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 Material Information
Title: CLAS notes the monthly news publication of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- College of Arts and Sciences
Publisher: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: April 1997
Frequency: monthly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Education, humanistic -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Subtitle varies; some numbers issued without subtitle.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 11 (Nov. 1988); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001806880
oclc - 28575488
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System ID: UF00073682:00103
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Around the college
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Faculty in the news
        Page 6
    Book bear
        Page 6
    Condon on computing
        Page 7
    On current events...
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Grant awards through Division of Sponsored Research
        Page 11
    From the chair...
        Page 12
Full Text







LA


notes


I Vol. 11, No. 4 Sh. U t of d g f L a As &


The UF Bank

A new and significant initiative
is now receiving considerable atten-
tion on campus the University
of Florida Bank. The Bank is com-
prised of a series of spread sheets
and support documents that pulls
together the diverse elements of the
university's budget. It attempts to
reconcile university costs, resources,
and productivity. The masochists
among you may download and ac-
cess all this information at hlttp://;';.'ww.

The Bank is intended as a guide
for the distribution of UF resources.
Tables are prepared to show which
units are "net contributors" and
which "use more money from the
Bank than (they) generate." How
these net surpluses and deficits will
translate into resource allocations
(and programmatic actions) is cur-
rently under discussion.
As academics, we tend to mis-
trust any attempt to quantify our
job performance. While this worry
is not necessarily misguided, we
should have an open mind about the
potential up-side of the Bank. CLAS
faculty are very productive teachers
and scholars. If the Bank captures
this accurately, the College should
look good and be rewarded. That's
the theory.
This approach to budgeting at
UF should hardly come as a surprise.
For the past three years, President
Lombardi has had in place the
Florida Quality Evaluation Project
(FQEP), which began the process of
gathering, sorting, and evaluating
critical institutional data. The next
logical step was to make use of these
data for budgetary purposes. With
the UF Bank, this phase has com-
--See Musings, page 12


Feminist Writers in the Mideast

Contributing to Women's Rights


Despite the media's portrayal of
Middle Eastern women as robe-wear-
ing, subservient members of society,
Aida Bamia, professor of Arabic lan-
guages and literatures, has found that
women actually hold important posi-
tions in many Mideast countries.
"There are many woman journalists,
doctors, lawyers and even police wom-
en," Bamia said. "They are present in
almost all aspects of life, including the
government. Egypt, for example, has a
female minister of social affairs."
Where Bamia has seen the greatest
advances for women's rights, however,
is in female literature. Her research on
Palestinian and Algerian women writ-
ers has introduced her to many Middle
Eastern feminists, such as Nawal
Saadawi and Fatima Mennissi, whose
voices are finally being heard on issues
such as political independence for their
countries and personal emancipation
for themselves.
"That's why I'm interested in the
case of the woman," she said. "During
the colonial period, they worked and
lived in double oppression. One was
political and one was social."
Bamia has found an increasing
number of woman writers in countries
where people might not expect females
to have such freedom. Contrary to most
perceptions about the Moslem religion,
it actually encourages the education of
women.
"There is a long tradition of edu-
cated Moslem women from early
Islamic times to the present date," she


are


IIII

1?1


w.

ti .

b.


1Y
I


Aida Bamia, professor of Arabic
languages and literature, studies
Arabic literature, with an emphasis
on female writers.


said. "Women have contributed to the
cultural activities in their respective
societies."
It is these stereotypes that Mid-
dle Eastern women are uneducated
and without a political voice that
Bamia hopes her research will correct.
One by one, she is discovering female
writers whose ideas are as advanced
as those expressed in Western coun-
tries. For example, Fadila Ash-Shabi
in Tunisia refuses to use the feminine
article to refer to herself because she
doesn't want to be categorized
as just a woman. She wants to be


This month's focus: Department of African & Asian L&L


--See Feminists, page 12







Around the College



DEPARTMENTS



HISTORY
Julian Pleasants, Dave Tegeder, Daniel
Stowell and Larry Odzak participated in
the annual meeting of the Florida Con-
ference of Historians held at Jacksonville
University Feb. 27-March 1, 1997.




LINGUISTICS
Roger Thompson, a Fulbright scholar,
has given 35 workshops and short
courses to more than 3,000 teachers at
12 universities in the Philippines.




POLITICAL SCIENCE
Philip Williams was invited to de-
liver the 1997 McVay Memorial Lecture
at Xavier University.


Powerful Magnet Will Help UF
Physicists Study New Phenomena


Jian sheng Xia, research scientist (r.) explains to Dean Harrison (1.) how the
magnet will help researchers study new states of nuclear magnetism and how
it will aid in the study of transport in highly polarized fluids. The magnet is
part of the Ultra-High BIT Facility being developed in collaboration with UF's
Microkelvin Laboratory.


HONORS AND AWARDS


PSYCHOLOGY
W. Keith Berg gave an address at
the University of Southern California
on the developments of anticipation.






UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA
CLAS notes is published monthly by the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences to inform fac-
ulty and staff of current research and events.


Dean:
Editor:
Graphics:


Willard Harrison
Lurel D. Ponjuan
Sally Brooks


The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences would like to congratulate the
following faculty members for their achievements and recognition.

* David Hackett (Religion) received a 1997-98 fellowship from the
Louisville Institutefor the Study of Protestantism in American Culture
to draft his study of "Fraternal orders and American Religious
history."


