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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073682/00102
 Material Information
Title: CLAS notes the monthly news publication of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- College of Arts and Sciences
Publisher: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: March 1997
Frequency: monthly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Education, humanistic -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Subtitle varies; some numbers issued without subtitle.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 11 (Nov. 1988); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001806880
oclc - 28575488
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Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Around the college
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Faculty in the news
        Page 6
    Book beat
        Page 6
    Condon on computing
        Page 7
    From a professor's point of view
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Grant awards through Division of Sponsored Research
        Page 11
    From the chair...
        Page 12
Full Text







LA


notes


IL I Vl 11 sit r SO No 3 Th U r o-flrd l of Li' & i S.


Private Giving


UF is currently gearing up for
another major capital campaign,
which will be officially kicked off
this fall. There is every expectation
that it will be as successful as the last
one, in which over $390 million was
donated from UF's loyal alumni and
friends. It is a great tribute to the
faculty both present and former
- that our graduates remember and
value their UF education so highly
that they are willing to give back of
themselves to the university.
Faculty are sometime unsure
what happens to money raised dur-
ing these high profile ventures. It
may be hard for them to appreciate
why more of this evident largesse
doesn't show up directly in their
workplace. Part of the problem may
be that we do not always do a good
job of showing faculty the results.
More effort is put into raising the
money than explaining where it goes.
We should make a point of indicating
the private sources for such critical
items as building renovations, new
computers, scholarly conferences,
lecture series, professorships, and
student scholarships/fellowships. As
only one outstanding example, let's
consider the last item.
Until the previous campaign
(1986-91), UF had done little in the
way of major fundraising, so it is
hardly surprising that CLAS had
virtually nothing in the way of
scholarship or fellowship funds to
distribute. In 1988, we were award-
ing 1 Turlington Scholarship and
2 Dean's Scholarships annually, a
total of $3,000. For the number of
deserving and needy students in this
huge college, 3 scholarships (and no
graduate fellowships) was totally
unacceptable, so we targeted this area


Statistics Help Fight Children's Cancer


They're fighting the war against
children's cancer but instead of drugs
and surgery, they arm themselves with
numbers and data. As members of the
statistical office for the Pediatric Oncol-
ogy Group (POG), statisticians collect
data on patients, place them in study
groups according to their diagnoses
and analyze the results. From the re-
sults, these "number crunchers" are
able to determine which treatments
are effective, which ones aren't and
which ones require further study, thus
improving the survival rate for many
pediatric cancer victims.
"Our direct role is to help design
the trials for treatment," said Jonathan
Shuster, professor of statistics and co-
principal investigator. "We even help
develop the research questions being
asked and advance the methods to
analyze clinical trials. We have a good
record of bringing new methods into
the real world."
The University of Florida was se-
lected as the site for the POG statistical
office from a national competition in
1979. Since 1980, the annual accrual
to therapeutic studies has increased
from almost 1,100 to more than 2,000.
Patients receive treatment from any
one of POG's 127 international mem-
ber institutions including St. Jude
Hospital for Children, Johns Hopkins
Hospital, Stanford and UF while the
statistical office manages the data on
about 80 open studies and 200 other
closed studies. The POG is funded by
the National Cancer Institute, and its
group headquarters is at Northwestern
University in Chicago.
"There are about 10,000 cases of


children's cancer diagnosed in the
U.S. each year," Shuster said. "Vir-
tually every medical center that is
involved with childhood cancer is an


Jon Shuster is co-principal investigator
of the statistical office for the Pediatric
Oncology Group (POG).

active participant in either POG or
its "sister organization," Children's
Cancer Group (CCG)."
A recent benefit of the POG's re-
search is the elimination of radiation
treatment for one particular form of
cancer. Once thought to be a necessary
evil, studies performed and analyzed
by the POG revealed that radiation
causes more harm than good in cur-
ing "limited stage non-Hodgkins
lymphoma."
"We did a randomized study
subtracting radiation and had over
85% survival without it," he said. "So
radiation is no longer prescribed for
these patients although it was the


This month's focus: Department of Statistics


--See Musings, page 12


--See Cancer, page 12







Around the College


DEPARTMENTS


AFRICAN & ASIAN L & L
Chauncey Chu presented a paper at
the Fifth International Symposium on Chi-
nese Languages and Linguistics in Taipei,
Taiwan, this past December.


ENGLISH
C .., ,'i Ulmer was elected to a five-
year term on the Executive Committee
of the Division on Literary Criticism of
the MLA.


PHILOSOPHY
Ofelia Schutte was an invited lecturer
at the Universidad Internacional de
Andalucia, Spain.



POLITICAL SCIENCE
For the fourth year in a row, Goran
Hyden gave an invited lecture at the
Army War College in Carlisle, PA, in
February. He spoke to 30 colonels all of
whom are candidates to become gener-
als in the U.S. Army.



WOMEN'S STUDIES
Sue Rosser gave a live presentation
on WPSU-FM, the Penn State Public
Broadcasting station, as part of the
"Women in Science" series.



UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA

CLAS notes is published monthly by the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences to inform fac-
ulty and staff of current research and events.


Dean:
Editor:
Graphics:


Willard Harrison
Lurel D. Ponjuan
Sally Brooks


Worldwide web http://clas.ufl.edu/clas-
notes


Dean Harrison Hosts Meeting of

AAU Arts and Sciences Deans


Dean Harrison recently hosted a meeting of38 Arts and Sciences deans from the
American Association of Universities (public) in late January at Sanibel Island.
Discussion sessions included such topics as post tenure review, data exchanges
and academic advising. This was UF's first time hosting this annual meeting.


