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The New-Yorker
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073673/00003
 Material Information
Title: The New-Yorker
Uniform Title: New-Yorker (New York, N.Y. 1836)
Alternate title: New Yorker
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H. Greeley & Co.
Place of Publication: New York N.Y
Creation Date: June 22, 1839
Publication Date: 1836-1841
Frequency: weekly
regular
Edition: Quarto ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- New York (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- New York County (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York -- New York
Coordinates: 40.716667 x -74 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Fox, L.J. New York City Newspapers, 1820-1850
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from University Microfilms (American periodical series: 1800-1850).
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 26, 1836)-v. 11, no. 26 (Sept. 11, 1841).
Numbering Peculiarities: Issues for Sept. 24, 1836-Sept. 11, 1941 called also whole no. 27-whole no. 286.
Numbering Peculiarities: Pages numbered consecutively in each volume.
General Note: Previously classed as a periodical in LC.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01588060
lccn - sn 86091368
System ID: UF00073673:00003
 Related Items
Related Items: New-Yorker (New York, N.Y. : 1834)
Succeeded by: New-Yorker (New York, N.Y. : 1834)
Succeeded by: New-York weekly tribune

Full Text







For the New-Yorker.
LINES.-ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S EVE.
BY MISS LUCY HOOPER.
"Charles, le roi de France, mourut an chateau do Vincennes dans
les douleurs les plus aigues et baigne dans son sang. En cet etat le
minalheureux jour de Saint Barthelemi fut sans cesse present a son
esprit. II marqua, par ses transports et ses larmes, le regret qu'il en
ressentait. Le Cardinal de Lorraine niourut aussi cette meme aunee
en terre papale, la surveille de Noel jour remnarquable par une dcs
plus effroyables tempetes qu' on aitjamais vues."-.Memoiresde Sully.

THE sun went down without a cloud
To tell of coming fate,
And the king of France sat on his throne
Arrayed in kingly state;
But his lip bespoke an evil heart
With an evil pride elate.
The sun went down without a cloud,
And through the summer air
Sweet hymns were floating softly up,
And words of gentlest prayer,
From lips that ere the morrow's dawn
Were cold and silent there !
The sun went down without a cloud,
Yet wo for pleasant France !
For vine-clad roof and lordly hall
Wept idly vanished glance,
And vain was woman pleading cry,
And vain the knightly lance!
The sun went down without a cloud;
The king sat on his throne ;
The stars saw fearful deeds that night,
The while they dimly shone,
When ruffian hands were steeped in gore
Alike from sire and son!
The sun went down without a cloud-
But what a fearful night!
The torch of truth went out in France-
Its blessed radiance blight!
Yet sat that king upon his throne,
Nor mourned the vanished light!
The sun went down without a cloud;
The skies gave forth no sign;
There fell from heaven nor storm, nor fire,
As in the olden time;
And yet, oh God! thine eye did mark
Each chosen one of thine !
The sun went down without a cloud-
The tide of Time again
Rolled on, as it had rolled before,
That night without a name -
And sat that king upon his throne,
Another, yet the same!
And there were voices in the air,
There was writing on the wall;
And his soul o'er courtly splendors cast
Its darkness as a pall:
Dreams of St. Barth6lemi's night
Were haunting him through all!
Alike from cell and bower they came,
From cot and lordly dome-
Pale spectres of the Past-to press
Around that monarch's throne.
And, 'midst his courtier bands, he greets
The martyr'd dead alone!
Upon his kingly throne he sat,
But not in kingly pride :
Terror and fear were round his couch,
The dead were by his side !
Were these companions meet to tread
With him the pass untried ?
Monarch of France! the meanest serf
Who walked in Truth's pure light,
And bowed his neck to the headsman's stroke
In holy faith that night,
Might pity thee, for the wrath of God
Is a fierce and scorching blight!
A fearful thing in sunny France,
That year on holy day:
The trees were rent. and the firm earth shook,
But their souls had passed away;
And an evil king and counsellor
That n ightL stillne.s lay !
Brooklyn, June 14, 1839. ---
LECTURES ON PHRENOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATION.
BY GEORGE COME, ESQ.
(Reported for the New-Yorker.)
LECTURE X.
LOCALITY.-This organ lies a little above the internal cor-
ners of the eye, on each side of Individuality. Dr. Gall men-
tions that his taste for natural history led him frequently into
the woods to catch birds, or to discover their nests ; but he gen-
erally found it impossible to retrace his way to a nest which he
had discovered, notwithstanding hi precaution to cut marks
on the trees and stick branches in the ground. On this ac-
count, he was obliged to take with him a schoolmate, named
Schiedler, who with the least possible effort went directly to
the place where a snare was set, even though they had laid
ten or fifteen in places not familiarly known to them. As
Schiedler possessed only very ordinary talents in other re-
spects, Dr. Gall was struck with his facility in recollecting


places, and frequently asked him how lie contrived to guide
himself so surely ; to which he replied by asking Gall in turn
how he contrived to lose himself every where. Gall moulded
his head. He afterwards moulded the head of a celebrated
landscape-painter, who had an extraordinary memory of
places ; and that of Meyer, author of Dia-na-Lore, who found
no pleasure except in a rambling life, and had an astonishing
facility of recollecting the different places which he had seen.
On comparing attentively these three heads, he was struck
with the correspondence which they presented in this organ,
each having two prominences commencing near each side of
the nose and going obliquely upward and outward almost as
high as the middle of the forehead. Innumerable subsequent
observations proved that the organ of the faculty for recol-
lecting places is situated in this region.
This is the faculty which enables us to take cognizance of
direction; it gives great facility, when large, of recollecting
places, and of learning geography. Many have wondered at
the accuracy with which the Indian travels through trackless
forests. It is owing to the large development and activity of
this organ, by which he is enabled to keep a map of the coun-
try in his head, and a chart of his course. If he has to turn
aside half a day's journey, on account of some impediment,
he can keep a reckoning in his mind of the direction and
amount of deflection, and compensate for it. This is the
cast of Mungo Park, in which it is very large. He has in
other respects a beautiful development. Mr. Park was a sur-
geon in the glens of Fowlsshiels, but he had sucel a passion
for traveling that he left his native country to penetrate into
the interior of Africa. The busts and portraits of Columbus,
Cork, Galileo, Kepler and Newton show a great development
of this region. Locality is almost monstrous in the head of
Mr. Dunn, Surveyor of Coal Mines at Newcastle, England.
In working coal mines, it is necessary to leave pillars for the
support of the roof; and as the mining is carried on in various
directions and all under ground, it is found to be very difficult
to tell the exact boundaries of the respective mines, and the


BY H. GREELEY & CO. OFFICE NO. 1 ANN-STREET. THREE DOLLARS PER ANNUM.


VOL. VI. NO. 14. NEW-YORK, SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 19I39. WHOLE NO. 274.


says Sir Everard Howe, "of any place existing beyond the
room he was in, yet was perfectly conscious of the loss of
memory."
This organ is possessed by the lower animals, and they
sometimes manifest it to an extraordinary degree. Gall says
a dog was carried in a coach from Vienna to St. Petersburgh,
and at the end of six months reappeared at Vienna. Another
was transported from Vienna to London, but found means to
return to his native city. Kirby and Spence, in their works
on Entomology, relate the following anecdote: An ass shipped
at Gibralter on beard the Ister frigate, in 1810, was thrown
overboard when the vessel struck at Point de Gat, in Spain, a
distance of 200 miles. He found his way back to Gibraltar,
presented himself at the gates one morning, and, when they
were opened, walked in and went immediately to his stable.
His not being stopped on the way is accounted for by the fact
that hlie hid holes in his ears, indicating that he had been used
for carrying criminals when flogged; and for such asses the
peasants have a great abhorrence. The falcon of Iceland re-
turns to its native place from a distance of thousands of
miles : and carrier pigeons have long been distinguished for
a similar tendency. Dr. Gall attributes the migration of birds
to a periodical and voluntary excitement of the organ of Lo-
cality.
NuMnER.-This organ is somewhat difficult to observe;
when large, it gives fulness to the outer angle of the eye, and
a little to the side, a very little below the point called the ex-
ternal angular process of the frontal bone. You see it large
in the mask of George Bidder, of Zerah Colburn, and of
Humbolt the mathematician, brother to the traveler of the
same name.
Gall discovered this organ by comparing the heads of two
boys remarkable for their powers of calculation. Beside pre-
senting the appearances before mentioned, the eye was in
some measure covered by the outer extremity of the eyebrow.
He afterward went to Baron Vega, a famous calculator, and
to the public schools, and invariably found this part promi-
nent in connection with great arithmetical talent.
Arithmetic and Algebra depend on this organ; but Geome-
try, and other of the higher branches of mathematics, depend
on other faculties. This opinion is not the result of speculation,
but of observation. George Bidder, when only seven years
of age, and without instruction, showed an extraordinary tal-
ent for mental calculation. When only eleven, I saw him
solve the most complicated questions in algebra more rapidly
than the most expert accountant could put the operations-
down. When he first came to Edinburgh, and before I had
seen him, Mr. Moir, surgeon, waited on me, accompanied by
three boys of nearly equal age, and said-" One of these is
George Bidder; can you tell me which is he by his head ?"
I was then desirous of seeing remarkable cases, and I told
him that I should "be glad at any rate to examine the boys.
I did so, and remarked that the first one could not, I was cer-
tain, be George Bidder, as in him the organ was deficient;
that the second should have considerable powers of calcula-
tion; but that the third should be George Bidder, because in
him the organ was remarkably developed. The gentleman
assured me that I was right. The first was his own son, to.
whom instruction seemed unable to impart any arithmetical
knowledge; the second was the most expert calculator select-
ed from a school in Edinburgh; the other was George Bidder
himself. Expecting to make of Bidder an extraordinary
mathematician, they gave him the best instruction. In a let-
ter to Professor Baird, I said-" I expect you will be disap-
pointed in your hopes of making Bidder a great engineer."
I founded this opinion on the fact that the organs, the great
lL,vpyr riT w-YrT,'-T;. '..;.-..., ,,,ia &esius. were ,
not of more than ordinary siz.e. This was looked upon,-o,,
course, as a piece of phrenological folly. One day I met the
teacher of Bidder: What do you say to your Phrenology
now?" said he. I said I would be glad to know what he
meant. "Why," said he, "I mean this: George Bidder,
whom you said would be such a great mathematician, has
been two years in my class, and does not show as much
genius as many others. This shows the folly of your science."
I told him to go and ask his friend, Professor Baird, to in-
form him what I had said two /ears previous.
I can speak on this subject the more decidedly, from being
myself very deficient in this faculty, notwithstanding my ex-
ertions to cultivate it have been considerable. Arithmetic has
always been to me a profound mystery, and to master the
multiplication table an insurmountable task. I could not
now tell you how mnny eight times nine are, without going to
work circuitously and reckoning by means of the tens. Yet
for seven years I studied arithmetic, but made hardly any
progress The deficiency of this faculty has been the occa-
sion of much trouble to me. I could understand every thing
relating to accounts, but had always to employ clerks to per-
form the calculations. This faculty in me is, in fact, idiotic.
Were my other powers in like condition, I should be totally
unfit for the ordinary business of life.
This organ is found veuy small, and the faculty very feeble,
in some nations and tribes. In this skull of a North Ameri-
can Indian, it is very little developed ; and I am told that in
the various agreements which have been made between your
Government and the various tribes, in which a certain amount
of money has been promised to the Indians, it has been found


impossible to make them comprehend the amount, beyond a
very small sum. Hence difficulties and dissatisfaction have
arisen, from their want of comprehension. The Greenland
tribes consider a number exceeding all their fingers and toes
as innumerable.
Number and Individuality both large, give facility in recol-
lecting dates, from aids in the recollection of printed numerals.
I have seen this organ in a state of disease. In 1835, I
saw, at the Lunatic Asylum of Newcastle, a patient named
Marshall, in whom Number was largely developed. Mr.
Mackintosh, the surgeon, finding him continually employed in
covering paper with arithmetical calculations, took it away,
for the purpose of allowing the organ repose; but he then
used thle slate. That being taken away, he used his nails to
scratch with upon the wall. His hands were then tied be-
hind him. He then used the tip of his tongue to trace figures
on the wall with saliva, and kept at work, adding and sub-
tracting, and multiplying and dividing, as well as he could in
this way. When I saw him, his tongue was excoriated by
the novel application to which it was subjected.
This faculty seems to be possessed in some degree by the
lower animals. George Le Roy states that magpies count
three, and founds his opinion on the following facts: In


jects. Classification, generalization, and systematizing, in
science or philosophy, depend on the reflecting faculties.
I have seen several instances in confirmation of this faculty.
Mr. L.'s forehead, as you see, presents a great development
and squareness of this region ; and in his dress, wardrobe, and
all his professional and domestic occupations, his love of or-
der was conspicuous. This trait of character was hereditary
in Mr. L.'s family; his father was particularly distinguished
for it. It is related of him, that on one occasion, having
missed his pen-knife, he summoned before him his relatives
and domestics, and demanded whether they had seen it. On
being answered in the negative, he unhesitatingly declared
that it must have been stolen. Being requested to search his
other pockets, he became quite indignant, and exclaimed that
for twenty years his knife had been in no other than in his
right waistcoat pocket. He was at length, however, pre-
vailed on to search his other pockets ; and he was quite con-
founded and mortified on discovering that he had really put
the knife in his left pocket instead of his right.
Sometimes the organ is large and the faculty active in id-
iots. Dr. Spurzheim mentions one at Paris, who could not
bear to see a chair or other object out of place; and another
at Edinburgh, a girl, who avoided her brother's room, on ac-
count of its confusion.
The Esquimaux are described by navigators as a most
filthy, slovenly, and disgusting race; and in them, as you may
see by this specimen, the organ is very small.
I have now treated of the organs which enter into activity
in mathematical studies. An opinion is prevalent, that mathe-
matics afford exercise to the reflecting faculties, and that their
tendency, as a branch of education, is to cultivate the talent
for general reasoning. To me this appears altogether erro-
neous. Geometry treats of the properties of space; algebra
and arithmetic of the properties of numbers; and the three
form the great elements of pure mathematics. For judging
of the proportions of space, Size, Locality and Individuality,
aided by Comparison, are the faculties required; and for
judging of the properties of numbers, Number and Order are
the great faculties, also aided by Comparison. Now causa-
tion always implies power, force, or agency; and the idea of
these does not at all enter into the propositions of pure mathe-
matics. It follows, therefore, that persons may be great in
mathematics, who are indifferent reasoners; and great rea-
soners, who are poor mathematicians. And this is the opin-
ion of the great masters in philosophy. Bacon observes that
"The mathematical part in some men's minds is good, and
the logical is bad; some can reason well in numbers and
quantities, that cannot reason well in words." I was led to
investigate this subject, and to analyze the mathematical
genius into its elements, by observing that Causality is often
deficient in the most famous mathematicians. In Sir Isaac
Newton himself, the upper region of the forehead is by no
means large; but the lower part, especially in the region of
Locality and Weight, is very great; and though he was extra-
ordinary as a mathematician, his manifestation of general
reasoning power was by no means remarkable. The head of
the late Peofessor Leslie possessed the same general devel-
opment; and though great as a mathematician, he was defi-
cient in the power of tracing logical sequences. On the con-
trary, Bayle, though possessed of powerful and acute reason-
ing powers, could never make much progress in mathematics.
Dugald Stewart remarks that When it is stated in the
form of a self-evident truth that magnitudes which coincide,
or which exactly fill the same space, are equal to one another,
the beginner readily yields his assent to the proposition; and
CT~ii. r.-'i-.; *'-1---- .( >th^ a all .thet i. r"'.aipd -
in any of the demonstrations of the first six booksof Euclid.
This is strong testimony to the fact that the relative propor-
tions of space or magnitude constitute the principal subject
of mathematical education, and that causation is not at all
implied. This you will readily understand by an examinina-
tion of this chart, which contains all the geometrical figures.
It is evident that a comparison of the relations of these figures
to each other, which constitutes the science of geometry has
nothing whatever to do with the consideration of force, power,
or agency which always enter into the idea of Causation.
Professor Leslie says that "the whole structure of geometry
is grounded on the simple comparison of triangles." Mr.
Stewart corrects this remark by observing, that "it is ex-
pressed in terms too unqualified." D'Alemberthas mentioned
another principle as not less fundamental, the measurement
of angles by circular arches ; but you will observe that both
triangles and circular arches are mere forms of space.
It seems to me perfectly obvious, therefore, that while the
mathematical sciences may be employed in the measurement
of forces which operate with undeviating regularity, they
cannot be employed in cases where the forces are not equable.
Human actions proceed from intellectual perceptions, moral
impulses or the force of passion. Now it is obvious these do
not possess that uniformity of operation which is indispensa-
ble to the application of mathematical measurement. In
judging of human actions we must by sagacity and experience
estimate the influence of internal impulses and external cir-
cumstances. And in doing so, Comparison and Causality are
principally operative: whereas in mathematics Causality is
quite inactive. Sir John Herschell remarks, that "There are
minds which, though not devoid of reasoning powers, yet


manifest a decided inaptitude for mathematical studies, which
are estimative, not calculating, and which are more im-
pressed by analogies, and by apparent preponderance of
general evidence in argument, than by mathematical demon-
stration, where all the argument is on one side, and no show
of reason can be exhibited on the other. The mathematician
listens only to one side of a question, for this plain reason,
that no strictly mathematical question has more than one side
capable of being maintained otherwise than by simple asser-
tion; while all the great questions which arise in busy life,
and agitate the world, are stoutly disputed, and often with a
show of reason on both sides, which leaves the shrewdest at
a loss for a decision."
In the above remarks I allude to pure mathematics or ge-
ometry, algebra, arithmetic and their branches ; and I think
what has been advanced quite sufficient to establish the folly
of those teachers who, as in the University of Cambridge,
England, keep young men for years at mathematical studies
n order to enable them to judge of the nature, force and di-
rection of the motives which produce human actions.
EVENTUALITY.-This organ, when large, gives prominence
nr-v r^T.iinrlprl f^ if-l 1inpi tnaf th-.-- Tvti d'!ip of/M tw fr*Q 4 p*^lnd-> Tn- tbp.>


two gentlemen, and remarked that Upper Individuality, as it
was then called, was large in the first, and Lower Individu-
ality in the second. Dr. Spurzheim in Paris, and we in Ed-
inburgh, discovered the functions of these parts about the
same time.
Individuality and Eventuality are both large in Joseph
Hume-hence his power of accumulating facts and narrating
occurrences. These faculties are extremely valuable to the
teacher. The one enables him to acquire knowledge, the
other to tell the story. An author in whom Individuality is
large and Eventuality small, will treat his subjects by descrip-
tion chiefly; one in whom Eventuality is large and Individu-
ality small, will narrate actions, but deal little in physical de-
scription. This is the portrait of Pope; this the head of
Sheridan: in the former Individuality is moderate and Eventu-
ality very large; in the latter both are large, and Form and
Size considerable. To illustrate the different kinds of com-
position which these different combinations produce, I solicit
your attention to the following extracts from these authors.
Pope rarely excels in describing physical existence, but he
surpasses in representing action. I should like to see some
of you take a pencil and attempt to represent on paper or
canvass the beautiful lady described in the following passage:
'Not with more glories in the ethereal plain,
The sun first rises o'er the purple main,
Than issuing forth, the rival of his beams
Launched on the bosom of the silver Thames.
Fair nymphs and well-dressed youths around her shone,
But every eye was fixed on her alone.
On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore,
Which Jew might kiss and Infidels adore.
Her likely looks a sprightly mind disclose,
Quick as'her eyes, and as unfixed as those.
Favors to none, to all she smiles extends;
Oft she rejects, but never once offends.
Bright as the sun her eyes the gazers strike,
And, like that sun, they shine on all alike.'
Here we have action, condition and quality almost to the
exclusion of substantive existence; and in this description of
the lady's face, though he bids us look at it, there is nothing
which indicates that he himself had been looking at it.
Sheridan, speaking of a woman and her husband, says:
'Her fat arms are strangled with bracelets, which belt
them like corded brawn-you wish to draw her out as you
would an opera-glass. A long, lean man, with all his arms
rambling; no way to reduce him to compass unless you could
double him up like a pocket-rule. With his arms spread he'd
lie on the bed of Ware, like a cross on a Good-Friday bun.
If he stands cross-legged, he looks like a caduceus, and put
him in a fencing attitude you would take him for a chevaux-
de-frise. To make any use of him, it must be as a spontoon
or a fishing-rod. When his wife 's by, he follows like a note
of admiration. See them together, one 's a mast the other
all bulk; she 's a dome, and he 's built like a glass-house.
When they part, you wonder to see the steeple separate from
the chancel, and were they to embrace, he must hang round
her neck like a skein of thread on a lace-maker's bolster.
To sing her praise you should choose a rondeau, and to cele-
brate him you must choose all Alexandrines.'
You find here that physical appearances are particularly
prominent.
In Curran this organ and Comparison are large, but Indi-
viduality deficient. It is large in Dr. Chalmers, though not
so large as Comparison. In Sterne it is very small. I ha~e
not seen Captain Marryatt, but he exhibits in his works very
good Eventuality. It is very large in Sir Walter Scott and
others who excel in narrative. Both Individuality and
Eventuality are generally quite large in children. Under the
influence of the former they will break their playthings on
purpose to see what is inside. The latter gives them great
fondness for stories. Franklin, as I before said, possessed
aallEventuality, and you find that all his writings and
speiychpT/'-, i ic
"I i.._ Thprp is no
continuous narrative or long dissertation. A clear, forcible,
but brief exposition of some important principle illustrated by
an anecdote, was the general form of his productions. Dr.
Gall maintained that the facility with which animals might
be tamed and educated depended on the degree in which the
region comprising this organ and Individuality are developed.

TIMiE.-Time is situated on each side of Eventuality. It
gives rise to the perception of duration, and of the relation
in which circumstances stand to each other chronologically.
By giving the perception of measured cadence, it appears to
me one source of pleasure in dancing. It is necessary to mu-
sic and versification. The deaf and dumb frequently mani-
fest this faculty strongly, and are highly delighted with the
exercise of dancing. They take the time by the eye from the
violin-player's arm, or at second hand, but instantaneously,
from the other dancers. Lord Kaimes and others have specu-
lated on the origin of the notion of time. They say we mea-
sure time by the number of ideas which pass in the mind.
This is obviously incorrect; for the more we are interested
in any occupation the less clearly we perceive the lapse of
time. On the contrary, when the other faculties are quies-
cent, Time seems to become ascendant; it goes on measuring
time incessantly, and keeps the notion of it continually in the
mind. Hence the apparent great duration of unoccupied time.
Some, however, have an instinctive knowledge of the lapse of
time under all circumstances, and can tell the hour of the day
with great accuracy. The talent of using tenses properly in
composition, seems to be dependant on ibis faculty. The


lower animals seem not destitute of the faculty.