SMark Thurner (History) received an award from the Conference on
Latin American History for the best article published in English on
any aspect of Latin American history in 1995-96.


SDonald Dewsbury (Psychology) received the University of Florida
Sigma Xi chapter's Senior Faculty Research Award for 1997.


SKathryn Burns (History) received a grant from the Pew Charitable
Trusts for a collaborative project on "Indigenous Elites and Chris-
tian Identity: Mediating Mind, Body and Spirit in Mid-colonial
Peru."


Worldwide web http://clas.ufl.edu/clas-
notes










CLAS Baccalaureate Honors Seniors
Dean Will Harrison and the College Student Council invite
you to participate in a baccalaureate ceremony honoring
our graduating seniors. It will be held on Friday May 2,
from 5 to 6 p.m. in the University Auditorium. Cap and
gown are optional. A reception on the lawn will follow.


Presentation Addresses Efficiency
of Multimedia Lectures

UCET and OIR/CIRCA will host Robin West, associate
professor of psychology, on April 9 from 2 to 4 p.m. in
TUR L011. She will present the results of her recent "field
experiment" testing the impact of multimedia lectures in
comparison to traditional lectures. The meeting is open
to faculty and graduate students. Please contact Nadine
Gillus to reserve a space at 846-1574 or e-mail: Nadine@
ucet.ufl.edu.


Female Students in Asian Studies
Can Apply for the Zirger Scholarship

A $1,000 scholarship, in memory of Mrs. Alice M. Zirger,
will be awarded to a female student in Asian studies for
1997-98. The deadline to apply is April 10. For further
information, please contact Susan Kubota in 407 Grinter
Hall.


Series Highlights Women Scientists

The Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research, the
Office of Research, Technology and Graduate Education
and CLAS are sponsoring the 1997 Women-in-Science Se-
ries. Following are the presentations scheduled for April.


Dr. Nancy Levenson
"How Much Trust Should We Put in
Computers?"
University of Washington-Seattle

Dr. Carol Folt
i'l.. 11tilg Effects of Multi-Species
Patchiness on Predator and Prey
Performance"
Dartmouth College

Dr. JoAnne Stubbe
"Ribonucleotide Reductases: Radical
Chemistry Enzymes with Suicidal
Tendencies"
Massachusetts Institute of Technology


April 7, 4 p.m.
CSE E222


April 8, 3:30 p.m.
211 Bartram Hall




April 18, 4 p.m.
Chemistry Lab.
Bldg. C130


Around the College

CLAS Faculty Receive RIP Awards

This year funds for sponsored research were made avail-
able to CLAS faculty from the ORTGE College Incentive
Fund. Together with supplementary funds from CLAS,
$387,000 was awarded recently through the Research
Initiation Project (RIP) competition. There were 85
proposals requesting $1,130,000. CLAS is pleased to
announce the following faculty who have received a
1997 RIP award.


Social & Behavioral
Sciences

Monika Ardelt SOC
Stephen Blessing PSY
Alfonso Damico POL
Martin Heesacker PSY
Renee Johnson POL
Michael Martinez POL
Irma McClaurin ANT
Karen Parker SOC
Joseph Spillane CRI

Humanities

Michel Achard RLL
Nora Alter GSL
Sylvie Blum RLL
George Diller- RLL
Amitava Kumar ENG
John Leavey, Jr. ENG
Kirk Ludwig PHI
Michael Millender HIS
Charles Montgomery HIS
Joseph Murphy AAL
James Paxson ENG
Mark Reid ENG
Peter Rudnytsky ENG
Stephanie Smith ENG
Chris Snodgrass ENG
James Twitchell ENG


Biological Sciences


George Bowes BOT
Daniel Brazeau ZOO
Lauren Chapman ZOO
Harvey Lillywhite ZOO
Larry McEdward ZOO
Donald Stehouwer PSY




Mathematical &
Physical Sciences

Gang Bao MAT
James Boncella CHE
James Channell GLY
Yunmei Chen MAT
Alan Dorsey PHY
Arthur Hebard PHY
Irene Hueter MAT
Alan Hutson STA
Robert Kennedy CHE
Andrey Korytov PHY
Elizabeth Lada AST
Dmitrii Maslov PHY
John Reynolds CHE
David Richardson CHE
Richard Yost CHE


In Memory of Scott Ogden

On March 5, 1997, CLAS and the UF Speech and Debate
Team suffered a great loss with the passing of Scott Michael
Ogden. Scott, a first-year competitor, had already won more
than 27 awards and titles at the state, regional and national
level of forensics competition. He had also qualified to rep-
resent the state of Florida at the Interstate Oratorical Contest
for Persuasive Speaking in Williamsburg, Virginia.









Professor Finds Better Way to Teach Chinese


Following is an interview with Chaunc-
ey Chu, professor of African and Asian
languages and literatures.


Chauncey Chu, professor of African
and Asian languages and literatures,
has just finished a book manuscript,
"A Discourse Grammar of Mandarin
Chinese."


Your research focus is in the area of
linguistics, specifically as it relates
to the Chinese language. How does
your view of linguistics differ from
other researchers'?

There are different schools of thought
in linguistics. The mainstream view
in the U.S. is that linguistics should
be made into a science like math-
ematics or physics, that there should
be rules and no exceptions. My view
is that linguistics is a social and cog-
nitive science with many exceptions.
Because people are involved in the
linguistic process, there will obvi-
ously be variations to any norm.