HONORS AND AWARDS

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences would like to congratulate the
following faculty members for their achievements and recognition.

SJohn Cech's (English) book, The Southernmost Cat, has received
a Storybook Silver Honor Award from the Parent's Choice Founda-
tion.

SKaren Seccombe (Sociology) received an award from the American
Sociological Association Funds to Advance the Discipline for her
upcoming book, "So You Think I drive a Cadillac?": Welfare
Recipients' Perspectives on the System and Its Reform.

SH. K. Eichorn (Astronomy) was honored by the International
Astronomical Community by having an asteroid named after
him. The citation reads: Asteroid (4297) Eichorn: Named in honor
of Heinrich Karl Eichorn (b. 1927), Austrian-American astronomer,
educator and scholar, innovator in the astronomy of stellar positions
and motions.

SKathryn Williams (Chemistry) received a $15,000 grant from the
Dreyfus Foundation to improve teaching instrumentation.

Special note: Robert Zieger, professor of history, also received a
1996-97 PEP award.








Around the College


7th Annual Research Symposium
In an effort to encourage undergraduate research initia-
tives, to promote faculty mentoring of undergraduate
research efforts, and to highlight the value of research to
undergraduate education at the University of Florida, the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will sponsor the 7th
annual research symposium. The Undergraduate Research
Symposium Committee will select from the nominations a
maximum of 24 student research projects (8 each in the hu-
manities, sciences and social sciences) for recognition, and
will coordinate a presentation of the students' research on
Saturday, April 19, 1997. The College will hold a luncheon
in the Arredondo Room of the Reitz Union for students,
their parents, chairs and faculty mentors following the
morning sessions.




Lecture Series Focuses on the Future

The Frontiers of Science Lecture Series, sponsored by
the Department of Physics, continues to focus on the
international technological competitiveness in the
United States. The series is given by nationally known
persons in their areas of expertise. Following is a list of
lectures for March and April. They will be held in the
University Auditorium and will begin at 8 p.m.

March 5 William Brinkman
Physical Sciences Research Vice
President
Bell Laboratory, Lucent Technologies
Murray Hill, New Jersey
"Unlimited Global Communications-The
Technology and Ch.ill, ,ig. -"

March 19 James K. Walker
Department of Physics
University of Florida
"A Case Study of U.S.
Technological Competitiveness-
Fiber Optics"

April 9 Kerri-Ann Jones
Acting Associate Director
Office of Science and Technology
Policy
Executive Office of the President
Washington, D.C.
"International Science and
Technology- National Security,
Economic Competitiveness, and
Global Stability"


UF Women of Distinction
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the admission of women to
full undergraduate status at UF, 47alumnae are named as women
of distinction. Listed below are those CLAS alumnae who will
share this honor.

Carol Browner-Administrator, Environmental Protection
Agency; English'77

Majorie H. Carr- Founder and longtime president of
Florida Defenders of the Environment; Biology '42

Sara E. Conlon-Director of the National Clearinghouse
for Professionals in Speech Education and the state's first
speech consultant; Speech Pathology '65

Kathleen A. Deagan- Research curator at UF's Florida
Museum of Natural History, faculty member and premier
archaeologist of colonial Caribbean and St. Augustine;
Anthropology '74

Molly Crocker Dougherty -Professor of nursing at the
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, significant
researcher focusing on women's health issues; Anthropol-
ogy '73

Merrill J. Gerber- Award-winning author of six novels
and four collections of short stories; English '59

Adele K. Graham- Leader for historic preservation, school
volunteerism; attended UF from 1956 to 1959

Shere Hite- Internationally known for her writings on
sexual behavior in the U.S. and author of "The Hite Report
on Female S,. \,ilht ; History'63,'66

Megan L. Neyer- Chief of diversity management at the
U.S. Air Force Academy, former diver, chair of Olympic
Committee Athlete Support Program; Psychology '86.

Patricia O'Connor- Distinguished service professor at
the University of Cincinnati, honored by Royal Spanish
Academy of Language; Spanish/Romance Lang.'54,'62

Dr. Marsha Raulerson-Physician, created Partners for To-
morrow Program, teaching parenting to 200 rural Alabama
families; English'63

Joan D. Ruffier-Businesswoman, past member and chair
of Board of Regents, will be first female president of the
University of Florida Foundation; English'61

Emma Walker Schulken-President of Virginia Highlands
Community College; '59 (no major listed)

Eleanor C. Smeal- Former president of the National As-
sociation for Women, activist and authority on women's
rights; Political Science '63









Popcorn Helps Kids Learn About Statistics


What does popcorn have to do
with statistics? A lot, says Richard
Scheaffer, professor of statistics,
who has helped develop curricu-
lum materials to improve students'
quantitative reasoning skills.
In order to help elementary-age
children understand data collection
and analysis, a big hot air popper is
placed in the middle of the room.
The top is left off so the kernels
can fly all over. The students' job
is to look for patterns in where the
kernels land. They measure things
such as how far the kernels travel
from the popper and if the popped
kernels go farther than the un-
popped kernels. Scheaffer believes
it's an active, fun way to introduce
the basic concepts of data anlaysis.
"On the surface, a lot of the ac-
tivities that we actually do sound
pretty elementary," he said. "But it
turns out that they can lead to a lot
of quantitative reasoning and as-




"Unfortunately,

many times the num-
bers and data are
often suspect, but the
general public doesn't
realize that. They
just don't know what

value to place on the
numbers and tend to
think all numbers are

important."


