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FRANCIS P. BLAIR & J. C. RIVES,
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TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 9, 1836.

TREACHERY OF TH11 INTELLIGENCE.
From day to day the National Intelligencer mis-
represents the. intentions of the Government in its
okt~i~ rwhjfii (iimif nt VaHfpole of

=T 4urOa" ai.onoring our coun-
try in the eyea,of foreign powers; and for the pur-
pose of furnishing, food to domestic party dissen-
tion, by mingling questions of foreign policy with
our political disputes. To accomplish all these
mischievous 'designs, the Intelligencer makes
elaborate efforts to prove that Gen. Gaines' move-
ment is connected with the question of boundary.
There never was a more fallacious or iniquitous
assumption. The boundary is to be settled by
the commission stipulated for in our treaty. Wh e-
ther the more western branch of the waters, dis
embogued into the sea by the river Sabine,
shall be established as the boundary, or the
more eastern branch which retains the name in the
higher latitudes, shall be held the true boundary,
is a matter of very little importance to the United
States. With boundless territory in the more tem-
perate latitudes, there is no motive to prompt our
Government to covet a little slipIof territory nearer
the heart of Texas, whether that country remains in
possession of Mexico, or becomes an independent
power. It would be only throwing our frontier far-
ther from protection, and more within the reach of
foreign aggression. The acquisition of this strip
of territory is not the object of the order of Gen.
Gaines. This is fully explained in the instructions
of the Secretary at War. The view with which
the temporary and contingent occupation of the
territory is authorized, is not; only justified by the
law .of nations, under the circumstances upon
which the order is predicated, but is expressly
provided for in the following article of the treaty
with Mexico:
ART. 33. It is likewise agreed that the two
contracting parties shall, by all the means in their
power, maintain peace and harmony among tlhe
several Indian nations who inhabit the lands ad-
jacent to the lines and rivers which form the
boundaries of the two countries; and the better to
attain this object, both parties bind themselves
expressly to restrain, by force, all hostilities and
incursions on the part of the Indian nations living
within theirrespective boundarie": so that the Unit-
ed States of America will not suffer their Inrdli.n to
attack the citizens of the United Mexican States,
nor the Indians inhabiting their territory; nor will
the Mexican States permit the Indians residing
within their territories to commit hostilities
against the citizens of the United States of Ame-
r'ca, nor against the Indians residing within the
limits of the United States, in any manner what-
ever."
If General Gaines conforms to his instructions,
this article is a full warrant for his procedure,under


the signature and the seal of Mexico itself.--"Both
parties bind themselves expressly to restrain, by force,
all hostilities and incursions on the part of the Indian
nations living within their respective boundaries,"
&c. &c. Mexico has now no force near Nacog-
doches to restrain the Indians in that quarter,
who are stated to have begun the'work of murder
and plunder. The people settled to the north
and east of Naccgdoches, particularly those on the
waters of the eastern branch of the Sabine, con-
sider themselves citizens of the United States.
General Gaines, it seems, understands that exter-
mination has been proclaimed by the Mexican
Generals, up to the Sabine. It may be the
policy, then, of the Mexican Government, in-
stead of doing all they can to "maintain
peace and harmony among the several Indian
nations who inhabit the lands adjacent to the lines
and rivers which form the boundaries of the two
countries," rather to let them loose, to carry exter-
mination up to the lines and rivers which form the
boundaries of the two countries. It may happen,
as those lines are not run, and as the Indians may
not possess sufficient science to settle the degrees
of latitude and longitude, (which, together wit
natural objects, are to fix our boundaries,) that
these savage hordes may, by mistake, include our
own infant settlements in their crusade of geo.
graphical extermination. At all events, Mexico
has no force there to restrain them, and if General
Gaines reports truly, that the Indians manifest a
disposition to commence hostilities, it is his duty,
under the treaty, to take a position to restrain
them.
Under a full knowledge that the American
administration has disavowed all intention to re-
tain a position in any portion of the territory
lnaimpd hv Mexico. a moment longer than is ne-


BY BLAIR & RIVES.


CITY OF WASHINGTON.


the work will soon be begun. Not only thz
Indians within the Mexican territory, but those
within the United States, wi!l pour down as of yore,
like the northern hordes of Europe, upon the de-
voted and inviting fields of the south. It may be the
policy of the Mexican authorities in this way to
relieve themselves of the troublesome struggle
in which they are engaged. But is it not
the duty of the Government of the United States
to fulfil the treaty, and restrain Indian hostilities,
whether directed against our own frontiers, or
those of Texas? It may not be the interest nor
the wish of Mexico that the clause of the treaty,
obliging this Government to prevent the Indians
on the north of Texas from'invading that country
and butchering the inhabitants, should be exe-
cuted; but it is the expressly stipulated duty
of this Government; and what the treaty re-
quires is enforced by all the obligations of hu-
manity towards the people of Texas, as well as
considerations .connected with the safety of our
own) frontiers. Mexico may have changed her
policy, but cannot change the treaty.

EXPUNGING RESOLUTION.
The Nashville Republican attempts to turA to
^Lbjtt et .e d. t g l ila-
tures of States containing swre than a majority of
the suffrages of the whole Union. This White
organ says:
"UNTIMELY DEATH.
"Departed this life, on the 30th June, the cele-
brated Expunging Resolution. Its untimely de-
cease was a severe blow to many dear and loving
friends and relatives. It left the world amid 'h1-
mentation, weeping, and great mourning.' It is
thought that this event will so seriously affect its
nearest and dearest friend, Col. Benton, that lie
will follow shortly himself."
"The decease" of the expunging resolution
would doubtless be a triumph to Judge White.
If he had truly represented the will of the people
of Tennessee, the resolution would have been
carried at the last session. It was ascertained,
however, that Judge White, by misrepresenting
his State, would just enable the opposition to
triumph in voting down a second time the propo-
sition to expunge. It was therefore concluded
by the republicans of the Senate, that they would
wait until Benjamin Watkins Leigh's place was
filled by a successor who would obey instructions,
and until the Senators of Michigan and Arkansas
should take their seats; when WHITE, and EwI G,
and SOUTHARD, and MANGUM, and TOMLIN5SON,
and BLACK, the contumacious Senators, together
with the whole body of their confederates, could
be voted down by a triumphant majority. This
will be done at the next session, and Judge White
will find, that his contempt for his constituents
will bring out from the people of Tennessee some
decisive manifestation of their approbation of the
measure which his Nashville organ would fain per-
suade them has been consigned to oblivion. The
majority of the present Legislature of Tennessee,
like Judge White, hypocritically secured their
seats by pretending friendship to the President.
Like the Judge, they will endeavor to make
the impression that the State would have the
brand of Clay's foul impeachment to remain upon
the first Chief Mag'istrate she g-ave to the Ui.ion:
but when the people speak again at the polls, they
will to-io r t.,.o that those sent to Nashvilie to re-
present them shall add the moral force of public
opinion in Tennessee to that of the other States
which have spoken their approval of Mr. Benton's
resolution, as a proper atonement for the wrong done
the chief officer of the Government, and the viola-
tion of the constitution by the prostituted bank
majority of the Senate.
We are not astonished, then, that Judge White's
Tennessee prints should labor to make the impres
sion that the expunging resolution had been resign
e' by its friends to a quiet and "untimely death." If
thus surrendered, it would relieve them greatly.
But we tell them that they will be passed trim.
phantly at the next session; that the vote which
Judge Wlhite, and the other Senators misrepresent-
ing their constituents, give against it, will put the
seal upon their fAlse professions of republicanism,
and will consign them to the grave to which they


would be most happy to give the President's fame
and the vindicatory resolution-a grave of infamy.
OPPOSITION HUMBUGS-TIIAT MR. VAN BUREN IS
A CATIIOLIC, AND RIDES IN AN ENGLISH COACH.
MR. VAN BUHEN'S ARISTOCRACY.-Among other
ridiculous and absurd stories, which the opposition
have invented, and put in circulation in relation
to Mr. Van Buren, the story about an English
carriage, English footmen, &c. is of a pieco with
that establishing his alliance with the Po:pe. The
story of the English carriage originated with the
veracious Noah, of Bank memory, and has been
repeated so often, and with so much apparent
seriousness, that many a credulous wig, no doubt,
really believes that Mr. Van Buren rides in an
English carriage, with English horses, English
fobtmen in English liveries, &c. &c. The story is
too ridiculous to be worthy of notice, but since it
has been so often repeated, and is really believed
by many Lading wigs, it may be well to state that
the whole is without the least foundation in truth.
We have a letter from a correspondent, who spent
the whole of last winter in Washington, and who
Shas long been personally acquainted with Mr.
Van Buren, and all his relatives in New York, and
whose statements can be implicitly relied upon.
He alludes to this ridiculous story, a:id says, "Mr.
Van Buren never ow:red an English carriage, or
English horses."--Dlaware paper.
NOTE BY EDITOR OF THE GL':nE.-The story
about the English carriage is one of the poorest ol
the fabrications of the opposition, and nothing car
display the bitterness of the party more than the


,- tl e
"D_" A uGsT 10 l836.