In what ways does your work deal
with the Chinese language?

First of all, my work is what is
known as functional linguistics. This
includes matching form, meaning
and function within grammar and
discourse. Specifically, my research
has been in functional syntax and


discourse grammar. My concern is not
only the structure of a sentence (how
you construct a sentence by using a
subject and a predicate) but also how
sentences are connected and related to
each other to make up a cohesive and
coherent discourse.

This is especially important for Chinese
because the Chinese language does
not use as many grammatical signals
as English does. The grammatical
structure of a Chinese sentence is more
constrained by the discourse context.
That's why I changed my focus from
sentence syntax to discourse gram-
mar.

How did you become interested in this
subject?

When I started to teach Chinese here,
I didn't understand why the students
were making certain mistakes as they
were learning the language. Then I re-
alized that, unlike Western languages,
you don't see proof in the sentence
itself. You have to look beyond the
sentences themselves and see why
something must be said one way and
not in another. In English, when you're
talking about something in the past you
use verbs in the past tense. In Chinese,
there is something very similar to past
tense but it is used in a different way,
as discovered by myself and a gradu-
ate student of mine. For example, you
don't use the past tense with every verb
that is in the past. You have to look at
what kind of verb it is and where the
verb occurs in the discourse.

What are some other differences be-
tween Chinese and English?

A Chinese sentence doesn't require a
subject. It requires a topic. That's a big
difference between the two languages.
To put it clearly, a topic is what one
talks about. In a Chinese sentence, you
don't have to have a subject because the
topic is more important. A topic doesn't


have to show action or identity with
what follows it. On the other hand,
in an English sentence, a subject is
someone or something that 'does'
or 'is.' So a subject has the 'doing'
or 'being' relationship with the
predicate.


What are the benefits of this re-
search?

This work will help teachers of
Chinese to teach the distinctions of
the language so students can learn
to speak it more effectively. Even
though it's a narrow field, it's very
useful. I've been asked to speak
to teachers of Chinese as a foreign
language in Taiwan, China, Singa-


"This work will help

teachers of Chinese

to teach the distinc-

tions of the language
so students can learn

to speak it more effec-

tively."

-Chauncey Chu
Professor of African and
Asian languages
and literatures



pore and most recently at Columbia
University in New York. I have also
completed a book manuscript, "A
Discourse Grammar of Mandarin
Chinese," which will hopefully be
out later this year or early next year.
Overall, I feel my research is a very
small step in helping two culturally
different countries understand each
other. Language, I believe, is the
most fundamental tool one needs to









CLAS Welcomes Its New Faculty
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences would like to welcome all its new faculty members. We are certain their
expertise, knowledge and professional experience will greatly add to the quality of education the College provides all its
students.



Alan Dorsey
SAssociate Professor of Physics


Previous Employer:
Ph.D. Granting Institution:
Research Interests:


Teaching Areas:
Outside Interests:


University of Virginia
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Theoretical research into the properties of superconductors;
pattern formation in nonequilibrium systems (e.g. snowflake
growth)
Physics
Spending time with family


Terry Mills
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Previous Employer: University of Southern California
Ph.D. Granting Institution: University of Southern California
Research Interests: Intergenerational relationships grandparents and grand-
children; effects of gender on aging
Research Activities: Longitudinal study of change and stability in grandpar-
ent- grandchild solidarity over a 23-year period (1971-1994);
investigation of the relationship between family structure and
social support network typology
Teaching Areas: Aging and the life course; social problems, organizations
Outside Interests: Travel, golf, spectator sports, walking Gainesville's nature
paths


Richard Elston
Associate Professor of

Previous Employer:
Ph.D. Granting Institution:
Research Interests:
Research Activities:

Teaching Areas:
Outside Interests:


Astronomy

National Optical Astronomy Observatory
University of Arizona, Steward Observatory
Formation and evolution of galaxies
Observation and modeling of faint distant galaxies at
high red shifts; building astronomical instrumentation
Astronomy and astrophysics
Flying, skiing, swimming, biking, reading, public science
education, camping, hiking and mountaineering







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


Aquatic Plant May Help Rice Grow
The Voice of America's English-language news program,
VOA World-Wide, aired an interview with botany Professor
George Bowes about his research into the photosynthesis of
the aquatic weed Hydrilla and the possibility of using its
genes to transform and enhance the productivity of rice.



Media Recognize Maple's Work
The New York Times, Boston Globe, Chiic.go Tribune, Re-
uters North American Wire and Reuters World Service were
among the outlets that published stories about the death
of William Maples, UF's forensic anthropology expert.


Private Lives, Public Conflicts:
Battles Over Gay Rights in Ameri-
can Communities (CQ Press) by
James Button (Political Science),
Barbara Rienzo and Kenneth Wald
(Political Science). (review taken from
book cover)
The battle over rights for gays
and lesbians is a major part of the
culture war currently being waged
in communities throughout the
United States. Private Lives, Public


Conflicts explores the cutting edge of civil rights the
grass-roots movement for legal protection on the basis of
sexual orientation.