TUNE.-Tune is situated on the lower lateral part of the
forehead, under and on each side of the temporal ridge.
When large, the forehead is filled up and rounded off in this
region, and does not form that rapid ellipsis which you see in
this head of Curran. Contrast the head of Handel with this
of Ann Orinmuod, who was admitted, at twelve years of age,
into the Blind Asylum of Liverpool, and during two years
means were unsparingly employed to cultivate and improve
any musical talent which she might possess ; but in vain:
she was unable to appreciate music; the finest gave her no
more pleasure than the rudest noise. This is the head of a
celebrated player on the German flute ; you perceive that in
it the organ is large.
Gall discovered the organ by first noticing this part large
in a young girl who could repeat whatever she heard sung or
played, and who recollected whole concerts, if she heard
them only twice, and by afterward examining the heads of all
the persons distinguished for musical talent to whom lie could
gain access.
This organ bears the same relation to the ear which the
organ of Color does to the eye. The ear receives the im-
rx.,-sion of sounds, and is agmreeablv or disagreeablv affected


but not to say any thing which would enable me to distinguish
them. On examination I found that one had very large Tune,
but deficient Weight and Time. This young lady, said I,
will take intense interest in hearing music, but have little
power of execution. I found the other to possess moderate
Tune only, but large Imitation and Weight. This young
lady, I remarked, may be trained to make an excellent per-
former, but there will be no soul in her music. She will be
one of the great number who devote so much time in youth
in acquiring an art which they throw aside the moment they
pass from parental control or enter on the graver duties of
life. This was in the early part of my studies. Ten years
afterward I dined with a gentleman whose lady said to me,
"I suppose, Sir, that you do not recollect me, though we
have met before." I said I did not, and should be glad to be
informed where I had previously seen her. "Do you recol-
lect," said she, "examining two of Mrs. Gibson's pupils at
one time on their musical capacity?" I told her I did.
"Well," she continued, I am the one who you said would,
notwithstanding her ability, give up playing as soon as she
had any tiling of importance to attend to. You perceive there
my instrument; it has had a string broken three months;
but so little interest do I take in music that I have not thought
it worth while to get it repaired."
This organ is sometimes diseased. Dr. Combe attended a
young lady who complained of acute pain at the external an-
gle of the forehead precisely in the situation of the organs of
Tune, which were largely developed, and upon which, in de-
scribing the seat of pain, she placed most accurately the
points of her fingers. Two days afterward she still com-
plained of pain in this region, and stated that she had been
dreaming a great deal of hearing the finest music. The next
day she mentioned the recurrence of her musical dreams.
But what is very remarkable, the excitement of the faculty of
Tune reached, during the day, a hight which could not be
controlled: the patient felt, not to say a desire only, but a
strong and irresistible passion or craving for music, which it
was painful beyond endurance to repress. She insisted on
getting up and being allowed to play and sing. That being un-
advisable, she begged to have a friend sent to play for her;
but the craving became intolerable : she seized a guitar, lay
down upon the sofa, and fairly gave way to the torrent with
a volume, clearness and strength of voice, and a facility of
execution which was astonishing. Regarding these phe-
nomena as arising from the over-excitement of the organ of
Tune, Dr. Combe directed the continued local application of
cold, and such other measures as tended to allay the increased
action, and the lady soon regained her ordinary state.

MISS TREE'S FAREWELL ADDRESS.
WRITTEN BY EPES SARGENT, ESQ.
(Delivered at the Park TheatreFriday Evening, June 14, 1839.)
THE curtain falls. Closed is the drama's page.
Why lingers Beatrice upon the stage ?
Away, illusion! all is real here;
The sigh is faithful and the grief sincere!
No mimic passion, no pretended wo,
Into my lips their borrowed ardor throw:
Should utterance tremble, should the tear-drop start,
Oh, do not doubt, its fount is in the heart!
Friends, I have prov'd you! Three swift years have pass'd
Since on your shores a pilgrim I was cast:
And if some anxious fears were mine at first,
How on my soul your liberal welcome burst!
Ye cheered my steps; ye took me by the hand-
I was no more a stranger in the land.
A stranger, why? On every side I heard
My native accents in each spoken word ;
And all the greetings which my toil beguiled
Were from the 'well of English undefiled.'
The mighty poet whose creation bright
With rev'rence 'vejersonified to-night-
Here as familiar as on Stratford's plains?
Your sires and his co-patriots were the same,
And do ye not with us partake his fame ?
Ah as the loiterer by some pleasant way,
Though Duty cry Begone!' would fain delay-
Review the prospect beautiful-retrace
Each glimpse of sunshine, each peculiar grace-
So would I linger, so would I forget
It is, alas! to part that we have met.
Yet, ere I go, desponding Memory asks,
Is this the last of my too happy tasks ?
Shall I no more a scene like this behold,
Nor tread these boards, in your approval bold ?
Those plaudits, which yet echo in mine ear,
Are they the last fi'om you that I may hear?
Too strong the chance that it must e'en be so:
Fate answers Aye !' but, ah! Hope whispers No !'
And yet, though mute the voice, though past the scene,
Though tempests roar, and oceans roll between,
Whatever hues may mark my future lot,
Still let me dream I am not all forgot!
That SHAKSPEARE'S fair abstractions may restore
A thought of her who once their honors bore ;
That TALFOURD'S pages, KNOWLES'S tragic art,
Some memory of the actress may impart:
A look, a tone, a not ungrateful smile,
Let me believe, though vain it be the while!
But the night hastens, and the time draws near;
Why do I still superfluous linger here ?
Ah! never yet so difficult a part
Tasked all my powers and filled my beating heart.
I cannot speak the thoughts my soul that swell-
I can but say, Friends Kindred Fare you well!


For the New-Yorker.
THE POLITICAL WRITINGS OF THOMAS PAINE.
IT is a fact not a little singular, in the history of Literature,
that Political Writing which relates to matters of great prac-
tical importance, and which is sure-when well done-of
meeting with vast popularity, is generally the worst executed
of any species of composition. In general, slovenly and care-
lessly written, it is purely ephemeral-seldom containing
truths of sufficient importance to endure, in the meagre shape in
which they are enveloped. The truth is, however, that Politics,
rightly viewed, is a noble study, and the inquiries tending to
it of great value, both speculative and practical. It is a
theme of some dignity, perhaps of the greatest. No employ-
ment of the faculties can be greater than the government of
men. Most Political pieces are expected to be, however, of
a current nature merely. Occasionally men arise who dis-
cuss the questions more important than any other to the hu-
man race after the truths of Religion, in a manner so as to
impress durability on their productions. Sometimes the
Politician is a Philosopher and a Poet; and then his works
are appealed to as standards of foresight and wisdom.
Political Writers may be divided into three classes:
I. Those who write to and for Statesmen and Philosophers;
1 T wnhc o wi te wta for tose of the c.nAted n-'l ,.i-,, v


And hunts up every sign concealed,
And every outward sign of ill,
And gives me his sad face's pleasures
For merriment's, or sleep's, or leisure's!

ANECDOTE OF NAPOLEON--After having gained the battle
of Wagram, the Emperor Napoleon established his head-
quarters for a time at Schoenbrun, and there occupied him-
self; pending the negotiations for his 4ustrian alliance, with
reviewing his troops and distributing among them rewards
and honors. One old and brave regiment of the line was
drawn out before him for this purpose, his custom being to
examine every corps individually, under the guidance of the
officers. After having formed the regiment into columns, Na-
poleon entered among the ranks and bestowed praises and
decorations on all who appeared worthy of them. Five hours
he spent on this occupation; and at length, when he had satis-
fied himself that no man's claims had been overlooked, he
finished by saying aloud to the Colonol-" Now present to me
the bravest soldier in your whole regiment." In some cases
this might have been a difficult matter; it did not appear so
now. The Colonel, indeed, hesitated for a moment; but the
question was caught by the soldiers, and one universal an-
swer came from the ranks. Morio! Corporal Morio !" was
the cry. The Colonel approved of the decision, and Morio
was called forward. He was a man still young, but em-
browned by service; and he already wore on his person three
badges of merit, and the cross of the Legion of Honor. Na-
poleon looked at him attentively. Ah," said he, "you have
seen service !" Fifteen years, my emperor," replied Mo-
rio; sixteen campaigns and ten wounds, not to speak of
contusions." How many great battles ? asked the Emperor.
" Sire, I was at your heels at the Bridge of Arcola; I was
the first man who entered Alexandria; it was I who gave you
my knapsack for your pillow at the bivouac of Ulm, when
forty thousand Austrians capitulated; I took five hussars
prisoners with my own hands on the day of Austerlitz. It
was I who served you"-- Hold! it is well, very
well! Morio, I name you Baron of the Empire; and to that
title I add a hereditary gift of five thousand francs a year."-
Acclamations rose anew from the soldiery. Ah, my empe-
ror," said Morio, this is too great a reward for me. But I
will not play the usurer with your bounty. None of my com-
panions, while I have it, shall want food or clothing."
-Morio still lives. He only quitted the service when his
master fell; and, in spite of that change, Morio still enjoys
the Emperor's gift. He has kept his word to hiscompanions.


country by his pen are too great to account (except for one
reason) for the declension and comparative obscurity of his
reputation. It is allowed by all liberal judges that, in his
'Common Sense,' and papers entitled 'The Crisis,' he strength-
ened in the American mind its aspirations after liberty; gave
them the right direction; manfully exhorted them in-their
wavering hour, and acted the part of a freeman and an active
friend to humanity In the face of all this, he is now become
odious, and his name passes for a by-word of contempt. He
is ranked with Wright, Trollope, and a similar band, and
despised as a mere flaming Democrat. He passes for a
thorough-going Radical, whereas he was the firmest of Dem-
ocrats. The reasons of this we believe to have originated
chiefly from his religious blasphemies-which have rendered
that part of his character justly contemptible-and the popu-
lar cast of his style and address. The first of these causes is
indefensible; we will not pretend to palliate it. We write
and speak now only of Paine the Politician-with his religion
we have nothing to do. It is to be observed, however, that
in his Political Writings published previously to the 'Age of
Reason,' he never alludes to the Deity but with the most
reverential mention. The only other cause for his obscurity
seems to result from his style. Though a master of compo-
sition, and an acute thinker, he was the People's writdr-ex-
pressing their views, as well as his own, but then better than
any other man could. Clear, plain, explicit, close, compact,
he could be understood by all; and he further possessed a
most desirable faculty in a certain off-hand, dashing manner.
which carried off every thing.
He is always full of sense, perfectly clear, and admirably
concise. He is, whenever he attempts it, as brilliant a de-
claimer as Burke, with almost equal fancy, and without any
of his verbosity. His glowing tirades on titles in the' Rights
of Man' and in The 'Crisis' are perfect specimens.a His
second 'Crisis,' addressed to Lord Howe, is equal for sarcas-
tic point and for cutting sneers to any thing in Junius. What
evils he had grew oat of strong sense, sharpened by a satirical
spirit and a contempt of impostures, however successful. He
is not a wandering, episodical writer, like Cobbett, but direct *
and straight-forward, perhaps a little too formal, and with as
few digressions as any English writer.
He has none of the common faults of Political writers: he
is never moody-never clumsy and round-about in his expres-
sions-never dull and tedious in his arguments. He has no
pointless anecdotes-no heavy familiarity-no puerile rheto-'
ric-no labored bombast. His sentences are clear and shapely
-he is closely logical, and his arguments are connected as
by a fine net-work. Whatever style he undertook, whether
of expostulation or deference, narrative or logical, declama-
tory or moral, ironical or earnest, it always was perfectly per-
spicuous and admirably appropriate. Hazlitt says he is ex-
cellent at summing up and giving conclusions, but that he
lacks the faculty of giving his ideas as they rise fresh in his
mind. He prefers Cobbett for this progressive exhibition of
the course of his thoughts.
There is a pungency in his manner of uttering the simplest
truths, which gives his pieces the air of a collection of aphb-
isms. He gives point to every thing he touches, and is never
dull and spiritless. He abounds in original sayings, and al-
ways concludes his pieces with a smart sentence: "An array
of principles can penetrate where an army of men cannot," is
one of a thousand instances.
Paine is said to have been little of a reader-to have pur-
posely excluded his mind from the acquisition of some spe-
cies of knowledge, in order to concentrate it fully on Politics.
What he did read, however, was choice literature; and his
few quotations are exceedingly apt. He composed by para-
graphs-which accounts for the extreme finish of his style;
for, though a very plain style in general, yet this could be per-
fected only by elaboration and study. His plain manner and
simple ground-work set off his wit, his illustrations, his occa-
sional flights, and his metaphysics, to great advantage, and
besides contributed largely to his popularity. During his
life-time he enjoyed a great and most deserved reputation,
which nothing could have destroyed but his religious direlec-
tion and consequent debasement of character.
THE ANALYST.
THE INTRUDER.
IF I desire with pleasant songs
To throw a merry hour away,
Comes Love unto me, and my wrongs
In careful tale he doth display,
And asks me how I stand for singing,
-' : ---. +.*..l1 Ofl wI in.'iw .
And then another time if I ..... ..
A noon in shady bower would pass,
Comes he with stealthy gestures sly,
And, flinging down upon the grass,
Quoth he to me-My master dear,
Think of this noontide such a year !
And if elsewhere I .lay my head
On pillow with intent to sleep,
Lies Love beside me on the bed,
And gives me ancient words to keep.
Says he-These books, these tokens number;
May-be they '11 help you to a slumber.
So every time when I would yield
An hour to quiet, comes he still,











THE


THE NEW-YORKER.

SATURDAY, JUNE 22,1839.
EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
AT LARQE, June 17,1839.
-'T is a dull life, this, of a traveler in this our day and
generation. I suppose this sentiment is heterodox, but heresy
is my orthodoxy, and I am sure it is here the sober truth.
It is only your stay-at-home travelers, who rock themselves
to sleep in their chimney-corners over the glowing pages of
Sindbad, Gulliver and Peter Parley, who ever talk heartily
of the delights of loco or any other motion which consists of
mere going ahead. Not that a dozen miles or so of progres-
sion may not be pleasant, occasionally, even to grown-up chil-
dren; but it is the novelty and oddness of the sensations in-
duced which form their attraction-nothing else. Let the ex-
periment be continued for even two or three days-let the
amateur in progress be twice or thrice in succession driven
or dragged from an endurable pallet in the small hours' of
morning, to shiver, swallow fog, and look at his fingers for
an interminable period-let him move, rest and eat at other
men's volition, and retire (per order) at night borne down
with fatigue, though he has done nothing-let him so move
on, awake though half the night, and of course half asleep
through the day-and he will at length be brought to agree
with me that modern traveling is essentially a dull business.
I think I shall prove it incontestably by the tenor of this letter.
I write on a canal-boat, but not of canal-boat progression
in particular. This is more sluggish than its alternatives, but
less uncomfortable than any of them. The occasional start-
ling hiss, the constant tremor and the under-deck odor of a
steamboat are not to be classed among the luxuries of travel;
while the tumult of night landings, the low, sharp singing of
the compressed steam, deprived for minutes of any vent but
such as it can find or make through the else forgotten seams
of its prison-house, may all be pleasant to the million who
pretend to relish or disregard them; to me they are not. A
steamboat, of course, before any other conveyance, where this
is to be had, because of its speed; but this is only saying, in
another form, that traveling is essentially uncomfortable, and
to be finished as quickly as possible. A stage-coach nobody
now pretends to think other than a necessary evil, beyond the
second guide-board. None ever awoke to a sad, aching con-
sciousness, the morning after concluding a three or four days'
journey by coach, without being strongly inclined to dispute
the axiom of divines and philosophers that existence is of it-
self a blessing. As to rail-riding-thbe novelty and the hobby
of the day-so strongly is it entrenched in the world's good
opinion, that it were vain to attempt to shake it-just yet.
It shares the great recommendation (to a non-admirer of
travel) of all steaming, that its discomforts, if such there be,
are of comparatively brief duration. For a few hours only,
the sight of the grand panorama of fields, forests and houses,
moving to the rearward with unexampled rapidity, may be
agreeable; the fresh, free winds meet the train' with an ex-
hilarating sweep ; and the intellectual operation of counting
the mile-stones, as they regularly succeed each other at the
rate of one to every two, two and a half, or three minutes, is
by no means to be scoffed at. But let any one stick to the
cars for a fortnight, or a week even, fixed in his allotted place
'from morn till dewy eve,' through sunshine, wind or rain, as
might be his portion, and if he did not begin to find it a
weariness to the flesh,' I would beg leave to pronounce him a
miracle of good temper, or of bad taste.
-Thus early a skeptic to the raptures of mere motion, I
trust I am not the less alive to the tranquil pleasures which
may be found in its train. To the worn and hackneyed slave
of business and toil, the mere sense of relief and of freedom
is a luxury-the truant's stolen holiday, without his obtruding
fears for the morrow. To wake with a surprised conscious-
ness that there is no incumbent task which must engross the
hours of to-day, and be succeeded by a similar task on the
morrow--aed so on, is something to be thankful for. And
then Nature, at this season of earliest summer and deepest
verdure, is beautiful, though I won't go into ecstasies about
it, considering that we have had six or eight showers this
present day, and an atmosphere cold enough for April-cold
enough for the good coal fire which is to be seen only. with
the eye of faith, and refuses to take the chill off even Faith
herself. Now a day like this in the middle of June-windy,
cloudy, rainy and cold throughout, and .s~.&risIo a t,",,,
i =i ,. --J -.V, reo-iovea or rhymes upon.
Nature must be more amiable than this, if she would have
any compliments from so unflattering an observer. But the
rain has ceased, or suspended -the sun sets clear beneath the
clouds, and the rich, bright vale of the upper Hudson looks
inviting, with its noble stream in the midst, fringed with tall
elms and'clustering vines and willows. I will on deck and
observe it. Adieu. G.
NORTH CAROLINA.-The Election in this State takes place
on the first Thursday in August, though we believe the Edge-
combe Congressional District (Mr. Stanly's) votes one week
earlier. There is no Governor or Legislature to choose this
year, both having been chosen last year-Whig-leaving
Members of Congress only to be now elected. The contest
with regard to diese is an interesting one. The decided ad-
vantages gained by the Whigs of this State in the last two


Elections have been neutralized by a change of position on the
part of two of their Representatives, Messrs. S. T. Sawyer
and C. Shepard, who followed Mr. Calhoun in the support of
the -Aib-Treasury scheme. Thus, although the Delegation
from North Carolina was elected eight Whig to five Admin-
istration, it has stood practically seven Administration to six
Opposition. The Election soon to take place will determine
whether this change is approved by the People.
In the 1st District, (Edenton,) Hon. Samuel T. Sawyer,
elected Whig, but siding with the Administration, is opposed
by Kenneth Rayner, Esq. a leading Whig Member of the pre-
sent Legislature, and author of the Whig Resolutions of last
winter. Mr. Sawyer appears to have gone over fully to the
Administration party, and to have been adopted by that party;
while he will doubtless carry with him some of his former
supporters. The result of the pending contest is therefore
very doubtful. Each candidate is able and popular. (Whig
majority in '37, 405.)
In the IId District, (Halifax,) Hon. Jesse A. Bynum, Adm.
is opposed, as heretofore, by Col. Wmin. L. Long, Whig. The
contest is spirited, but Mr. Bynum is said to be closely re-
lated to many influential Whig families in the District, who
usually forbear opposing him; and a strong Calhoun diversion
has been made in his favor, by the declaration of Hon. John
Branch, Messrs. Julius, Arnis, and other influential men in
the District in favor of the Sub-Treasury. As he has beaten
Col. Long before, we incline to the belief that he will do it
again. (Bynum's majority in '37, 70.)
In the IlId District, (Beaufort,) Hon. Edward Stanly,
Whig, is opposed by Hon. Thomas H. Hall, Adm. who long
represented the District, but was run out in '35 by Mr. Petti-
grew. Mr. Hall is a strong candidate, but so is Mr. Stanly;
and we do not think the latter can be beaten. (Stanly's ma-
jority in '37, 666.)


be able and popular, and his election from this overwhelming
Whig District will be a substantial triumph to the Adminis-
tration. David F. Caldwell of Randolph was first proposed
as the regular Whig candidate, but declines. Mr. Hender-
son appears to be a new man.
In the XIth District, (Mecklenburg,) Hon. Henry W. Con-
ner, Adm. is opposed by Gen. B. M. Edney, Whig. There
can be little doubt of Mr. C.'s reflection. (In '37, Conner's
majority, 791.)
In the XIIth District, Hon. James Graham, Whig, is also
running without opposition. Mr. Graham was not opposed
in '37. The Whig majority in the District ranges from 1,000
to 1,500
In the XIIIth Disrtict, Hon. Lewis Williams, the staunch
Whig Member, who has been some forty years in Congress,
is opposed by Roderick Murchison, Adm. There can be no
doubt of Mr. Williams's reflection. (His majority in '37
was 1,491.)
Thus the contest in the State will be desultory and strag-
gling-extremely spirited in the close Districts, and languid
or nominal in the others; but it is impossible to say which
party will have a majority of the Members. We believe they
will stand seven to six.
VIRGINIA.-Col. John Carroll, of Grayson, heretofore
claimed as a Conservative, has addressed a note to the Edit-
ors of the Lynchburg Virginian, denying the correctness of
the claim. He says he "only differs with Mr. Van Buren on
the Sub-Treasury, but shall support him as President, in pre-
ference to any candidate that is or shall be before the peo-
ple." Of the Conservatives, he says that he "' shall vote
against any Conservative, and will not support them to fill
any office." We shall hereafter class him as an approved
friend of the Administration Our returns of the vote for
Members of Congresss are still deficient in a few particulars,
and we are therefore unable to publish a full table this week;
but we think it may be safely promised for our next.