.,J "- t -*. ,
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been so extensively and industriously spread upo of all the opposition partyus throw the election rthosef courtesies' h oi owinlations aston, aniiapproa- the general ur of policy st
this subject, I have thought proper, in fulfilme into the House of Repres tles. It may not 'well as tfhe self-lrespet- wouM prompt us to re- 'which t pi'r ursted. T hi s argum-n we are t
of your wishes, to obtain his authority for this d be :some may be enthusi. "-ough to hope even ffard. Within these .irnes, -we would inuire, well awr, l noweght with, but be re- te
claration. against hope, thathope, that their f re candidate how it is possible mayto 4 cles teo objects of these pt sive 's thosn who ere originally t be eadv- t
Mr. Van Buren was bred in the religious prin- successful. If there be -a ch, his must be a (AfiVentions, whilst the efforts of one are directed cates of ir. Adams and Mr. Clay, who opposed pi
ciples of the Reform Protestant Dutch Church, most sanguine. .emperame 'j But whether these to:support Judge White, and 6f the other to sUs- l' -n tion both oc asins,
whose tenets are similar to those of the old Pres- candidates be run with an 'ion of casting the tain General Harrison? and who. haye.never thought any thing 'Tght or lii
byterian churches. Whilst he resided in Kin !-r- election on the House, or, an overweening Are there not striking and irreconcilealite dif .proper ii he has sais,
hook, this war, the only church in the village; his confidence, that some one-, 1t mn may be elected, ferences. rpolitical- opini tbetw&rf these gentle, ptopernt 6or do'Lneaei.President, as
parents attended it, and he was baptised in it; and the effect will be precisely -e same. The inevi- mTn? Judge White, as far asswe cap- decide from of erp oonh lared
until his removal to the city of Hudson, he was a table consequence will b ess Mr. Van Buren bis pu blict:ts, was.one of the warmest cuppotters g nce by tfiatol f ing of the opposition wh laboin
regular attendant on its services. There being no gets a vote of the People enough to Ielect of Gen. Jackson's administration, untl6ong after powerat hiszfir, electionandGenmost ef whomine qt
Dutch church in Hudson, and Mrs. Van Bure. be- him, that the election it devolve on the his second eection.. He sustained him in those erted themselves' in his' behalf at the second., to
coming a member of the Presbyterian church at House of Representativ The number of particular measures' and. opinions which gave the With whatever distaste this argumentt may. be.red ti
that place, he attended with his family, until, hemr electors of President, t ch each State is greatest offence to a portion of the-Jackson party, cived by the position, ol whatever brnto ou
death, a church of that denomination, first at entitled, is fixed by the co rion to be equal to and caused them to senpiate from.those who had ae friends of the administration we appeal with o1
Hludaon, and afterwards at Albany, under the care the whole number of its" r`entatives in Con- been their political friends. The alleged ground confidence, ase there can be o doubt the to
of the late Dr. John Chester. Since the death of gress, with the addition o senators. This ar- of their secession was, tWat Gen. Jackson enter- ill deem it a reco endation of Mr. Vn de M
Dr. Chester, which occurred, 1 think, in the be- rangement,even as to the l colleges, gives to gained, and had advanced opinions incompatible t en Whi tis committee conosed of eMr. n Bu
ginning of 129, he has been a pew-holder in the the small States an advan i allowing them an with that limited and 'rict construction of the the same member, (nw, a then,) urged uparly tonVI
church, and has usually attended, when in Albany, equality with the larg1e1 o far as the Sena. powers conferred on t Governent by te Con- the peoplethe propriety of electing Gene ualpa- pr
on the ministrations of the Rev. Dr. Welsh of the tors are to be taken ., account. In the stitution, ever contended for by. the republican& to th f residehfcy, theyleelecont Gered alJas pm
Baptist church, a selection, which, I presume, may main, however, the pro i2 to be considered party, of which they claimed tobeithetraitest violent oppositio fr of o e w r t
be ascribed to personal friendship, and to the popular in its character e each State has sectif not the exclusives, whilst their brethren nowImahotioe of M nsepoans d
high character.,of that distinguished clergyman a vote proportioned toht leers. But when (who, according to their own belief, remain firnl nd1 7h e l. n ast goo .o -reb.oiT n~, -asne th
., to," ers. lut when (w o, a -- .- their own belief m nt f o lth gom Iore l ga n d
for ability and eloquence, the election is thrown louse, the vote is in the faith) they regard as no better than heretics. readict-fl tatthe gatst a lami"tie s wou bfan! .I
It is due to Mr. Van Buren to add that he is no given by States, and States of Dela- Judge White continued to sustain Gen. Jackson's the country in case of Genk'al Jackson's success. co
sectarian, and that he uniformly has been and is a ware, Michigan, and Aill have the same administration until the last session of Congress, He has nearly finished the second term for which
decided advocate of freedom of conscience, and weight as Virginia, Pe nd New York. whenhen lie acted with the opposition. Indeed, Thte vatiinations ofnhis political
of the equal rights of all persons to participate in In this state of things notes, and where about the time of his last election to the Senate, he enemies have not been justified by events The of
the privileges "nd blessings secured by our con- State ae
the privileges and blessings secured by our con States are equally di te is represent, declared in a letter which was. published in Ten- country has enjoyed during his term of service ju
situation edbyone member, may decide the nessee, that it was "fancifulP to su ppo at he wh u igr p is r- t serc
I have the honor. t0a b_ .... conntnil" s a -47nthe e xtsi 'the p.. wth I oe slmb ta e a much p os t to
I- h e thue sei t ta conts Te Coat n m iia e tt wafa n, ndyen to ttt tstra n thasev eno t e lot oi fii- m
SYour obedent servant, it is true, as a remedy for extreme cases, autho- other hand. Gen. Harrison has always been known population and wealth have increased with rapid B
AARON VANDERPOEL. rized the House to decide beten the three high. to have been a supporter of the administration of' strmes, our commerce has whitened every sea, m
Hon. ZADOK CAsrEY. est voted for. But this provision was clearly Mr. Adams and Mr. Clay. He received an im-.. our cities are increasing in size and beauty, our. O
meant to provide for cases, where, after a bona portant appointment from that administration. lie manufactures are flourishing, and agriculture, the
ADDRESS OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE fide struggle for an election by the people, the is now warmly sustained by the friends of Mr. mother of all the arts, has had its labors richlya I
TO THE CITIZENS OF VIRIGINIA. contest could only be decided byithe House. But Clay in Kentucky, and is identified in public remunerated. Our western country is daily filling Pr,
This is a humorous and powerful paper, one was it ever contemplated, that,'by any arrange- opinion, with the American System, (that is, a tariff with industrious and valuable inhabitants, and m]
s s a u ad p r p ment made a priori, the election was to be taken for pi otection,) and a plzan of internal improvement cities are springing up in the wilderness as if by bee
which we heartily commend to the republicans in out of the hands of the People/ aad the will of the by the General Government of the widest extent, ma gic. Our national debt has been paid, and ta
every quarter of the Union. House of Representatives, voting by States, sub- Judging from the public course of these' gentle- our revenue has been so productive that we wa
stituted for their choice Wllat would have been men, they are antipodes in politics. How can a now -present the novel spectacle to the world "l
ADDRESS thought of a proposition in theFederal Convention voter, then, give to his electors a power to vote for of a nation entirely free from debt, with a as:tio
OA DR S t eta Crsoi omitteeto give the election of President in the first in- either of these, whom hlie may find the strongest? Treasury overflowing to such a degree that it
Of the Central Corresponding Committee to the stance to the House of Representatives? Would Is the privilege to be extended to Mr. Webster hasbeen found necessary to provide for deposit- ex
Citizens of Virginia. it not have run counter to all our ideas of free also? That gentleman is known to entertain the ing large sums in the State treasuries. In our sin
[From the Richnmond Enquirer.] Governments? Would it not have blended differ- opinions of the old Federal party, in their great- external relations we are equally fortunate la
ent departments, which should be ever kept dis- est latitude. successful and our affairs have been stri
We devote a large portion of this day's paper tinct, and converted our free institutions into an The signs of the times in Virginia are strong to conducted with the same wisdom and prudence wh
to the following unimpassioned, argumentative, aristocracy? Nor is the experience which the peo- show, that the opposition are endeavoring to with. wvhich have directed and regulated our domestic ca
clear and conclusive address. We may so char- pie have had of elections madein the House, such draw essentially from Judge White, though a concerns. The administration has inflexibly pur- ext
acterize it. because, though it is signed with our as to encourage them in countenancing proceed- faint show is madi of keeping him in the field sued the wise example set by Mr. Jefferson, of cot
name, we claim none of the honor of its composi- ings which are calculated to prevent them from Will that gentleman permit his name to be used, maintaining friendly and commercial relations with seI
tion. '. e recommend it to the calm consideration deciding, and giving the determination to that merely to strengthen the pretensions of persons all nationsentangling alliances with none. We car
of every citizen of the Union; and we are au- body. In the case of the contest between Mr to whom he has been always politically opposed? have abstained fiom interfere n. in the affairs, or tir
thorized to request of' every republican press in .Jeflferson and Mr. Burr, the latter, who had not It' Judge White could be elected by the opposi- taking part in the domestic feuds of other coun- Un
Virginia, as well as of the Globe, a republication obtained a single electoral vote, with a view to tion, under what auspices would he come into tries, even in cases calculated to excite individual n
in their respective papers: make him President, was very near being made power? What must be the course of his adminis. sympathy. We have observed strictly the laws of
TO THE PEOPLE OF VIRGINIA. so by the House after forty ballots. One single tration, and who would fill his cabinet, and the im- neutrality. We have demanded of no country qd
FELLOW-CITIZENS: The time is near at hand, additional ballot thrown into his scale, would portant offices under him? The history of par- what was unjust; and whilst we have insisted 18
when you will be called upon to exercise one of have made it preponderate-and it would al- ties, and a knowledge of the principles which firmly, but mildly, on justice being doi.e to our- thi
the most important rights which belongs to you most seem to have been a Providential inter- regulate human action, unerringly prove that the selves, we are ever ready to render the same to sh
as freemen. On the first Monday in November position which carried us through a crisis so significant, but incautious, hints given in the op- others. By practising on these maxims in our iu- re
next, you will have to assemble, and to declare by fearful, and prevented consequences which position prints, in the incipient stages of their ad tercourse with the nations of the earth, the admin- ca
your suffrages, to whom you are willing to confide might have proved most disastrous. To mark vocacy of that gentleman, are true. If elected, istration has exalted omir character as a people,
the high trusts cf President and Vice Presi- the sense of the people of the dangers at- he must conform his course of policy to the prin- and at no period has it stood higher for integrity ad
dent of the United States. This election, tendant on elections of President made by the ciples of the opposition party, and select their and decis.on. The President has been enabled to gr
at all times one of vit.,l importance to our House, an amendment to the constitution was men as his ,gents- make treaties with many nations, by which our t
country, is rendered immeasurably, more so, speedily adopted, compelling the electors to desig- If we have succeeded in demonstrating that the commerce has been extended and facilitated, and wi
by the circumstances in which we are placed, the nate in their ballots whom they voted for as Presi- people should retain and exercise the invaluable in some instances new avenues are opened for the sh
principles involved in the contest, and the impor- dent, and whom as Vice President. This was privilege of selecting for themselves their Chief enterpiize and industry of cur citizens, and for th
taut consequences that may result from the se- calculated to diminish the danger, but not entirely Magistr'ate, and have exhibited a true picture of the employment of our gallant seamen. He has li
election which you may make. It is most fortunate remove it. The other instance of an election the dangers to which their right of self-govern- effected thie settlement of claims of long standing, ap
for our country, that in the election to the Chief made by the House of Representatives resulted in meant in this respect is exposed, there can be no in compensation for injuries inflicted on us during (u
Magistracy of thie United States, the people have defeating the public will. The truth of this, the doubt that the only remedy is to be found in their European wars, by invasions of our neutral rights.
the control in their own hands, and that (if they incidents of the Presidential contest, and subse. selecting the individual to whom they are willing Large amounts of money paid on these accounts
are true to themselves) no man can arrive at that quent events have equally contributed to demon- under all the circumstances, to entrust the helm have arrived, and others will speedily arrive in the Bo
distinguished and most honorable station, but by state. So strongly, indeed, was the individual of the Executive Government, and to give to him United States, and contribute to swell the public bi
the free exercise of the public will. 'Ihe powers chosen impressed with a conviction that his riec- their united and zealous support, coffers. A contest of great difficulty and delicacy gr
of the President under the constitution, it must tion resulted from the forms of the constitution, We now proceed, fellow-citizens, to state to you with our ancient allies, the French, was settled st
be admitted, are very extensive. He may do and not the wLhes of the nation, that he declared the reasons which should, in our estimation, in- by the firm and wise course pursued by the PresS. u,]
much to advance or to mar the public prosperity, in his inaugural address, that as he lmd less than a duce you to give your support to Mr. Van Buren dent, in a manner honorable to both nations, and ad
But the more extensive his powers, the greater plurality of the electoral votes, he would, if the for the Presidency. The first of these is, that the good understandings an.d friendship between
thp ennflgener reposed: the more tenaciously constitutions had allWfl'--it,-lave .'Tr~flim!ea- the we beriev X-TiI mTWn-fiiy ,quu---to discharge the two coun..ies happily restored. If this be a p
shol'.d t'he people adhere to the sound principle election to the electors for a second choice. What the duties of that office. That he possesses tal- true delineatiorr of the situation of our country si
bf free Governmen,; which r quires that his would have been the result of such an experi- ents of a superior order, we think we are fully under the administration of the President, may we
,.,o ,, t he the result of their suffrages, (not meant, is no longer a matter of con~jtctriw, ~iwA of jutil' *u aiueri;g,, :i e wbenf eco pij. dis- njL _wy with confidence on Mr. Van Buren's de- ho
ofcombination or management, )-a u, uX u, % ,,rth4Ab ., ^_U.. ^_ -- r, tr.$ ,'i. ictiuaiiy tm guisliea care rr uI t at gentleman frcm an early term nation dl.- to l, p sm l3ine of rn oliv
should they be, to confide the desigi ation to the take place,d.dtte incum~entnieil'the selection of period of life up to the present time. Born ot and the same ma2ms ofadmini'ation, wasstrongly-he
caprice, or untrammelled discretion ot others, the House, find his pretensions at all strengthened parents highly respectable, but vwry moderate in recommending him for the Presidency t se
The friends of various candidates may submit with the people by that circumstance. If the effect their circumstances, when he commenced life, lie The next topic on which we shall address you, pe
their pretensions, inform the public mind of their of scattt ring votes will be to defeat the public will, had n"t the adventitious aid of fortune, or of in- fellow-citizens, will be to examine as briefly as we it,
qualifications, the services they have rendered, and can the people be induced to sanction such a proce- fluential connexions. Unsustained by these, and can, some of the leading objections which have en
the bearing and influence of a particular selection durt? Will they so actas to have the election taken relying on his own unaided exertions, on his abili- been urged by the opponents of Mr. Van Buren. 'm
on the policy and intc rests of the country. This out of their hands, and transferred to the House? ties and integrity, he made his way at the bar Before e do so, we would premise, that of all the
done, the choice of tme President should be"mde will thtyconsentthat "theextrememedicineofthe though he had to contend with talents, with men who have appeared on the theatre of public ro
by the people themseiw-s; or, what is essentmally constitution should be made itsdaily bread?" But,it wealth, and to resist the power of official weight life in the United States, (perhaps Jefferson and th
tie same, by their agents, chosen for thespecialit dby some, let uschoose electors, and leave it and. political combination. He soon attained an Jackson alone excepted,) none has been exposed of
object, informed of the will of their constituents, to theni to select, at tie time of voting, the strong- eminence in his prof ssion, and was, after a tfme, to such unmeasured vituperation and abuse as'this th


