
interest in their children's lives and
feel unjustly disenfranchised."


:I







Conlon on Computing


Discipline-Diverse Computing


Last month
I wrote about
/- the choice of
,11- V f software tools
-- and some of
',. .the processes
h that people use
to make their
c choices. The
choices are, of
course, shaped
by the needs of their discipline. No
central computing provider can
anticipate the needs of academic
disciplines as diverse as those found
within our College. The departments,
centers, institutes and programs are
the most informed about their com-
puting needs. Yet much of the plan-
ning for computing on campus con-
cerns the provision of basic services
- services that everyone must have
to participate in the UF community.
Such services include e-mail, access to
the Web for both reading and publish-
ing, production of text documents,
access to sources of information and
more mundane services such as disk
back-up, printing and modem access.
Our common needs are growing. Use
of images in documents, transmission
of images and formatted text and
Web site production are now com-
mon place requirements in all our
disciplines.
I'd like to spend some time on the
opposite concern consideration of
the diverse computing needs of our
academic disciplines. The examples
I cite below should not be used to
stereotype computing in the disci-
plines. Our faculty and students use
approaches across disciplines and
their use of computing can be difficult
to summarize.
Our physical and mathematical
science departments are usually
recognized for their high-end com-
putational needs. Quantum Theory
uses super-computing resources to
attack problems. Numerical analysts
use specialized tools and libraries of
software to construct programs to


solve thorny computational problems.
Chemists and others control labora-
tory equipment with computers and
use computers to automatically record
laboratory results. Statisticians develop
algorithms for exploring properties of
test and estimation procedures. Simu-
lation is common in these disciplines,
as are massive data sets. Visualization
is emerging as an important tool for
understanding complex natural phe-
nomena and mathematical relation-
ships. Image processing is developing
as a basic research interest in these
disciplines and then applied in such
fields as engineering and medicine.
Such endeavors require computers
with great computational speed and
systems with large amounts of disk
storage. Such high-end applications
may require systems that run continu-
ously for days or weeks, surpassing
the reliability requirements of admin-
istrative systems. Massive data may
require very high-speed networks for
transmission. Document preparation
in the sciences involves heavy use of
formulae, mathematical and other sym-
bols, graphics and tables. Specialized
software such as TeX for the production
of these documents is common.
Social scientists collect primary data
that is often analyzed using statistical
software. Existing demographic data
from the Census Bureau and other
federal agencies is often needed for
research. Geographers make use of
satellite images, GPS systems, GIS
software and produce graphics that
must be displayed on special devices.
Programs written in audiology and
psychology perform basic and applied
human subject research. Resulting
experiments can involve interfacing
laboratory equipment to computers.
General purpose computers are often
used in combination with discipline-
specific software purchased or written
for particular applications. Portable
computers are often needed to perform
primary data collection off campus.
In the humanities, special comput-
ing needs often go unrecognized. But
the language departments have unique


needs to produce texts in a wide vari-
ety of languages other than English.
European languages can typically be
accommodated using word process-
ing software developed for English
and adapted for other languages. But
languages such as Arabic, Japanese
and Hebrew require specialized
approaches. Hypertext production
may require specialized software.
Film Studies employs video editing
software, and computers are used
throughout the humanities to de-
velop and present multimedia mate-
rials for both teaching and research.
Databases of references and histori-
cal materials are becoming common
resources for students and scholars.
Web site forms manage conference
business, editorial processes and
student information.
Implementing discipline-diverse
computing in a large-scale net-
worked environment is a significant
challenge. The "one-size-fits-all"
approach of people who focus on
standards runs counter to the rich-
ness of the computing environments
required by our academic work. But
standards are very important. Mak-
ing our diverse applications work
in a system of standards can involve
substantial technical effort. Disci-
pline-specific software can interfere
with the operation of the computer
for other purposes. In some cases,
dedication of the computer to the
particular research purpose is pos-
sible, but in most cases, all software
on a computer must interoperate and
no one program can be permitted to
prevent other programs from operat-
ing.
Discipline-diverse computing is
a goal and reality. We need specific
tools for our academic work. We
insist that standards, while required
for communication, must not inter-
fere with our academic work. In like
manner we insist that our academic
tools not interfere with the opera-
tion of our computers for standard
purposes.%









Undergraduates Impress CLAS Faculty with Research Projects

Eighteen students participated in the Seventh Annual CLAS Undergraduate Research Symposium April 19. The stu-
dents were selected based on the quality of their research proposals. Each participant had 12 minutes to deliver their
research results then answered questions during a panel question-and-answer session. Following the symposium,
students, their mentors and their family attended a luncheon in the Arredondo Room during which President Lom-
bardi presented them with plaques and certificates. Three students were also selected for having given exceptional
presentations and will receive $75.