MARYLAND.-The Adm. Convention, which assembled
at Ellicott's Mills on Saturday the 15th inst., nominated
James Carroll, Esq., of Anne, Arundel Co., and Col. Solo
mon Hillen, jr., of Baltimore city, as the candidates of
that party for Congress from the Fourth District. They
are both men of handsome property and personally very
popular. The former, it is said, has stipulated that he shall
not be called upon to address the people; the latter, how-
ever, is an active campaigner.
Philip F. Thomas, Esq., of Talbot Co., has been nomi-
nated as the Adm. Candidate in the District represented
in the last Congress by the Hon. James A. Pearce, Opp.
Mr. Thomas was a distinguished member of the last Legis-
lature, and won the good opinion of all parties by the ta-
lents which he evinced. Should his party succeed in elect-
ing him, it will compensate them for the loss they sustain
in the retirement of Gen. Howard of Baltimore.
MississippI.-Dr. Silas Brown, State Treasurer, and
the Opp. Candidate for re-election to that office, died at
Jackson, the capital of the State, on the 28th of May; and
Col. Philip Dixon the Opp. Candidate for Auditor of
Public Accounts, died at the Mississippi Springs, on the
25th of May. They were both highly esteemed, and their
decease is universally regretted. Dr. Brown was the
third incumbent of that office who has died within the last
two years; Gov. McNutt has appointed Samuel Craig,
Esq., the Adm. Candidate for election to that office by the
people next November, as his successor ad interim.
The nomination of the Hon. Edward Turner, the Chan
cellor of the State, as the Opp. Candidate for Governor,
leaves the former office vacant. Robert H. Buckner and
Argyle Campbell, Esqs., are announced as candidates to
succeed him. Win. Y. Gholson, Esq., of Pontotoc, is also
proposed. In Mississippi, all the judicial officers are elect
ed by the people.
MASSACIHUSETTS.-A Convention of the opponents of
the Temperance Law now in force in this State, assembled
at Northampton, on the 12th inst. It does not distinctly
appear whether the Convention was a party one or not
Ambrose Ames, Esq of Greenfield, presided, assisted
by five Vice Presidents and three Secretaries. Resolu-
tions, opposing the present law, and in favor of support-
ing Morton and Sedgwick, for Governor and Lieut. Gov-

' indifferent parts of the State for celebrating the approach-
ing National Anniversary witn great spirit. Among other
gentlemen who have engaged to deliver orations, we no-
tice the Hon Caleb Cushing, M.C., John P. Tarhell, Esq.,
a distinguished Member of the Legislature, and Alexander
H. Everett, Esq., of Roxbury, and Jonathan Chapman,
Esq., of Boston.
The President of the United States, in reply to a com-
munication from the Democratic Republican General Com-
mittee of this city, has informed them that he will arrive here
about the first of July. He intends to travel by private con-
veyance, and desires to be received with as little parade as
the wishes of his friends will allow.
The Hon. Rice Garland, now a Member of Congress from
Louisiana, is announced by the Opeolousas Gazette as its
candidate for Governor of the State at the election to be held
in 1842-more than three years hence. It appears to be in


a great hurry.
Robert Dale Owen, Esq., is announced as the Adm. can-
didate for Congress in the 1st District in Indiana-formerly
represented by~the Hon Ratcliff Boone, in the place of James
Lockhart, Esq. who has been induced to withdraw. The
avowed object in making this change is, that Mr. Lockhart,
although a popular man, was not a match for his Opp. com-
petitor upon the stump; Mr. Owen on the other hand is re-
garded as one of the most able men in the State, and has been
for several years a distinguished member of the Legislature
from Posey Co.
William Owsley, Esq., Judge of the Supreme Court of
Kentucky, has been recommended by a public meeting in
Bourbon to the Convention which is to assemble at Harrods-
burgh in August next as a suitable person to be selected as
the Opp. candidate for Governor.
The Hon. John Chambers, of Mason Co., a Member of
the last Congress, is also proposed on the same side.
The Hon. Chilton Allan, formerly a Member of Congress
from the Lexington District, is likewise proposed.
The Hon. Thomas Kittera, for many years a leading
Member of the Philadelphia Bar, and formerly a Member of
Congress, died in that city on Sunday last.
The Hon. Cornelius P. Van Ness, formerly Minister to
Spain, was greeted, on his arrival at Burlington, Vt. on the
12th inst., by a large concourse of the citizens of that and the
neighboring towns. Upon his landing, he was saluted by a
discharge of artillery, and was escorted to his lodgings by a
great procession.
Col. 14W'. R. Johnson, of Virginia, well known as 'the
Napoleon of the Turf,' had $1600 taken from his pantaloons
pocket while in the act of paying his fare for Philadelphia at
the Agent's Office in New-York on Saturday last. In the


After Gregory, the next in hand was Capt, Joseph Smith,
an officer of high standing and of liberal and enlarged views.
Your treaty operations with this commander were curious,
and are deserving of a brief notice. It will be seen that they
were equally insincere on your part with the profbfer of official
dignity so recently extended to Capt. Kearney. Among the
junior officers named, Capt. S. asked for Lieut. Wilkes to
command one of the small vessels-a station in all respects
quite commensurate with his rank, standing amd qualifica-
tions. Let it be remembered how short a time had elapsed
since this station-the command of a small vessel-had been
mentioned to Commodore Jones by your predecessor, and now
locum tenens of the Navy Department, as a fitting appoint-
ment for this same officer! Out of this point much difficulty
had been made, and I have no doubt one motive of Capt.
Smith in asking for Lieut, Wilkes was the hope of reconciling
conflicting elements. The highest post .ever claimed for this
individual was now tendered to him. Why was it not accept-
ed? Can you or Governor Dickerson tell? Where slum-
bered your authority, of which we heard so much when you
first took charge of the Expedition ? Where was the army
discipline you then spoke of using, in making up the personal
of the squadron? Did Lieut. Wilkes find favor in your sight
from the fine illustration of army discipline he exhibited in
not only declining a better position than he and Dickerson
had clamored for, but also in setting an eXample of subordina-
tion and obedience for young officers, by telling Capt, Smith
that he would resign his commission in the service rather than
consent to take a subordinate position in the Expedition, or,
of course, any thing short of the entire command ? Such a
modest, beautiful exhibit of professional zeal was not to be
lost upon you; and your nice perceptions of justice and high
sense of honor, it would seem, at once indicated to you the
honored instrument with which to punish older officers for
their unwillingness to take command! Sir, do you believe
that there is a single officer of independent feeling in the Na-
vy who believes that Lieut. Wilkes declined the station of-
fered to him by Capt. Smith, without having previously re-
ceived some slight intimation of what was in store for him,
and that the time h wd r0w arrived when the mask might be
thrown aside ? I do not say that there is any record of this
understanding, nor do I expect that either of you will own it;
but this I will say, that people will think what they please,
nor can you prevent their thoughts taking the bent to which


N E W-Y 0 R K E R.


Washington a full term of seven years. More prodigal thar Laban,
you gave him, for a single term, both the Rachael and the Leah of his
heart. A junior lieutenant, with scarcely enough service at sea to
make him famnillar with the common routine of duty on board of a
minan-of-war, and, with one or two short interruptions, a sinecurest on
shore for the last fifteen years, lie was lifted over the heads of many
laborious and meritorious officers, and placed by you in the conjuaand
of the Exploring Expedition, in violation of law. The President con-
firmed the act.
"And, as if that were not indignity enough, the public were in-
fornied that none of Wilkes's superiors possessed the requisite talents.
I here challenge you and his friends to point out a single accomplish-
mpe.,nt or qualification in him, for such service, which I will not show
other officers to possess in more perfection. Scientific men have seen
no proofs of his science, and lie is not recognized by them as of their
number. We are told he is a Surveyor The grounds upon which
his claims to this qualification are set uip, consist in his survey, last
fall, of George's Batink ; and, many years ago, of his assisting Gednry
and Blake, under Wordsworth, to survey Narragansett Bay. Of the
accuracy of his Chart of George's Bank we may not speak; for, as
yet, Hassler's operations, which will test it, have not been extended so
far. As Hydographers, both Gedney and Blake, and many others we
might name, are vastly his superiors. While he has been campaign-
ing at Washington, they have been hard at work. And, after many
years of arduous service, meritorious officers are insulted, degraded
and vilified !"
Harry Bluff' has fairly represented the feelings of "an over
whelming proportion of the officers of the Navy; and such
will be the judgement of the whole country as well as of the
Navy. It is a melancholy reflection that a man occupying
your station should have preferred the gratification of little
and vindictixe feelings, to the high, frank, and honorable dis-
charge of aq public trust; but so it was, and you must now lie
in the bed prepared by yoir own hands. The wrong has been
done-your acts cannot be recalled-and in rpy next I shall
examine the pitiful subterfuge by which you have attempted
your justification. Very respectfully, your
New York, June 13th, 1839. FELLOW CITIZEN.

APPOINTMENTS BY TIHE PRESIDENT.
John P. Anderson to be Attorney pf'the United States
for the Western Bistrict of Pennsylvania, in the place of
Benjamin Patton,jr., resigned.
Ely Moore, Surveyor of the District and Inspector of
the Revenue for the port of New York. to take effect on
the 1st of July next, in the place of Hector Craig.
Philip A. de Creney of Portland. to he Consul of the
U. S. for the Island of Martinique, in the place of Peyton
(Gav removed.


tipathy to this feeble but warlike nation, determined to bring
them into subjection by insisting upon the election of a Semi-
nole chief, who was to govern all, and, in the event of their
refusal, compel them to leave Lheir country. The Mickasu-
kies, being reduced to this emergency, consented, and Chitto-
tuste-nuggee was elected chief. He is about forty year of
age, remarkably pleasant and affable when spoken to, but at
other times very dignified and reserved. By his conversa-
tion and conduct in and out of council, he showed himself to
be a man of much intelligence and observation. The Indians
paid him great respect, and seemed gratified in having so able
a counsellor.
The last council was held on the 22d instant; both chiefs
were present, together with forty-five Seminole and Mickasu-
kie warriors. Gen. Macomb upon this occasion, as upon all
others, gave to it a dgree of excitement and interest by adher-
ing to imposing forms and ceremonies. Indeed, this is indis-
pensable in all negotiations with Indians, for among the most
degenerated these customs are retained from generation to
generation, and attach to all that is said a degree of solem-
nity which they believe is gratefully received by the Great
Spirit.
A large council chamber was erected, and the General and
his staff, with all the officers at the post, in uniform, were
escorted to the council by the band of the 7th infantry and a
company of dragoons on foot. White flags were hoisted at
different points; a fire was built in the centre of the chamber,
around which the Indians were seated in profound silence;
pipes and tobacco were given to them, and amid a cloud of
smoke the Indians passed round, shaking hands with all pre-
sent The terms of peace were again fully explained to them
-that they were to go below l'ease creek and remain within
the prescribed limits, as shown by the black lines drawn upon
the map, and be at peace. The 15th day of July next is the
day agreed upon for them to be within the country for the
present allotted them. Chitto-tuste-nuggee followed in a
brief and sensible speech. He expressed, with great earnest-
ness, the pleasure he derived in being once more friends; and
his concurrence and that of his tribe in all that had been pro-
posed. The most vigorous measures, he said, should be im-
mediately adopted to bring in the straggling parties, and a
complete removal should be effected to the country assigned
without delay. He desired that posts might be established
near their boundaries to keep the whites from intruding upon


For the New-Yorker.
THE EXPLORING EXPEDITION.-No. II.
To the Hon. Joel R. Poinsett, Secretary of War:
SIR-I resume, with the first leisure hour since my last
letter, the review I therein commenced of your Jesuitical ac-
tion in connection with the South Sea Exploring Expedition;
and I regret sincerely that the subject is not a more inviting
one.
It may here be proper to state, that about the time Capt.
Gregory was relieved from the command, or more correctly
speaking, superseded, an impression prevailed to a consider-
able extent, that the older officers of the Navy had not shown
a becoming readiness to take charge of the Expedition, and
that they had successively declined or evaded the service, on
grounds incompatible with professional duty and ambition.
As a general charge, I leave this point in medio; while in
many instances I know the imputation to be alike wanton,
ungenerous and unjust. I know farther, and so do you, that
the extraordinary selection finally made was justified on this
assumption in derogation of older officers. It was so intima-
ted on the floor of the Senate, in the quasi defence which,
from a few weak points, you received there. Many members
of Congress were under this impression, and were thereby not
a little influenced by it, in maintaining silence when they saw
the rules of the service and the rights of the officers alike
trampled on by your appointment. Sir, did you not give cur-
rency to this impression? Will you deny having done so?
Did you not say that the older officers had received a rebuke
or lesson from which they might profit in future? And what
atonement have you made, or can you make, personally, to
those you have so deeply injured? You have paltered, in a
double sense, with truth and honor;-what I charge, I '11 fix
upon you. The appointment of your Commander was justi-
fied on the ground that his seniors and superiors declined the
service. Now mark how a plain tale shall put you down.
Sir, neither 3ou nor Governor Dickerson dare deny that
Capt. Kearney did agree to take charge of the squadron sub-
stantially as Commodore Jones left it; that he agreed to take
the whole scientific corps-nay, refused to object to them, as
it was more than intimated to him that he might; that he
asked no change in junior commanders, and ouly required
that Lieut. Gedney-who taught Lieut. Wilkes the rudiments
of hydrography-should be appointed second in command on
board the Macedonian; that Governor Dickerson did agree to
and ratify this arrangement; that Capt. K., with that prompt-
ness peculiar to his character, on the strength of the authority
given, actually directed Lieut. Gedney forthwith to prepare
letters to Messrs. Lieut. Dornin and Glynn, requesting them
to get under way with thetr respective vessels within five days
after receipt of such letters, proceed to Rio, and there await
his (Capt. K.'s) arrival in the flag ship Surely there was
no want of promptness-no shrinking from duty manifested
here. These arrangements were made late in the afternoon.
Early on the following morning, Capt. K., accompanied by
Lieut. Gedney, repaired to the Department, for the purpose
of despatching orders and of putting the squadron immediately
in motion. But a night had intervened; and during that
night the spoiler came! You, sir, Joel R. Poinsett, inter-
fered, and checked the enterprise when thus, I may say, on
the very eve of its advent. It was a dark deed, and dark-
ness had well been chosen for its accomplishment. The first
salutation received by Capt. Kearney from Secretary Dicker-
son was an announcement that the arrangements of yesterday
were all broken up-that he (Dickerson) had nothing farther
to do with the Expedition, and that Capt. K. must now call
upon you-Joel R. Poinsett.
Well, he did call upon you during the afternoon of the same
day. He was by you informed that the Macedonian must be
withdrawn; and thus was accomplished what your joint man-
agement connected with the famous Norfolk Commission had
failed to effect. Thus was undone what Governor Dickerson
had done, or pretended to do, only the day before ; thus was
nailed to the counter as base coin the imputation that no offi-
cer of rank would take charge of the Expedition. Whether
your object was now to give the Macedonian to a favorite as
the flag ship of a home instead of the West India squadron,
or from other motives not now to be dwelt upon, I leave you
to explain.
All this, however, failed to drive Capt. Kearney from the
command, and a proposition to substitute a large merchant
vessel, capable of accommodating the scientific corps, as the
flag ship, was proposed and acceded to by him. But this ar-
rangement was afterward abandoned on your part; and after
having done as much mischief as you could perpetrate within
twenty-four hours, you pretended to withdraw from all farther
responsibility-(pretended, I say, for it was only pretence;)
and the whole matter seemed to slide into a general irrespon-
sible Committee of Conference, comprising Governor Dicker-
son, the Commissioners, and yourself, by whom it was deter-
mined that the squadron should consist of only one sloop, one
brig, one schooner, and the store ship. When matters had
arrived at this crisis, then, and not till then, Capt. Kearney,
disgusted, disheartened, and losing all confidence in being
able to accomplish the objects of the Expedition with such a
force, retired, as I have heretofore stated. Thus, sir, upon
you rests the responsibility of having in this instance produced
a state of things perfectly in consonance with the whole ac-
tion of your predecessor, and which has subsequently been
used as a justification of the walkllou'r cor-:'- -
-^^-^^-^^L- *.g-- in.. e~ ce,ac directly^ at tI~e
same time, upon the science of the country. I repeat, that
upon you rests the responsibility, unless you bring in the Gov-
ernor and the Commissioners to share it with you, which I
am by no means disposed to say you may not justly claim to do.
In this latter arrangement, the plan of the Commissioners,
it is well known, was to crowd the entire scientific corps on
board the store ship Relief, with canvass-screened state rooms,
to be buttoned down like live stock in rough seas and stormy
weather. If it were not as generally believed as such an
event is generally desired, that the Navy Board's existence is
drawing to a close, my respect for the men composing it
would not restrain the expression of my opinions, derived
from all that I have seen and know, of the baneful influence
of that irresponsible concern upou the vital interests of the
naval service of the country. From what I have now stated,
the public will learn-what the Navy and many private indi-
viduals, as well as public functionaries, have all along known-
how you failed in this instance to procure an officer of rank
to take charge of the Expedition !


claims. At any rate, was it not your duty to have looked into
those claims before you ventured to trample upon his feelings
and rights as an officer? Did not the records of the Navy
Department show that he had entered the service in 1i09,
near thirty years ago? and that he had borne himself gal-
lantly at New-Orleans, on board of the bomb-ketch Etnia-
and afterward, while commander of one of the gun-boats,
(though he was then quite a young Midshipman,) in fight-
ing and subduing the Barrataria pirates?
From 1811 to 1813 he was in the Brig Siren where he per-
formed his duty to the entire satisfaction of his commander.
He was also in the sloop of war Fralies, when she was cap-
tured by a superior force in 1814, and remained a prisoner of
war until march 1815. Within a month after his return home
he joined the frigate Congress as acting Lieutenant, and sail-
ed for the Mediterranean. From that vessel he was trans-
ferred to the Washington 74, Commodore Chauncey in com-
mand, in which vessel he returned to New York in 1818.
After a very short respite he was ordered to the Independ-
ence, and at the expiration of a few months from her to the
Columbus 74, when he served as first Lieutenant under Com-
modore Bainbridge till August 1821. He had scarce come
on shore from this cruise before he was again ordered to the
frigate United States, when he again acted as first Lieut.
under Commodore Hull on the Pacific, and did not leave that
ship till May 1827. From this date till 1831, he was on duty
as Lieutenant, in the Navy Yard, Charlestown. His next ser-
vice was ais commander of the schooner Porpoise in the West
Indies. At the termination of this cruise, he was ordered to
the Columbus, when he remained on duty until appointed to
the command of the Macedonian, as I have already stated.
During this long career of unobtrusive and faithful public
service, not in Washington, but afloat, he had acquired that
familiarity with the ocean, that thorough and practical know-
ledge of his profession, which is infinitely more desirable and
valuable in a commander than a vain and pompous pretension
to science. More than half the expeditions on record have
been rendered less useful in their results than they otherwise
would have been, by the jealousy, weakness and folly of their
commanders, in wishing to be considered scientific. An
able, prudent, yet bold and experienced seaman, who knows
how to take care of his vessels and his men under all circum-
stances, and to harmonize all under his command, is the fittest
to conduct such an enterprise as the South Sea Surveying Ex-
pedition. Such a man is Capt. James Armstrong, who, after
being two years attached to the Expedition, was rudely super-
seded by a favorite, without the courtesy of a previous con-
sultation!
In the remonstrance sent in by Lieut. Magruder, who had
also been a long time attached as first Lieut. to the Mace-
donian, (with the request that it should remain on file in the
Department) against the injustice of being superseded, it
seems to me that there was one portion, which muust have
been withering in its affect, where he told you that he was of
the same date as Lieut. Wilkes, that he had been examined
by the same Board, and that he had not only passed higher
than Lieut. Wilkes, by whom he was now supplanted, in
mathematics and in seamanship, and of course ranked above
him, but that he had seen many times the sea-service since
they had been commissioned as Lieutenants!
Sir-I have no wish to lessen the public confidence in your
Lieut. Commodore, by instituting comparisons between him
and other officers by name. If I could bring you to a fair
accountability, without the slightest allusion to him, I should
be glad to do so. He was but your agent, and I mean to hold
the principal and not the instrumental responsible. The
outrage committed upon the naval service by his appointment
was keenly felt and wholly indefensible. All that in justice
can be said in extenuation is, that you had the power and
disposition to do wrong, and did it. Governor Dickenson,
however much delighted with what was done before, now be-
gan to show some symptoms of alarm. The deep-toned, in-
dignant feelings which were known to exist in the service,
dismayed the good honest old man' about his retiring popu-
larity; and he soon busied himself in saying that he did not
do il-' thou canst not say I did it,' while at the same time
he knew that he had signed his name to the order by which
it was done! The degredation of holding office on such hu-
miliating conditions ought to have excited your sympathy for
him, and made you ashamed to throw responsibilities upon
him, which property belonged to yourself; however, I care
not how it may be adjusted in the running account between
you. Thus much, however, I may say: that should you and
the Governor have any difficulty in deciding upon the respect-
ive parts you have borne in degrading the service and mar-
ring a noble enterprise, you may lay this flattering unction to
your hearts, that between you lies all the glory: that no man
of honor will ever wish to show in the monopoly; and that
no future secretaries, who may not be bent on embalming
their memories in the converse of glory will follow in your
footsteps or imitate your example.
Sir, that I may not be charged with misrepresenting the
feelings of the service, allow me here to bring to your review,
an extract from one of a number of articles which appeared
in a Southern paper under the signature of Harry Bluff of
the U. S. Navy.:'
"Misrule, confusion and mismanagement stalked forth with giant
strides. The once popular South Sea Surveyinrg and Exploring Ex-
pedition was now rendered odinusto the nftioe,= Tt"'1,..
P^" -.i^8 i,^^j^'umte~t t e.^difme a ny-wo'roand are-'
proach upon thle Navy; and when the country, impatient of its pro-
tracted delays, was informed that the expedition was on the eve of
sailing, it was suddenly left without a commander-nand the Secreta-
ry, with one hundred captains and commanders subject to his orders,
reported that lie could not get one to go.
"Respect for his office was now completely smothered with pity,
mingled with a feeling loss strong thami contempt for the mami. Even
the young midshipmen held him in derision, and played off their wit
upon him in official letters; and the officers talked openly of sending
a round rabbin to ask for his removal. The Navy was in ai uproar;
and even his darling Wilkes threatened to resign rather than obey his
orders.
"Bit it remained for thie Navy to receive one more stab. It came
from the hand that was least suspected, and went to its very vitals.-
Stand forth, Joel R. Poinsett, fur thou art thie man In your youthful
dayn you had associated much with the Navy. You had seen thie
brave Porter and his gallant comrades nobly defending their little Es-
sex against triple his force, You had the whole list of officers before
you. And, with the least tact, you might have restored the expedition
to order, and made it, even at that late hour, acceptable to the Navy
and worthy of the country. Many old and gallant officers were aux-
ious to command it. Conscious of the claims to which their long and
faithful services entitled them, with a modesty and a sense of decorum
which even the President could not appreciate, they waited in anxious
suspense, hoping the command would h)e tendered to them.
But there was a cunning little Jacol), who had campaigned at