(Excerpt) Throughout American history gay identity
has remained hidden because of an atmosphere of perva-
sive hostility to homosexual expression. In the dominant
Judeo-Christian tradition, im',,c'.-. \,il behavior was
excoriated as a heinous sin, the law branded it as serious
crime, and the medical profession diagnosed homosexuals
and lesbians as diseased."...This environment made it
extremely difficult to formulate gay identity or to locate
a homosexual subculture... Under these oppressive condi-
tions, it is surprising that a major gay political movement
was ultimately able to emerge.


Disease Killing Captive Alligators
The Rocky Mountain News and Reuters North American Wire
published a story about a mystery disease killing captive
alligators. Kent Vliet, associate in zoology, was quoted.




"Rosewood" Tells Painful Story
The Ronoake Times and World News quoted history
Professor David Colburn about the release of the movie
"Rosewood." Colburn was a member of the state panel
that documented the claims of the Rosewood descen-
dants.




Book Beat

The New Language of Qualitative
Method (Oxford University Press)
by Jaber Gubrium (Sociology) and
James Holstein. (review taken from
book cover)
In recent years scholars and
researchers in all disciplines have
moved away from traditional quan-
titative methods of research to more
qualitative methods that emphasize
questions of meaning and interpreta-
tion. Considering research method-
ologies as a set of idioms, The New Language of Qualitative
Method examines alternate vocabularies for conveying
social reality.

(Excerpt) If we accept the tenet that knowledge is humanly
produced, it's not hard to conceive of sites of method talk as
knowledge factories places where the work of knowledge
construction takes place. Extending the metaphor, colleges
and universities stand out as production sites, since nearly
all social researchers have professional ties to these institu-
tions. A good way to hear method talk, then, might be to visit
a production site, to drop in on a first-rate, if make-believe,
department of sociology where research is the order of the
day.


PLL
iiii Hrl ,
Ll .Cerl~r







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


Aquatic Plant May Help Rice Grow
The Voice of America's English-language news program,
VOA World-Wide, aired an interview with botany Professor
George Bowes about his research into the photosynthesis of
the aquatic weed Hydrilla and the possibility of using its
genes to transform and enhance the productivity of rice.



Media Recognize Maple's Work
The New York Times, Boston Globe, Chiic.go Tribune, Re-
uters North American Wire and Reuters World Service were
among the outlets that published stories about the death
of William Maples, UF's forensic anthropology expert.


Private Lives, Public Conflicts:
Battles Over Gay Rights in Ameri-
can Communities (CQ Press) by
James Button (Political Science),
Barbara Rienzo and Kenneth Wald
(Political Science). (review taken from
book cover)
The battle over rights for gays
and lesbians is a major part of the
culture war currently being waged
in communities throughout the
United States. Private Lives, Public


Conflicts explores the cutting edge of civil rights the
grass-roots movement for legal protection on the basis of
sexual orientation.

(Excerpt) Throughout American history gay identity
has remained hidden because of an atmosphere of perva-
sive hostility to homosexual expression. In the dominant
Judeo-Christian tradition, im',,c'.-. \,il behavior was
excoriated as a heinous sin, the law branded it as serious
crime, and the medical profession diagnosed homosexuals
and lesbians as diseased."...This environment made it
extremely difficult to formulate gay identity or to locate
a homosexual subculture... Under these oppressive condi-
tions, it is surprising that a major gay political movement
was ultimately able to emerge.


Disease Killing Captive Alligators
The Rocky Mountain News and Reuters North American Wire
published a story about a mystery disease killing captive
alligators. Kent Vliet, associate in zoology, was quoted.




"Rosewood" Tells Painful Story
The Ronoake Times and World News quoted history
Professor David Colburn about the release of the movie
"Rosewood." Colburn was a member of the state panel
that documented the claims of the Rosewood descen-
dants.




Book Beat

The New Language of Qualitative
Method (Oxford University Press)
by Jaber Gubrium (Sociology) and
James Holstein. (review taken from
book cover)
In recent years scholars and
researchers in all disciplines have
moved away from traditional quan-
titative methods of research to more
qualitative methods that emphasize
questions of meaning and interpreta-
tion. Considering research method-
ologies as a set of idioms, The New Language of Qualitative
Method examines alternate vocabularies for conveying
social reality.

(Excerpt) If we accept the tenet that knowledge is humanly
produced, it's not hard to conceive of sites of method talk as
knowledge factories places where the work of knowledge
construction takes place. Extending the metaphor, colleges
and universities stand out as production sites, since nearly
all social researchers have professional ties to these institu-
tions. A good way to hear method talk, then, might be to visit
a production site, to drop in on a first-rate, if make-believe,
department of sociology where research is the order of the
day.