Following each of the four sessions, students answered questions from the
audience concerning their research projects.


Ann Steward's presentation was titled,
"The Effect of Pallidotomy on Acoustic
Characteristics of Speech Produced by
Patients with Parkinson's Disease." Her
mentor was Geralyn Schulz, assistant
professor of communication processes and
disorders.


i~.ii".






Jennifer Madden was one of three students to receive $75 for giving exemplary
presentations. She is a history major and her mentor was Sheryl Kroen,
assistant professor of history. The other two recipients were Matthew Carrigan
(Interdisciplinary Studies) and Tobin Shorey ('[ i-1. i I1.



































The 18 participants in the Seventh Annual CLAS Undergraduate Research Symposium were (not in
order): Dawn-Christi Heron, Ann Steward, Suzanne Walton, Gerard Foo, Alexandra Sanin, Sofia Wahaj,
Matthew Carrigan, Kevin McCarthy, Jason Shinn, Clarissa Green, Adrienne LeBas, Bill Vincent, Tobin
Shorey, Barbara Schulman, Tara Williams, Jennifer Madden, Reshmi Hebbar and Jason King.


Tara Williams'presentation was titled,
"Rudy: A Polysymbolic Character." She is an
English major and her mentor was Brandon
Kershner, professor of English.


Gerard Foo's presentation was titled, "Theory
of Mind Development and Prosocial Behavior
in Children." He is a psychology major and
his mentor was M. Jeffrey Farrar, associate
professor of psychology.








From a Professor's Point of View


Reflections on Heaven's Gate


by Dennis Owen, assistant professor of religion


Another episode of multiple if
not mass-deaths associated with
a new religious movement raises
familiar questions. The Religion
Department is besieged by report-
ers wanting the same information:
"What's a cult?" "Has this hap-
pened before?" "Will it happen
again?" "Why would people take
such an extreme act?" The answers
are seldom complete or comforting.
And perhaps worse, by the time
we know enough about the move-
ment-its leaders and adherents, its
history and development-interest
has faded and popular attention has
turned to something new with more
entertainment value.
Heaven's Gate seems something
of an exception. Leaving behind
easily accessible information, expla-
nations and even words of comfort,
its adherents have avoided the de-
humanization which met the victims
of Jonestown. For some, the evident
peacefulness of this passing, a true
suicide unlike Jonestown and Waco,
is itself disturbing.
Two of the more interesting and
troubled national responses to the
Heaven's Gate suicides have held
liberal society responsible, (NY
Times, Apr. 17 and March 30). One
suggested that since religion had
been purged from the public world,
Americans were losing touch with
what normal religion looked and
sounded like. The second took issue
with what he called cult apologists
who failed to appreciate and con-
demn the dangers of a charismatic
religious manipulator.
The first charge is simply wrong,
religion is everywhere on radio
and television, on the net, in the
schools. Staggering numbers of
Americans profess belief in God and
participate in religious organiza-
tions. Further, since the writing of
the Constitution, extreme religious
diversity and inventiveness have