AFFAIRS IN FLORIDA.
(Correspondence of the Army and Navy Chronicle.)
FORT KING, May '27, 183R.
The last fifteen or twenty days have been to us a season of
much interest and speculation. The Florida war has been
so often ended, that every step taken to effect a result so de-
sirable seemed to sink us still deeper in the mire, and caused
us to look confidently for a more harrassing and sanguinary
continuance. But the occurrences of the last week leave no
doubt that the war is ended, and we at least have the pros-
pect of beine relieved fi'om pursuing an enemy who canl never
be found or numbered but under a flag of truce.
General Macomb arrived at Garey's Ferry in April, nnd
immediately issued orders to the army generally, of such a
character as would be the means of opening a communication
with hostiles, and appointed the 1st of May for a general council
at Fort King. Allthe friendly Indians and negroes were des-
patched into the interior with instructions to obtain nn inter-
view impossible; but, from the threats which had been from time
to time received from them, there were but fr'w who predicted
a successful result. The most experienced officers in Florida
were of this opinion. No Indian or white man would run
the hazard of encountering them, as Sam Jones had sent in
word that any stranger who approached his camp, under any
circumstances whatever, he should be put to death.
Gen Macomb arrived here on the 30th of April, but not an
Indian was to be seen or heard of; and from the frequent de-
predations in different parts of the country, the prospect of
a successful result, was, indeed, gloomy. Gen. Taylor came
soon after, completely discouraged. The friendly Indian who
had been with him some six or eight months, instead of being
the medium of communication with the hostiles, had joined
them, taking with him all the friendly Indians at Tampa, and
leaving word that Gen. Macomb had come for the purpose of
gathering them in utinder friendly assurances, seize them, and
transport them to Arkansas, and that hie and his friends were
not to be deceived.
After this become known, every officer saw but a recur-
rence of those disheartening events which have cliharacterized
this protracted war from its very commencement. Gen. Mac-
omb, however, was not willing to abandon his object under
these circumstances, and accordingly adopted every plan that
could be devised to attain the desired end. Indian John, a
friendly Indian, together with his women and children, re-
ceived presents and provisions, and were directed to take
themselves to the hammocks and swamps, aud not return un-
til he had had an interview with some of the hostiles. He
returned after the lapse of a few days, bringing intelligence
that eight Mickasukie warriors were encamped within a mile
of us, and the following morning would visit the camp.
Early-in the morning these distinguished visitors were seen
wending their way through the pine woods towards our en-
campment, bearing a white flag, and headed by Har-lock-tus-
te-nuggee, a Mickasukie chief. They were received by Gen.
Macomb with much form and ceremony, and with every mark
of friendship and kindness. All of them were much embar-
rassed by the appearance of so many officers and soldiers in
uniform, and it was not until they were told that they per-
tained to the rank of the great chief that was sent to talk to
them, that they were at all satisfied. The appearance of
these Indians was indeed interesting; some of them had had
no intercourse with the whites for at least three years. The
chief Har-lock-tuste-nuggee was a man about thirty years of
age, well-dressed, tall, commanding person, manly, prepos-
sessing countenance, and an expressive and fluent speaker.
The others were quite young, and remarkable for their hide-
ous and repulsive faces, and their fine, well-proportioned,
athletic persons, which were well displayed, they having no
other garb than a rough buck-skin shirt. The General ex-
plained to them clearly and briefly the object of his visit among
them, and, if they were willing to comply with his demands,
the white and red man could once more be at peace. The
country below Pease creek was shown to them upon the map,
the boundary defined, and if they were disposed to go there
and be at peace, and not cross the line, they should remain
unmolested for the time being; and that those Indians who
were committing depredations along the frontiers, in the vicin-
ity of Talluhassee, must be brought in without delay. If you
are willing to accede to this, said Gen. Macomb, we can again
be friends; if not, the war must be continued. The chief
evinced much pleasure, and expressed his willingness to com-
ply with every demand. Time Indians, he said, were scatter-
ed throughout ihe country in parties of four and five, but he
knew that so soon as those west of the Suwannee river heard
what he should send to them, they would cease their depre-
dations, come in immediately, and retire to the country as-
signed them. His young men he would send there without
delay, requiring them to come in.
This chief and his companions left us the following morn-
ing, and eight days after encamped in our vicinity with up-
wards of a hundred souls In the mean time Lieut. Col.
Harney arrived from Key Biscayne with Chitto-tuste-nuggee,
the principal chief of the Seminoles and Mickasukies,. Sandy,
a faithful black interpreter, after three days' search, accident-
ally discovered this Indian near the Everglades, returning
from a fishing excursion. He immediately accosted him,
when the chief asked him what he wanted there. "I sup-
pose you have come with more lies." Sandy, however. ,_r
at-A .L ;:... L. ... .4unis given to Col. Harneyby Gen.
M/acomb, which he was induced to believe, and consented to
accompany him to the fort.
Upon Chitto-tuste-nuggee's arrival at Fort Lauderdale, he
obtained fi'om Lieut. Col. Harney a corroboration of all that
had been told him by Sandy. He expressed his willingness
to accompany Col. Harney to any point to meet Gen. Macomb;
but, before doing so, was desirous to return to his tribe and
consult upon the acceptance of thIe terms offered them. After
an absence of three da.s, he returned, bringing with him
O-che-haidjo, a young chief who had been delegated by the
tribe to witness his proceedings with the whites.
Sam Jones, from his age and inability to travel, declined
coming, but desired his acquiescence in the terms proposed
to be made known. This man, in the opinion of the Indians,
has never been considered an important chief, and less so now
than ever. The Mickasukies, of which tribe he is a chief,
have heretofore occupied thie northern portion of the peninsula;
but from the inroads made upon them by the troops, they
have been obliged to retire south, cultivate and live upon land
belonging to the Seminoles, who are by far more numerous.
The Seminoles, finding this to be the case, and having an an-


Matamoras, May 27.-There are in this place near 2000
troops under the command of General Valentia Canalize.
The communications between this place and the capital
have been for more than six mouths intercepted by the
Federalists. The schooner Albert of New Orleans has
been lost at the entrance of the bar of Brazos de Santiago.
The cargo has been sold for $3130. The schr. Southern-
er has been seized by the custom house. General Canalize
left this place on the 19th at the head of 700 men and six
pieces of artillery, with the design, as he said, of going to
San Fernando, but he has more probably gone to join the
forces of General Bustamente for the purpose of attacking
Tampico.
STILL LATER FROM MExIco.-By slips from the New
Orleans Picayune, under date of June 12, we have received
dates from Vera Cruz, via Galveston, two days later than
our previous advices. Col. Bee, the Texian Minister to
Mexico, left Vera Cruz on the 30th May for Havana. The
troops taken at the defeat of Mexia are many of them em-
ployed in the streets of Vera Cruz, and are treated with
great severity. It is stated that the Mexicans have not a
single man-of-war left. Lemus, a brave and skilful gene-
ral, has still near 2000 Federalists under his command in
the vicinity of Munclova. The Government party look
upon him as a dangerous customer. The Federalists at
Tampico still hold out manfully against the Centralists.
FROM Mrxico.-The N. 0. Commercial Bulletin pub-
lishes the following extract from a letter written at Vera
Cruz:-
A private letter from Mexico, under date of May 25, in-
forms us that the Rev. Dr. Moldon, Apostolic Vicar of
Texas, reached that city on the 13th of May, and next
morning called to pay his respects to the President, ad in.
term, who would not see him under pretext of business.
That night, at 12 o'clock, he was conducted to prison,
where hlie remains without hope of acquiring his liberty at
present.
The Mexican Government is organizing an army of
60.000 men, with which to recover the sovereignty of their
lost province of Texas, and appear determined to make a
desperate effort to effect it.
FROM TExAs.-By the steam packet New York, which
arrived at New Orleans on the 10th June, from Texas,
Houston naners were received nto the 7th inst The ttennm-


murders-its drain upon the Treasury of our country-and ils
filling tlihe pockets of those who have done much, and rnmay Ie
expected to do more, in contributing to its continuance.
The country, which is, for the present, assigned to the In-
diins, is within a line commencing at the southern point of
land between Charlotte Harbor and Sanybel River; thence
north up Pease creek to a line running due east, striking the
head of Lake Istokpoga; thence to the Kissimmee river by
Istokpoga creek, down the Kissimmee through Lake 0-kee-
cho-bee, directly south to Shark river, continuing to its mouth ;
and fromin thence to the place of beginning. This boundary
gives them a country inhabitable for any white man. The
larger portion of it, most of the year, is completely inundated.
There is some land, in the vicinity of Pease creek and the
Kissimmee river, suSceptible of cultivation; but elsewhere,
that which is not ovm flown i:-, deep sand. By this arrange-
ment the Indians are excluded from the Atlantic, to which
they heretofore have had free access; and, like the Arabs,
have robbed and destroyed all who have been so unfortunate
as to be wrecked upon that coast.
The southern extremity of the peninsula is reserved and is
said to be good land, and desirable for the location of fborts
and light-houses. A chain of posts is to be established across
the country, from Tampa Bay to Fort Mellon, leaving a space
of country-a neutral ground-between the Indian boundary
and the nearest post, of about fifty miles in breadth. Infantry
and dragoons are to occupy the posts, and by placing there
intelligent and judicious officers, who arc acquainted with the
Indian character, and with the disposition of the settlers re-
sorting to such places for traffic and gain, we may look for
much good resulting from the present arrangement. One
thing must result from it: we can, within the coming six or
nine months, obtain an intimate knowledge of their fastnesses
and if the Government persists in driving them from the
country, merely to carry out the policy of emigration which
is adopted, we can meet them upon more equal grounds and
perhaps succeed. But if the true policy be observed, that
which is due to humanity and justice, and that which is de-
manI(ed by our cili'.ens, who are thickening upon our West-
ern frontier unprotected, they will be allowed to remain. Let
loose such spirits as these inii a country to which they must be
taken by force, and the scenes which have been enacted here
the last four years will bear no comparison with the bloody
conflicts and murders which must ensue upon that border,
where are assembled fifty thousand warriors, who only want
a leader to give vent to a feeling which can never be subdued.
If the war is again commenced, the Indians will be driven
from the Everglades, and the country will again be overrun
by parties of four and five, who will be a terror to every set-
tler and village. Let them go to the country to which they
have gladly consented to go ; and if they remain at peace, why
disturb them ? No man can crave it, but for its delightful
climate; and let time accomplish that which the best blood
and coffers of our country have failed to do. We may talk of
the triumph of the Indians, and of the prostration of the hon-
or of our arms; this is all idle, and belongs to the crafty spec-
ulator, and the loafers who have been hanging upon our fron-
tier from the commencement of the war, and who will now be
reduced to the necessity of working for their daily bread.
I he integrity of our Government is involved only when re-
moving the Indians from a country which they have sold, and
which can be cultivated by the whites. This has already been
accomplished; and some magnanimity should be displayed
towards an enemy who is willing to abandon the whole for a
portion upon which no white man can live. It is impossible
not to feel un interest in these people, who for four years have
been contending for their homes. Florida is the land of their
birth; but, independent of this, there is no country in the
world so peculiarly adapted to their wants and habits. Its
climate, at all seasons of the year, is so mild that a single
article of'dress is sufficient for their comfort; the soil is fertile,
producing spontaneously roots and vegetables enough to sup-
ply their wants; its rivers and ponds abound with fish and
turtle; and in its hammocks and pine barrens game of every
description can be found whenever they are disposed to hunt it.
This is the country they have been contending for, until
they are now driven to a nook and corner uninhabitable for
civilized man; for which they come, as humble suppliants, to
ask or receive peaceable possession.

FLORIDA.-We have had two or three straggling ac-
counts during the past week of murders committed by the
Indians, but the news received by this morning's mail is
more favorable. The Indians are coming in from every
quarter and the tnmot confident belief Is entertained, that
the war is in reality ended

LATER FROM MExIco.-We are indebted for the follow-
ing'Mexican news to slips from the N. Orleans Louisianian
ofJnne 10th.
A gentleman who left Mexico the 20th May, and Vera
Cruz the 1st June, has informed us that Tampico was
closely invested by Bustamente's forces, who were in pos-
session of thIe pass into the harbor, and nothing could go
in or out without their consent. The city of Mexico was
perfectly tranquil and the government was raising troops.
i The first installment of the sum stipulated by treaty has
I ..... puid by the Mexicans to the French.
FRou TAMPICO.-Information has been received in this
city, by the shooter Creole, from Tampico, that General
Arista, at the head of 600 infant (Central troops) arrived
at the bar of Tampico from Altemira on the night of the
27th ult., surprised and captured in a few minutes the small
party of Federalists who were stationed there to defend
the place, without losing, or having even a single man
wounded, belonging to his party. The man of-war schr..
formerly the old Independence of Texas, stationed at the
bar, was captured in fifteen minutes, the greater part of
her crew basely deserting the few resolute men on board,
jumped overboard and escaped, leaving her two principal
officers, (one a Frenchman who behaved nobly) and seven
men, all wounded, to fall into the hands of the enemy.
General Arista had dispatched a brig to Vera Cruz. to ob-
tain eight large pieces of ordinance and two bomb cannons,
with which he intended to attack thie city of Tampico, and
according to his expressed determination carry it without
sacrificing a single man. Bustamente was at Altemira,
and was daily expected at Tampico.









THE


N E W-Y 0 R K E R.


NEW-Y 0 R K.

The Office of The New-Yorker is removed to No. 1
Ann-street, near Broadway, under the Amnerican Museum.

ET It would be extremely ungallant in us not to yield
place to the following spirited remarks, from the pen of one
of the most gifted of the class about which they are written,
even if we did riot agree with the sentiments expressed ; but
as we perfectly accord with them, we cheerfully present them
to the serious contemplation of the beau sexe:'
WOMEN OF GENIUS.
Women of genius ?-Yes! Let us throw down the gaunt-
let, and take up the mooted point. Gentlemen of The New-
Yorker'! will you refuse us your assistance ? or do you in-
cline to the opinions lately advocated in an article with the
above title, the drift of which appeared to be that these gifted
ladies are, above all others, the proper and legitimate sub-
jects of matrimonial election and felicity (an opinion to which
we are far from crying amen)! Genius in man or woman is
always an erratic, wandering propensity, something strangely
at variance with the settled, and sober, everyday habit of this
weary world-something leading its possessor to delight rather
in its quiet and sunshiny corners than to walk gravely and
contentedly along its dusty pathway. Is it then any dispar-
agement to a class of our gifted countrymen to say that, as a
body, women of genius are not free from little eccentricities
and pleasant conceits in their daily walk; that more than
others they are prone to those little discrepancies which make
strange gaps indomestic comfort and respectability ; that even
their pins and needles seem at times to partake of the lo-
comotive faculties of their fnir owners' minds, and their very
blue stockings are apt to exhibit little rents and omissions
which would shock a tidy spinster of no pretensions ?-and
all this for writing nipperty-tipperty poetry nonsense '-all
this for becoming singing-birds to the public, forsooth!
With these views, can we approve of trapping the unwary,
hanging out a false advertisement, holding up to view a wrong
side of the picture, representing these women of enlarged
souls 'cabined, cribbed, and confined,' to the narrow limits
of domestic life, acting their parts to a charm, and never
dreaming of building the lofty rhyme, or making themselves
a name ? Impossible! Whatever purpose literary women
were made for, we do not think it was for this. We have an
objection to holding up matrimony as the true end of woman
to this class of our readers. Why should a lady of fine fac-
ulties and cultivated mind desire only to become 'the do-
mestic assistant of some hum-drum man'? Why should a
woman of genius consider herself able to dispense with that
time, and sedulous attention, and self-devotion which a man
of genius finds necessary for him to gain a niche in the Tem-
ple of Fame? Why should unhappy gentlemen be excited by
false representation to marry ladies, who, if they retain their
literary habits, will often cause the wretched wight to exclaim,
as he looks at his wife's once snowy fingers, Oh, this ink!
this ink !"
It is not a consummation to be wished: there are many
reasons. What gentleman of ordinary talents could marry a
woman of great genius and proportionate energy without
wishing at times to hide his diminished head'? What pub-
lic man would desire to be outshone by his own wife ? It is
clearly a false position Women of genius were not created,
like ordinary mortals, only to be wooed, won, and comforta-
bly married. More than any other class they can dispense
with such contingencies. They were born to enlighten, bless
and purify the moral atmosphere. And as genius in the lady
by no means ensures that of her husband, how ludicrous ap-
pears often the position of the parties, reminding one of the
introduction in the immortal Pickwick Papers-' Sir I am
Mr. Leo Hunter, husband of Mrs. Leo Hunter, who writes
for the Magazines '
Certainly those gentlemen are scarcely to be blamed who
shrink from such a notoriety. We have ever been able cor-
dially to excuse the expected spouse of Miss Hannah Moore,
who, as the time for their nuptials drew near, terrified at
what hlie was about to commit, was not forthIcoming at
the church-door, but had, as was afterward ascertained,
mounted his horse and rode away, no one knew whither-
and this not from any dislike of his intended bride, but fiom
pure, sheer dread of the keen encounter of such a mighty in-
tellect. Nor do we wonder. How could an ordinary man
think of appropriating to himself that mind which had scarcely
its equal in the country, without trembling at Isis own pre-
sumption ?
There is, too, an absorbing power in literary pursuits,
which, lifting the mind quite above common occupations,
would scarcely render a lady of this turn a more agreeable
domestic companion. How can she be expected to sew on a
button, whose soul is so clearly above buttons ? What is the
time actually spent in committing wild thoughts and floating
fancies to paper, compared to the hours when those thoughts
are under review ?-hours when the husband of the lady, if a
dull man, might indeed tell the same story over twice, or ask
in vain for another cup of tea, while his affectionate partner.
if at last awakened, would indignantly reply to his repeated
inquiries, in the words of the old ballad,
Sir, I ride on a horse within wings.'
We also observe an awkward forgetfulness in the paper be-


fore us, of the fact thliat women of genius have seldom much
respect for any but men of genius ; that in their magic glass
ordinary mortals do look very ordinary. Wherefore, then,
expose them to an unhappy daily comparison ? There is
another fact: men of genius, aware of their own little eccen-
tricities, and knowing too well the rambling and truant pro-
pensities of the craft, seldom marry women of genius, but
rather avoid an equality of intellect when contracting such
alliances, leaving thus all the sacrifices to be made by the
lower order, the ordinary mortals, the unhappy victims, the
deluded gentleman of common power, who believes that a
woman of fine ability and keen perception can find anmuse-
ment in his frivolous conversation, and never feel her mind
soaring above its dead level of insipidity and dullness. It ie
to warn such, that I write. There are dangerous movements
abroad. This article may have connection with them. Wo-
men are advocating many strange opinions, gaining new views
of their powers and capacities. They have recently, in the
city of New-York, sat on committees, anid addressed public
meetings-and what more likely than a combination of wo-
men of genius, agreeing to represent themselves as tame, harm-
less, interesting personages, till such time as their objects
have been attained, their true character veiled, and they find
that they can triumphantly present a petition to depose the
misguided husbands whom these representations have gained
-to assume their privileges, run for Congress, and aspire to
the Presidential chair ? In this view, what so dangerous as
upholding women of genius ? Does not every intelligent man
agree with a work we have lately read, in v. hic'h intellectual
power was defined to be something that in the mind of man
required to be developed, improved and called out, but in the
mind of woman something that must be kept back, tram-
meled, forbidden to show itself, lest, as the author strangely
observes, it should produce misery to its possessor and the
world ?
Women of genius !-Unhappv and misrepresented class!-


Mrs. M. G. Milward, is capital, besides being quite original.
We should like no better fun than to read a two-volume novel
by this graphic writer. We have not laughed as much since
the thirteenth number of Nicholas Nickleby. "Humbugs of
New-York" is a dissertation upon general empericism, not a
review of Dr. Reese's book of that name. The writer has
strength and elegance, and touches the subject of Abolition
with a felicitous pen. We wholly disagree with his briefly-
expressed commendation of the book, whose title forms the
text of his article. Instead of being clear, we consider it a
dull, heavy, conceited, absurd, ignorant, stupid, blundering
display of imbecility. It proved nothing, refuted nothing: it
fell still-born from the press, and no critical galvanism can
make it kick with a semblance of life. Character of Medea
-a grand, a noble paper, exhibiting that fine scholarship and
pure classical taste, which have so marked the papers on
similar topics in Blackwood. In this working age, we come
upon such a paper, with as much pleasurable surprise as we
should feel in encountering the ruins of a Grecian temple on
the site of a new city in the West.
Among the remaining papers in this number, we notice as
peculiarly worthy of praise, Mr. J-Ales F. Otis's beautifully
selected chaplet of verses on the charms of.May ; an interest-
ing account of Virginia, transcribed from the Royal MSS. in
the British Museum; and Mr. J. N. Reynolds's Leaf from an
Unpublished Journal. We hardly know of a more fluent and
affluent writer than Mr. Reynolds. The mind of the reader
rushes along with his, as if, to use a sailor's expression, he
" had it in tow." This is the effect of a strong, clear, well-
regulated intellect, which, secure in the possession of high
powers, is competent at all times to their fullest exercise.
We say to Mr. White, 11Mace virtute. Go on in the same
exalted path, and if your periodical is not warmly cherished
by the literary men of the country, the discredit will be theirs
-the honor cannot fail to be your own.

Travels it Palestine and Syria: by George Robinson,
Esq. (Paris: printed for the author. London: Henry
Colburn. New-York: sold by Franklin Robinson. Two
volumes, octavo; pp. 358, 444.)-Right seldom is it that
our eyes are greeted with a book like this-a book of trav-
els executed in the style and with the beauty of the Lon-
don Annuals; paper white as snow and smooth as porcelain;
type new and double-leaded ; margin of princely amplitude,
and illustrations, if not equal to the Drawing-Room Scrap-
Book,' at least good enough for the reader's expectation and
the price of the work. Probably these particulars may be at-
tributed to the fact that the wealthy and accomplished author
has taken the trouble to become his own publisher, and pre-
pared his volumes with reference not to their cost but to his
own taste. Would that all authors of merit were able to set
forth their labors in the same comfortable and luxurious dress!
Mr. Robinson's preface is a model. He introduces it with
the axiomn of De Weiss: Tout home doit au publique le
tribut de son activity, et devrait s'efforcer de laisser quelque
trace honorable de son existence.' Indeed this preface, in
addition to being brief, pertinent, and in very good taste, act-
ually embodies a summary of the subject-matter, and ani im-
partial and very appropriate review of the whole book. We
recommend it particularly to Mr. Cooper, as rather the worst
preface-writer in the literary world.
On this wise, Mr. Robinson remarks, after giving an out-
line of his entire journey in less than two pages:
"Such is the brief outline of a tour, dilating itself from an
intended period of a few weeks to as many years, and under-
taken with no other object than that of gratifying personal cu-
riosity. The author can, indeed, with sincerity disclaim ever
having entertained the remotest intention 9f pu ting in type
his notes and observations at the time 1:e mail"- them-con-
fessing with cheerfulness that however .miicn he may have
traveled for his own amusement and instict ioi,'. I.e considers
himself in many ways inadequate to furm-.i ppL'r data for
the solution or elucidation of questions whi-isi rc,,cern in a
higher degree the geographer and archacologip:. But, hav-
ing made a more complete and extensive tour (.f "he Levant
than it has happened to others to have done, his sole object
in publishing the present volumes has been a wish to be use-
ful to the general reader by imparting, in a simple and em-
bodied form, the result of his own personal observations upon
countries he has visited, together with that information con-
cerniiag them which hitherto lay scattered over the works of a
hundred different authors. For this reason, as well as for the
specific and undigressive style in which the narrative is car-
ried on, he is induced to think that his work will be of great
convenience to future travelers-well remembering the griev-
ous encumbrance ofs huge volumes on the way, which, he
humbly considlers, are much better consulted in the seclusion
of a library, than on the highroad from Jerusalem to Da-
mascus."
And thus it is. The work will be invaluable to all future
travelers; for, to all intents and purposes, it is a guide-book,
and scarcely inferior, as such, to Madame Starke's popular
volume. The style is certainly unpretending, and very prac-
tical. The whole is written in the form of a diary, and each
day's transactions and observations are separately and faith-
fully recorded ; but the writer seldom gets beyond simple mat-
ters of fact. lie does not digress, speculate, nor apostro-
phise. He has no surprising adventures to relate. He finds
neither space nor time for episodes, and, of course, as a mere
reading book, the work lacks interest now and then. Com-
pared with the recent work of Dumas on Egypt and Arabia
Petrwa, it is as a well-defined map by the side of a magnifi-
cent, glowing, living landscape-excellent in its way-and
yet a very different kind, an inferior order of excellence from


and to the brilliant production of the French traveler. The
latter is a philosopher and a poet; the former a plain, blunt
historian.
The work of Mr. Robinson contains the following illustra-
tions :
In Colored Lithograph.-1. View of Jerusalem. 2. Exte-
rior of the Holy Sepulchre. 3. Antiquities in the Town and
Environs. 4. View of Bethlehem. 5. Distant View of Mt.
Thabor. 6. ViewofBierout. 7. Cedars of Lebanon. 8. Ru-
ins of Balbec. 9. View of Damascus. 10. The Orontes,
near Soudich.
Engraved Maps and Plans.-1. Plan of Jerusalem. 2.
Ground-Plan of the Church of the Resurrection, at Jerusalem.
3. Map of the Holy Land. 4. Plan of the Ruins of Balbec
(Heliopolis.) 5. Plan of the Ruins of Amman (Ammon.)
6. Plan of the Ruins of Djerash (Gerasa.) 7. Map of the
Haouran. 8. Map of Syria.
Mr. Robinson shows great familiarity with, and great de-
votion for, the Bible ; and his frequent allusimons to the Sacred
Volume, with his brief quotations from it, add much to the
interest and the value of his work.