Richard Scheaffer
Professor of statistics


sessments of how well these skill are
developing."
This is just one activity created by
Scheaffer and his colleagues in their
joint work between the National Coun-
cil of Teachers of Mathematics and the
American Statistical Association. Their
overall goal has been to find better
ways of teaching quantitative skills to
all children from kindergarten through
high school, culminating in an AP sta-
tistics course at the high school level.
"We're addressing the issue of how
we can have a more quantitatively
literate citizenry," he said. "To do this,
we have to educate children more ef-
fectively. Our first project was for the
middle school grades. It taught teach-
ers how to help their students reason
with data."
Because of this project-funded by
the National Science Foundation-
mathematics curricula nationwide now
include more applications that involve
fitting models to data. Scheaffer is
pleased with the results and believes
educating children in statistics at an
early age is imperative because of the
large amount of information they'll be
exposed to as adults.
"This is probably more important
in recent years because we live in an
information society where everything
is quantified," he said. "Unfortunately,
many times the numbers and data are
often suspect, but the general public
doesn't realize that. They just don't
know what value to place on the num-
bers and tend to think all numbers are
important."
By taking advantage of new technol-
ogy, Scheaffer and his colleagues have
been able to develop practical exercises
that would otherwise have been impos-
sible.
"Now we have computers, and
hand-held graphing calculators that
will compute the statistics and show
graphical displays at the push of a but-
ton," he said. "We do things quickly
and easily with school kids that we


.

tr./zl y


Richard Scheaffer and his colleagues
work with the National Council of
Teachers of Mathematics and the
American Statistical Association to
develop better ways to teach children
quantitative skills.





wouldn't have been able to do 15-20
years ago."
In addition to creating a more
literate public, an improved math-
ematics curriculum will also help
our students be more competitive
against students in other industrial-
ized nations, Scheaffer said.
"That is one of our goals: to bet-
ter educate our students in math
and science so they'll be more com-
petitive internationally," he said.
"It seems we do a pretty good job
of teaching kids basic manipulative
skills such as adding, subtracting
and multiplying, while our weak-
ness seems to be in teaching reason-
ing and thinking skills. Teaching
students how to reason with data
will certainly help them."









USPS Employees Honored for their Service to the University

USPS employees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences were honored for their commitment and years of service
to the university at a reception in the 0. Ruth McQuown Room, February 20. President John Lombardi, Dean Willard
Harrison and Robert Willits, associate director for Personnel Services, each offered words of gratitude and encourage-
ment. The employees received a pin, a CLAS mug and a certificate signed by the Dean.

Thirty Years: Lois Greene-Anthropology; Mary Arnold-Botany; Dailey Burch-Chemistry; Theodore Fryer-Psychology
Twenty-five Years: Richard Harris-Classics; Isaiah Washington-Psychology Twenty Years: Sherrel Brockington-Academic Advis-
ing; Patricia Dixon-Physics; Larry Frederick-Physics; Jimmie Norton-Zoology Fifteen Years: Debra Folks-Botany; Evelyn Rock-
well- Botany; Ronald Ozbun-Geology; Cynthia Bright-Physics; Sarah Lee-Psychology; Ruth Ann Czerenda-Zoology
Ten Years: Sally Brooks-C 'mi .- of the Dean; Alfred Buhl-C 'mr .- of the Dean; Suzanna Hicks-Psychology; Bonnie McLaurin-Psychol-
ogy; Phil Padgett-Statistics; Margaret Roberson-Zoology Five Years: Dietra Howard-English; Susan Rizzo-Physics; Margaret
Gratton-Psychology; Debra Mageed-Academic Advising


Lois Greene has worked at UF for 30
years. She is the office manager for the
Department of Anthropology.


Alfred Buhl-computer operator manager
in the office of the Dean has been at UF
for 10 years.


Evelyn Rockell-word processing op-
erator in the Department ofBotany-has
been at UFfor 15 years.


Sherrel Brockington is a program as-
sistant in Academic Advising. She has
been at UF for 20 years.


Debra Mageed has worked at UF for
five years. She is a program assistant in
Academic Advising.







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


Duels Solved Conflicts in Old South
Bertram Wyatt-Brown, professor of history, was featured
on the Discovery Channel talking about duels and their role
in the old-time political process.


Eva Peron Agreed to Just One Portrait
The Washington Post quoted Andres Avellaneda, professor
of romance languages and literatures, in a story about the
only portrait of Eva Peron that she authorized.


Do Movies Mirror Cultural Trends?
The Washington Times quoted James Twitchell, professor
of English, about the cultural trends of recent movies.


From Two Republics to One Di-
vided: Contradictions of Postco-
lonial Nationmaking in Andean
Peru (Duke University Press) by
Mark Thurner (History). (review
taken from book cover)
From Two Republics to One Di-
vided examines Peru's troubled
transition from colonial viceroy-
alty to postcolonial republic from
the local perspective of Andean
peasant politics. Thurner exam-
ines the paradoxes of a resurgent
Andean peasant republicanism
during the mid-1800s and provides a critical revision
of the meaning of republican Peru's bloodiest peasant
insurgency, the Atusparia Uprising of 1885.