Sand prompt and faithful to c'rury it into elIct. est opposition candidate. Wl1, what is this but appointed Atterney General ofNew York. Bre:d in gentleman. Remarkable for his courtesy, and the ne
It is known to y;.u, fellow-c'ti'ens, that at a transerr'inig the choice froni the people to the the ranks of the Republican party, in his own State, observance of the rules of decorum in his speeches In
Convention held at the Capitol in January last, electors? Who is to judge df the contingency ? and devoted to the advancement of their princi- and writings towards his political opponents, it ma
conformably with the invariable usages of the The electors. They may, hailing this latitude al- ples, Mr. Van Buren was brought by them was to have been expected that some degree of ro
i Republican party, since the first election of Mr. lowed them, vote for the mtn whose principles into public life, and has been sustained up to the forbearance on tneir part would have been extend- nc
Jefferson, Martin Van Buren, of New York, was are thie most obnoxious, and lhve the pretext rea- present time. He became a State Senator, and ed towards him. So far from this, all the deadly th
unanimously recommended to you, fir the office dy at hand-" We thought" this candidate the was afterwards sent to the Senate of the United missiles of political warfare have been hurled at th
of President, and Wiiliam Smith, of Alabam., for strongest." Will the peopleconsent to delegate States, in ahich lie served for many years, stand- him, without mercy and without stint. Those X
that of Vice President of tilhe United States. The this extraordinary power? This is surely depriv- in;g in the first ranks of a body which contained who make free use of such weapons, mistake the P
Electors nominated by that body have agreed to ing themselves of the privilege of deciding who scme of tile ablest statement of the 1lnd. He character of the American people. They are as B
serve, and have expressed their cordial approba- is to be the President. Willthey give up this in- was then elected Governor of New York; whilst generous as they are just; and whilst they exer- re
tion of the views ot the Co:ivetion, and their de- estimable right? Will they consent to convert in thit office, was appointed by General Jackson cise the rights of free investigation into the ac- S
termination to use all fair anId honorable exertuons thie electors, who ought to be considered merely Secretary of State of the United States, and Minis- tions of public men, they require proofs ofchargrs
to carry them into effect. It becomes the' duty of ,s their agents-their attorneys to execute their ter to the Court of St. James-and being recalled which are exhibited, and will not permit them to
the undersigned, composing the Central Commit- will, into the arbiters of their fate, so far as the fi'om thence by the rejection of the Senate, was be put down by unfounded censure or wholesale
tee, concurring :.s they (10o Wtth te Convention, choice of President is concerned? If this system triumplhantly elected to thu Vice Presidency by the denunciation. Such weapons, used to destroy a u
r by whom, they were appointed, to present Mr. is to be pursued through the United States, how people through their electors, to which choice political adversary, are apt to recoil on those whlo g
n Van Buren and Judge Smith to the People of Vir- can a voter, when he comes to the polls, know you largely contributed, and we believe have employ them; and in the case of reckless and in-
Sgminia, as candidates for the distinguished offices for whom he isvoting for as Presi'lent? Is he voting seen no reason to regret. The duties of these discriminate accusers, the even-handed justice of tI
Which they have b-eei named. This recomnmenda- for Mr. Van Bur, n, Mr. Webster, Mr. White, or various situations, Mr. Van Buren discharged with the community "returns the ingredients of tie se
1 tion they m:>k(, unclog-edl with any condition, Gen. Harrison? He cannot tell. He is voting unquestionable ability and fidelity. The charac- poisoned chalice to their own lips." The in-
e quali-ication, or altern- ties whatsoever. It pre- blindfolded, and the worst of the matter is, that teristics of his mind arc-, sagacity, a knowledge of ferernce likely to be drawn from the employment 0
sents a plain, a simple, and intelligible issue to the he ha- placed the bandage on'his own eyes. How mankind, coolness, and self-possession. In his of such unsparing and violent abuse, is, that it i
n people, and we confidently andti fearlessly rely on his vote is ultimately to tell, depends upon the official intercourse, lie is rc-markable for mildness must be a bad cause which requires aresortto such t(
t 1.:e verdict of our fillow-citizens, on the fitness of will of the electors whom he has made the keepers and urbanity of manner. He treats his oppo- means; and men are led to the inquiry, whether 2
, the persons nominated for the offices in question, of his conscience, and to whom lie has surrender- nents with respect anid courtesy, and even amidst tile real object be not to remove out of the way of
a and on thIe stro:,g reasons and motives fur their ed the important right of exercising his elective the warmest conflicts of party, he is never carried other and more favored aspirants to pre-eminence n
Ss:lection. We choose to rely emphatically oil franchise, which every freeman should consider away by passion, nor hurried into indiscretion. and fame a formidable rival, who stands in the b
s the intrinsic claims and pretensions of' the candi- too sacred to be alienated. With these qualities, it is impossible but that, by path of their ambition. Experience and a know- q
t dates of' the Convention, because in the new and The Whig Convention held at [the Capitol last the discharge of the duties of so many and impor- ledge of the world should te-ch another lesson; q
d unprecedented situation of the contest for the Pre- winter' nominated Judge White for President, and tarnt offices, both State and Federal, he must have that political men, as well as individuals in private it
sidency, it is d-flicult to form a comparative estimate Mr. Tyler for Vice President, and designated cer- acquired such an experience and knowledge of life, often thrive on persecution. The improper
of the merits of rival candidates, from the simple tain persons to be Electors. Whether the Elect- public affairs, and particularly of the great and removal of Mr. Van Buren from a mission he was
t fact of the uncertainty who the candid te of the ors so named have consented to serve, or have diversified interests of the country, both foreign every way qualified to fill, by the action of the
o self-styled Whig, or opposition party, really is, pledged themselves to carry the wishes of the and domestic, as to qualify him, in an eminent Senate, had the effect to elevate him in popularity, ,
or will be. The present contest presents an en- Convention into effect, by voting for Judge White, degree, to be useful in the office of Chief Magis- and was the immediate precursor of his election to
Sltirely new phasis it political affairs. Heretof'ore, is unknown to the public. That these nomina- trate. the Vice Presidency, and of his being placed in a
at least at the two last Prcsidential elections, and tions were not acceptable to all tihe opposition party We advocate the election of Mr. Van Buren, more direct road to a more eminent station.
at many which preceded them, where there were in Virginia, would appear from a portion of that because we believe that he can combine more In the crusade which is carried on against Mr. t
r serious struggles, two candidates were brought party hIaving called a Conventionto meet at Staun- than any other individual, the support of the Re- Van Buren, attempts have been male to create F
into the field, openly, unhesitat.ngiy, and within an ton, on the 4th of July last, for the express pur. publican party throughout the United States. In prejudices in your minds, because he is a citizen a
y intention to stla-e tile electio'i on tile prefeBrence pose of nominating Gen. Harrison. This meedung evidence of this, we rely on his unanimous nomi- of New York, and some seem to suppose we i
f given by thle people to the one, or the other. The has been accordingly held, and so far as it will nation by the Convention at Baltimore. What- ought to h.-ve a Southern President. The Gene-
voters weit to the polls, on either side, knowing have any influence, it would be natural to sup- ever diversity of opinion might have existed in ral Government, on the 4th of March next, will t
what they were about, and had only to depos.te i pose that it will operate adversely to the interests that body as to the office of Vice President, as to have been in existence forty-eight years; during t
e ticir ballots fur the man of their choice. This o'f Judge White. They nominated Gen. Harrison Mr. Van Buren there was perfect unanimity. It which time, Viginia has had the Presidency for