Conversations with Goethe in the Last Years of his Life.
-This is the fourth volume of Specimens of Foreign Litera-
ture,' a translation from the German of Eckermann, by S. M.
Fuller, and by far the most interesting of the series. It is
indeed a truly delightful volume, and one that will afford ev-
ery lover of literature as much instruction as entertainment.
The translation, we are informed, is made by a lady. With
a very few verbal oversights, such as the wrong collocation of
a little word now and then, a fault which translators from the
Germnan are insensibly liable to commit, it is an excellent trans-
lation-simple, easy, flowing, and conversational-just what
it ought to be. It has all the transparency and beauty of ori-
ginal composition. The lady has done herself uncommon
credit, while at the same time she has conferred on the lit-


Ing Conversations, faithfully reported as they appear to be,
will have a tendency to effect both purposes. Thie instructed
and the uninstructed, as Horace has it, will no doubt con-
tinue to write; but the better part will gradually purify their
compositions from base admixtures, and thus draw the ser-
vile part after them. Such, indeed, are our hopes and as-
pirations. We might give some interesting selections from the
unique autobiography of Eckermann, and the discriminating
introductory remarks of the translator, and perhaps we may
afford our readers that gratification hereafter; but for the
present we must refer them to the volume itself. We assure
them, that even if they are no friends to the illustrious Ger-
man, they will peruse these openings out of his mind and
heart, as well as the minutime of his life and home, with ex-
treme avidity.
New Books.-We are still behindhand in our acknowledge-
ments of the New Works with which we have been furnished
by our kind and mindful friends the publishers.
To Messrs. Weeks, Jordan and Co., of Boston, we are in-
debted for a budget of pleasant little books, the chief of which
is Mary Howitt's Birds and Flowers, and other Country
Things." This is a charming collection of bright thoughts
and sweet fancies, thrown into most melodious verse. The
author is, of all the female poets of the day, our favorite. We
shall take occasion to choose many gems from this casket.
"The American Flower-Garden Companion ;" "The Amer-
ican Fruit-Garden Companion;" and A Treatise on the
Culture of the Dahlia and Cactus," are three eminently use-
ful works from the pen of Mr. E. Sayers, who seems to unite
experimental knowledge with the best ability to communi-
cate it to others. "Charles Hartland, or the Village Mis-
sionary," is well and truly described in the preface of its Ed-
itor, Mr. Wm. A. Alcott, 'author of The House I live in,
etc.':-" The book is designed, as will readily be seen, to
convey moral and religious instruction, by exhibiting to the
young, in pictures of every-day life the excellence of virtue on
the one hand, and the miseries of vice on the other. It is
also designed to show the importance and necessity of pos-
sessing the true missionary spirit in all the ordinary concerns
and relations of domestic life, and above all in the discharge
of the responsible duties of a teacher."
Lea and Blanchard, of Philadelphia, have published His-
torical Sketches of Statesmen who flourished in the time of
George III.; to which is added Remarks on Party, and an
Appendix, by Henry Lord Brougham "-in two neat duode-
cimo volumes. The character of this splendid production has
been made already familiar to readers in this country by co-
pious extracts.
E. L. Carey and A. Hart have published Sketches of
Public Characters, Discourses and Essays; to which is added
a Dissertation on the Eloquence of the Ancients, by Henry
Lord Brougham "-also in two neat volumes, and similar to
the preceding work. A translation of another of Paul de
Kock's novels has just been issued from the same respectable
source.
Mr. E. French has published a History of Michigan,
Civil and Topographical, in a compendious form ; with a
View of the Surrounding Lakes; by James H. Lanman," in
an elegant royal octavo volume of 397 pages. This is a work
which is not only highly creditable to the industry and talents
of the author, but valuable as an important addition to the
historical records of the country. It displays an enthusiastic
spirit, and is evidently written throughout con more, as well
as with a regard to distinctness in the array of ficts and in-
cidents. Considerable power is evinced in description, and
there is an ease and grace in the composition which render it
attractive.

The American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine.
-The number for May and June, completing the present se-
ries of this literally superb periodical lies before us. It is
embellished with two beautiful engravings, the subject of one
being Trout-Fishing," and the other a Forest Joust." It
is printed in the best taste and highest style of the art, and
equal in all respects to works of similar character in England.
Persons who bave seen the splendid affairs to which we al-
lude, will appreciate this praise. We have read with inter-
est and admiration the commencement, now published, of
" A Week in the Woodlands ; or Scenes on the Road, in the
Field, and round the Fire; by Frank Forester," whose alias
is, we are told, H. WV. Herbert, author of"' The Brothers.' &c.
If it be that gentleman, he has, Irishly speaking, surpassed
himself. A more fresh, racy, charming, knowing narrative is
not to be found in noveldom. If it is well-sustained through-
out, and it will be a treasure to this, as it would to any other
journal in any country.

KJ' Mr. Colen, the lithographer, has published a spirited
portrait of George Washington, from Peale's painting. It is
of the size of life, and admirably executed.

Important Decision to Travelers.-The QGuincy (Mass.)
Patriot notices a novel decision in an action of Noah Fi-
field vs. the Braintree and Weymouth Turnpike Corpora-
tion, determined at the last term of the Court of Common
Pleas for the county of Norfolk, Mass. It was settled that
a person traveling upon the common and ordinary business
of family concerns-going to a grist mill, &c.-is exempted
from the payment of toll.


New York Canal Tolls.-Amount of receipts for the
second week in June, 1839, $8,051 03; amount of re-
ceipts for the second week in June 1838, $7,139 99; ex.
cess $911 04. [Albany Eve. Journal.

NEW AGENTS.
TD' Mr. JOHN CAUGHEY will hereafter act as Agent for The New
Yorker at Newburgh, N.Y.
ISRAEL A. HATCH is an Agent to procure subscribers for The New
Yorker in the New-England States.
Mr. JAMES PATTON is an authorized Agent for The New-Yorker in
the Eastern States, (instead of Edward Miller, announced by mistake
in our last.) Mr. Cook of New-Haven is also authorized to act in
our behalf.
DANIEL PARKHURST is appointed Agent for The New-Yorker to ob-
tain subscriptions in the Counties of Oneida and Madison.
T. M. Bisiop will hereafter act as Agent for The New-Yorker at
Ovid, N. Y.
Also, S. H. TAYLOR at Springville, Penn.
Mr. ROBERT BROWN will hereafter act in our behalf in Albany. All
persons to whom it may be more convenient to subscribe, or make
payment to him than to us, are invited to do so.
articti,
On the 16th, by Elder Isaac N. Walter, William J. Morgan of Flor-
ida to Angelina Baker of this city.
Monday, 17th, Robert H. Leathem to Anne Bailey.
Tuesday, 18th, Mandlebert Canfield to Anna Lawrence.
Wednesday, 19th, J. C. Harris, of the firm of John Saxton & Co., to
Emily Ann Morgan.
Thursday, 20th, John C. Bloom to Frances B. Hyde.
In Washington, on the llth, Thomas McDonnell to Mary Cecelia
Barnes, both of that place.
At Fishkill, Dutchess co on the 12th, George W. Snow of this city
to Amelia Van Wyck of Fishkill.
Also, at Hlempstead, L. I., Jacob T. Vanderhoofof this city to Har-
riet S. Thompson of Hempstead.
At NewHIaven, on the 19th, by Rev. Dr. Croswell, Benjamin Brew-
ster to Amelia Carringtou.
Also, at the same place, Roswell Hood to Abbey M. Beach.
At Guilford, Chenango co. 24th tult. James Dennis, a Revolutionary
pensioner, to Eunice Dennis, his former wife, after a cruel and dis-
tressing divorcement of more than two years.

n1iebl,
On the llth, Ruth Ann Atwell, in her 62d.
On the 16th, Mrs. Agnes Forrest, aged 88.
On the 17th, Maria Wiley, 23.
Also, Cyprian Flachat, 72.
Also, Sarah Mansell, 10.
On the 18th, Margaret Craig, 13.
Also, Malvina Allan, 19.


AMERICAN INSTITUTE.-At a regular meeting of the American
Institute, the following gentlemen were appointed as the Stand-
ing Committee of the Department of Agriculture:
Charles Henry Hall, Nicholas Wyckoff,
Jeremiah Johnson, Charles F. Durant,
Nicholas Cowenhoven, Thomas A. Emmet,
Francis Price, William F. Phyfe,
Samuel F. Halsey, John H. Coster,
George Williams, Isaac Adriance.
CORRESPONDING COMMITTEE.
George F. Hopkins, Joseph Titcomb,
Adoniram Chandler, James Hamilton.
T. B. Wakeman, Cor. Secretary, is ex officio Chairman.
FINANCE COMMITTEE.
E. T. Backhouse, I. Foote,
E. D. Plimpton, George Bacon,
William P. Dissosway, J. D. Ward,
Gurdon J. Leeds.
The Managers of the Twelfth Annual Fair from the City of New-
York have also been elected. As soon as the list of Managers from
the Country is completed, it will be published. The Fair will take
place in the early part of October. There is every prospect of a
splendid Exhibition. jun22
THIS DAY PUBLISHED-THE EDINBURGHI REVIEW, NO.
CXXXIX. For April, 1839. Contents:
1. Reigns of George III. and IV.;
2. Moral and Intellectual Statistics of France;
3. Mr. Gaily Knight's Arehitectural Tours;
4. Charles I. and the Scottish Commissioners;
5. Sir John Barrow's Life of Lord Anson;
6. Commission on Irish Railways;
7. Life and Adventures of Maceroni;
8. Ancient Scottish Melodies;
9. False Taste-Dr. Chanuning;
10. Church and State. JEMIMA M. LEWER, Publisher,
jun22 It Basement, cor. Broadway and Pine-st.
ECKWITH'S ANTI-BILIOUS PILLS.-Frequent applications
from those who have confidence in Beckwith's Anti-Dyspeptic
Pills,' and in their author, for a Pill of more actively purgative prop-
erties, have induced him to issue one calculated to supply the demand.
These Pills are, therefore, designed expressly as an active purga-
tive, and possess highly Anti-Bilious qualities, yet without a particle
of calomel, or any other mineral. Calomel has been omitted from no
prejudice against it when prescribed for individual cases by a judi-
cious physician; but the inventor protests against it in combinations
designed for popular use; for it is well known to the Faculty that
most of the objects desired in the employment of such articles can be
attained without it, and that its too common introduction into fami-
lies for domestic prescription is often followed by consequences inju-
rious to the general health, if not destructive to the constitution. They
are NOT offered as a panacea; they promise no cures hut such as are
well known to follow a thorough action upon the bowels; but when-
ever an active purgative is required, (and there are few who do not
daily determine this fact for themselves,) these Pills may be safely
taken. As an ANTI-DYSPEPTIC they should not be taken; dyspeptics
have no business ordinarily with purgatives of this class. The labor-
er, the hearty feeder, with sluggish bowels, the habitually bilious-in
short, all who desire or need to have their bowels urged to more active
duty-may rely upon the efficacy of these Pills.
They are handsomely put up in tin boxes, with directions, and for
sale by Henry D. Turner, 184 Broadway, New-York, up stairs, and
most of the other agents for the sale of Beckwith's Anti-Dyspeptic
Pills throughout the United States. Price 25 cents per box.
KT2 A liberal discount made to those who purchase by the quan-
tity. jun22 4t*
9 MILES'S COMPOUND EXTRACT OF TOMATO.-The pro-
prietors of the above-named article are prepared to show, by indis-
putable evidences, that their medicine is the only genuine Extract of
Tomiato-that it was the first of the name, and the only one of the na-
ture that has been frequently described, ever introduced to the public.
To do this, they intend hereafter to show-
Firstly, That Miles's Cempound Extract of Tomato was in circula-
tion and high repute early in 1837;
Secondly, That it has fully proved to answer all that was anticipated
for it after thIe discovery was announced;
Thirdly, That all other medicines embracing the word Tomato
have no claims. to the name-that they are spurious articles, and only
to be ranked with thIe common nostrums of the day.
In reviewing thie history of these base attempts to defraud the ori-
ginators and inventors of the genuine Compound Extract of Tomato,
the whole course of the pretenders will be exposed, from the com-
mencement of their operations to the present time.
It is not contended that any of the spurious articles were in exist
ence before the 1st of February, 1838 ; therefore, the following edito-
rial remarks by the conductor of the Cincinnati Journal and Lumin-
ary, published early in the autumn of 1837, will conclusively show
that Miles's Compound Extract of Tomato had then for some time
been before the public, and bore a high reputation. E. W. Chester,
Esq., the gentleman alluded to, is now a resident of this city, well
known for his eminent talents; and to him a reference may be made
on thIe subject.
0- MILES'S TOMATO MEDICINE.-The virtues of the Toma-
to, not only as a delicious vegetable for the table, but also as a medi-
cine, have been for a considerable time past attracting no little atten-
tion. It has been believed to possess anti-bilious qualities, which, if
they could be effectually extracted or separated from the superfluous
matter, would he invaluable. This has been characterized as abilious
country. A large portion of the diseases arise from disordered livu:rs
or derangements in the glandular system. If a remedy easy, safe, ef-
fectual in its operation, and leaving the constitution unimpaired,
could be discovered for bilious complaints, this would unquestionably
be among the most healthy climates in the world.
Calomel has been the almost universal remedy for diseases of this
character ; but it is a remedy which nothing but necessity should in-
duce the use of. It may be considered as trespassing on another pro-
fession to speak of this, yet we may be permitted to express our
strong conviction that calomel cannot be used without injurious and
lasting effects upon the system, greater or less according to the quan-
tities taken, and the frequency of its use, and the constitution of tlie
patient. A substitute for this, therefore, from the vegetable kingdom,
is a desideratum in this country.
"We believe this desideratum has been discovered in the Tomato.
Dr. Miles, of this city, and his associates, with much labor anud ex-
pense, as we understand, have succeeded in obtaining such an extract
from this vegetable as, it is hoped, will be found an effectual substi-
tute. We have taken some pains to inquire among medical men and
oilier.s >vht liti tai, us.ed tlis inn'tlieine, us to its efl',.'ts ; amid we feel welt
satisfied that it will prove a mo.-.t valuamlae remedy in bilious cons-
plaiuts. So far as we have been able to learn, it hIas produced the de-
sired effect, operating to produce a healthy action of the liver, effect-
ing bilious discharges when needed, and in some instances breaking
up fevers even with more certainty and in a shorter time than calo-
mnel. For sick or bilious headaches it has been found a good remedy.
Those who have used it say that it does Hot produce the debilitating
effects of most other kinds of purgative medicines; that there is no
increased danger of colds after its use, and where large doses of calo-
mael would be needed, this operates without any danger of the dis-
tressing and injurious effects of calomel when producing salivation.
"As we have reason to hope, from our investigation, this extract of
the Tomato will prove a substitute for calomel-in a great variety of
cases, we caunot but regard it as a great blessing to thIe human family.
It is therefore that we speak of it; and we trust that it will be fully
tested by families. We have every assurance that it is perfectly safe,
and free from all mineral substance."
A small quantity of this medicine, of 50 three-grain pills each, ii
boxes, price fifty cents, may be obtained of Posts & Main, Cedar-st.;
Goddard & Butler, Gold-st.; Rushton & Aspinwall, and Marshall C.
Slocum, Broadway.
A large supply is daily expected, when it will be found at the stores
of all the respectable Druggists in the city. jun22


ECKWITHI'S ANTI-DYSPEPTIC PILLS.-Whenever these
Pills have been once introduced into a family, they become a
standing remedy, and are called for again and again, which is sufficient
proof of their good qualities. Bishop Ives, Dr. Ilawkes, Gov. Irc-
dell, Hon. II. Potter, Hon. E. Stanly, Rev. Win. McPheceters, D. D.
and manny of the first Physicians in this country, are among those who
have furnished letters in testimony of the beneficial effects resulting
from the use of these pills.
Thie pills are put uip in a superior style, in tin boxes, containing 40
pills. Price 50 cents. To be had of H.D.TURNER,
jun22 4t5 180 Broadway, New-York, up stairs.
G ARDEN-ENGINES.-J. STONE, 390 Breadway, New-York, begs
to call thie attention of the public to his improved patent garden
or small fire engines. The great difficulty heretofore experienced in
thie use of garden engines as hitherto constructed, is that whenever the
valves become defective, either by dirt getting under them, or when
worn out, the whole machine has to be unsoldered and taken to pieces.
Whereas those now offered to the public are so constructed that both
valves can bie taken out and replaced merely by the removal of one
screw, which can be performed in a few minutes. These engines are
not only useful fu)r watering gardens, but also for cleaning windows,
as they throw water to a considerable hight. They would also in many
cases answer thie purpose of a fire engine, if applied when the fire first
breaks out, and often bethe means of saving much property. Price
only $'22. They can be seen in operation, so that persons can be ena-
bled to judge of their merits. A liberal commission allowed to mer-
chants and country dealers. Force and other pumps, water closets,
baths, lead, copper and brass work of every description.
March 23 6m
OYFUL NEWS TO THiiOSE WHO NEED IT.-Thie universal
and unrivaled success of JAYNE'S EXPECTORANT in all pul-
monary affections, is now fully conceded by all who have given it a
proper trial. No one should now despair, however apparently hope-
less may be his situation. Its superiority over every other treatment
can no longer be doubted. It must, it has, and it will prevail, over
prejudice and every other opposing obstacle, because it is the only
remedy for thIe above disease which may be depended upon.
The following extract of 'a letter is from a highly respected clergy-
man of the Baptist Church : NEW-YORK, March 10, 1839.
Dear Sir-I feel it my incumbent duty to say, having formerly been
prostrated by means of the asthma, and, although relieved of that, my
lungs have ever since been sensitive. Having recently taken a vio-
lent cold, I was severely afflicted with the influenza, so that a hard
cough prevented my customary repose, and consumption seemed to
be the inevitable consequence. But having seen a notice of the In-
dian Expectorant,' I applied to oune of your agents, of whom I pur-
chased two bottles, which restored me to perfect health.
Respectfully yours, JOHN ELLIS,
Late pastor of the Baptist Church in Stamiford, Ct.-now ofN. Y.city.
To Dr. D. Jayne.
To be had wholesale and retail of A. B. & D. Sands, 79 Fulton-st.,
corner of Gold, and 100 Fulton-st., corner of William. Price $1 00.
June 1.
IRGINIA AND NEW ENGLAND MINING COMPANY.-An ad-
V journed meeting of the Stockholders in this Company, for thlie
purpose of choosing Directors for thie ensuing year, and the transac-
tion of t' suc'hi tobo usine ss*ass beu m bm ita c tedn (at\ >te .tm etingtiir l l