(Excerpt) From Napolean to Bismarck, nineteenth-century
autocrats sought to create and seal patriotic allegiance to
an emerging nation-state through infantry wars against
neighboring Ctri. P -. The drums of war and the defense
of fatherland or homeland (patria) might, in the conflict
approach to nationbuilding, unite an emergent nation
otherwise divided by ethnic and class differences. Such an
external opportunity to unite the nation in the common
defense of homeland had presented itselfuninvited at Peru's
front door when Chilean troops came knocking in 1879.


New Generation Enjoys "Star Wars"
The Dallas Morning News cited English professor Andrew
Gordan's work on the "Star Wars" trilogy. Gordon, an expert
on the film "Star Wars," was quoted on what the re-release
of these movies means to the different generations.

Prof. Gives Status on Privatized Prisons
The Santa Fe New Mexican quoted criminology Professor
Charles Thomas about his annual publication, The Private
Adult Correctional Facility Census.

Africa Isn't One Country But Many
The Times Literary Supplement printed an article by Michael
Chege, director of the Center for African Studies, concerning
the structural programs in Africa.


Book Beat

Organic Voice Disorders:
Assessment and Treatment
(Singular Publishing Group,
Inc.) edited by Wm. S. Brown
(Communication Processes
and Disorders), Betsy Vinson
(Communication Processes
and Disorders) and Michael
Crary. (review taken from
preface)
Organic Voice Disorders:
Assessment and Treatment
is an edited textbook for
individuals who have an
interest in studying human
voice production. It is in-
tended to be a definitive text that reflects the current trends
in prevention, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of voice
disorders.


(Excerpt) Most adults are aware, in a general ii, of the
function of the respiratory tract, through which air flows
to and from the lungs. They recognize that this airway is
composed of the mouth, nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and
lungs. Observation and incidental study have revealed that
vocal sound is produced when the vocal folds, which are
located in the larynx, are set into vibration by the breath
during exhalation.







Faculty in the News


CLAS Faculty Make Headline News

CLAS faculty are recognized as experts in their fields of research in academia and the private sector. Following is a list
of UF researchers whose comments and research have recently appeared in the media.


Duels Solved Conflicts in Old South
Bertram Wyatt-Brown, professor of history, was featured
on the Discovery Channel talking about duels and their role
in the old-time political process.


Eva Peron Agreed to Just One Portrait
The Washington Post quoted Andres Avellaneda, professor
of romance languages and literatures, in a story about the
only portrait of Eva Peron that she authorized.


Do Movies Mirror Cultural Trends?
The Washington Times quoted James Twitchell, professor
of English, about the cultural trends of recent movies.


From Two Republics to One Di-
vided: Contradictions of Postco-
lonial Nationmaking in Andean
Peru (Duke University Press) by
Mark Thurner (History). (review
taken from book cover)
From Two Republics to One Di-
vided examines Peru's troubled
transition from colonial viceroy-
alty to postcolonial republic from
the local perspective of Andean
peasant politics. Thurner exam-
ines the paradoxes of a resurgent
Andean peasant republicanism
during the mid-1800s and provides a critical revision
of the meaning of republican Peru's bloodiest peasant
insurgency, the Atusparia Uprising of 1885.


(Excerpt) From Napolean to Bismarck, nineteenth-century
autocrats sought to create and seal patriotic allegiance to
an emerging nation-state through infantry wars against
neighboring Ctri. P -. The drums of war and the defense
of fatherland or homeland (patria) might, in the conflict
approach to nationbuilding, unite an emergent nation
otherwise divided by ethnic and class differences. Such an
external opportunity to unite the nation in the common
defense of homeland had presented itselfuninvited at Peru's
front door when Chilean troops came knocking in 1879.


New Generation Enjoys "Star Wars"
The Dallas Morning News cited English professor Andrew
Gordan's work on the "Star Wars" trilogy. Gordon, an expert
on the film "Star Wars," was quoted on what the re-release
of these movies means to the different generations.

Prof. Gives Status on Privatized Prisons
The Santa Fe New Mexican quoted criminology Professor
Charles Thomas about his annual publication, The Private
Adult Correctional Facility Census.

Africa Isn't One Country But Many
The Times Literary Supplement printed an article by Michael
Chege, director of the Center for African Studies, concerning
the structural programs in Africa.


Book Beat

Organic Voice Disorders:
Assessment and Treatment
(Singular Publishing Group,
Inc.) edited by Wm. S. Brown
(Communication Processes
and Disorders), Betsy Vinson
(Communication Processes
and Disorders) and Michael
Crary. (review taken from
preface)
Organic Voice Disorders:
Assessment and Treatment
is an edited textbook for
individuals who have an
interest in studying human
voice production. It is in-
tended to be a definitive text that reflects the current trends
in prevention, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of voice
disorders.


(Excerpt) Most adults are aware, in a general ii, of the
function of the respiratory tract, through which air flows
to and from the lungs. They recognize that this airway is
composed of the mouth, nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and
lungs. Observation and incidental study have revealed that
vocal sound is produced when the vocal folds, which are
located in the larynx, are set into vibration by the breath
during exhalation.