e'consent of the States through which it passed. He has
ever heard an explanation of the subject (although it has been
matter of constant reference) that has been satisfactory to his
ind. All that he can say is, that if the question were again
resented to him, he Would vote against it; and that his regret
r having done otherwise, would he greater, had not Mr. Mon.
e, much to his credit, put his veto upon the bill; and were it
t the only vote ia the course of seven years' service, which
e most fastidious critic can torture into an inconsistency with
e principles which Mh. V. B. professed to maintain, and in
e justice of which,he is every day moreand more:.confirmed."
'ote to Mr. V. B.'s speech in relation to the right of the Vice
president to call to order, 4-c.
For a more general development of Mr. Van
uren's.views as to Internal Improvements, we
efer to the following extracts of his letter to the
hocco committee:
"The opinions declared by the President in the
laysville and his succeeding annual message, as I
understand them, are as follows: 1st. That Con-
ress does not possess the power to make and es-
ablish a road or canal within a State, with a right
f jurisdiction to the extent I have stated; and
hat if it is the wish of the people that the con-
truction of such works should be undertaken by
he Federal Government, a previous amendment
f the Constitution conferring that power, and de-
ning and restricting its exercise, with reference
o the sovereignty of the State, is indispensable.
d. An intimation of his belief that the right to
lake appropriations in aid of such Internal Im-
prove ments as are of a national character, has
een so generally acted upon, and so long ac-
uiesced in by the Federal and State Govern-
ments, and the constituents of each, as to justify
As exercise; but that it is, nevertheless, highly ex-
pedient that even such appropriations shoull-
vith the exception of such as relate to light-
houses, beacons, buoys, public piers, and other
improvements in the harbors and navigable rivers
of the United States, for the security and facility
of our foreign commerce-be deferred, at least
mntil the national debt is paid. 3d. That if it be
.he wish of the people that the agency of the
Federal Government should be restricted to the
appropriation of money, and extended in that form
n aid of such undertakings, when carried on by
State authority, then the occasion, the manner, and
he extent of the appropriation, should be made
he subjects of Constitutional regulation.
"In these views I concurred, and I likewise par-