PLL
iiii Hrl ,
Ll .Cerl~r







Conlon on Computing




Tool Time


We use computers to help us get our
work done. To get work done using
a computer, we learn to use various
software programs which become
our tools. How do we choose these
tools? What are the implicit and ex-
plicit factors that guide our choices?
How does home software differ from
software in the office? How can we
make better choices?
Inertia guides many of our choic-
es. That is, we choose not to choose.
Is WordPefect 5.1 still the best avail-
able tool for the production of text?
Probably not, but we see its daily
use in many parts of the College.
People are resistant to change for
at least one good reason and one
not-so-good reason. A good reason
to resist is that you may have col-
leagues, editors and an existing body
of work that would be difficult to
change. So, for example, abandon-
ing TeX in the mathematical sciences
would be counterproductive. A
not- so-good reason to resist change
is short-sighted concern regarding


time lost during the learning of
a new tool. Most new software
systems are quite approachable.
One can be productive with a
new word processor within a
day and new features of new
tools can often save substantial
time.
r- Serendipidity guides some
choices. I have often heard
S people tell me that they use the
-._ tools that came with their new
computer. The tool was there,
so they began to use it. In some
S cases this introduces people to
standard, productive modern
software. Other times people be-
gin to use tools that few people
know anything about. It seems
a shame to throw away perfectly
good software that came with a
new computer. But it also is a
shame to begin using software without
considering its suitability. Sometimes
software can be donated to others who
might be able to make better use of it.
Economics guides many choices.
Sometimes we use the software we do
because we do not have a choice. We
are constrained by budgets to use what
we are given. At CLAS we have been
fortunate to construct a College server
which houses many current software
systems with licenses paid for by the
College and maintained by CLASnet.
You can count on this software to be
current and legal. Even so, it's just not
possible for us to consider software that
would cost several hundred dollars
per machine. There are approximately
2,500 computers in CLAS. Software
that costs $300 per copy would cost us
$750,000 to license on every machine
in the College. Such systems can not be
purchased by us. We use site licenses
and floating licenses and educational
pricing to reduce our costs.
Site licenses can cover all the ma-


chines at a "site" for a fixed cost. Our
Novell contract allows us to deploy
Netware server software and Corel
applications such as WordPerfect and
Quattro Pro on as many machines as
we wish. A group of approximately
20 software programs costs us about
$3 per machine per year. The state
Microsoft contract enables us to pur-
chase floating licenses of Microsoft
Office (Word, Excel and Powerpoint)
at approximately $140 each. Floating
licenses are checked out like books
at the library to users on a first come
first serve basis. We typically do not
need more than one copy per twenty
machines to ensure that everyone
can use the software whenever they
choose.
These contracts and licenses and
other deals change often. So if you
are purchasing software it is wise to
check the CLASnet web page (http://
www.clas.ufl.edu/clasnet) and the
CIRCA software page (http://www.
circa.ufl.edu/) for current information
about purchasing software.
At home, the issues are a bit dif-
ferent. You want to run the same or
compatible software at home as in
the office. In some cases, our campus
licenses cover home use. But these
vary from product to product, so you
must always check before copying
software onto your home machine.
In most cases our licenses do not
cover home use.
Choosing software can be a com-
plex process. We've produced a set of
recommendations for the basic tasks
that most faculty, staff and students
perform every day. You can find it
at http://www.clas.ufl.edu/desktop. If
we've missed something important,
please let me know. You can e-mail
me at mconlon@clas.ufl.edu.








On Current Events...


Divorce, Abortion Are Positive Signs for Society
-By Cathy Keen, writer for UF News and Public Affairs


The rise in abortions, divorces
and women in the labor force rep-
resent greater equality between the
sexes and not a moral breakdown
of society, a University of Florida
researcher says in a new book.
"Despite nostalgia about the
'good old days,' few people actu-
ally want to return to those times as
they really were, when divorce was
an oddity and women bore lots of
children," said Leonard Beeghley, a
UF sociologist and author of "What
Does Your Wife Do? Gender and the
Transformation of Family Life."
"Given a choice, women will
get jobs, which produce not only
income, but self-esteem. Given
a choice, couples will have fewer
children. Given a choice, men and
women will escape wretched mar-
riages.
"Living in an advanced capital-
istic economy gives us choices that
would have been impossible just a
few years ago," Beeghley said. "One
way some people try to cope with
change is by trying to bring back
the past, where women stayed home
to bear children, men earned a liv-
ing and everyone knew their place.
But this appeal to 'tradition' won't
work."
It's no accident that divorce rates
have risen steadily in all Western in-
dustrialized societies; they increase
wherever modernization occurs, he
said.
In the 19th century, when people
lived on farms in relative isolation
and spouses were economically
dependent on one another, notions
about a happy marriage were less
important, Beeghley said. Even if
people's relationships broke down
or were abusive, few were in a posi-
tion to divorce, he said.
Today, most people live in urban
settings and both spouses often have
incomes, Beeghley said. The oppor-
tunity to see many people at the


office, on the bus, in the supermarket
- allows married couples to compare
their relationship with others, and their
independent incomes allow them to
seek divorce if the marriage breaks
down, he said.
"Even though we still treat women
unequally in divorce and do not protect
children well, the ability to divorce
signifies greater equality between men
and women," he said.
Modernization also brought an
increase in abortion rates. As early as
the late 1800s, when birth rates fell as
a result of a decline in available farm
land the means to support a family
- families became "child-centered"
and couples wanted fewer children
so they could nurture them properly,
Beeghley said.
With no birth control pill available,
contraception alone was unlikely to
explain the rapidly falling birth rates,
Beeghley said. He used the example of
"Little House on the Prairie," in which
Laura Ingalls Wilder describes grow-
ing up in the Midwest in the late 19th
century.
"Her parents had only three chil-
dren instead of the eight to 10 that
would have been typical earlier in the
century," he said. "Although Laura
is silent about how this was accom-
plished, it is probable that the couple
practiced birth control; it is also pos-
sible that Ma Ingalls had an abortion.
Remember, contraception was less
effective then, and it only takes one
failure for pregnancy to occur."
Although the abortion rate has risen
in all Western societies, it is highest
in the United States because public
policy does not promote contracep-
tion, Beeghley said. In contrast, the
Netherlands has a very low abortion
rate despite levels of sexual activity
among young people equal to those
of the United States. The Dutch make
birth control pills available without
prescriptions and cover the expense in
their national health plan, he said.