Conlon on Computing



High Speed Networks


The college operates networks in
nineteen buildings (see the CLAS-
net home page at http://www.clas.
ufl.edu/clasnet for a list). These net-
works operate at 10-megabits per
second- that is, the network has
a rated speed of 10 million bits per
second or approximately 1 million
bytes or characters per second. In
practice, the network transfers data
at a much lower rate for any par-
ticular user, typically about 100,000
bytes per second or about 1/10 of
the rated speed of the network. This
performance is typical for ethernet,
the kind of network we run. 100,000
bytes per second means that you
can move about 50 pages of text in
a second or one medium sized web
image in one second. A good home
modem transfers data at a rated
speed of 28.8K bits per second, or
about 3,000 bytes per second, which
is roughly 30 times slower than the
campus network. It would take
about 1,700 seconds, or about half
an hour to download thirty seconds
of TV-quality video using a 28.8K
modem. On the campus network, the
same video clip will take about 50
seconds to download, which is still
too long if you are standing in front
of a class. For an informative look
at the powers of ten and some facts
regarding data storage, check out the


Data Powers of Ten page at http://www.
cacIl.caltech.edl,/'~I Cl'/dat1tlltall'.
So we want to go faster. Faster com-
puters enable us to process more data
(numbers, text, audio and images), and
as we process more data, our demand
to access more data grows. Current
Internet technology is reasonably
well balanced between computational
power and communication speed. But
computational power doubles every
eighteen months according to Moore's
Law. Moore's Law should be called
Moore's observation, as there is no
natural law here. But Intel and other
chip manufacturer's have managed to
double the speed of integrated circuits
every eighteen months for the past
twenty years and the trend is expected
to continue for at least the next ten
years. With faster computers we expect
to push more data through our com-
munication systems.
Our intra-building 10-megabit net-
works run on unshielded twisted pair
(UTP) or thin-net cabling. The core
network of the university operates at
100-megabits per second. As we reno-
vate buildings we install high quality
UTP cabling capable of 100-megabit
transmission. This prepares us for
eventual speed increases within our
buildings.
In some cases, speed can be im-
proved by isolating traffic. Rather
than
have all the machines in a building on
the same network, the building can be
subdivided into segments and each
segment can be fed 10-megabit service.
By having fewer machines on each seg-
ment, the segments operate at higher
speed. Switched Ethernet can be two
to five times faster than unswitched
ethernet. Beyond switched 10-megabit
service is 100-megabit service. Beyond
100-megabit service is switched 100-
megabit service.
Beyond these speeds requires an-
other new wiring system to the desktop
computers. Fiber optic cable has a
rated speed of 2-gigabits per second.


Such a system could deliver a two-
hour movie with stereo sound to
your desktop in a second. It could
also provide for "channels" or path-
ways to be held open in the network
to support streamed communication
not subject to the Internet's rather
uneven performance characteristics.
Such is the hope of the developers of
Internet II, a collection of technolo-
gies to be developed to provide reli-
able very high speed communication
for data, voice and video over the
next decade. We'll hear more about
Internet II and our participation in it
as details emerge.
CLAS and UF are planning up-
grades to network wiring and elec-
tronics to improve the speed of
networks in and between college
buildings. Such improvements are
designed to match the increasing
speed of the computers that will be
on those networks and provide for
development and use of new tech-
nologies for teaching and research.
Some of these new technologies will
arise from Internet II. Others will
come from new Internet and industry
standards such as ATM (Asynchro-
nous Transfer Mode). ATM could be
an important technology for data and
video transmission in the next two to
five years.
So where does that leave home
users and their modems? The newest
modems are rated at 33.3K and this
summer 56K modems will be sold.
Higher speeds may come from the
cable television companies who are
experimenting with cable modems
(modems that attach not to the phone
system but to the cable television net-
work and from there to the Internet).
Such systems are capable of 1-mega-
bit per second speeds now, but may
be capable of 10-megabits per second
in the next year or so. In any case, it
looks like the speed of the network
on campus will remain significantly
higher than the network at home for
the foreseeable future.







From a Professor's Point of View



The Poverty of Science Wars
-by Frederick CGr..,'i former chair of the history department and current president of the History of Science Society


(While virtually all of us have encoun-
tered the notion of a "paradigm shift,"
not everyone is familiar with who
coined the phrase or when it began its
extraordinary journey across academic
disciplines. Its author was historian
of science Thomas Kuhn, who in 1962
introduced the concept in his now fa-
mous book, The Structure of Scientific
Revolutions.)

Tom's death last summer hit
me much harder than I ever would
have anticipated. So much had been
opened up by his work. But it was
more than merely a memory of the
novelty and freshness of his message
that I pondered. Tom's achievement
seemed to have finished something
as well; hence his death also sym-
bolized whatever it was that he had
brought to an end. What that was
has been less clear.
At the annual meeting of the
History of Science Society last No-
vember, Tom's name came up more
than once. Historian of medicine
Charles Rosenberg observed that
in 1962 Tom could not have antici-
pated the polarized antipathies that
emerged in the wake of his success.
Neither, continued Rosenberg, did
he approve the "science wars" of
1996. Yet it is undeniable that after
Tom's book was published science
had been brought, as Charles put
it, "into the realm of the temporal,
the contingent, the negotiated." The
Pandora's Box of epistemological
and social privilege scientists en-
joyed prior to Kuhn's time had
been opened. Yes, Charles contin-
ued, science had been moved from
the timeless to the mundane. Yes,
few scientists remained noble and
disinterested seekers after truth in
their ethnographer's account. And
yet nowhere did Tom Kuhn as-
sume that he had forced historians
or anyone else to declare that the
human circumstances of a scientific


discovery were more important than
the discovery itself, as if one had to
choose between mutually exclusive
factors.
Another participant was particu-
larly unhappy with what she called
"the dichotomous misrepresentation"
of the fields of science and science stud-
ies by media bent on sensationalizing.
Actual exchanges among scientists
reveal a variety of diverse opinions
about the status of scientific knowledge
just as among science studies scholars


"The answer, for me, is

that after Kuhn's work
science could never again
be captured by any sim-
ple or even homogeneous
set of categories. That
means no individuals,
including scientists and
historians, can any lon-
ger claim to be the "true"
spokespersons for sci-
ence and/or its history."