united and specified powers, and that none can'be
exercised under it but such as are expressly given,
Dr are fairly necessary and proper to carry speci-
led powers into effect. He repudiates most de-
cidedly the latitudinous construction habitually
riven by the -federal- party, and denounces the
Llien and Sedition laws as palpable violations of
lhe constitution. In the same speech, Mr. Van
Buren expresses the opinion that the Bank of the
United States was unconstitutional, anil that its
huarter by Congress was the first inroad made on
-hose doctrines of limited construction of the con.
titution, which had formed the distinctive feature
f discrimination between the Republican party
nd the Federalists. Mr. Van Buren has retained
d up to this time thI mIaI as to the con*
titutionalit of the bank. 'ht impossible, within
te limits of this address, (already so much ex-
ended,) to introduce extracts from this speech.
re will content ourselves with saying, that the
erusal of it will demonstrate Mr. Van Buren's
elrfect coincidence in opinion with the most en-
ghtened and republican statesmen of Virginia
; to the powers of the General Government$
id the rules by which it ought to be expounded.
Mr. Van Buren's supposed opinions on the
Iestions of the Tariff, and Internal Improvement
r the General Government, have subjected him
much censure, from a portion of the opposi-
on. It is to be presumed that the most numer-
is branch of that party do not disapprove the
pinions imputed to him by some of their coadju-
ts, because that branch were the supporters of
r. Adams, and voted tor Mr. Clay; and it isa nc-
rious fact, that during Mr. Adams's term of ser-
ie, a high tariff for protection, and internal im-
ovements by the General Government, upon the
ost extended and magnificent scale, was the set-
ed and declared policy of the administration.
It, in truth, Mr. Van Buren's olpnions upon both
ese subjects have been greatly misrepresented.
Gen. Jackson's messages to Congress, he re-
mmended "a modification of the Tariff which
would produce the reduction of the revenue ts
z wants of the Government, and the adjustment
the duties upon imports, with a view o eqiuaA
stice in relation to all our national interests, and
ay be injurious to those interests. 'l'1r. Van
aren's letter to a Commnittee appointed by, -
eeting ,at Shocco Springs, in North 'Carolina, in
october, 1832, he'thus expresses his opinions:
SThe Protective System, and its proper adjustment, became
subject of frequent and necessary consideration whilst I
med a part of the cabinet; and the manner in which the
resident proposed to carry into effect the policy in relation to
ports, recommended in his previous messages, has since
en avowed, with that frankness which belongs to his char.
er. To this end he recommended 'a modification ofthe
iff, which should produce a reduction of the revenue to the
nts of the Goveinment, and an adjustment of the duty upon
ports, with a view to equaljustice in relation to all our na-
nal interests, and the counteraction of foreign policy, so far
it may be injurious to those interests.'
' In these sentiments I fully concur; and I have been thus
plict in the statement of them, that there may be no room
misapprehension as to my own views upon the subject. A
cere and faithful application of these principles to our legis-
ion, unwarped by private interest or political design, a re-
iction of the wants of the Government to a'simple and eco-
nical administration of its affairs-the only administration
ich is consistent with'the purity and stability of the republi-
I system; a preference in encouragement, given to such
nutfactures as are essential to the national defence, and its
tension to others in proportion as ;hey are adapted to our
untry, and of which the raw material is produced by our-
ves; with a proper respect for the rule which demands that
taxes should be imposed in proportion to the ability and
edition of the contributors, would, I am convinced, give ul-
>ate satisfaction to a vast majority of the people of the
ited States, and to arrest that spirit of discontent, which is
iv unhappily prevalent, and which threatens such extensive
ury to the institutions of our country."
The compromise (as it is called) of the tariff
iestion, has adjusted -that subject, until the year
342. But this should be considered to be under
is limitation, that the money to be raised by it
all not exceed the wants of the Government,.
stricting those wants "to a simple and econom'-
I administration of its affairs."
If the sums to be raised under the tariff, as now
ljusted by law, should prove excessive; should
eatly exceed the wants of the Government, on
e seal just described, the people, it isbelieved,
ill not consent to pay unnecessary taxes, in the
ape of duties, merely t&6 accumulate surpluses in
e Treasury. If the tariff be'; kept within the
nits indicated by Mr. Van Buren, we do not
apprehend that it will be oppressive or danger-
is..
In relation to internal improvement, the only
implaint which has been miade'agaiust Mr. Van
iren, is, as to his vote on the Cumbert*id road
11. That road was sustained by Mr. Jefferson on
'ounds peculiar to it, growing'out of'the disposi-
n of the territory of the United Stites through
which it passed. But Mr. Van Buren has publicly
Lmitted that he regretted that vote, and, in
)int of fact, he has uniformly voted against such
improvements by the General Governmtnt ever
ice.
We call the attention of the people to the fol-
wing extract:
-', m._. '...i, i-.,, no necanrs certain-that in-this reSDec-a
sion after lie came into the Senate, the knowledge ofthe per-
tual drain that tle Cumberland road was destined to prove up-
Sthe public Treasury,unless some means were taken to prevent .
and a siiyere desire to go at all times, as far he could consist-
.tly with the constitution, to aid in the improvement,and pro-
ote the posperity of the western country, had induced him,
without full examination, to vote for a provision authorizing the
election of toll on this road. The affair of the Cumberland
ad, in respect to its reference to the constitutional powers of
is Governmer.t, is a matter entirely sui generis. It was au-
orized during the administration of Mr. Jefferson-grew out
tithe disposition of the territory of the United States, and had














CONGRESSIONAL.