"The debate about abortion
is not just about the embryo," he
said. "It's about gender relations,
the centrality of motherhood to
women's lives, the nature of family
life and most importantly-it's
about equality."
Those appealing to 'tradition'
say women's employment, divorce



"The debate about
abortion is not just
about the embryo.
It's about gender
relations, the cen-
trality of mother-
hood to women's
lives, the nature
of family life and

most impor-
tantly-it's about
equality."

-Leonard Beeghley
UF Sociologist


and abortion signify a decline
in morality, Beeghley said. "But
equality is also a traditional moral
value," he said. "People who are
equal can regulate fertility so that
unintended pregnancies are rare."
While traditionalists may view
the growing trend of asking a man
what his wife does for a living as a
symbol of the family's demise, he
said, "the question actually signifies
that a woman who happens to be
your wife can also be independent
and your equal."








UF Hosts Anthropologists for
NSF Conference

Leading theorists on human evolution came to UF
February 26-28 for the National Science Foundation-
sponsored conference, Explaining Global Human Diversity.
Their goal was to establish new synthetic theories about
the development of human language, culture and biology.
Participants were encouraged to re-think anthropological
theory in terms of new methods of discovering and dat-
ing relationships among human groups from genetics,
archaeology and historical linguistics.
"We were honored to be chosen to host this confer-
ence," Moore said. "One participant said that these meet-
ings put us 'on the map' as a department leading in the
development of anthropological theory."
The traditional fields of anthropology were represented
and included speakers from 14 departments of anthropol-
ogy including the University of Michigan, the University
of Arizona and Stanford University. John Moore, professor
of anthropology and department chair, and Marvin Har-
ris, professor of anthropology, provided the philosophical
framework for the conference discussions.
Human biologists began the conference by presenting
the latest findings in genetics and human development,
emphasizing those features of human biology which had
direct consequences for human adaptation and migration
as indicated by their global distribution.

"One participant said that these meetings
put us 'on the map' as a department lead-
ing in the development of anthropological
theory."
--John Moore
Chairman of Anthropology


During the focus on linguistics, the speakers discussed
the theoretical maximum which determines how historical
or "genetic" relationships among languages can be de-
termined. Archaeologists then targeted two regions of
the world where the dynamics of human diversity were
especially interesting Oceania and the New World. In
both regions, humans migrated to areas previously devoid
of human population. Anthropologists hope that analysis
of the more simple cases will help them understand the
more complicated situations of human migration and
diversification on the continents of Africa, Asia and Eu-
rope.
Cultural anthropologists ended the discussions by
explaining how their actual ethnographic observations
of human societies were or were not consistent with the
discoveries of biologists, linguists and archaeologists.
"By this conference, we hope we have cleared the table
of some obsolete theories, and raised the expectations for
the successful creation of new synthetic theories," Moore
said.


Symposium Honors International
Physicist's Research on NMR

In celebration of his 75th birthday and in honor of his
significant contributions to nuclear magnetic resonance
(NMR) research, Raymond
Andrew, Graduate Re-
search Professor of physics,
was honored on January 5
at the E. Raymond Andrew
75th Anniversary Sympo-
sium. CLAS, the UF Office
of Research, Technology
and Graduate Education I
and the National High /
Magnetic Field Laboratory V
sponsored the event which
included five members of
the National Academy of
Sciences, a Nobel Laure-
ate and many other dis- Raymond Andrew,
tinguished scientists from Graduate Research
the U.S. and Europe. The Professor of physics,
symposium opened with has made significant
a proclamation from Gov- contributions to NMR
ernor Lawton Chiles. research.
Andrew graduated
from the Cavendish Labo-
ratories, Cambridge, with a bachelor's in 1942. He received
his master's in 1946, his Ph.D. in 1948 and his doctorate
of science in 1964. His first work on NMR came shortly
after its discovery at Harvard University where he was a
Commonwealth Fellow from 1948-49.
He then returned to Scotland as a lecturer at St. An-
drews where he conducted seminal NMR studies of solids.
He moved to the University of Wales in 1954 and served as
professor and as head of the department of physics until
1964. During this time, he made one of his most significant
discoveries: the narrowing of NMR lines by magic angle
spinning. This is now the foundation of modern high
resolution NMR studies in solids.
Later in 1964, he was appointed Lancashire professor
and head of physics at Nottingham and became dean in
1975. Then in 1983, Andrew came to UF where he now
conducts NMR research both in the physics department
and in the health science center. He was elected a Fellow
of the Royal Society in 1984.
He admits that at the time of his earliest work, he had no
idea of the magnitude of his research with NMR including
the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),
an established diagnosis tool. In fact, Andrew predicts
the MRI will become even more valuable to the medical
field.
"We never foresaw such immense applications as
there are today," Andrew said. "And there are even more
developments, especially in medicine. The next step is in
surgical intervention."