-Fredrick Gregory
Professor of history


there is and has been a spectrum of
views about relativism. But all these
differences have been flattened into
"science wars" by protagonists on both
sides and the result has been that the
relationship between scientists and
historians has too often of late been de-
termined by media and their interests.
The testimony of all four participants in
the plenary session betrayed that their


experience of interaction between
historians and scientists has been
and remains nothing like what has
been depicted in the attacks that
make headlines.
The last two speakers in the
session stressed the pragmatic
benefits of constructive interaction.
One suggested that historians and
philosophers of science might even
play a facilitating role for scientists
who have become overly invested
in existing theory, provided there
is mutual respect between the sci-
entists and historians and provided
the latter possess technical com-
petence necessary to understand
the science in question. The other
speaker reminded us of the key
role scientists played in transform-
ing the university after World War
II into places where research and
scholarship flourished in relative
freedom. He drew a parallel be-
tween scientists then and intellectu-
als today, urging us in the present to
be wary of an ominous new transi-
tion that threatens to commercialize
research. Should we abandon our
responsibility as Kulturtrager by
becoming Kulturkampfer we be-
come expressions of the very forces
that threaten the academy.
No one, it would seem, found
anything good at all in the extreme
positions that have been trumpeted
about in public. And neither, I am
convinced, would Tom Kuhn. So
what was it that Tom brought to
an end? Why did I have the sense
that the end of something had
been marked? The answer, for me,
is that after Kuhn's work science
could never again be captured by
any simple or even homogeneous
set of categories. That means no
individuals, including scientists
and historians, can any longer claim
to be the "true" spokespersons for
science and/or its history. It is re-
ally just a matter of learning how to









Categorical Data Analysis Key to Soc. Science Research


Following is an interview with Alan
Agresti, professor of statistics.

The area of research you focus on
is categorical data analysis. What
exactly is that?

The measurements we use fall into
one of a set of categories such as
whether a person considers him/
herself a Democrat, Republican or
an Independent or whether they
choose to buy an import or domestic
car. These sorts of data occur often
in all areas, but especially in the so-
cial sciences. The statistician's role
is to develop methods to determine
how one's outcome depends on
other factors. For example, how does
a person's preference for president
depend on gender, race or religious
affiliation? Statisticians deal with
ways of trying to figure out which of
these sorts of things have an impact
and how strong the impact is.

Why do you enjoy this kind of re-
search as opposed to other areas of
statistical analysis?

Compared to statistical methods
based on the normal distribution for
numerical outcomes such as IQ, SAT
score or cholesterol level, methods
for categorical outcomes have been
under development very recently,
primarily in the past two decades.
The methods have been especially
useful in disciplines that tradition-
ally were not highly quantitative,
such as the social sciences. Work-
ing in this area gives me a chance
to develop statistical methods mo-
tivated by interesting real-world
problems.


Categorical analysis is used not
only in the social sciences but in the
medical field as well. What are the
connections between the two?

For instance, physicians need to


know that if a patient undergoes a
particular kind of treatment, what are
his/her chances of living or dying? Or
a physician might need to evaluate a
patient's progress while they are receiv-
ing a certain treatment, deciding if the
response is good, fair or poor. That's
something that is usually subjective
and again involves a set of categories.
These sorts of data are quite common
in biomedical applications, and the
same sorts of methods that work well
in social science problems tend to work
there also. In fact, although my main
interest is in social science applications,
my research funding has been from the
National Institutes of Health.

Your research has helped several CLAS
faculty interpret theirfindings. Would
you mind giving a brief explanation
of some of your collaborative CLAS
projects?

I've helped John Henretta in sociology
with models for various gerontological
questions, such as one's decision about
whether to choose early retirement. I've
done some work with Mike Radelet,
who studies the effects of racial char-
acteristics of defendants and victims
on who gets the death penalty. That's
another good example of a categorical
outcome: a defendant either receives it
or doesn't. I've also helped Jane Brock-
mann in zoology. She was studying
female horseshoe crabs and what at-
tracts males to them. There are several
possible factors, and using a standard
method for categorical outcomes called
logistic regression, we determined that
the crab's size had the impact in attract-
ing males.


Would you mind explaining one ofyour
recent projects?

One of the most recent papers I wrote
had to do with movie reviewers and
how they rate movies. A colleague,


Alan Agresti's research focuses
on categorical data analysis and
developing statistical methods
motivated by real-world problems.


Larry Winner, and I looked at Siskel
and Ebert and their thumbs up-
thumbs down ratings system which
is a great example of categorical data
analysis the movie is either good
or bad, they either recommend it or
they don't. We found that of eight
of the most popular reviewers in
this country, Siskel and Ebert have
the strongest agreement. You tend
to think of them as adversarial but
they actually agree with each other
more than any other two movie re-
viewers did. Our study will be the
cover story in an upcoming issue
of a popular statistics magazine,
CHANCE. This is just one example
of the many areas you can apply
categorical data analysis.%










CLAS Faculty Receive 1996-1997 TIP Awards

In 1993, the State of Florida implemented the Teaching Improvement Program (TIP) to recognize and reward those
faculty members who exemplify exceptional teaching quality and productivity. CLAS is pleased to announce the fol-
lowing faculty members who have received a 1996-1997 TIP Award.