THE DISPUTED ACT OF CONGRESS.

REMARKS OF MR. UNDERWOOD,
On directing the Secretary of War to place Bene-
dict ford and Robert Brush on the list of pen-
sioners.
Mr UNDERWOOD said that the case presented for consi-
deration by thie resolutions was one novel in its character, and
concerning which he was desirous to submit a few remarks.
It seems that the Speaker of this House, and the presiding
officer of the Sename, had regularly affixed their signatures to
an enrolled bill or act; that the same was presented to the
President of thie United States, who, on the 30th day of June,
183t, approved and signed it; and that the bill or act thus au-
theinticated, was filed and recorded in the office of the Secretary
of State. This act provides lfor the payment of pensions to
Benedict Altbford and Robert Brush, and has been duly published
among the acts of the first session of the 23d Congress. But
the Secretary of War has 'refused to execute it, upon the
ground that the Senate of the United States did not pass the
bill. 'iThe journal of the Senate states that the bill was inde-
finitely postponed.
I thine, Mr. Speaker, it was the duty of the Secretary to exe-
cute the act. 1 think he was bound to regard it as a part of
the laws of thie land, and, as such, to respect and obey it. lie, no
doubt, equally conscientious, (fbr certainly there is here no cause
for irnputiug to him a bad motive,) believes that he has autho-
rity to look beyondd the act as enrolled, signed, approved, filed,
and recorded in the office of State, into the journals of the two
Houses, and to decide upon what hlie may there find, that the
act in Ouesuion is null and void; because those journals, or one
of then, satisfies his mind that the act was never passed accoid-
ing to the requirements of thie Constitution.
1 a'k, sir, where does the'Secretary of War, a mere execu-
tive officer, findlhir authority for overhauling the journals of
the two Houses, the enrolled bill as signed by the presiding of-
ficers, as approved by the President, and as recorded in the
:Sare D)epartment, and, upon his examination, in effect to de-
clare void a statute, published to the nation, and sanctioned by
all th, slaerninies prescribed for manitesting to the People the
laws they are to obey? Such authority has not been confer-
red by acy express provision of the Constitmion, or by ary
statute; and if it exists, it is the creature of inference, a deduc
tion merely from the known and admitted principles and pro-
visions oftha Cajsstitution and laws. From whatpart of the
Constitution, from what statute, wii! you deduce such authori-
ty for an executive officer?
Tac 5th secron of thel st article of the Constitution requires
"each House to keep a journal of its proceedings, and from
tinmie to time to publish the same, excepting such parts as may,
in their-j idgment, require secrecy." I admit the obligation on
I're part of Congress to comply with this mandate; but suppose
it is notudone, will it follow as a consequence from such omis-
sion, that executive officers are thereby justified in refusing to
obey the statutes which are promulgated'? Can they legitimate-
ly refuse obedience, because they do not see all the steps taken
by each House in the passage of the bill, set out at length in a
pablishedjournal? If it had been the intention of the Conven-
tion to make the obligatory force of a statute depend upon the
publication oftticjournal, and upon exhiliiiin o inthe- lice of
the journal as published a fltfilmnent, of every c.stitiliional re-
quisite or injunction, such intention, most certainly, would
have been expressed in clear and explicit language. The
Convention would not have left a matter of such impor-
tance to rest entirely upon inference. The fact that
that there is no express constitutional provision making the
validity of an act of Congress depend upon the journals of
the two Houses and their contents, is to my mind conclu-
sive, and proves that the journals and statutes are not so
connected as to make an examination of the journals nie-
cessary, in order to decide upon the obligatory force of tihe
statute. This truth is also manifest from the express lan-
guage of the Constitution. The journals are to be published
"from time to time." How often, at what intervals? Here is
discretion granted. Congress may publish them annually,
biennially, or monthly. If the obligatiQn of a statute depended
upon the contents of the journals, their publication shoul.l pre-
cede, or at least accompany, the promulgation of the statute, so
that the citizens and officers of Government might be furnished
with means of determining whether the statute imposed any
obligation. Congress may suppress the publication of tihe
journals. Thie Constitution expressly confers authority to do
so, in regard to so much as may, in the judgment of Congress,
'require secrecy." In the exercise of their judgment, Con-
gress might think all their proceedings in reference to this or
that subject required secrecy. They might give to the nation
the result of their deliberations in the form of a statute, and
withhold a knowledge of every previous step. In such a case
it would be preposterous to resist the obligation of the statute,
because the Public could not see that the steps taken by Con-
gress in its passage were regular and constitutional.
I have submitted these remarks for the purpose of maintain-
ing the position that the nation is not to determine what is or is
not law, by an examination of the journals of the two Houses
I will endeavor to show, in the setluel, that the validity of a
statute cannot be overturned and nullified by arraying the con
tents of thejournals against it.
All civilized nations must necessarily provide some mode of
making known the la,,vs which are to be enforced. They must
also provide some mode by which their officers and their citi-
zens can produce the law, and justify their conduct under it,
whenever and wherever their conduct may be questioned be-
fore the judicial tribunals of the country. This may be done in
various-vays. In Governments like ours, based upon written
constitutions, paramount to ordinary legislation, the mode may
be prescribed in the constitution itself; and, it so, then it is
placed beyond the control of thie legislature. The constitution
of the United States does not purport to regulate and fix the
precise mode by which the laws are to be made known and
authenticated, and yet it is not altogether silent on the subject.
So-far as-it does speak, it is to be regarded; but where it makes
no provision, the subject is left under the control of ordinary
legislation. It may be safely affirmed that the constitution no-
where provides that an extract from the journal, or the produc-
tion of the original, shall be evidence of what the law is. It is
very clear that, unless the journals contain the provisions of a
statute, their production would give no light on the question ol
what is or is not law. The journals purport, and do give a his-
tory of tile action of Congress upon certain bills, by their titles,
and are legitimate, but not conclusive evidence to show these
bills were passed, or rejected, or postponed by Congress. But
such a history affords no information as no the contents of the
bill passed or rejected 1; antd when you desire to know what thie
law for exau-,)l% f ,you wish to kno.v how much tax has
besnr imposed, a rl upon what articles levied, you must
look elsewhere than im the journal to find it. The
constitution might have required that every statute
should be regismered at large upon the journals, and
that copies thI refrom, certified by the Clerk of either House:
should be evidence of what the law is. But it has made n(
much provisioi, aid, in the absence of all constitutional regu
lation, it was courm!etent fbr Congress to take up the subject
and to fix the mole of making known and arithenticating the law,
of the country. Congress has done this, and it becomes rmpor
tant to consider, for a itmonment, how it has been done. It war
done by one o-f the earliest acts of Congress, under the Consti
tution. The act was approved on the 15th of September, 1789
and may be regarded as the cotemporaweous exposirion of th<
Constitutions far as to show that that i iitrurnanLnL.sion taee
hibit Congres fro ,at7.^fpiseKSd LIIa L unre .on
stiUltion, as then understood, did not contain such provisions a:
rendered legislation unnecessary.
The act of 1789, in substance, provides that the Secretary o
State shall preserve the original bills, resolutions, &c. an(
cause the same to be recorded in his office. The Secretary o
State is required, as soon as conveniently may be2" after hi
receives the bills amd resolutions, to cause the same to be pub
wished in newspapers, and to cause one prinnted copy to be de
livered to each Senator arid Representative, and two prinree