T HE UNIVERSAL ESTIMATION in which the celebrated LIFE
- PILLS and PHENIX BITTERS are held, is satisfactorily de-
monstrated by the increasing demand for them in every State and sec-
tion of the Union, and by the voluntary testimonials to their remark-
able efficacy which are every where offered. It is not less from a
deeply gratifying confidence that they are the means of extensive and
inestimable good among his afflicted fellow creatures, than from in-
terested considerations, that the proprietor of these pre-eminently
successful medicines is desirous of keeping them constantly before the
public eye. The sale of every additional box and bottle is a guarantee
that some person will be relieved from a greater or less degree of suf-
fering, and be improved in general health; for in no case of suffering
from disease can they be taken in vain. The proprietor has never
known nor been informed of an instance in which they have failed to
do good. In the most obstinate cases of chronic disease, such as
chronic dyspepsia, torpid liver, rheumatism, asthma, nervous and bil-
ious head-ache, costiveness, piles, general debility, scrofulous swell-
ings and ulcers, scurvy, salt rheum, and all other chronic affections
of thIe organs and membranes, they effect cures with a rapidity and
permanency which few persons would theoretically believe, but to
which thousands have testified from happy experience. In colds and
coughs, which, if neglected, superinduce the most fatal diseases of the
lungs, and indeed of the viscera in general, these medicines, if taken
but for three or four days, never fail. Taken at night, they so pro-
mote the insensible perspiration, and so relieve the system of febrile
action and feculent obstructions, as to produce a most delightful sense
"of convalescence in the minorniii.g; and though the usual symptoms of
a cold should partially return during the day, the repetition of a suit--
able dose at the next hour of bed-time will almost invariably effect
permanent relief, without further aid. Their effect upon fevers of a
more acute and violent kind is not less sure and speedy, if taken in
proportionable quantity; and persons retiring to bed with inflamma-
tory symptoms of the most alarming kind, will awake with the grati-
fying consciousness that the fierce enemy has been overthrown, and
can easily be subdued. In the same way, visceral turgescence, the'
long established, and visceral inflammations, however critical, will
yield-the former to small and the latter to large doses of the Life
Pills; and so also hysterical affections, hypocondriacism, restlessness,
and very many other varieties of the Neurotical class of diseases,
yield to the efficacy of the Phenix Bitters. Full directions for the
use of these medicines, and showing their distinctive applicability to
different complaints, accompany them; and they can be obtained,
wholesale and retail, at 367 Broadway, where numerous certificates
of their unparalleled success are always open to inspection.
For additional particulars of the above medicines, see Moffat's 'Good
Samaritan,' a copy of which accompanies the medicines; a copy can
also be obtained of the different Agents who have the medicines for sale.
French, German, and Spanish directions can be obtained on appli-
cation at the office, 367 Broadway.
9T All postpaid letters will receive immediate attention.
Sold wholesale and retail by WM. B. MOFFAT, 367 Broadway, N.
Y. A liberal deduction made to those who purchase to sell again.
AGENTS in the city of New-York for the sale of Moffat's Life Pills
and Phenix Bitters: A.B. & D. Sands, corner of Fulton and William-
sts.; E. Chestney, 144 Bowery; Millihau, 183 Broadway; P. I-ick-
ie, 413 Broadway; Dr. Leeds, 47 Cherry-st.; Dr. Lee, 294 Madison-st.;
Dr. Quackenboss, 45 Carmine-st.; John Hinton, corner of 21st street
and 8th Avenue; E. M. Guion, corner of Bowery and Grand-st. and
441 Grand-st.; H. 0. Green, corner of Rivingtou and Clinton-sts.; Dr.
R. B. Folger, 3 1-2 Chambers-st.
The Life Medicines may also be had of the principal druggists in
every town throughout the United States and the Canadas. Ask for
Moffat's Life Pills and Phenix Bitters; and be sure that a fac simile of
John Moffat's signature is upon the label of each bottle of bitters or
box of pills. March 23.
BY order of Samuel J. Bayard, Judge of Seneca County Common
Pleas, of the degree of Counsellor, Notice Is hereby given, pur-
suant to the provisions of the statute authorizing attachments against
absconding and concealed debtors, that an attachment has ilstied
against the estate of Daniel Winchell, ani inhabitant of this State, a
concealed debtor, lately residing in Seneca County, and that the same
will be sold for the payment of his debts, unless he appear a::d dis-
charge such attachment, according to law, within three months from
the first publication of this notice ; and that the payment of any debt,
and the delivery of any property belonging to such debtor to him or
to his use, and the transfer of any property by him for any purpose
whatever, are forbidden by law, and are void. Dated the 15th day of
April, 1839. 0. H. PLATT,
may 11 [3m] Attorney for Attaching Creditor.
FEVER AND AGUE.-Try all hliings-" Hold on to that which is
Best."-ROWANI'S TONIC MIXTURE never fails to cure this
most distressing of all diseases, Intermittent Fever, or Fever and Ague.
This medicine is universally admitted to have eclipsed the pretensions
of every other mode of treatment, and therefore supercedes the em-
ployment of any other remedy, wherever the Fever and Ague exists.
The superior merits of the Tonic Mixture rest upon several important
qualities. It is entirely of a vegetable composition, prevents rela''-es
of the disease, establishes a sound and permanent appetite, obvia:es
costiveness of the bowels, and invigorates and fortifies the entire sys-
tem. Without an exception in any age or country, no medicine has
spread with such rapidity, and gained such distinguished reputation,
within the period of the five years that it has been used in the treat-
menet of Fever and Ague and general debility,' more than 100,000 ca-
sas being annually cured by its employment, and upwards of 20,000
certificates to prove the infallibility of the medicine when used as di'.
rected. A large supply constantly on hand, for sale, wholesale an-
retail. J. 0. FAY, General Agent,
At the Drug Store, 193 Broadway, (Franklin House,)
corner of Dey-street, New-York
J. 0. FAY is also General Agent for ROWAND'S ALTERATIVE,
or Compound Spirituous Extract of Sarsaparilla.
N. B. Beware! Purchase none but the original genuine Rowand's
Tonic Mixture. Feb. 3. 12m
R. PERRY, late of No. 12 Peck Slip, has removed to No. 1 ANN-
ST., under the American Museum, OFFICE MEDICAL AND
SURGICAL INFIRMARY, whgre he will be happy to see his former
patrons, and the public generally. Those persons unacquainted with
Dr. Perry, are informed that lie has received a regular medical edu-
cation at the University of Pennsylvania, and attended the Pennsyl-
vania Hospital, under the direction of the late Dr. Physick, for three
years. He also attended Guy's Hospital, London, for one year, and
has had a large private practice in this city. Dr. Perry would cau-
tion the public against thIe medical impostors and advertising quacks
who fill the journals of the day with their false pretensions to medical
knowledge. The Doctor devotes his attention more particularly to
diseases of a Chronic nature.
Dr. Perry may be consulted till 10 o'clock in the evening, at the
Medical and Surgical Infirmary, No. 1 Ann-st. Private entrance 218
Broadway, 2d door in the rear. A. HAMILTON PERRY, M. D.
N. B. All letters must be post-paid, may 18.
CELEBRATED EYE WATER.-DR. FRANCIS' Celebra:eI Eye
Water is adapted to all inflammatory diseases of the eye. It has
been tried and succeeded imi cases where hope had fled, and where the
medical faculty had declared the sufferer to be incurable. This cel-
ebrated Eye Water is adapted to all inflsimmatory diseases of the eyes,
even when in tiscir most tedious and chronic stages. It is adapted to
all kinds of nervous ate'ectioms, liability to use the eye-lids, weakness
of sight, opthalmias, &c. It will also remove those nebulous, scaly,
dead cloudy appearances frequently known by the name of cataracts.
Finally, all those inflammatory and nervous diseases with which the
organs of vision are attacked should invariably be healed by this in-
estimable remedy.
CERTIFICATES.
From the Rev. Mr. Davis, pastor of the church at Bridgeville, N.Y.
This is to certify that a poor man, with whom I have been acquaint-
ed for some time, after spending nine months iu an eye infirmary, was
discharged by the physicians of the institution, with what they termed
an incurable cataract, so that he was nearly blind. A trial of Dr.
Francis' remedy, three bottles only being used, removed it, to the sur-
prise of all who knew him ; and now he can see with that eye as well
as he ever did. I feel it my duty to give this information for the ben-
efit of the public.
A gentleman by thIe name of Brady, having a cataract on each eye,
after spending eighteen months with some of the first oculists, was
given up as incurable. After using Dr. Francis' Eye Water only ten
days, his eyes were perfectly restored, to the astonishment of all his
acquaintance.
Another case is that of a poor man, who, after spending twelve
months in an eye infirmary, was discharged as incurable, with a nebula
on each eye, so that he was almost blind ; and after using Dr. Francis'
Eye Water but a ftw days, he recovered his sight perfectly.


The Rev. T. Harrison, 44 Thompson-st. having procured a bottle of
the above for Mrs. Harrison's eyes, says, to his astonishment, it has
removed the dimness and pain which had been excessive for years.
Shie had used many different eye waters, but they all failed. It is
hoped, therefore, the public will soon appreciate its value.
The Rev. D. Dunbar says-" From thIe testimony of those who have
used the Eye Water prepared by Dr. Francis, I have no hesitation in
recommending it to the special notice of the public, as an inestimable
remedy. DUNCAN DUNBAR, Pastor of the McDougal-st. church."
'" This is to certify, that my eyes were in a high state of inflamima-
tion for several months. Several remedies had been tried without any
good effect; and after using one bottle of the above Eye Water, it per-
fectly restored my sight, and I believe saved me from total blindness.
MRS. ANDERSON, No. 3 Goric-st."
Mrs. McCaffery, 16 Cherry-st.-" This is to certify, that I was afflict-
ed with a continual weeping of scalding water from my eyes for sev-
eral months. Many remedies were tried, without affording me the
smallest relief; and I thought I should be blind. I applied Dr. Fran-
cis' remedy, and after using one bottle, I can truly say it has saved me
from absolute blindness."
This is to eertitfy, that my son had been afflicted with sore eyes
for five years, during which time several remedies had been used
without any good effect being derived ; and in consequence of the
great weakness of his sight, I was obliged to keep him entirely from
the benefits of education. After the use of two small bottles of Dr.
Francis' invaluable Eye Water, he has so far recovered his sight that
hlie is now able to go to school and pursue his studies.
GEORGE B. SMITH, Carleton House, Broadway, N. Y."
Many certificates can be seen at the office.
9T N. B. This Eye Water is not prepared or sold by any person
in the United States but by Dr. Francis, No. 10 Barclay-st. N. Y.
To prevent counterfeits, all that are genuine have the Doctor's
crest and seal on each bottle from this date. June 1.
C ASSERLY & SONS' ENGLISH, CLASSICAL, and FOREIGN
- BOOK-STORE, 108 Nassau-st.-Afte,- a period more protracted
than a three-fold apprenticeship, devoted to the service of education
and literature, it cannot be deemed presumptuous m1 the subscriber to
offer himself to the patronage of an intelligent public, as a caterer of
no little experience in the selection of books best adapted to the taste
or talents, wants or wishes of all classes in the community at large.
He therefore takes leave to announce to his friends and fellow citi-
zens, that, exclusively of a valuable and carefully selected stock: of
books on all subjects and in all languages, well worth the inspection
of the curious, ihe has made arrangements to procure from Europe, at
the earliest notice, the most popular productions on General Educa-
tion, Ancient Classics, Modern Languages, Art, Science, Elegant Lit-
erature, Philosophy, Theology, Controversy, &c.
From his long and intimate acquaintance with the best authors con-
nected with most of the foregoing departments, hlie flatters himself
that lie brings to the business advantages not always attainable by
booksellers even of the most extensive practice; and from the same
reason he may, not without much confidence, assert that he will be
enabled to provide a selection of such books as are most generally use-
ful for schools, academies, colleges, universities, or respectable pri-
vate libraries. Among his second-hand as well as among his new
books, the able Divine, the curious Student, the laborious Teacher,


B DELAPIERE, Importer and Manufacturer of MILITARY ORNA-
SMENTS and FANCY ARTICLES, for Theatrical and other deco-
rations, Carriage and Horse Trimmings, &c., and Embioiderer in GOLD &
SILVER. 90 Fulton and 25 Howard st., begs leave re-pectfuly to inform his,
customers and the public that he is well prepared to furnish goods in the above
line, of the best kind and workmanship.
The attention of coach-makers is requested to his manufactory of COACH
LACE, in Howard, one door east ot Canal st.
Military Companies newly forming, or old ones changing (he style ef uni-
form, can be supplied with epaulettes, lace, sashes, tassels, &c., to suit their
taste.
Embroidery, in Gold and Silver, done in the most splendid style.
N.B. TAILORS needing instruction for Army and Navy UNIFORMS,
according to the War and Navy Department Regulations, will be suppled
therewith. May 6. tf
BY order of John Crane, Esq. Supreme Court Commissioner, Notice
is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the statute author-
ising attachments against non-resident debtors, that an attachment
has issued against the estate of JOSEPH HEBARD, late an inhabit-
ant of this State, a non-resident debtor residing at Pine Grove, in
Pennsylvania, or elsewhere, and that the same will be sold for the
payment of his debts, unless he appear and discharge such attach-
ment, according to law, within nine months from the first publication
of this notice ; and that the payment of any debt, and the delivery of
any property belonging to such debtor to him or to his use, and the
transfer of any property by him for any purpose whatever, are forbid-
den by law, and are void. Dated the 9th day of April, 1839.
april 20 39t C. TUCKER, Att'y for Attaching Creditor.
CLOCK ESTABLISHMENT-corner of the Bower and Division st.
S The subscriber is prepared to manufacture to order Clocks of various
kinds. A superior weil-attested Steeple Clock with jeweled chronometer
escape.inent, approved of by the American Institute and a medal given.
Also, Regulatorsfor Watch-Makers with the patent improved escapement,
Clocks for public buildings, halls, fronts of galleries, &c.. showing the same
time on two opposite faces, if required.
Also, IVES' PATENT SPRING CLOCKS-a new and genteel arti
cle, warranted good time keepers-for sale wholesale and retail.
Also, a great variety of'the common kind of Clocks, suitable forever per
son, for sale onthe mostreasonableterms, by A. B. SMITH. Oct 22.
NDIA RUBBER SHOE STORE, 58 Chatham-street.-Ladies' and
Gentlemen's Boots and Shoes of fashionable style, manufactured
from the India Rubber Cloth, with leather soles. These shoes are
impervious to water, and as durable as any other; they are well adapt-
ed to this season of the year, and should be worn by all who value
health. Shoes made to order. The undersigned is the Inventor, and
the only Manufacturer in this city. All descriptions of Clothing for
sale, together with Air Pillows, do. Cushions, Life Preservers, Rub-
ber Cloth for Carriage Coverings, &c. &c. D. L. WINSLOW.
March 2.
.,000 0 !Ooffo a year will not supply the unprecedented de-
1 ^inamud for the
POOR MAN'S PLASTER.
No plaster in the world equals it for pain in the back, loins, side,
breast, neck, shoulders, joints, limbs, rheumatism, lumbago, &c. &c.
When all other kinds fail, this affords speedy and permanent relief.
Hundreds have called to express their surprise and thanks for the
cures they have effected. Physicians use this plaster in their practice,
as far preferable to all others. Sold wholesale and retail at the Loz-
enge warehouse, No. 106 Nassau-st. one door above Ann. Feb. 9
H UMAN HIAIR-Whiskers and Eyebrows.-Since the publication
of A. GRAND JEAN'S COMPOSITION, more than thirty imita-


D R. G. R. PHELPS'S COMPOUND TOMATO PILLS-Entirely
- vegetable.-These Pills are now extensively used, and wherever
they have been introduced, have acquired an unprecedented celebrity
as an alterative in Dyspepsia, nervous and chronic diseases, and liver
affections; also, as a cathartic in all Bilious diseases, Rheumatism,
Costiveness, &c. &c. As a renovator for constitutions enfeebled by
protracted disease or the abuse of mercury, fever and ague, chronic
or long-standing complaints, scrofula, &c. they have been used with
signal and beneficial results. They are particularly recommended
to the feeble and sedentary as a dietetic or dinner pill,' to invigorate
the digestive powers of the stomach, and promote a healthy action;
thereby preventing acidity, flatulence, heartburn, costiveness, &c.
For ordinary family or anti-bilious physic, especially for those resi-
ding in warm climates or marshy localities, and for travelers, they are
believed to be far superior to any in use. Each box is accompanied
with full and detailed directions, so that any person may safely use
them without other advice.
This medicine is confidently recommended by the Medical Faculty,
and admitted by many of them to be mre extensively applicable to
diseases generally, than any remedy ever prepared. But be cautious
that you do not get an imitation or spurious preparation, as the great
demand for the genuine Pills has induced several persons, regardless
of their effects on life and health, to send forth their anomalous prepa-
rations under the name of Tomato Pills;' others, as reckless of con-
sequences, have merely changed the label of their unsalable nostrums
to that of 'Tomato Pills,' 'Tomato Extract,' &c. Those who wish
the original and only genuine Tomato Pills, and the medicine so
highly recommended, should enquire for Phelps's, and be particular
that the paper is signed by the proprietor, G. R. Phelps, M. D.
Hartford, Conn.
A few of the many certificates received from physicians are here
given. For numerous others, of interesting cures, see pamphlets in
the hands of all who sell the genuine Pills.
From Dr. J. E. Eaton, dated
BROOKFIELD, Mass. March 29, 1839.
Dr. Phelps-Dear sir: Your pills are in great demand here. I have
but a few on hand. No one who has taken them but is perfectly sat -
isfied with their beneficial effects in removing disease, of however
long standing. I shall be in Hartford about the 15th of next month,
and will then bring with me a number of certificates, from people of
the first respectability, of cures the pills have effected; some 10, 12,
and one of 20 years' standing. The one last mentioned is a Mr. Lu-
ther Stowell, of South Brookfield, who has had a scrofulous ulcer of a
most formidable kind, and who has never been one day without ban-
daging his leg, from his foot to his knee. His certificate I shall bring
with me. Please send me 12 dozen boxes of Pills, and oblige
Yours, &c. J. E. EATON.
Extract of a letter from a Physician of experience and extensive prac-
tice in Ohio, dated NEW-HAVEN, Oct. 29,1838.
I am sorry I did not send for more of Dr. Phelps's Compound To-
mato Pills. I have great confidence in the article, and think they will
almost if not entirely supersede calomel in the autumnal fevers of this
country. I have been in the habit, for a good many years, of admin
istering mercury in doses of one hundred grains, combined with mor
phine, in bilious diseases, with the most happy effects. Having heard
so much of the Tomato Pills in the cure of bilious fevers, I thought I
would give them a trial. Mr. -- arrived here a short time since,
from Indiana, and was severely attacked with bilious intermittent fe-
ver. Being very much opposed to calomel, I used this medicine in
place of it, and feel rejoiced to state to you that I never saw disease
yield so rapidly to the power of medicine. I could enumerate several
other cases which have been treated in like manner, but I am fully
satisfied that this medicine is of extensive value; and think it will be-
fore long come into general use in all cases of disease connected with a
derangement of the bilious system. Yours, &c. THOS. JOHNSON.
From Dr. J. F. Jewett, Chickopee, Mass.
CHICKOPEE FALLS, Oct. 22, 1838.
Dr. Phelps-Dear sir: Having heard much said of late in favor of
your Compound Tomato Pills,' I have been induced to give them a
trial in a variety of diseases for which they are recommended, and
which have occurred in my practice, and I must say that I am better
pleased with them than with any medicine I have ever used. I have
given them as a cathartic in the bilious affections which usually pre-
vail at this season of the year, and also as an alterative in liver and
other glandular obstructions; and think they have done more in bring-
ing about regular and healthy secretions than any medicine with
which I am acquainted. I have long believed the Tomato to possess
deobstruent and anti-bilious properties as a condiment; and in its use
as a medicine, that belief has been fully established. I find them to
possess powerful diuretic properties also, as I prescribed them in two
cases of dropsy, (one of them a very severe one,) with decided good
effects in both; the urinary discharges were increased from half a pint
to two gallons within the first forty-eight hours after I commenced
using the Pills, and the patient is now in comfortable health. I have
now but two boxes of Pills on hand, and shall be lost when they are
gone, as I use them in almost all cases where I want a cathartic.
Respectfully yours, J. F. JEWETT.
From George E. Palmer, M. D.
STONINGTON, Jan. 21,1839.
G. R. Phelps, M. D.-Dear sir: I want another supply of your Pills;
they are in great demand here. The best proof I have of their vir-
tues is found in the fact, that every body who has used them once is
desirous to have more of them. You will please send a larger supply,
a they continue to occupy the place in my estimation they at first as-
sumed ; and I do not hesitate to recommend then in all cases where a
deranged state of the bilious system seems to require an alterative.
Yours very truly, GEe. E. PALMER.
From Dr. Nathaniel Hooker, of Hartford.
HARTFORD, August.7, 1838.
This certifies, that for some time past I have been considerably in
the habit of prescribing Dr. Phelps's Compound Tomato Pills, and
have invariably found them to answer a valuable purpose, and in some
instances far to exceed my most sanguine expectations-affording the
most decided relief in a short time. I think they may be used in all
the complaints for which they are recommended in the bills of direct
tions, with safety and much advantage. NATHANIEL HOOKER, M. D.
Reference may be had, also, to the following gentlemen, who have
either used or prescribed these Pills with the most desirable results :
Rev. J. N. Sprague, Hartford; Rev. A. McLatie, Simsbury; Rev. W.
Case, Avon; Dr. Sanford, Tariffville; Dr. J. Wilcox, Granby; Dr. 0.
B. Freeman, Canton; J. 0. Phelps, Esq. Simsbury, Conn.; Dr. J. Gra-
ham, and J. VW. Avery, New-York; Joseph Hart, and Anson R. Taylor,
Chickopee; H. 0. Jenks, Esq. Ludlow; James Collin, Lenox, Mass.;
Henry Humphreys, Greensborough; WV. Wilcox, Kingston, N. C.;
Dr. S. Breckenridge, Norwich, Conn.; and numerous others, whose
names are with the agents.
*.* Orders for Agencies, or Pills, directed to the Proprietor, Hart-
ford, Conn. will be promptly attended to, and a liberal discount al-
lowed. Price 37 I -2 and 75 cts. per box.
For sale in New-York, wholesale and retail, by Messrs. Hoadley,
Phelps & Co. 142 Water-st.; A. R. & D. Sands, cor. of William and
Fulton-sts.; Haviland, Keese & Co. 80 Maiden Lane ; Prall & Ray, 83
do.; Perkins & Gillies, 125 do.; J. & J. F. Trippe, 90 do.; Rushtons &
Aspinwall, 86 William-st.; S. Care & Nephew, cor. of Fulton and
Water-sts. Also at retail by most of the druggists and merchants in
the country. G. R. PHELPS, Proprietor, Hartford, Conu.
_April 13.
TO TIlE PUiSLIC.-Retnittancesto all parts of England, Ireland, and
Scotland.-S. J. SYLVESTER, 130 Broadway amiti 22 Wall-st. New
York, respectfully acquaints the public throughout the United States and
Canadas, that such arrangements ae effected through his Bankets. Mlessrs.
J. Barned & Co., Liverpool, and Mes-is. James Bult, Sen, &. Co. London,

as to enable him to give Drafts and Letters of Credit, payable in any part of
England,Ireland or Scotland,in any sum required, fiom 5 and upwards,
whereby all risk and much expense is saved by those wishing to remit. The
established repu ation of the above named Bankers in London and Liverpool
is a guarantee for regularity in all transactions. Every attention will be paid
tsorderstransmitted by mail. S. J. SI LVESTER,
130 Broadway, and 22 Wall-st. New York
lir NOTICE.-S. J. SYLVESTER informsthe public that he has n'ot
removed, hut continues at 130 Broadway where he has been established for
13 yvars, and at 22 Wall-st.; and that he has no other office in New York, or
elsewhere. He continues so buy and sell all kinds ot Bank Notes, Gold, and
Bills of Exchange, and collect Drafts on any part of the United States, Can-
ada, and Europe. Persons holding Bills of Exchange on England can sell
them at the highest rates; and those remitting funds to New York can draw
at sight,or if left, interest will be allowed at the rate of 6 per cent. per an-
num. Sept 15













THE


N E W-Y 0 R K E R.


- IMMOEONW*m I


THE NEW-YORKER.