been the norm for American society.
For the second, we need to recall that
the prophet, an outsider chosen by
God, is one of the central paradigms
of western religion. We also need re-
minding that religion is indeed privi-
leged by the First Amendment which
forbids governmental prohibition of
free exercise leaving religious practice
to the conscience of each individual
practitioner.
Other than the actual deed of leav-
ing this life early on the wings of the
angel of death, Heaven's Gate seems
well within the range of beliefs and at-
titudes commonly found in American
society. They were indeed centered
around charismatic leadership, and
thus display one of the standard hall-
marks of a "cult," but that is by no
means unusual. Most major world
religions began in just the same way,
and since the great frontier revivals
(1800-1830) charismatic leadership
has been central to many of America's
successful religious movements. They
were very syncretistic, blending bits
and pieces from Christianity, Asian
religions and New Age religions into a
somewhat disjointed blend that spoke
easily of Herf Applewhite repeating
the journey of Jesus in order to impart
the knowledge which would allow us
to escape the cycle of reincarnation and
join (higher) aliens in our new spiritual
bodies in a vehicle that's origin and
destiny was the "next level." In con-
temporary America one can attend an
Eipscopalian Zen meditation, dance at
a Jewish Suffi dance, shed water and
inhibitions at a Methodist sweat lodge,
pass a peace pipe at at Lutheran retreat,
or alternately, join a Native American
protest over excessive theft of their
practices by other religions. Syncretism
is the norm, and in a highly compete-
tive, mobile, market / consumer driven
culture we can expect syncretistic forms
of faith to increase (along with purist
backlashes).


By traditional American stan-
dards, Heaven's Gate was not very
unusual. If any of Heaven's Gate's
beliefs and practices stand out as
ominous, they are (1) the extreme
rejection of the body and the world
(symbolized by castration and the
phrase "we have nothing left to
learn here,") and (2), the extreme
isolation of the group despite
(ironically made possible by) its
mastery of the technology of com-
munication. We may wonder if
the electronic global village may
well be something more like global
solipsism.



"By traditional
American standards,
Heaven's Gate was
not very unusual."




As Americans remain skeptical
of their futures despite a robust
economy, and as the global commu-
nity becomes increasingly competi-
tive more people will seek mystical
pathways to success. Standing in
line at the checkout counter, I inven-
tory the psychic hot line ads in the
back of the magazines. My highest
tally for one magazine so far, 65
cents. Surely in a culture where
millions of people will pay $3.99 a
minute for a treacle regarding love
and money in their future, some
will resort to poison to avoid it.
We are becoming used to the idea
that the terminally ill may commit
suicide blamelessly to avoid ter-
rible pain and suffering. We're all
terminal when you come to it. And
pain is relative to those experienc-
ing it.a








Professor Hopes to Put an End to Negative

Stereotypes About Women on Welfare


Karen Seccombe, associate pro-
fessor of sociology, hopes her up-
coming book, So You Think I Drive
a Cadillac, will help eliminate the
negative images people have of
welfare recipients.
"We have a distorted image of
who's receiving welfare," she said.
"According to national statistics, the
most common recipient is a child,
not a woman of a specific ethnic
background or age."
To gain an understanding of
how women in Alachua County feel
about being on welfare, Seccombe
and several of her graduate students
interviewed 50 recipients of Aid to
Families with Dependent Children
(AFDC). Approximately half of the
respondents were white and half
were African American and the
educational levels ranged from 8th
grade to several women who were
working on their bachelor's degrees.
One women even had intentions
of entering a master's program in
physical therapy. They ranged in age



"Contrary to what a lot

of people think, these

women do not see wel-

fare as an 'easy way

out.'Instead they voiced

how appreciative and

thankful they were to

have welfare. They real-

ize how much worse off

they'd be without it."

-Karen Seccombe
Associate professor of
sociology


from 19 to 48. Many women and their
families lived in subsidized housing
projects.
Women were interviewed about the
factors that forced them to need wel-
fare, how they cope with the stigma at-
tached to welfare, how they make ends
meet and what they think of the welfare
system and current reforms, she said.
Some of the reasons they gave for being
on welfare included: not being able to
find work since many businesses gave
jobs to college students instead, work-
ing on their GED or being left by their
husband.
"Contrary to what a lot of people
think, these women do not see welfare
as an 'easy way out,'" she said. "In-
stead they voiced how appreciative
and thankful they were to have wel-
fare. They realize how much worse off
they'd be without it."
Another finding from Seccombe's
study is that women on welfare don't
like the system and were initially
excited about the proposed reforms.
Unfortunately, the reforms taking place
are not necessarily in their best interest.
They want, for example, a system that
encourages jobs.
"I heard over and over again that
these women want to work, that they
hate being dependent on the system
and that they want a better life for their
children," she said. "But they don't
want to have their benefits ripped
away from them. They need job train-
ing, daycare and health benefits until
they can get back on their feet."
Medicaid is actually a primary
reason why many women are still
on AFDC, Seccombe said. While the
respondents said they'd like to work,
the only jobs available to them don't
offer benefits or pay enough for them
to buy their own health insurance.
"They feel that in order to be a good
mother, they must make sure their
children have access to health care,"
she said. "Without a good paying job,
however, their standard of living actu-
ally decreased because their benefits,