copies, duly authenticated, to be sent to the Executive author
ity of each State." Here is the mode prescribed for publishing
your laws, and here, sir, is the place where you are to fint
what the law is. The act provides ior making up a record o
the laws in the Secretary's office, and then it provides for
seal, and then declares that "all copies ofrecords and paper
in the said office, authenticated under the said seal, shall b
evidence equally as thie original record or paper." Now, th
true question is, when the record is made up i thie State De
partnnent, in pursuance of the act of 1789, can you impeacl
its absolute verity, by opposing to It the journals of either o
both Houses of Congress ; and, if this can be done, what tribu
nal is authorized to do it ? Is the Secretary of War authorized
to sit in judgment ?-
I contend that the judicial tribunals of the nation (and it i
their province to settle what is, and is not, law) ought not, and
would no( permit an authentic transcript, under the seal o
the Secretary of State, to be impeached, by bringing it in con-
flict with the journals. How are you to make tip the issue
Is it one of fact, to be tried by a jury, or is it purely a question
of law, to be set led by the Court? Certainly it is a question c
law, to be tried by the Court. And how tried? I have neve
leard of any other way in which to try such a question, bu
upon the face of the record. I know, sir, that the laws of a fo
reign state may be proved as matters of fact. But the laws c
thisnation are not to be proved in that manner. Our judge
arejudicially bound to notice them; and when, and how, ar
the to be informed? Must they not take the record as certi
field under the seal of State as conclusive? Or shall they re
ect it, because they may find in tihe journals'of Congress some
thing t d'induce a suspicion or conviction that the record i
the office ol State was erroneously made up? They could ns
regard the journal, because neither the Constitution ner an
act of Congress provides how it shall be authenticated. Th
clerks who keep the journals have no seals of office under
which to verify transcripts from them, anid there is no act
Congress making such-transcripts evidence. In this state(
things,-the Judiciary would be bound to decide the law upo
the evidence furnished in pursuance of the act of 1789. Ca
the Secretary of War go beyon'l tie iJudiciary? Cani he, in con
junction with the Clerk of either House, or alone, bring th
journal in conflict with the record of the State Department! T
ask the question is enough. -
The Constitution provides that all revenue bills shall orig
nate in this House. Suppose a revenue bill is duly signed b
the Speaker and President of thie Senate, approved by th
President of the United States, and recorded in the State De
ar:ment, will the marshal, or collector of the tax, be justifie
.In refusing to obey it, if he can find an entry on the journal (
the Sonate, that the bill originated theree! Or if he should se
such an entry, ought he not rather to say, the Clerk has mad
it throug-h mistake; Senators are presu mAed to be acquainte
with their constitutional powers, anid it cannot be believedthi
any "Senator, or committee of the Senate, would have ii
produced auch a bill, or that the Senate would have ente:
tamined or considered t7? In such a case the presumption :
rquchl stronger that the Clerk has, through mistake, niade thi
0.purnal speak an improper language, than that the Senate ha
Violated the Constitution, hy originating a bill they had n
nower to originate.


Nhe reside4 hesen'rtrs, Ihe er of the oNd<
President of the Senate are to sign acn bill wnh is
passed, and they are to do it "in their respective Houses"-
not at their lodgings, but publicly, in the presence of those
who enact the laws. When all this is done, the Commit-
tee of Enrolments arc directed to present the bill to the
President fbr his appiobation. How is he to dispose of it'
Tiht Constitution says, if he approve, he shall sign it, but it
not, lie shall return it with his objections to that House in
which it shall have originated." The President did approve
and sign the bill for the benefit of Alford and Brush, and, hav-
mIng done so, he performed all the Constitution required of him,
except taking care to have it faithfully executed. The Con-
stitution does not direct what the President shall do with the
enrolled bill after he has signed it. It does direct him to send
it back with his objections to the House in which it originated,
if he will not approve and sign; and, by the joint rules, hlie is to
be informed in which House the bill originated, by a certificate
of the Clerk endorsed on the bill. But where he approves and
signs, how is the bill to be preserved, and how is the law to be
made known'! The Constitution furnishes no answer, but the
act of 1789 gives one. That act requires the Secretary of State
to receive it from the President, and to proceed with it by re-
cording anrd publishing in the mannerI have mentioned. This
act also provides, in substance, that if a bill shall be passed by
two-thirds of both Houses of Congress, notwithstanding the ob-
jections of the President to the contrary, the Secretary of State
shall receive such bill "from the President of the Senate or the
Speaker of the House of Representatives, in whichsoever
House it shall last have been approved," and proceed to record
and publish the same, as hie would if the President had approv-
ed and signed it. Thus, sir, you perceive that it requires the
union of tlhe provisions of the Constitution, an act of Congress,
and the rules of the two Houses, to complete and carry out the
work of legislation in all its parts, and to make it known to the
People. You also perceive the safeguards which the system
furnishes to detect error and prevent mistakes. I contend,
when a bill passes through the ordeal provided by this system,
and is recorded in the police of the Secretary of State, it there
becomes a record of what the law is, and, as such, is to be veri-
fied under the seal, and cannot be controverted by opposing to
it the manuscript or printed journal, or the oral testimony ol the
clerks of the two Houses, or of any man.
1 do not mean to assert that the guards are so numerous that
there is no possibility of mistake, and that a bill, which never
passed both Houses, could not possibly meet with the appro-
val of the President, and find its way to the record in the State
Department. I mean no such thing; for I well know that all
human transactions proceed from imperfect t.eings, prone to
err and liable to mistake, and therefore I admit the possibility,
or, if you choose, the probability, in the present case, of the
existence of a mistake. It may be that the bill for the benefit
of tAlford and Brush never did pass both Houses; and unless iL
did, it is not law. But the fact of iLs having been signed by the
presiding officers, approved and signed by the President, exam-
ined by the Committee of Enrolments, and by them presented
to the President, and recorded in the Secretary's office, are evi-
dence that the bill did pass both Houses; and all that can be
urged against it, to the contrary, is the statement in the journal
of the Senate, that it was indefinitely postponed. If there be
conflicting evidence, which shall prevail'? Certainly that which
is recognised by law and made evidence by express provision.
Such is the evidence to be derived from the records in the
State Department,whereas the evidence derived from the journal
has no validityimparted to it, either by the Constitution or b)
any statute, nor is there any mode provided for obtaining the
evidence thejournal may furnish when wanted.
In the, nature of things, there is no more reason for confiding
-in the s mtar .ms -of tjow-na-, than in the ae wof the pre-
siding officers of the two Houses and the Committee of Enrol-
ments. Their acts declare that the bill did pass. The signing of
bills by the presiding officers is a very solemn act: all other
business is suspended; the title of the bill or act, about to be
signed, is distinctly read aloud in the presence of each
House, and if it never had passed, any member might rise and
make the question. Here is opportunity to correct and detect
mistakes. Who can say that the agents engaged in this work
are more liable to blunder and mistake than the Clerk who
makes up the journal Has it come to this, that we are to as-
certain whether an act published in the statute book is or is not
law, by entering into the inquiry, or rather by allowing an Ex-
ecutive obicer to go into there inquiry, whether the presiding
officers of the two Houses, or their clerks, are most-liable to
make mistakes'? In postponing bills indefinitely, theClerk may
mistake the title of a bill which was passed lor that which was
postponed, and make his entry accordingly on the journal.
The mistake may escape detection; and if it should, according
to the practical doctrine of the Secretary of War, then the
mistake of the Clerk would actually nullify an act of Congress.
Suppose the manuscript or printed journal should state that a
c,.rtain bill was indefinitely postponed, when a member of
Congress, paying particular attention to the subject of that bill
remembered distinctly, and was willing to swear, that the bill
was duly passed and approved and regularly signed by the
Speaker: would not the affidavit of the member be as satisfac-
tory evidence in favor of the law as the journal would be
against it? I state this case to show the absurdity of departing
From the record evidence of what the law is, as furnished in the
Department of State, and adopting other tests heretofore un-
known.
The journal of the last day of the session is not read by the
Clerk in the presence of the members of Congress, and they
have no opportunly to correct any mistake which, in the hur-
ry of business, may be committed by the Clerk.
It may be said that the Censtitution gives force and effect to
the journals, and makes them equivalent to records, and im-
parts to them the intrinsic verity of records. That the Consti-
ution intended the journals of each House to be evidence lor
some purpose,, no one can deny; but that the Constitution de-
signed to make the journals the highest and best evidence, and
the fountain whence you must draw your information to decide
questions like this belbre us, I deny. The act ot 1789 is uncon-
stitutional, if the journals alone are to be consulted in order to
ascertain what the law is; for that act provides a different
mode, which could not be done if the Constitution prescribed
the mode. Why, then, did the Constitution require journals tc
be kept and published 1 answer, that the leading object, it
not the only one, was, to lay before the People the conduct of
their representatives, and to exhibit their legislative history
The great value of tie journals consists in the yeas and nays.
The People in a representative Government have a right-s
right of all Others the most valuable-to control their represent
tatives, to dismiss them whenever their course is disapproved
and to select others to manage their aflkirs. The People cannot
bring their represent atives to a settlement without keeping ar
account against them. The journal contains the account; th(
yeas and nays exhibit the items for and against each represent
tative; and the publication of the journal enables the citizen
t voter, who is the judge for the occasion, to sum up the items
and balance the a count. The representative is accountable to
his constituents. The requirements of the Constitution, in re
s gard to the journal, were intended to secure and enforce a prac
t tical responsibility on the part of the representative. In thief
: view, the yeas and nays on propositions which never become
e laws, are as important as on those which pass.
If the President objects to the passage of a bill, and refuses t
sign it, he is required to return it, with his objections, to tha
IHouse in which it originated. In such case the Constitution di
rects that his objections (not the contents of the bill) shall be en
n tered at large on the journaland that thie vote on reconsideratiou
s shall be taken by yeas and nays. In such a case, it may be con
tended that the C'onsiitumion designed to make the journal evi
s deuce of the maw. Not so. The conteutsof the bill should ap
pear on the journal, if we are to look in it to find the law. Th
Constitution does not require that. But as the exercise of" th
e veto power places the President and the two .'.'- ,
-- i twwiwfMTr Tsr i.io and .n-i e principles invo0v
ed in such cases will generally he of thb first importance, th
s Constitution requies that the political issue between the Presi
dent and Congress should be fairly made up and presented, s
f that the tryers, the voters of the country, may have the cas
I fully stated when they come to sit in judgment. Such was th
f great object of the Convention in those constitutional provision
e which relate to the objections of the President and the yeas an