Department of African & Asian
Languages & Literatures

Susan A. Kubota, Lecturer
Ann Kathryn Wehmeyer, Assoc. Prof.


Department of Anthropology

Paul J. Magnarella, Professor


Department of Botany

Walter S. Judd, Professor
Francis E. Putz, Professor


Department of Chemistry

James A. Deyrup, Professor
Randy Duran, Assoc. Prof.
Lisa A. McElwee-White, Assoc. Prof.
David A. Micha, Professor


Department of Classics

Mary Ann Eaverly, Assoc. Prof.


Department of Communication
Processes & Disorders

Christine Sapienza, Assist. Prof.


Department of English

Marsha Bryant, Assist. Prof.
Amitava Kumar, Assist. Prof.
David Leverenz, Professor
Brian R. McCrea, Professor
John P. Powell, Jr., Professor


Department of Geography

Nigel J. Smith, Professor


Department of Geology

Paul F. Ciesielski, Assoc. Prof.


Department of Germanic &
Slavic Languages & Literatures

Eva Eichhorn, Lecturer
Willard R. Hasty, Assoc. Prof.


Department of History

Jeffrey S. Adler, Assoc. Prof.
Geoffrey J. Giles, Assoc. Prof.
Robert A. Hatch, Assoc. Prof.


Department of Mathematics

Kevin P. Keating, Assoc. Prof.
Theral O. Moore, Assoc. Prof.
Kermit N. Sigmon, Assoc. Prof.
Marvel Townsend, Lecturer


Department of Philosophy

Thomas P. Auxter, Assoc. Prof.


Department of Physics

David Reitze, Assist. Prof.
Fred Sharifi, Assist. Prof.
Christopher J. Stanton, Professor


Department of Political Science

James W. Button, Professor
William A. Kelso, Assoc. Prof.
Albert R. Matheny, III Assoc. Prof.


Department of Psychology

Richard A. Griggs, Professor
Martin Heesacker, Professor
Charles M. Levy, Jr., Professor


Department of Religion

Dennis E. Owen, Assist. Prof.
Miriam B. Peskowitz, Assist. Prof.


Department of Romance
Languages & Literatures

Michel J. Achard, Assist. Prof.
Juanita W. Casagrande, Lecturer


Department of Sociology

Felix M. Berardo, Professor
Frederick A. Shenkman, Assist. Prof.


Department of Statistics

Myron Chang, Assoc. Prof.
Lawrence Winner, Lecturer


Department of Zoology

Douglas Levey, Assoc. Prof.









Grant Awards through Division of Sponsored Research

January 1997 Total $3,216,802


Investigator Dept.

Corporate...$650,803


Agency


Award


Title


Am Chemical
Am Chemical
Am Chemical
Bayer
Ciba-Geigy
Cor Ther
FMC
Imation
Monsanto
Multi
Rhone-Poul.
Ciba-Geigy
Dow Corning
Elf Atochem
Synquest
Monsanto
Walgreens
US Biomat.


50,000
20,000
50,000
40,000
27,225
45,000
36,680
63,000
65,000
5,083
25,650
36,054
64,305
54,963
15,657
43,801
5,000
; is'R


Sequencing and structural investigations of copolymerization reactions.
Laser control of chemical and material processes.
Spectroscopic studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and carbon ions.
Miles compounds contract.
Compound supply.
Cor therapeutics: provision of compounds.
FMC compounds contract.
Project of carbonless products.
Succinimide chemistry.
Software research support.
Rhone-Poulenc compounds agreement.
Synthesis of a persumed metabolite.
A technology for siliconizing polymer surfaces.
Insertion Reaction of halocarbons into halogenated alkenes.
Organic synthesis and mechanism.
Active molecule delivery using electroactive polymers.
Security research project.
Clinical trial research design.


Bowes, G.
Winefordner, J.
Schanze, K.
Benner, S.
Hudlicky, T.
Micha, D.
Adams, E.
Dorsey, A.
Avery, P.
Avery, P.
Shuster, J.

Other...$42,350


Bernard, H.
Dermott, S.
Jones, D.
Jones, D.
Thomas, C.
Mueller, P.
Sorkin, R.


BOT
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
PHY
PHY
PHY
PHY
STA


ANT
AST
BOT
BOT
CRI
GLY
PSY


NSF
NSF
NASA
NIH
NSF
US Navy
NSF
NSF
DOE
DOE
NIH


Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Misc Don
Multi source
Misc Don
Misc Don


65,000
93,000
75,000
151,657
205,000
5,000
110,000
64,800
74,126
9,790
1,587,945


3,150
3,497
4,000
14,500
2,000
13,835
1,368


Characterization of C3 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isofo rms.
A microwave plasma for multielement trace analysis.
Development of temperature sensitive paints for wind tunnel testing.
Oligonucleotide based tools for treating HIV.
Biocatalytic conversion of aromatic waste to useful compounds.
US-Latin American workshop on molecular and materials sciences.
Magnetism of solid helium-3.
Theoretical studies of vortex dynamics in superconductors.
Task B: Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics.
Task S: Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics.
Pediatric Oncology Group statistical office.


Miscellaneous donors.
Astrophotographic studies program.
Miscellaneous donors.
Miscellaneous donors.
Private corrections project.
Miscellaneous donors.
Psychology miscellaneous donors.


State...$6,000


Giesel, J.


ZOO Game Comm 6,000 Research to determine subspecies of sandhill cranes.