SATURDAY, JUNE 22,1839.
EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
AT LARGE, June 17, 1839.
-'T is a dull life, this, of a traveler in this our day ar
generation. I suppose this sentiment is heterodox, but here$
is my orthodoxy, and I am sure it is here the sober truth
It is only your stay-at-home travelers, who rock themselves
to sleep in their chimney-corners over the glowing pages
Sindbad, Gulliver and Peter Parley, who ever talk heartily
of the delights of loco or any other motion which consists
mere going ahead. Not that a dozen miles or so of progre
sion may not be pleasant, occasionally, even to grown-up chi
dren; but it is the novelty and oddness of the sensations i
duced which form their attraction-nothing else. Let the e
periment be continued for even two or three days-let th
amateur in progress be twice or thrice in succession drive
or dragged from an endurable pallet in the small hours'
morning, to shiver, swallow fog, and look at his fingers fi
an interminable period-let him move, rest and eat at other
men's volition, and retire (per order) at night borne dow
with fatigue, though he has done nothing-let him so mov
on, awake through half the night, and of course half asleep
through the day-and he will at length be brought to agree
with me that modern traveling is essentially a dull business
I think I shall prove it incontestably by the tenor of this lette
I write on a canal-boat, but not of canal-boat progressive
in particular. This 'is more sluggish than its alternatives, bi
less uncomfortable than any of them. The occasional star
ling hiss, the constant tremor and the under-deck odor of
steamboat are not to be classed among the luxuries of trave
while the tumult of night landings, the low, sharp singing
the compressed steam, deprived for minutes of any vent bi
such as it can find or make through the else forgotten sean
of its prison-house, may all be pleasant to the million wi
pretend to relish or disregard them; to me they are not.
steamboat, of course, before any other conveyance, where th
is to be had, because of its speed; but this is only saying, i
another form, that traveling is essentially uncomfortable, an
to be finished as quickly as possible. A stage-coach nobody
now pretends to think other than a necessary evil, beyond ti
second guide-board. None ever awoke to a sad, aching con
aciousness, the morning after concluding a three or four day
journey by coach, without being strongly inclined to dispute
the axiom of divines and philosophers that existence is of i
self a blessing. As to rail-riding-thbe novelty and the hobb
of the day-so strongly is it entrenched in the world's goc
opinion, that it were vain to attempt to shake it-just ye
It shares the great recommendation (to a non-admirer
travel) of all steaming, that its discomforts, if such there be
are of comparatively brief duration. For a few hours enl'
the sight of the grand panorama of fields, forests and house
moving to the rearward with unexampled rapidity, may b
agreeable; the fresh, free winds meet the train' with an e:
hilarating sweep ; and the intellectual operation of counting
the mile-stones, as they regularly succeed each other at th
rate of one to every two, two and a half, or three minutes,
by no means to be scoffed at. But let any one stick to ti
cars for a fortnight, or a week even, fixed in his allotted plac
'from morn till dewy eve,' through sunshine, wind or rain, a
might be his portion, and if he did not begin to find it '
weariness to the flesh,' I would beg leave to pronounce him
miracle of good temper, or of bad taste.
-Thus early a skeptic to the raptures of mere motion,
trust I am not the less alive to the tranquil pleasures which
may be found in its train. To the worn and hackneyed slave
of business and toil, the mere sense of relief and of freedom
is a luxury-the truant's stolen holiday, without his obtrudin
fears for the morrow. To wake with a surprised conscious
ness that there is no incumbent task which must engross thi
hours of to-day, and be succeeded by a similar task on th
morrow-a-nd so on, is something to be thankful for. An
then Nature, at this season of earliest summer and deepe;
verdure, is beautiful, though I won't go into ecstasies about
it, considering that we have had six or eight showers th
present day, and an atmosphere cold enough for April-col
enough for the good coal fire which is to be seen only. wit
the eye of faith, and refuses to take the chill off even Fait
herself. Now a day like this in the middle of June-wind,
cloudy, rainy and cold throughout, aad..s ir, l iMe
.... ....... .- :"-a.. o'T '-er-lovea or rhym ed upon
Nature must be more amiable than this, if she would hay
any compliments from so unflattering an observer. But th
rain has ceased, or suspended-the sun sets clear beneath th
clouds, and the rich, bright vale of the upper Hudson look
inviting, with its noble stream in the midst, fringed with ta
elms and'clustering vines and willows. I will on deck an
observe it. Adieu. G.
NORTH CARoLINA.-The Election in this State takes plac
on the first Thursday in August, though we believe the Edge
combe Congressional District (Mr. Stanly's) votes one wee
earlier. There is no Governor or Legislature to choose thi
year, both having been chosen last year-Whig-leavin
Members of Congress only to be now elected. The contest
with regard to 'these is an interesting one. The decided ad
vantages gained by the Whigs of this State in the last tw


Elections have been neutralized by a change of position on th
part of two of their Representatives, Messrs. S. T. Sawye
and C. Shepard, who followed Mr. Calhoun in the support o
the PR-ib-Treasury scheme. Thus, although the Delegation
from North Carolina was elected eight Whig to five Admin
istration, it has stood practically seven Administration to si:
Opposition. The Election soon to take place will determim
whether this change is approved by the People.
In the 1st District, (Edenton,) Hon. Samuel T. Sawyer
elected Whig, but siding with the Administration, is opposed
by Kenneth Rayner, Esq. a leading Whig Member of the pre
sent Legislature, and author of the Whig Resolutions of las
winter. Mr. Sawyer appears to have gone over fully to the
Administration party, and to have been adopted by that party
while he will doubtless carry with him some of his forme:
supporters. The result of the pending contest is therefore
very doubtful. Each candidate is able and popular. (Whit
majority in '37, 405.)
In the lid District, (Halifax,) Hon. Jesse A. Bynum, Adm
is opposed, as heretofore, by Col. Wm. L. Long, Whig. Th(
contest is spirited, but Mr. Bynum is said to be closely re
lated to many influential Whig families in the District, who
usually forbear opposing him; and a strong Calhoun diversion
has been made in his favor, by the declaration of Hon. Johr
Branch, Messrs. Julius, Arnis, and other influential men in
the District in favor of the Sub-Treasury. As he has beater
Col. Long before, we incline to the belief that he will do it
again. (Bynum's majority in '37, 70.)
In the IlId District, (Beaufort,) Hon. Edward Stanly,
Whig, is opposed by Hon. Thomas H. Hall, Adm. who long
represented the District, but was run out in '35 by Mr. Petti-
grew. Mr. Hall is a strong candidate, but so is Mr. Stanly;
and we do not think the latter can be beaten. (Stanly's ma-
41 -. 7 ^, -3 *f _


be able and popular, and his election from this overwhelming
Whig District will be a substantial triumph to the Adminis-
tration. David F. Caldwell of Randolph was first proposed
as the regular Whig candidate, but declines. Mr. Hender-
son appears to be a new man.
id In the XIth District, (Mecklenburg,) Hon. Henry W. Con-
sy ner, Adm. is opposed by Gen. B. M. Edney, Whig. There
h. can be little doubt of Mr. C.'s reelection. (In '37, Conner's
es majority, 791.)
of In the XIIth District, Hon. James Graham, Whig, is also
ly running without opposition. Mr. Graham was not opposed
of in '37. The Whig majority in the District ranges from 1,000
s- to 1,500
il- In the XIIIth Disrtict, Hon. Lewis Williams, the staunch
n- Whig Member, who has been some forty years in Congress,
x- is opposed by Roderick Murchison, Adm. There can be no
ie doubt of Mr. Williams's reflection. (His majority in '37
en was 1,491.)
of Thus the contest in the State will be desultory and strag-
or gling-extremely spirited in the close Districts, and languid
er or nominal in the others; but it is impossible to say which
vn party will have a majority of the Members. We believe they
ve will stand seven to six.
ep VIRGINIA.-Col. John Carroll, of Grayson, heretofore
ee claimed as a Conservative, has addressed a note to the Edit-
S, ors of the Lynchburg Virginian, denying the correctness of
r. the claim. He says he only differs with Mr. Van Buren on
,n the Sub-Treasury, but shall support him as President, in pre-
ut ference to any candidate that is or shall be before the peo-
rt- ple." Of the Conservatives, he says that he "' shall vote
a against any Conservative, and will not support them to fill
4; any office." We shall hereafter class him as an approved
of friend of the Administration Our returns of the vote for
ut Members of Congresss are still deficient in a few particulars,
ns and we are therefore unable to publish a full table this week;
"O but we think it may be safely promised for our next.
A
is MARYLAND.-The Adm. Convention, which assembled
in at Ellicott's Mills on Saturday the 15th inst., nominated
id James Carroll, Esq., of Anne, Arundel Co., and Col. Solo
i mon Hillen, jr., of Baltimore city, as the candidates of
that party for Congress from the Fourth District. They
are both men of handsome property and personally very
Popular. The former, it is said, has stipulated that he shall
not be called upon to address the people; the latter, how-
te
it ever, is an active campaigner.
y Philip F. Thomas, Esq., of Talbot Co., has been nomi-
Snated as the Adm. Candidate in the District represented
in the last Congress by the Hon. James A. Pearce, Opp.
of Mr. Thomas was a distinguished member of the last Legis-

lature, and won the good opinion of all parties by the ta-
lents which he evinced. Should his party succeed in elect-
Y' ing him, it will compensate them for the loss they sustain
s' in the retirement of Gen. Howard of Baltimore.
.e
X. MISSISSippi.-Dr. Silas Brown, State Treasurer, and
Ig the Opp. Candidate for re-election to that office, died at
K, Jackson, the capital of the State, on the 28th of May; and
is Col. Philip Dixon the Opp. Candidate for Auditor of
ie Public Accounts, died at the Mississippi Springs, on the
ce 25th of May. They were both highly esteemed, and their
aS decease is universally regretted. Dr. Brown was the
a third incumbent of that office who has died within the last
a two years; Gov. McNutt has appointed Samuel Craig,
Esq., the Adm. Candidate for election to that office by the
I people next November, as his successor ad interim.
-h The nomination of the Hon. Edward Turner, the Chan
Ve cellor of the State, as the Opp. Candidate for Governor,
m leaves the former office vacant. Robert H. Buckner and
ig Argyle Campbell, Esqs., are announced as candidates to
succeed him. Wmin. Y. Gholson, Esq., of Pontotoc, is also
e proposed. In Mississippi, all the judicial officers are elect
e ed by the people.
d MAssAcHUSETTS.-A Convention of the opponents of
st the Temperance Law now in force in this State, assembled
ut at Northampton, on the 12th inst. It does not distinctly
is appear whether the Convention was a party one or not
Id Ambrose Ames, Esq, of Greenfield, presided, assisted
,h by five Vice Presidents and three Secretaries. Resolu-
th tions, opposing the present law, and in favor of support-
y, ing Morton and Sedgwick, for Governor and Lieut. Gov-
m mdtterent parts of the State for celebrating the approach-
,g ing National Anniversary witn great spirit. Among other
te gentlemen who have engaged to deliver orations, we no-
ie tice the Hon Caleb Cushing, M.C., John P. Tarbell, Esq.,
;g a distinguished Member of the Legislature, and Alexander
11 H. Everett, Esq., of Roxbury, and Jonathan Chapman,
d Esq., of Boston.
The President of the United States, in reply to a com-
munication from the Democratic Republican General Com-
mittee of this city, has informed them that he will arrive here
k about the first of July. He intends to travel by private con-
veyance, and desires to be received with as little parade as
the wishes of his friends will allow.
g
g The Hon. Rice Garland, now a Member of Congress from
- Louisiana, is announced by the Opeolousas Gazette as its


candidate for Governor of the State at the election to be held
e in 1842-more than three years hence. It appears to be in
Sa great hurry.
S Robert Dale Owen, Esq., is announced as the Adm. can-
didate for Congress in the 1st District in Indiana-formerly
represented by the Hon Ratcliff Boone, in the place of James
Lockhart, Esq. who has been induced to withdraw. The
x avowed object in making this change is, that Mr. Lockhart,
e although a popular man, was not a match for his Opp. com-
petitor upon the stump; Mr. Owen on the other hand is re-
' garded as one of the most able men in the State, and has been
for several years a distinguished member of the Legislature
from Posey Co.
t
e William Owsley, Esq., Judge of the Supreme Court of
SKentucky, has been recommended by a public meeting in
Bourbon to the Convention which is to assemble at Harrods-
burgh in August next as a suitable person to be selected as
e the Opp. candidate for Governor.

The Hon. John Chambers, of Mason Co., a Member of
the last Congress, is also proposed on the same side.
S The Hon. Chilton Allan, formerly a Member of Congress
- from the Lexington District, is likewise proposed.
0 The Hon. Thomas Kittera, for many years a leading
SMember of the Philadelphia Bar, and formerly a Member of
SCongress, died in that city on Sunday last.
a The Hon. Cornelius P. Van Ness, formerly Minister to
Spain, was greeted, on his arrival at Burlington, Vt. on the
t 12th inst., by a large concourse of the citizens of that and the
neighboring towns. Upon his landing, he was saluted by a
Discharge of artillery, and was escorted, to his lodgings by a
great procession.
Col. J'V. R. Johnson, of Virginia, well known as the
SNapoleon of the Turf,' had $1600 taken from his pantaloons
pocket while in the act of paying his fare for Philadelphia at


For the New-Yorker.
THE EXPLORING EXPEDITION.-No. II.
To the Hon. Joel R. Poinsett, Secretary of War:
SIR-I resume, with the first leisure hour since my la
letter, the review I therein commenced of your Jesuitical ac
tion in connection with the South Sea Exploring Expeditior
and I regret sincerely that the subject is not a more invitin
one.
It may here be proper to state, that about the time Cap
Gregory was relieved from the command, or more correct]
speaking, superseded, an impression prevailed to a consider
able extent, that the older officers of the Navy had not show
a becoming readiness to take charge of the Expedition, an
that they had successively declined or evaded the service, o
grounds incompatible with professional duty and ambition
As a general charge, I leave this point in medio; while i
many instances I know the imputation to be alike wanton
ungenerous and unjust. I know farther, and so do you, thi
the extraordinary selection finally made was justified on thi
assumption in derogation of older officers. It was so intimm
ted on the floor of the Senate, in the quasi defence whici
from a few weak points, you received there. Many member
of Congress were under this impression, and were thereby n(
a little influenced by it, in maintaining silence when they sa'
the rules of the service and the rights of the officers alik
trampled on by your appointment. Sir, did you not give cut
rency to this impression ? Will you deny having done so
Did you not say that the older officers had received a rebuk
or lesson from which they might profit in future? And whf
atonement have you made, or can you make, personally, t
those you have so deeply injured? You have paltered, in
double sense, with truth and honor;-what I charge, I '11 fi
upon you. The appointment of your Commander was just
fled on the ground that his seniors and superiors declined th
service. Now mark how a plain tale shall put you down.
Sir, neither you nor Governor Dickerson dare deny thr
Capt. Kearney did agree to take charge of the squadron sul
stantially as Commodore Jones left it; that he agreed to tak
the whole scientific corps-nay, refused to object to them, E
it was more than intimated to him that he might; that h
asked no change in junior commanders, and ordnly require
that Lieut. Gedney-who taught Lieut. Wilkes the rudiments
of hydrography-should be appointed second in command o
board the Macedonian; that Governor Dickerson did agree t
and ratify this arrangement; that Capt. K., with that promp
ness peculiar to his character, on the strength of the authority
given, actually directed Lieut. Gedney forthwith to prepare
letters to Messrs. Lieut. Dornin and Glynn, requesting their
to get under way with thetr respective vessels within five day
after receipt of such letters, proceed to Rio, and there awa
his (Capt. K.'s) arrival in the flag ship Surely there wa
no want of promptness-no shrinking from duty manifbste
here. These arrangements were made late in the afternoon
Early on the following morning, Capt. K., accompanied b
Lieut. Gedney, repaired to the Department, for the purpose
of despatching orders and of putting the squadron immediately
in motion. But a night had intervened; and during tha
night the spoiler came! You, sir, Joel R. Poinsett, intel
fered, and checked the enterprise when thus, I may say, o
the very eve of its advent. It was a dark deed, and dark
ness had well been chosen for its accomplishment. The firs
salutation received by Capt. Kearnoy from Secretary Dickel
son was an announcement that the arrangements of yesterday
were all broken up-that he (Dickerson) had nothing farther
to do with the Expedition, and that Capt. K. must now ca
upon you-Joel R. Poinsett.
Well, hlie did call upon you during the afternoon of the sam
day. He was by you informed that the Macedonian must b
withdrawn; and thus was accomplished what your joint mar
agement connected with the famous Nor:folk Commission ha
failed to effect. Thus was undone what Governor Dickerso
had done, or pretended to do, only the day before; thus wa
nailed to the counter as base coin the imputation that no off
cer of rank would take charge of the Expedition. Whether
your object was now to give the Macedonian to a favorite a
the flag ship of a home instead of the West India squadron
or from other motives net now to be dwelt upon, I leave yo
to explain.
All this, however, failed to drive Capt. Kearney from th
command, and a proposition to substitute a large merchar
vessel, capable of accommodating the scientific corps, as th
flagship, was proposed and acceded to by him. But this ai
rangement was afterward abandoned on your part; and afte
having done as much mischief as you could perpetrate with
twenty-four hours, you pretended to withdraw from all farthe
responsibility-(pretended, I say, for it was only pretence;
and the whole matter seemed to slide into a general irrespor
sible Committee of Conference, comprising Governor D)ickel
son, the Commissioners, and yourself, by whom it was deter
mined that the squadron should consist of only one sloop, on
brig, one schooner, and the store ship. When matters ha.
arrived at this crisis, then, and not till then, Capt. Kearney
disgusted, disheartened, and losing all confidence in bein
able to accomplish the objects of the Expedition with such
force, retired, as I have heretofore stated. Thus, sir, upo
you rests the responsibility of having in this instance produce
a state of things perfectly in consonance with the whole at
tion of your predecessor, and which has subsequently bee
used as a justification ,f theiovr ..... -
same time, upon the science of the country. I repeat, tha
upon you rests the responsibility, unless you bring in the Gox
error and the Commissioners to share it with you, which
am by no means disposed to say you may not justly claim to dc
In this latter arrangement, the plan of the Commissioners
it is well known, was to crowd the entire scientific corps o
board the store ship Relief, with canvass-screened state room,
to be buttoned down like live stock in rough seas and storm
weather. If it were not as generally believed as such a:
event is generally desired, that the Navy Board's existence i
drawing to a close, my respect for the men composing
would not restrain the expression of my opinions, derive,
from all that I have seen and know, of the baneful infiuenc
of that irresponsible concern upon the vital interests of th
naval service of the country. From what I have now stated
the public will learn--what the Navy and many private indi
viduals, as well as public functionaries, have all along known-
how you failed in this instance to procure an officer of ran]
to take charge of the Expedition !!!


After Gregory, the next in hand was Capt, Joseph Smith
an officer of high standing and of liberal and enlarged views
Your treaty operationss with this commander were curious
and are deserving of a brief notice. It will be seen that the
were equally insincere on your part with the proffer of official
dignity so recently extended to Capt. Kearney. Among thi
junior officers named, Capt. S. asked for Lieut. Wilkes t,
command one of the small vessels--a station in all respect;
quite commensurate with his rank, standing amd qualifica
tions. Let it be remembered how short a time had elapsec
since this station-the command of a small vessel-had beer
mentioned to Commodore Jones by your predecessor, and now
locum tEnens of the Navy Department, as a fitting appoint
meant for this same officer! Out of this point much difficulty
had been made, and I have no doubt one motive of Capt
Smith in asking for Lieut. Wilkes was the hope of reconciling
conflicting elements. The highest post ever claimed for this
individual was now tendered to him. Why was it not accept.
ed? Can you or Governor Dickerson tell? Where slum-
bered your authority, of which we heard so much when you
first took charge of the Expedition? Where was the army
discipline you then spoke of using, in making up the personei
of the squadron? Did Lieut. Wilkes find favor in your sight
from the fine illustration of army discipline he exhibited in
not only declining a better position than he and Dickerson
had clamored for, but also in setting an eXamnple of subordina.
tion and obedience for young officers, by telling Capt, Smith
that he would resign his commission in the service rather than
consent to take a subordinate position in the Expedition, or,
of course, ary thing short of the entire command ? Such a
modest, beautiful exhibit of professional zeal was not to be
lost upon you; and your nice perceptions of justice and high
sense of honor, it would seem, at once indicated to you the
honored instrument with which to punish older officers for
their unwillingness to take command! Sir, do you believe
that there is a single officer of independent feeling in the Na-
vy who believes that Lieut. Wilkes declined the station of-
fered to him by Capt. Smith, without having previously re-
ceived some slight intimation of what was in store for him,
and that the time had PQw arrived when the mask might be
thrown aside ? I do riot say that there is any record of this
understanding, nor do I expect that either of you will own it;
but this I will say, that people will think what they please.