Karen Secombe, associate professor,
is writing a book, So You Think
I Drive a Cadillac, based on her
research on women on welfare.


foodstamps and medical care were
cut or eliminated. They ended up
being worse off than when they were
on welfare."
When asked how they thought
the welfare system should be re-
formed, they said it should reward
people who worked, not punish
them, Seccombe said. They suggest-
ed continuing to help poor women
with Medicaid and other benefits
while they made the transition to
work.
By publishing the results from her
study, Seccombe feels her book can
give women on welfare a chance to
tell policy makers what works and
what doesn't. Without their input,
she's afraid their situation won't
change.
"Our policies are not necessar-
ily created to help them," she said.
"Our welfare reform is designed to
get women off of welfare, not to get
them out of poverty. That's a big
difference."







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


TV Values Go Downhill After Noon
The New York Times quoted James Twitchell, professor of
English, in an article about the decline in television values
in the afternoons. Information from his recently published
book Adcult USA was also cited.

Fla.'s Electric Chair Not Working
The Washington Post and USA Today were among several
newspapers that quoted Michael Radelet, professor and
chair of sociology, in stories about Florida's apparently
problematic electric chair and its role in the death pen-
alty.

Birth Control Not Just for Females
Newsday and Los Angeles Times quoted William Marsiglio,
professor of sociology, on the options of birth control for
men.


Prof. Studies Aging and Memory
The Arizona Republic and the Chiic.go Tribune quoted
Robin West, associate professor of psychology, on aging
and memory issues.


Wild Fruits Aren't Sweet But Toxic
The New York Times cited the research of Doug Levey, as-
sociate professor of zoology, concerning why some fruits
are toxic.


Safety Issues Same for All Prisons
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch quoted Charles Thomas, profes-
sor of criminal justice, regarding safety records in public
and private prisons.


Book Beat


PostNegritude Visual and Literary
Culture (State University of New York
i Press) by Mark Reid (English). (review
taken from back cover)
; In the 1960s and 1970s, the civil
rights movement and other national
and cultural movements fractured
dominant paradigms of American
AK L identity and demanded a reformula-
tion of American values and norms.
This book borrows the moral, ethi-
cal, and political purposes of these movements to show
how film, literature, photography, and television news
broadcasts construct essentialist myths about race, gender,
sexuality, and nation.

(Excerpt) Internationally, Eurocentric patriarchy and
racism affect the economic and social livelihood of black
people. Together, patriarchal and racist practices support
new forms of colonialism in the African diaspora. For in-
stance, in contemporary America, Eurocentric processes
produce such racist acts as the beating of Rodney King and
the mainstream media's depiction of black communities as
solely a narrative ofdrive-by shootings, drugs and car-jack-
ings. On a sociopsychic level, these processes generate such
racist images as the Republican Party use of Willy Horton
during the 1988 United States presidential campaign.


The Twentieth-Century Novel: An
Introduction (Bedford Books) by R.
B. Kershner (English). (review taken from TWNFtIIY
back cover)
Designed to supplement under-
graduate and introductory graduate
level study of the modern novel, The
Twentieth-Century Novel offers a
brief yet complete survey of the his-
tory, theory, and issues of the form.
Through carefully chosen examples
and concise explanation, Kershner introduces students
to the basic terminology, explores traditional conceptions
of the novel, and traces the form's development through
modernism and postmodernism to the present day.

(Excerpt) Writing in 1981, the critic Wayne Booth sug-
gested that the two recent developments in criticism that
had forced him to rethink his position, in a "somewhat
surprised surrender to voices previously alien to me,"
were the work of Bakhtin and feminist criticism. Most
critics would simply name feminism, which is not so much
an interpretive school like others as it is a revision of the
grounds of interpretation themselves. Perhaps Booth's
admission here can stand for the belated and reluctant
admission by the predominantly white, male academy that
at least one major factor in the evaluation of literature had
been p c'-V ini (ticill, ignored.