Japanese Linguist Finds Language Fascinating


Ann Wehmeyer, associate profes-
sor of Japanese and linguistics, may
know more about the history of the
Japanese language than many native
Japanese. She has been reading and
writing in Japanese for 25 years, she
lived in the country for six years


Ann Wehmeyer, associate professor
of Japanese and linguistics, studies
the origin and history of Japanese
language.


and has been studying the origin of
linguistic investigation in Japan for
the past five years.
Her research focuses on when
people discovered grammar and
structure to language, which was
sometime around the 18th century.
Through her studies, she's found
that the Japanese of that time took
their language very seriously and
considered it a gift from the Gods.
"What was interesting for me is
that when people started noticing
that verbs followed certain patterns,
they interpreted that as being a kind
of divine structure," Wehmeyer said.
"It was thought to be something that


the Gods gave to the Japanese language
which made it special."
During the time the Japanese were
discovering a pattern to their language,
they were also trying to resurrect Shinto
which was Japan's indigenous religion.
Up until then, it had been eclipsed by
the Chinese religions of Confucianism,
Daoism and Buddhism.
"Shinto means 'the way of the
Gods'," she said. "The Japanese thought
if they understood the patterns of their
language that it was one bit of evidence
of the Gods' design."
The birth of Japanese linguistics
and the resurrection of Shinto came
at a time when Japan was trying to
distinguish itself from China. Prior
to this period it is believed that Japan
didn't exist, that there were just feudal
kingdoms. Then, thanks to the work
of Motoori Norinaga, the Japanese
language and eventually Japan the
nation was born.
"Articulating a national language
was central to establishing a Japanese
nation," Wehmeyer said. "Language
was also important in establishing
religion and articulating what they
believe spiritually."
Before the written Japanese lan-
guage existed formally (prior to 712
A.D.), people would borrow words
from the Chinese language and use
Chinese characters for their sound
value. The result was a confusing
mixture of two languages. Norinaga,
however, figured out how to read the
manuscripts written in this pseudo
language by compiling lists of the char-
acters, determining their sound value
and learning how they were used.
"Norinaga is said to be the greatest
thinker Japan has ever produced," she
said. "He discovered certain things
about Japanese that people hadn't
noticed before such as that there were
eight vowels instead of the five vowel-
system in modern Japanese."
The vowel system is just one of


many changes the Japanese lan-
guage has undergone since its begin-
ning. Wehmeyer notes that in mod-
ern Japanese, for example, there are
distinct hierarchical levels and that
who you're talking to determines
what form of the language you use.
For example, everyday conversation
typically uses an informal language
while formal occasions require the
use of an elevated form.
"There are honorific terms used
to refer to your social superiors,
and when speaking about yourself
you have to use humbler terms,"
she said. "It's a way of elevating the
other party and pushing yourself
down."
Despite all the specialized work
Wehmeyer has done on the origin of
the Japanese language- as well as
her personal experiences in speaking
it- she feels her research can be use-
ful to professionals in many fields.
"I'm a linguist but I'm trying to


"It was thought to

be something that
the Gods gave to
the Japanese lan-

guage which made it
special."

-Ann Wehmeyer
Associate professor of
Japanese and linguistics


study language in its cultural and
social contexts," she said. "I hope
that the work I do will be of interest
to people in history, religion and
anthropology, not just to other lin-
guists."








rrant Awards through Division of Sponsored Research


February 1997 Total $1,260,662


Investigator Dept. Agency


Award


Title


Corporate...$260,662


Wagener, K.
Yost, R.
Harrison, W.
Katritzky, A.
Hanrahan, R.
Thomas, C.
Hollinger, R.
Hollinger, R.
Marks, R.
Marks, R.


CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CRI
SOC
SOC
STA
STA


Dow Corning
Finnigan
Leco
Multiple
SRT, INC
CCA
Bealls
Parisian
Knoll
Biomaterials


32,152
25,000
37,625
89,500
1,000
8,500
2,000
1,500
60,000
3,385


Federal...$607,680


Campins, H.
Judd, W.
Boncella, J.
Eyler, J.
Wagener, K.
Reynolds, J.
Bartlett, R.
Ohrn, Y.
Hodell, D.
Bao, G.
Dorsey, A.
Nichols, G.


AST
BOT
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
GLY
MAT
PHY
RLL


NASA
NSF
NSF
NSF
US Army
US Navy
Air Force
US Army
NSF
NSF
NSF
DOE


6,000
64,923
49,221
85,000
66,347
54,318
7,500
20,000
156,271
22,600
72,000
3,500


A technology for siliconizing polymer surfaces.
Fundamental and instrumental studies of GC/MS/MS on the GCQ.
Micro second pulsed glow discharge.
Miles Compound Contract.
Gas phase hydrogen halogen systems.
Private corrections project.
Security research project.
Security research project.
Invest clinical trial/faculty incentive program.
Clinical trial research design.



Comets: A multimedia presentation for schools.
Generic flora of the southeastern United States.
Research experiences for undergraduates in chemistry.
Acquisition of an electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer.
Acquisition of a preparative high pressure liquid chromatograph.
Conductivity contract with Redox Switchable Conducting Polymers.
1997 coupled-cluster theory and electron correlation workshop.
1997 Sanibel symposium.
Acquisition of a stable isotope mass spectrometer with automated sys.
Inverse problems in diffractive optics and wave propagation.
Theoretical studies of vortex dynamics in superconductors.
National resource centers and foreign language fellowships.


Foundations...$15,000


Williams, K.