Universities...$76,331


Malecki, E.
Channell, J.
Tanner, D.
Scicchitano, M.
Shuster, J.


GEO
GLY
PHY
POL
STA


Purdue
Texas A&M
U of Cal
UF Athletic
U of Texas


41,399
2,314
17,000
4,680
10,938


Florida component of information sources for rural manufacturing firms.
Participation on scientific cruise of the Joides Resolution.
Optical reflectivity/ transmittance measurements of correlated electron compds.
A survey of Gator sports fans.
Statistical support for UT Southwestern Methotrexate project.


Duran, R.
Krause, J.
Vala, M.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Katritzky, A.
Hudlicky, T.
Wagener, K.
Dolbier, W.
Dolbier, W.
Reynolds, J.
Hollinger, R.
Marks, R.


CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
CHE
SOC
STA


Federal ...$2,441,318





-Musings continued m page 1 -Cancer continued from page 1
--Musings continued from page 1


as a major need in the campaign. To
say the least, our alumni and friends
responded magnificently.
The amount of scholarship/fel-
lowship money we distribute has
risen from the previously indicated
$3,000 to about $230,000 annu-
ally. The number of undergraduate
scholar-ships has risen from 3 to 81.
The number of graduate fellowships
has risen from 0 to 37. And I reiter-
ate that all of this has come about
from gifts of our alumni and friends.
Several people work very hard to
achieve this success, starting with our
current development staff of Carter
Boydstun and Ed Blue. This is why
fund raising (aka "friend raising")
is so important to CLAS. And by no
means can we rest on these successes.
We need more scholarships, and our
need is particularly great in fellow-
ships to cultivate stronger graduate
programs. Graduate students are
needy, almost by definition.
Each year we invite the graduate
Fellows and their fellowship donors
to a celebratory dinner that is a truly
extraordinary evening. Anyone who
can listen to these rising scholars
stand before us and describe their
current work and their plans for the
future without feeling good about
this next generation has to have a
thick and crusty heart. It is a mar-
velous occasion, and I've always
thought that if we could just get more
prospective donors to experience the
scholarly excitement of that evening,
we would surely meet all our fellow-
ship goals.
The other areas in which we raise
money are also success stories, but
space does not permit more here. Re-
call, however, that a new campaign
is about to commence, one that will
without doubt be even more success-
ful than the first, and CLAS faculty
and students will be the benefactors.
We have set ambitious goals in CLAS,
and we ask your help in exceeding
them.



Will Harrison,
Dean

[harrison@chem.ufl.edu]


standard treatment."
Another example of the critical role
statistics research plays in the treatment
of children's cancer involves the con-
tinuation of chemotherapy in treating
Osteogenic Sarcoma (a type of bone
tumor).
"Researchers from the Mayo Clinic
had claimed that chemotherapy was
the promise that didn't deliver for pa-
tients with this kind of bone tumor, and
that radical surgery and/or amputation
was all that was necessary," Shuster
said. "The POG study, however, proved
that chemotherapy was valuable and
actually contributed at least a 30%
advantage in long-term survival."
The POG accrues approximately
2,000 patients a year. It manages their
treatments by randomly placing them
in specific study groups and sequen-
tially monitoring each group's prog-
ress. If results show that one group
isn't performing as well as expected,


The Department of Statistics pro-
vides a comprehensive program to
serve the needs of students and this
diverse academic community. It
offers undergraduates a variety of
courses which satisfy general educa-
tion requirements and introduce the
fundamentals of statistical design
and analysis, enabling students to
read the research literature of their
major. The undergraduate degree
programs have 60 majors preparing
for graduate study or for careers in
quantitative positions in business
and industry. The department plays
a major role in training graduate
students from many disciplines in
the statistical design and analysis
methods needed to conduct their
individual research projects. It also
offers a diverse environment in its
graduate degree programs which
currently have 55 majors working
on M.S. and Ph.D. degrees.
Department faculty have a wide
variety of research interests which
range from theoretical to applied


the researchers will either stop the
study or begin another form of treat-
ment. This is to ensure that a group
of patients doesn't suffer as a result
of the treatment group they're in.
"Our job is to track the trials very
closely," he said. "We have to watch
to see if there's a difference emerging.
If there is, we can close the study,
report the change and then re-treat
some of the patients if needed. We're
very concerned with safety."
Shuster believes one of the
strengths of the POG is the diverse
team of specialists dedicated to
researching, treating and curing
children's cancer.
"It's a really good example of
multi-disciplinary research," he
said. "Within our office, we have
statisticians, systems analysts, data
managers and administrative person-
nel. Outside of our office, we work
closely with clinical and basic science


topics and cover abroad spectrum
of methodologic areas. Categori-
cal data analysis, design of experi-
ments, linear models, Bayesian
analysis, biostatistics, nonpara-
metrics, clinical trial methods,
statistics education, genetic data
and probability theory are some
of the areas of interest.
In addition, the department
faculty actively collaborate with
scientists in other disciplines on
important research investigations.
The Division of Biostatistics, lo-
cated in the Health Science Center,
and IFAS Statistics in McCarty
Hall provide statistical expertise
for collaboration with research-
ers in those areas. The Pediatric
Oncology Group Statistical Office
conducts clinical trials worldwide
investigating treatments for child-
hood cancers. Other faculty col-
laborate with colleagues in busi-
ness, engineering and the social
sciences.


From the Chair....


Ronald Randles, chairman of the Department of Statistics