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


TV Values Go Downhill After Noon
The New York Times quoted James Twitchell, professor of
English, in an article about the decline in television values
in the afternoons. Information from his recently published
book Adcult USA was also cited.

Fla.'s Electric Chair Not Working
The Washington Post and USA Today were among several
newspapers that quoted Michael Radelet, professor and
chair of sociology, in stories about Florida's apparently
problematic electric chair and its role in the death pen-
alty.

Birth Control Not Just for Females
Newsday and Los Angeles Times quoted William Marsiglio,
professor of sociology, on the options of birth control for
men.


Prof. Studies Aging and Memory
The Arizona Republic and the Chiic.go Tribune quoted
Robin West, associate professor of psychology, on aging
and memory issues.


Wild Fruits Aren't Sweet But Toxic
The New York Times cited the research of Doug Levey, as-
sociate professor of zoology, concerning why some fruits
are toxic.


Safety Issues Same for All Prisons
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch quoted Charles Thomas, profes-
sor of criminal justice, regarding safety records in public
and private prisons.


Book Beat


PostNegritude Visual and Literary
Culture (State University of New York
i Press) by Mark Reid (English). (review
taken from back cover)
; In the 1960s and 1970s, the civil
rights movement and other national
and cultural movements fractured
dominant paradigms of American
AK L identity and demanded a reformula-
tion of American values and norms.
This book borrows the moral, ethi-
cal, and political purposes of these movements to show
how film, literature, photography, and television news
broadcasts construct essentialist myths about race, gender,
sexuality, and nation.

(Excerpt) Internationally, Eurocentric patriarchy and
racism affect the economic and social livelihood of black
people. Together, patriarchal and racist practices support
new forms of colonialism in the African diaspora. For in-
stance, in contemporary America, Eurocentric processes
produce such racist acts as the beating of Rodney King and
the mainstream media's depiction of black communities as
solely a narrative ofdrive-by shootings, drugs and car-jack-
ings. On a sociopsychic level, these processes generate such
racist images as the Republican Party use of Willy Horton
during the 1988 United States presidential campaign.


The Twentieth-Century Novel: An
Introduction (Bedford Books) by R.
B. Kershner (English). (review taken from TWNFtIIY
back cover)
Designed to supplement under-
graduate and introductory graduate
level study of the modern novel, The
Twentieth-Century Novel offers a
brief yet complete survey of the his-
tory, theory, and issues of the form.
Through carefully chosen examples
and concise explanation, Kershner introduces students
to the basic terminology, explores traditional conceptions
of the novel, and traces the form's development through
modernism and postmodernism to the present day.

(Excerpt) Writing in 1981, the critic Wayne Booth sug-
gested that the two recent developments in criticism that
had forced him to rethink his position, in a "somewhat
surprised surrender to voices previously alien to me,"
were the work of Bakhtin and feminist criticism. Most
critics would simply name feminism, which is not so much
an interpretive school like others as it is a revision of the
grounds of interpretation themselves. Perhaps Booth's
admission here can stand for the belated and reluctant
admission by the predominantly white, male academy that
at least one major factor in the evaluation of literature had
been p c'-V ini (ticill, ignored.









rrant Awards through Division of Sponsored Research

March 1997 Total $2,385,264


Investigator Dept. Agency


Award


Title


Corporate...$250,134
Reynolds, J. CHE
Katritzky, A. CHE
Katritzky, A. CHE
Katritzky, A. CHE
Katritzky, A. CHE
Dolbier, W. CHE
Dolbier, W. CHE
Marks, R. STA