CHE Dreyfus


15,000 UV/VIS Fiber optic spectrophotometers for undergraduate chemistry lab.


Other...$13,523


ANT Misc Don
CHE Misc Don
GLY Misc Don


2,376
4,947
6,200


Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.


CHE ACS
CHE Multiple


20,000 Stable antibodies lacking disulfide bonds: applications to breast cancer.
1,500 Florida advanced materials chemistry conference.


Shuster, J. STA Northwestern
Bolten, A. &
Bjorndal, K. ZOO U of Virginia


78,922 Pediatric Oncology Group phase I contract.

97,000 Bahamas National biodiversity data-base, strategy, and action plan.


Bernard, H.
Yost, R.
Mueller, P.


State...$21,500


Stewart, J.
Talham, D.


Universities...$351,844





--Musings continued from page 1

menced.
We should look carefully at the
Bank data and see what messages
are being sent. And are they valid?
For example, knowing to what ex-
tent the many CLAS academic units
are pulling their weight in teaching
(e.g., student credit hours per faculty
FTE) should be one element of input
in allocating scarce resources. Even
departments that traditionally attract
few formal majors can contribute
significantly by offering general edu-
cation courses. And most do so. But
evaluating teaching contributions
is relatively easy compared to the
daunting prospect of making similar
judgments about scholarship, given
the rich diversity of CLAS.
As recognized by President Lom-
bardi, there are some important
limitations in constructing these
data comparisons. Natural Science
departments bring in grants and
contracts that fit neatly into a balance
spread sheet. The Humanities do not
generally share this opportunity, so
their tally sheet will not reflect as di-
rectly their extensive and important
scholarship. Funding opportunities
for the Social and Behavioral Sciences
lie somewhere in between. All this
must be carefully considered in the
use of Bank data.
To say that we will pay no mind to
crass data is figuratively to stick our
head in the sand, a corporal posi-
tion that unduly exposes the flanks.
It also suffers from the fact that it is
not an option.
The UF Bank is a reality, and we
will participate. In fact, I believe
that CLAS will benefit from this
data-driven comparison. The current
versions of the UF Bank show that
CLAS does well in both teaching and
research. CLAS is the central engine
that drives this complex university.
Any budgetary document that fails
to reflect this would be seriously
flawed.



Will Harrison,
Dean

[harrison@chem.ufl.edu]


--Feminists continued from page 1


considered a human being so she uses a
combination of masculine and feminine
personal pronouns.
"Other women writers do not like
the term 'feminine literature' because
they feel it's pejorative," she said.
"They feel it refers to kitchen duties and
other traditional feminine activities,
whereas their work deals with political,
national and general human issues."
In addition to her research on
women writers, Bamia also feels that
her role as teacher is just as important
in order to familiarize her students with
the accomplishments of Arab women
and literature.
"It is important to touch students be-
cause they're your best ambassadors,"
she said. "Through one person you can


touch 10 and so on. I've noticed there
is a genuine willingness to be intro-
duced to this part of the world."
Bamia shares her research in other
ways by getting published in encyclo-
pedias and by editing the Journalfor
the American Association of Teachers
of Arabic. Her other research activi-
ties include studying a folk Algerian
poet, Muhammed ben At-Tayyeb.
"Research gives you a wider
audience through your readers,"
she said. "Ultimately, I hope to cor-
rect the impression people have of
the Arab world- Arab women in
particular- and to eliminate those
stereotypes. We try, as educators, to
do that as much as possible."


The Department of African and
Asian Languages and Literatures
(AALL) was founded in the Fall of
1982 in order to establish a channel
for "non-Western" languages and
literatures. The Department consists
of five areas: Chinese, Japanese, He-
brew, Arabic and African languages.
From its inception the Department
has stressed development of depth
in the existing languages, rather than
expanding laterally. In order to fulfill
this policy AALL initiated in the mid
1980s a bachelor's in East Asian Lan-
guages and Literatures (Japanese and
Chinese tracks), and since then this
major has shown a steadily increas-
ing number of majors.
The next major will be in Near
Eastern Language and Cultures,
which will be offered next year
through the College Interdisciplin-
ary Program. The new major will
have two tracks (Hebrew and Ara-
bic) and will offer a wide variety of
"cultural" courses along with the
language and literary ones. One of
the novelties of this major will be two
mandatory courses-the History of


Semitic Languages and Major Writ-
ers in Contemporary Hebrew and
Arabic Literatures-that will be co-
taught by our Arabic and Hebrew
professors. After all, Arabic and
Hebrew are strongly related to each
other (modern politics and conflicts
aside). In the near future we hope to
be able to offer a major in African
languages and cultures as well.
AALL prides itself on its com-
mitment to high-quality teaching,
and the students' evaluations of
our faculty are usually among the
highest in CLAS. It is my pleasure
to add that despite our small size,
AALL is rather productive in schol-
arship. It is anticipated that in the
coming year two of our Japanese
professors will publish their books
in the prestigious Cornell East Asian
series, and our Hebrew linguist will
publish her work on Semantics of
Aspect and Modality through John
Benjamins. In the same time frame
our Chinese linguist will publish a
comprehensive work about Chinese
discourse grammar, and one of our
Africanists will publish a dictionary
of Akan.


From the Chair....


Avraham Balaban, chairman of the Department of African
and Asian Languages and Literatures