claims. At. any rate, was it not your duty to have looked ii
those claims before you ventured to trample upon his feeling
and rights as an officer? Did not the records of the N;
St Department show that he had entered the service in 1((
c- near thirty years ago? and that he had borne himself g
i; lantly at New-Orleans, on board of the bomb-ketch Etna
g and afterward, while commander of one of the gun-boa
(though he was then quite a young Midshipman,) in fig
t. ing and subduing the Barrataria pirates?
ly From 1811 to 1813 he was in the Brig Siren where he p
r- formed his duty to the entire satisfaction of his command
n He was also in the sloop of war Fralies, when she was ci
d tured by a superior force in 1814, and remained a prisoner
)n war until march 1815. Within a month after his return ho
n. he joined the frigate Congress as acting Lieutenant, and si
n ed for the Mediterranean. From that vessel he was tra
n, ferred to the Washington 74, Commodore Chauncey in co
it mand, in which vessel he returned to New York in 181
is After a very short respite he was ordered to the Indepei
a- ence, and at the expiration of a few months from her to t
h, Columbus 74, when he served as first Lieutenant under Co
rs modore Bainbridge till August 1821. He had scarce co
At on shore from this cruise before he was again ordered to
w frigate United States, when he again acted as first Lie
e under Commodore Hull on the Pacific, and did not leave tl
r- ship till May 1827. Fromn this date till 1831, he was on di
? as Liettenant, in the Navy Yard, Charlestown. His next s
e vice was us commander of the schooner Porpoise in the W
at Indies. At the termination of this cruise, he was ordered
to the Columbus, when he remained on duty until appointed
a the command of the Macedonian, as I have already stated
x During this long career of unobtrusive and faithful pub
i- service, not in WVashington, but afloat, he had acquired tl.
e familiarity with the ocean, that thorough and practical kne
ledge of his profession, which is infinitely more desirable a
at valuable in a commander than a vain and pompous pretenisi
b- to science. More than half the expeditions on record hi
.e been rendered less useful in their results than they other
is would have been, by the jealousy, weakness and folly of th
e commanders, in wishing to be considered scientific.
d able, prudent, yet bold and experienced seaman, who kno
ts how to take care of his vessels and his men under all circus
n stances, and to harmonize all under his command, is the fitt.
to to conduct such an enterprise as the South Sea Surveying I
t- petition. Such a man is Capt. James Armstrong, who, af
ty being two years attached to the Expedition, was rudely sup
re seded by a favorite, without the courtesy of a previous cc
m sultation!
's In the remonstrance sent in by Lieut. Magruder, who b
it also been a long time attached as first Lieut. to the Ma.
is donian, (with the request that it should remain on file in t
d Department) against the injustice of being superseded,
n. seems to me that there was one portion, which muust hr
y been withering in its affect, where he told you that he was
e the same date as Lieut. Wilkes, that he had been examir
y by the same Board, and that he had not only passed high
it than Lieut. Wilkes, by whom he was now supplanted,
r- mathematics and in seamanship, and of course ranked abc
n him, but that he had seen many times the sea-service sir
they had been commissioned as Lieutenants!
st Sir-I have no wish to lessen the public confidence in y(
r- Lieut. Commodore, by instituting comparisons between h
ty and other officers by name. If I could bring you to a f
r accountability, without thie slightest allusion to him, I shoi
11 be glad to do so. He was but your agent, and I mean to h(
the principal and not the instrumental responsible. T
g outrage committed upon the naval service by his appointed
ge was keenly felt and wholly indefensible. All that in just
n- can be said in extenuation is, that you had the power a
d disposition to do wrong, and did it. Governor Dickensc
n however much delighted with what was done before, now 1
is gan to show some symptoms of alarm. The deep-toned,
R. dignant feelings which were known to exist in the servn
-r dismayed the good honest old man' about his retiring pop
s larity; and he soon busied himself in saying that he did z
Sdo it-' thou canst not say I did it,' while at the same tin
She knew that he had signed his name to the order by whi
it was done! The degredation of holding office on such It
e miliating conditions ought to have excited your sympathy I
t him, and made you ashamed to throw responsibilities up
i him, which property belonged to yourself; however, I ca
Snot how it may be adjusted in the running account betwo
r you. Thus much, however, I may say: that should you a
the Governor have any difficulty in deciding upon the respe,
Sive parts you have borne in degrading the service and ma
ring a noble enterprise, you may lay this flattering unction
your hearts, that between you lies all the glory: that no m
of honor will ever wish to show in the monopoly; and th
r- no future secretaries, who may not be bent on embalmi
Their memories in the converse of glory will follow in yo
e footsteps or imitate your example.
Sir, that I may not be charged with misrepresenting t
Y' feelings of the service, allow me here to bring to your review
g an extract from one of a number of articles which appear
a in a Southern paper under the signature of Harry Bluff
n the U. S. Navy.:'
,dl
"Misrule, confusion and mismanagement stalked forth with gi;
strides. The once popular South Sea Surveying and Exploring E
n petition was now rendered odious tf tte ofl i oi'-' _..-f 'i1 -'-
*- --- .... __... "v' ixv' AJ)/ZtImJeL et -ecame a y-word and a
e preach upon th'e Navy; and when thie country, impatient of its pm
Stracted delays, was informed that the expedition was on the eve
sailing, it was suddenly left without a commander-and the Secren
ry, with ome hundred captains amid commanders subject to his orde
I reported that lie could not get one to go.
9. "Respect for his office was now completely smothered with pil
mingled with a feeling loss strong than contempt for the man. Ev
the young midshipmen held him in derision, and played off their v
n upon him in official letters; and the officers talked openly of sendi
s, a round rabbit to ask for his removal. The Navy was in an uproa
y and eveu his darling Wilkes threatened to resign rather than obey 1
orders.
a "Bat it remained for thie Navy to receive one more stab. It cam
s from the hand that was least suspected, aid wcnt to its very vitals.
t Stand forth, Joel 1K. Poiisett, fur thou art the man i In your youth
d days you had associated much with the Navy. You had seen t
brave Porter and his gallant comrades nobly defending their little E
e sex against triple his force, You had the whole list of officers befim
e you. And, with the least tact, you might have restored the expediti,
t, to order, and made it, even at that late hour, acceptable to the Na'
i- and worthy of the country. Many old and gallant officers were au
ious to command it. Conscious of the claims to which their long am
faithful services entitled them, with a modesty and a sense ofdecoru
k which even the President could not appreciate, they waited in anxio
suspense, hoping the command would be tendered to them.
"But there was a inning little Jacob, who had campaigned
, Washiugtoi a full term of seven years. More prodigal than Laba
;. you gave him, for a single term, both the Rachael and the Leah of In


heart. A junior lieutenart, with scarcely enough service at sea
make him familiar with the common routine of duty on board of
Y mnan-of-war, and, with one or two short interruptions, a sinecurest
I shore for the last fifteen years, he was lifted over the heads of mias
e laborious and meritorious officers, and placed by you in the conniaia
o of the Exploring Expedition, in violation of law. ThePresideunt co
firmed the act.
S "And, as if that were not indignity enough, the public were i
- formed that none of Wilkes's superiors possessed the requisite talen
1 I here challenge you and his friends to point out a single accomplish
n ment or qualification in him, for such service, which I will not she
other officers to possess in more perfection. Scientific men have see
no proofs of hisscientce, ard lie is not recognized by them as of the
- number. We are told he is a Surveyor The grounds upon whim
y his claims to this qualification are set up, consist in his survey, la
fall, of George's Baink ; and, many years ago, of his assisting Gedni
and Blake, under Wordsworth, to survey Narragansett Bay. Of tl
Accuracy of his Chart of George's Bank we may not speak; for,
s yet, Hassler's operations, which will test it, have nuot been extended
Sfar. As Hydographers, both Gedney and Blake, and many others w
. 'ight name, are vastly his superiors. While lie has been cainpaigi
ing at Washington, they have been hard at work. And, after mar
Years of arduous service, meritoriouss officers are insulted, degrade
Sand vilifiedI"
S Harry Bluff' has fairly represented the feelings of an ove
t whelming proportion of the officers of the Navy; and sue
i will be the judgement of the whole country as well as of th
Navy. It is a melancholy reflection that a man occupying
" your station should have preferred the gratification of little
Sand vindictixe feelings, to the high, frank, and honorable di,
- charge of 4 public trust; but so it was, and you must now li
in the bed prepared by yqcur own hands. The wrong has bee
L done-your acts cannot be recalled-and in mpy next I shall
examine the pitiful subterfuge by which you have attempt
your justification. Very respectfully, your
NYew York, June 13th, 1839. FELLOW CITIZEN.

APPQINTMENTS BY TIHE PRESIDENT.
John P. Anderson to be Attorn.y pof the United State
for the Western Bistrict of Pennsylvania, in the place o
Benjamin Patton,jr., resigned.
Ely Moore, Surveyor of the District and Inspector o
the Revenue for the port of New York. to take effect oI
the 1st of July next, in the place of Hector Craig.
Philip A. de Creney of Portland. to be Consul of th,
TT V .1 T | 1 i. 0' ,. 1 0.


.- OMP",Mmm%-- -


at The Seminoles, finding this to be the case, and having an an
n, tipathy to this feeble but warlike nation, determined to brin-
is them into subjection by insisting upon the election of a Semi
to nole chief, who was to govern all, and, in the event of their
a refusal, compel them to leave heir country. The Mickasu
my kies, being reduced to this emergency, consented, and Chitto
id tuste-nuggee was elected chief. He is about forty years o
- age, remarkably pleasant and affable when spoken to, but at
n- other times very dignified and reserved. By his converse
ts. tion and conduct in and out of council, he showed himself to
h- be a man of much intelligence and observation. The Indians
)w paid him great respect, and seemed gratified in having so able
ir a counsellor.
eh The last council was held on the 22d instant; both chiefs
st were present, together with forty-five Seminole and Mickasu.
VY kie warriors. Gen. Macomb upon this occasion, as upon all
as others, gave to it a dgree of excitement and interest by adher.
so ing to imposing forms and ceremonies. Indeed, this is indis.
ve pensable in all negotiations with Indians, for among the most
n- degenerated these customs are retained from generation tn
,d generation, and attach to all that is said a degree of solem.
nity which they believe is gratefully received by the Great
r Spirit.
h A large council chamber was erected, and the General and
le his staff, with all the officers at the post, in uniform, were
g escorted to the council by the band of the 7th infantry and a
e company of dragoons on foot. White flags were hoisted at
s- different points; a fire was built in the centre of the chamber,
e around which the Indians were seated in profound silence;
n pipes and tobacco were given to them, and amid a cloud of
11 smoke the Indians passed round, shaking hands with all pre-
d sent The terms of' peace were again fully explained to them
-that they were to go below 'ease creek and remain within
the prescribed limits, as shown by the black lines drawn upon
the map, and be at peace. The 15th day of July next is the
day agreed upon for them to be within the country for the
s present allotted them. Chitto-tuste-nuggee followed in a
f brief and sensible speech. He expressed, with great earnest-
ness, the pleasure he derived in being once more friends; and
Shis concurrence and that of his tribe in all that had been pro-
n posed. The most vigorous measures, he said, should be im-
mediately adopted to bring in the straggling parties, and a
e complete removal should be effected to the country assigned
wir^tlhion f df-.iv-i N n*- elq.-i i^-orl tblnt> nn/^.- -;-b*v'* I-- __ T 1-


Matamnoras, May 27.-There are in this place near 2000
Troops under the command of General Valentia Canalizo.
SThe communications between this place and the capital
r have been for more than six months intercepted by the
SFederalists. The schooner Albert of New Orleans has
Been lost at the entrance of the bar of Brazos de Santiago.
The cargo has been sold for $3130. The schr. Southern-
er has been seized by the cutistom house. General Canalize
Left this place on the 19th at the head of 700 men and six
pieces of artillery, with the design, as he said, of going to
San Fernando, but he has more probably gone to join the
s forces of General Bustamente for the purpose of attacking
eTampico.
STILL LATER FROM MExico.-By slips from the New
Orleans Picayune, under date of June 12, we have received
I dates from Vera Cruz, via Galveston, two days later than
our previous advices. Col. Bee, the Texian Minister to
SMexico, left Vera Cruz on the 30th May for Havana. The
t troops taken at the defeat of Mexia are many of them em-
Sployed in the streets of Vera Cruz, and are treated with
. great severity. It is stated that the Mexicans have not a
Single man-of-war left. Lemus, a brave and skilful gene-
ral, has still near 2000 Federalists under his command in
the vicinity of Munclova. The Government party look
upon him as a dangerous customer. The Federalists at
Tampico still hold out manfully against the Centralists.
FFROM Mrxico.-The N. 0. Commercial Bulletin pub-
lishes the following extract from a letter written at Vera
Cruz:-
A private letter from Mexico, under date of May 25, in-
forms us that the Rev. Dr. Moldon, Apostolic Vicar of
Texas, reached that city on the 13th of May, and next
morning called to pay his respects to the President, ad in-
terim, who would not see him under pretext of business.
That night, at 12 o'clock, he was conducted to prison,
where lie remains without hope of acquiring his liberty at
present.
The Mexican Government is organizing an army of
60.000 men, with which to recover the sovereignty of their
lost province of Texas, and appear determined to make a
desperate effort to effect it.
FROM TEXAS.-By the steam packet New York. which


ato AFFAIRS IN FLORIDA.
igs (Correspondence of the Army and Navy Chronicle.)
,vIy FORT KING, May 27, 183R.
w), The last fifteen or twenty days have been to us a season
al- much interest and speculation. The Florida war has bee
- so often ended, that every step taken to effect a result so d(
its, sirable seemed to sink us still deeper in the mire, and cause
ht- us to look confidently for a more harrassing and sanguinan
continuance. But the occurrences of the last week leave r
er- doubt that the war is ended, and we at least have the pro
er. pect of beina relieved from pursuing an enemy who can nev(
ap- be found or numbered but under a flag of truce.
of General Macomb arrived at Garey's Ferry in April, na
me immediately issued orders to the army generally, of such
al- character as would be the means of opening a eommunicatic
ns- withhostiles, and appointed the 1st of May for a general counc
i- at Fort King. All the friendly Indians and negroes were de
18. patched into the interior with instructions to obtain an inte
id- view impossible; but, from the threats which had been from tinr
:he to time received from them, there were but fi.w who predict
)m- a successful result. The most experienced officers in Florid
me were of this opinion. No Indian or white man would rt
:he the hazard of encountering them, as Sam Jones had sent i
ut. word that any stranger who approached his camp, under ar
hat circumstances whatever, he should be put to death.
uty Gen Macomb arrived here on the 30th of April, but not E
er- Indian was to be seen or heard of; and from the frequent d
est predations in different parts of the country, the prospect
to a successful result, was, indeed, gloomy. Gen. Taylor cart
to soon after, completely discouraged. The friendly Indian wt
had been with him some six or eight months, instead of being
)lic the medium of communication with the hostiles, had joined
hat them, taking with him all the friendly Indians at Tampa, an
)w- leaving word that Gen. Macomb had come for the purpose,
mnd gathering them in under friendly assurances, seize them, arn
ion transport them to Arkansas, and that he and his friends wei
ive not to be deceived.
ise After this become known, every officer saw but a recu
eir rence of those disheartening events which have characterize
An this protracted war from its very commencement. Gen. Ma(
ws omb, however, was not willing to obandon his object und(
m. these circumstances, and accordingly adopted every plan thi
est could be devised to attain the desired end. Indian John,
Ex- friendly Indian, together with his women and children, r
ter ceived presents and provisions, and were directed to tal
er- themselves to the hammocks and swamps, aud not return un
on- tilb he had had an interview with some of the hostiles. H
returned after the lapse of a few days, bringing intelligence
mad that eight Mickasukie warriors were encamped within a mil
ce- of ius, and the following morning would visit the camp.
the Ealy in the morning these di-tinguished visitors were see
it wending their way through the pine woods towards our e]
ave campment, bearing a white flag, and headed by Har-lock-tu
of te-nuggee, a Mickasukie chief. They were received by Gem
ied Macomb with much form and ceremony, and with every mar
her of friendship and kindness. All of them were much emba
in rassed by the appearance of so) many officers and soldiers i
ave uniform, and it was not until they were told that they pe
ice tained to the rank of the great chief that was sent to talk 1
them, that they were at all satisfied. The appearance i
)lr these Indians was indeed interesting; some of them had ha
im no intercourse with the whites for at least three years. Th
air chief Har-lock-tuste-nuggee was a man about thirty years i
uld age, well-dressed, tall, commanding person, manly, prepo
old sessing countenance, and an expressive and fluent speaker
'he The others were quite young, and remarkable for their hid,
ent ous and repulsive faces, and their fine, well-proportione
ice athletic persons, which were well displayed, they having n
nd other garb than a rough buck-skin shirt. The General ex
on, plained to them clearly and briefly the object of his visit among
be- them, and, if they were willing to comply with his demands
in- the white and red man could once more be at peace. Th
ce, country below Pease creek was shown to them upon the map
)u- the boundary defined, and if they were disposed to go their
1ot and be at peace, and not cross the line, they should remain
me unmolested for the time being; and that those Indians wh
ch were committing depredations along the frontiers, in the vicir
nu- ity of Tallahassee, must be brought in without delay. If yo
for are willing to accede to this, said Gen. Macomb, we can again
on be friends; if not, the war must be continued. The chic
ire evinced much pleasure, and expressed his willingness to conr
en ply with every demand. The Indians, he said, were scatter
nrid ed throughout ihe country in parties of fbur and five, but h
ct- knew that so soon as those west of the Suwannee river hear
ar- what he should send to them, they would cease their deprm
to dations, come in immediately, and retire to the country as
an signed them. His young men he would send there without
iat delay, requiring them to come in.
ng This chief and his companions left us the following morn
,ur ing, and eight days after encamped in our vicinity with ur
wards of a hundred souls In the mean time Lieut. Col
he Harney arrived from Key Biscayne with Chitto-tuste-nuggee
w, the principal chief of the Seminoles and Mickasukies,. Sandy
ed a faithful black interpreter, after three (lays' search, accident
of ally discovered this Indian near the Everglades, returning
from a fishing excursion. He immediately accosted himr
when the chief asked him what he wanted there. I sul
;- pose you have come with more lies." Sandy. however,',
i--- .l^o 1%.tl..1. ,. ta.tui-nu given to re- Macomb, which he was induced to believe, and consented t
'o-
of accompany him to the fort.
ta- Upon Chitto-tuste-nuggee's arrival at Fort Lauderdale, h
rs, obtained fn'om Lieut. Col. Harney a corroboration of all tlia
had been told him by Sandy. He expressed his willingnes
tY, to accompany Col. Harney to any point to meet Gen. Macomb
vit but, before doing so, was desirous to return to his tribe aun
ng consult upon the acceptance of the terms offered them. Afte
lr! an absence of three days, he returned, bringing with hin
h 0-chhe-hadjo, a young chief who had been delegated by th,
ne tribe to witness his proceedings with the whites.
- Sam Jones, from his age and inability to travel, decline
rul coming, but desired his acquiescence in the terms propose(
;s- to be made known. This man, in the opinion of the Indians
re has never been considered an important chief, and less so nov
in than ever. The Mickasukies, of which tribe he is a chief
vy have heretofore occupied thie northern portion of the peninsula
-d but from the inroads made upon them by the troops, the
nm have been obliged to retire south, cultivate and live upon lanu
us belonging to the Seminoles, who are by far more numerous


murders-its drain upon the Treasury of our countrvy-and its
filling the pockets of those who have done much, and may Ibe
expected to do more, in contributing to its continuanc('e.
of The country, which is, for the present, assigned to the In-
1n dians, is within a line commencing at the southern point of
e- land between Charlotte Harbor and Sanybel River; thence
,d north up Pecase creek to a line running due east, striking the
ry head of Lake Istokpoga; thence to the Kissimmee river by
10 Istokpoga creek, down thIe Kissimmee through Lake 0-kee-
s- cho-bee, directly south to Shark river, continuing to its mouth ;
er and from thence to the place of beginning. This boundary
gives them a country inhabitable for any white man. The
Id larger portion of it, most of the year, is completely inundated.
a Tlierie is some land, in the vicinity of Pease creek and the
Dn Kissinimrnee river, susceptible of cultivation ; but elsewhere,
il that which is not oveiflown i,; deep sand. By this arrange-
s- ment the Indians nre excluded from the Atlantic, to which
r- they heretofore have had free access; and, like the Arabs,
ie have robbed and destroyed all who have been so unfortunate
?d as to be wrecked upon that coast.
la The southern extremity of the peninsula is reserved and is
in said to be good land, and desirable for the location of forts
in and light-houses. A chain of posts is to be established across
iy the country, from Tampa Bay to Fort Mellon, leaving a space
of country-a neutral gr-ound-between the Indian boundary
in and the nearest post, of about fifty miles in breadth. Infantry
e- and dragoons are to occupy the posts, and by placing there
of intelligent and judicious officers, who are acquainted with the
ie Indian character, and with the disposition of the settlers re-
io sorting to such places for traffic and gain, we may look for
Much good resulting from the present arrangement. One
(1 thing must result from it: we can, within the coming six or
id nine months, obtain an intimate knowledge of their fastnesses
of and if' the Government persists in driving them from the
il country, merely to carry out the policy of emigration which
re is adopted, we can meet them upon more equal grounds and
perhaps succeed. But if the true policy be observed, that
r- which is due to humanity and justice, and that which is de-
d minded by our citizens, who are thickening upon our West-
c- ern frontier unprotected, they will be allowed to remain. Let
er loose such spirits as these in a country to which they must be
at taken by force, and the scenes which have been enacted here
a the last four years will bear no comparison with the bloody
e- conflicts and murders which must ensue upon that border,
.e where are assembled fifty thousand warriors, who only want
n- a leader to give vent to a feeling which can never be subdued.
le If the w-ar is again commenced, the Indians will be driven
ce from the Everglades, and the country will again be overrun
le by parties of four and five, who will be a terror to every set-
tler and village. Let them go to the country to which they
,n have gladly consented to go ; and if they remain at peace, why
n- disturb them ? No man can crave it, but for its delightful
s- climate; and let time accomplish that which the best blood
n. and coffers of our country have failed to do. We may talk of
*k the triumph of the Indians, and of the prostration of the hon-
r- or of our arms; this is all idle, and belongs to the crafty spec-
in ulator, and the loafers who have been hanging upon our fron-
r- tier from the commencement of the war, and who will now be
to reduced to the necessity of working for their daily bread.
of Ihe integrity of our Government is involved only when re-
d moving the Indians from a country which they have sold, and
le which can he cultivated bythe whites. This has already been
of accomplished; and some magnanimity should be displayed
s- towards an enemy who is willing to abandon the whole for a
portion upon which no white man can live. It is impossible
e- not to feel un interest in these people, who for four years have
d, been contending for their homes. Florida is the land of their
o birth; but, independent of this, there is no country in the
World so peculiarly adapted to their wants and habits. Its
g climate, at all seasons of the year, is so mild that a single
article of'dress is sufficient for their comfort; the soil is fertile,
e producing spontaneously roots and vegetables enough to sup-
ply their wants; its rivers and ponds abound with fish and
re turtle; and in its hammocks and pine barrens game of every
n descriptioncan be found whenever they are disposed to hunt it.
o This is the country they have been contending for, until
they are now driven to a nook and corner uninhabitable for
u civilized man; for which they come, as humble suppliants, to
n ask or receive peaceable possession.
ef
S FLORIDA.-We have had two or three straggling ac-
Scounts during the past week of murders committed by the
e Indians, but the news received by this morning's mail is
d more favorable. The Indians are coming in from every
Quarter and the most confident belief Is entertained, that
S_ the war is itr reality ended
t LATER FROM MExIco.-We are indebted for the follow-
Sing'Mexican news to slips from the N. Orleans Louisianian
,- of Jnne 10th.
S A gentleman who left Mexico the 20th May, and Vera
, Cruz the 1st June, has informed us that Tampico was
Y, closely invested by Bustamente's forces, who were in pos-
t- session of the pass into the harbor, and nothing could go
g in or out without their consent. The city of Mexico was
a, perfectly tranquil and the government was raising troops.
'- The first installment of the sum stipulated by treaty has
.. i-.^.. pid by the Mexicans to the French.
"o FROr TAMPIco.-Information has been received in this
city, by the schooner Creole, from Tampico, that General
e Arista, at the head of 600 infant (Central troops) arrived
at the bar of" Tampico from Altemira on the night of the
2 '7th ult., surprised and captured in a few minutes the small
s party of Federalists who were stationed there to defend
; the place, without losing, or having even a single man
wounded, belonging to his party. The man of-war schr..
r formerly the old Independence of Texas, stationed at the
a bar, was captured in fifteen minutes, the greater part of
her crew basely deserting the few resolute men on board,
d jumped overboard and escaped, leaving her two principal
officers, (one a Frenchman who behaved nobly) and seven
men, all wounded, to fall into the hands of the enemy.
, General Arista had dispatched a brig to Vera Cruz. to ob-
, tain eight large pieces of ordinance and two bomb cannons,
, with which he intended to attack the city of Tampico, and
; according to his expressed determination carry it without
Y sacrificing a single man. Bustamente was at Altemira,
dand was daily expected at Tampico.