Federal...$2,064,497
Campins, H. AST
Telesco, C. AST
Ewel, J. BOT
Harmon, A. BOT
Katritzky, A. CHE
Kennedy, R. CHE
Reynolds, J. CHE
Bartlett, R. CHE
Reynolds, J. CHE
Reynolds, J. CHE
Katritzky, A. CHE
Wagener, K. CHE
Yost, R. CHE
Mica, D. CHE
Ohm, Y. CHE
Bartlett, R. CHE
Ohm, N. & CHE
Bartlett, R. CHE
Channell, J. & GLY
Opdyke, N. GLY
Smith, D. GLY
Buchler, J. & PHY
Dufty, J. PHY
Ipser, J. & PHY
Whiting, B. PHY
Sanderson, S. & POL
Wood, C. SOC
Hyden, G. & POL
Pfeifer, K. POL
Van Haaren, F. PSY
Carter, R. STA
Chapman, C. ZOO


Other...$61,842
Bernard, H.
Bernard, H.
Falsetti, A.
Dermott, S.
Jones, D.
Wagener, K.
Baum, R.
Nordlie, F


ANT
ANT
ANT
AST
BOT
CHE
CAP
ZOO


Adhesives
Am Cyanamid
Flexsys
Glaxo Res
Nippon Soda
Specialty Coat.
Specialty Coat.
Biomaterials


NASA
NSF
NSF
NSF
NSF
NSF
NSF
Air Force
Air Force
Air Force
Army
Army
DOA
Navy
Navy
Army

Navy

NSF
ACD

NSF

NSF

NASA

NSF
NIH
DOE
NSF


Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Multiple
Misc Don


36,234
2,800
40,000
5,700
8,280
130,000
19,500
7,620


19,998
85,000
90,000
80,000
34,717
78,000
65,283
160,043
65,000
134,693
103,457
115,000
18,000
11,448
15,809
10,000


Conducting adhesives based on 3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene derivatives.
American Cyanamid compounds agreement.
Structure activity relationships in viscous substances.
Compounds for biological screening.
Nippon Soda.
New methods for the synthesis of flourinated paracyclophones.
New methods for the synthesis of flourinated paracyclophones.
Clinical trial research design.


Florida space grant consortium training grant.
A MID-IR study of the disks and envelopes of intermediate-mass stars.
Sustainability of soil fertility in reconstructed tropical ecosystems.
Characterization of proteins that interact with CDPK.
Conducting polymers derived from novel electron rich condensed heterocycles.
Chemical monitoring using capillary separations.
Conducting polymers derived from novel electron rich condensed heterocycles.
Metastable molecules and other energetic structures.
Multi-color electrochromic polymer coatings.
Electronic property control through redox behavior of conjugated polymers.
Detoxification of military wastes by nearcritical and supercritical water.
Unsaturated carbosiland and carbosiloxane polymers.
Analysis of human & host animal emanations for the presence of attractants.
Molecular spectra and dynamics at interfaces.
Molecular spectra and dynamics at interfaces.
1997 coupled-cluster theory and electron correlation workshop.


15,000 Partial support of the 1997 Sanibel Symposium.

161,248 Acquisition of high resolution magnetometer.
99,868 William C. Foster Fellows visiting scholars programipa.

3,000 A workshop on long range correlations in astrophysics and other systems.

60,000 Astrophysics and gravitational physics.

536,368 Human dimensions of deforestation and regrowth in the Brazilian Amazon.


15,052
34,060
6,209
47,244


3,705
1,440
3,000
3,497
12,000
16,200
15,000
7,000


Ethnic contestation on national terrain: politics of development in Tanzania.
Gender differences in alcohol-seeking behavior.
A longitudinal evaluation of Florida's programs and services.
Constraints on primate group size.


Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.
Astrophotograpic Studies program.
Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.
Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
Zoology presidential research graduate fellowship program.


Universities...$8,791
Tanner, D. PHY


8,791 Phosphor Center of Excellence.


Georgia Tech





-Musings continued m page 1 --Conflict continued from page 1
--Musings continued from page 1


Catalog, CLAS notes, Alumni CLAS notes, and
now the CLAS Journal. Archived back issues
of all these CLAS publications are accessible
from the homepage.
The CLAS Journal has only just begun.
Our intention with this journal is to cover
current CLAS events in a most timely fash-
ion, preferably within days. As examples of
what we have published and what we are
planning, we initiated the Journal with cov-
erage of the new Physics Building, which is
rapidly taking shape across Museum Road.
This will be the biggest building built to
date on the UF campus, and it will have a
significant effect on CLAS. For those who
have not gone over to see the new Physics
Building, the photos we published will give
the viewer a feel for the size and stature of
this building. Our stories are slanted toward
brief text complementing informative color
photo essays.
We have also covered the recent Under-
graduate Research Symposium, showing the
program and pictures of all the participants.
We next showcased a representative sample
of our 72 new CLAS undergraduate schol-
arship winners, including the essays that
won these scholarships for the 4-6 students
we asked to come by and have their picture
made. The 72 winners are some of our best
and brightest in CLAS. We will have exten-
sive coverage of the CLAS 1997 Baccalaure-
ate, with lots of pictures of students, parents,
and faculty. By means of a digital camera,
candid color photos taken at these events can
be downloaded directly to the computer for
rapid publication on the Web.
I hope you will designate the CLAS
homepage and the CLAS Journal as Book-
marks or Favorite Sites that you will peruse
often to see what's happening in our busy
College. Give us suggestions for depart-
mental events that we should cover. Depart-
ments may wish to sponsor special issues of
the CLAS Journal by organizing and putting
together an issue that informs about a specific
departmental activity or function.
We are only beginning to scale the learn-
ing curve for electronic journalism, but the
opportunities and promise are most exciting.
We would value your thoughts and sug-
gestions as CLAS negotiates the electronic
thoroughfares.


Will Harrison,
Dean
[harrison@chem.ufl.edu]


affects how they'll resolve conflicts.
One characteristic which determines
this is equality, or the extent to which
the people involved have equal ac-
cess to resources. Another relevant
characteristic of people's relationship
is social distance or to what extent
they're intimate with one another.
For example, whether or not the
other person is a family member, ac-
quaintance or complete stranger will
determine how the conflict will be
handled. A third aspect is the cultural
distance the people involved share.
This includes whether or not they
share the same language, the same
lifestyle, the same values and/ or the
same sense of right and wrong.

Besides your research on social
control, you've also written some
articles on people's perception of
capital punishment. What was your
focus with that study?

I was interested in seeing if the as-
sumption that family members of
homicide victims are more likely to


support capital punishment is true.
Many believe that we need capital
punishment to exact revenge for the
family members of homicide victims.
What I found is that not all of these
"vicarious victims" agree. There are
distinct racial differences. Family
members of white victims are more
supportive than family members
of African American victims. One
possible reason for this difference is
that many African Americans do not
trust the police or the criminal justice
system. So even though they might
support the punishment of the of-
fender, they don't necessarily believe
capital punishment is appropriate.
Another reason why vicarious vic-
tims, regardless of race, might not be
particularly supportive is more per-
sonal. Most often, homicide victims
and offenders know one another.
By extension, it's likely that many
vicarious homicide victims know
the offender as well. That intimacy,
again, might preclude vicarious vic-
tims from supporting the offender's
execution.%


From the Chair....

Michael L. Radelet, chairman of the Department


of Sociology

These are exciting days in
Sociology. With 450 undergradu-
ate and 60 graduate students, the
department is in the process of
making a number of changes that
will enable us to more effectively
and efficiently respond to the chal-
lenges of the 21st century. We are
rapidly expanding the number
of seats in our undergraduate
courses, and in a number of differ-
ent ways are broadening the types
and quality of services that we can
offer to our students.
The department first awarded
graduate degrees in 1931. We now
emphasize four main specializa-
tions: 1) Aging, Health, and the
Life Course, 2) Criminology and
Deviance, 3) Family and Gender
Studies, and 4) Race and Ethnic
Studies. In each of these areas we


are fortunate to have some excep-
tionally talented senior professors
who, by any measure, are among
the top handful of American
scholars in the field. We also have
junior faculty in each of these areas
whose scholarship and teaching
have been truly outstanding.
Fully half the sociologists on
campus have their faculty ap-
pointments elsewhere, and hold
affiliate status in Sociology. Ten
are in the Medical School. Their
teaching and research ties with us
are extremely valuable. As one
way of facilitating interaction, in
March we held one of our regular
faculty meetings "down the hill."
We see even more interdisciplin-
ary projects in the future, and are
seeking to build bridges wherever
we can.