- nays on reconsideration.
The question before us derives additional importance at th
d present time, from the doctrines started on the subject of ex
Spunging. What will be the consequences of establishing th
g right tU expunge, and justifying the conduct of the Secretary
dI War in this case? The most fearful and corrupt results ma
f en-de. A servile Senate, forgetful of the motives and reason
a which induced the fathers of the Constitution to institute their
s body, lost to every sense of personal dignity and sell.respec
e either individually or in the aggregate, and fitted by degrad:
e tion to offer the incense of flattery to the nostrils of power, s
- that thrift may follow fawning," can, by uniting the doctrine
I of expunging with the practice of the Secretary, construct a
r engine of Executive despotism strong enough to crush the 1
- berties of this country. When a President wants a pretext ul
A on which to refuse the execution of a law or a treaty, he hm
nothing to do but to set his minions to work, and to have t.
s journal showing the vote on its passage, or the advice and con
d sent of the Senate in treaty cases, expunged, and then, sir, h
I may say there is no law, there is no treaty, and set up bfor hin
Sell.
S It may be asked whether there is no remedy in case a bil
n through mistake, should be signed by the presiding officers
i1 each House, approved by the President, and find its way to itr
r records in thie State Department? There is a remedy. It is, t
It' repeal the act. Congress must apply the remedy, and, in de
-" hiding upon the propriety of a repeal, it is a legitimate inquiry
?f whether or not any mistake was committed in the passage o
s the bill. Upon such inquiry, the journals may be received i
e evidence, and may have such weight as each member choose
i- to give to them, and they might be repelled by parol testimony
i- Of all this Congress has the exclusive right to judge. If tlt
e- Secretary of War has the right, hlie may always refuse to ex.
n cute aa act of Congress. Pass a second, a third, arnd a fourLt
it bill for the relief of Alfobrd and Brush, land the Secretary mi
y refuse to execute any of thriemn, alleging thie existence ofmistak
le It is no answer to say that you would impeach him for repea
'r edreftsa's, thatsuch conduct would manifest corruption. E
nf may honestly refuse obedience in every case, if you allow hii
Of tojudge; andl am one of those who think there canbeno coi
n viction upon impeachment, unless corruption is established(
i and fixed upon the accused. My argument is intended to sho
i' that the executive officer has no discretion, no right to look b
.e hind the law as published by the proper authority.
.0 As a judicial question, there is not an intelligent tribunal i
the United States which would hesitate a moment in pronoun
i ing the act for the benefit of Alford and Brush the law of ti
y land. No lawyer could frame a special plea to get behind tl
1 record in tha State Department. A law obligatory on the jud
e- ciary ought certainly to be obeyed by executive officers.
d I have thus, sir, presented my views of this singular and nov
Of case. I believe the Secretary has erred, but through no b;
e motive.


VORY LETTER FOLDERS of an unusually
large size and of the finest quality and finish,
Ivory, Bone and Lignumvitae Seals and Wafer
Stamps; Bronze, Boxwood, Glass, Metallic and
Fancy Inkstands, and Sand Boxes of every va-


nsI the New Yw4 Commercial.

By the packet ship Poland, from Havre, arrived
this morning ', we have received our Paris journals
to the 1st July, from which we extract the follow-
ing:
The King had been urged, since the attempt of
Alibeau, to establish a body-guard, but would not
listen to it, saying that bayonets had not been
wanting, and that he would rather expose his life
than submit to such servitude. His Mlajesty had
addressed the following- letter to the archbishops
and bishops of France:
"REVEREND Sin: A new attempt has just
threatened my life. Providence has preserved it.
My gratitude is raised toward Him who has cover-
ed with his powerful hand a life entirely devoted
to the welfare of France. I have the firm con
eviction that their persevering protection will a'd
me in maintaining in my country peace and res-
pect for religion, order and law. My intention
is, that a solemn Te Deum and thanksgivings
should be celebrated in all the churches of you'
diocese. "LOUIS PIILIPPE."
PARIS, 27th June, 1836.
Alibeau had attempted suicide. Galignani's
Messenger gives the following account of it.
One of his keepers having gone out for a mo-
ment to get some tobacco to chew, he requested
the other, who was with him, to go and hasten his
return. The latter had scarcely turned his back,
when the prisoner attempted twice to dash out
his brains against the wall; but the keeper
was too quick for him, and seized him by
the clothes, Faying, "Ah! my fine fellow! You
wish to p!ay me a trick, which would have
been the ruin of me!" Alibeau at first endea
vored to turn it off as a joke, but afterward ac-
knowlhdged his real intention, asserting that it
was not for want of courage that he attempted his
life, but that he had become disgusted with his
present state of existence, and wished to save him.
self from eight more wearisome days. He is at
times prodigal of his expressions. One of them
is-," My name begins with the first letter of the
alphabet, and the king has yet to fear all the rest
of the letters." Another is-" N whatever may
be my fate, my name will be known through all
Europe, and my devotion of myself honored by all
true patriots."
Advices from Madrid, of the 23d June, speak
of an arrangement about to be entered into by a
reunion of the grandees, to guarantee a loan
Should this fail, it is said the Queen will pledge
the royal domain.
A letter from Smyrna, dated June 3d, publish-
ed in the Journal du Commerce of the 30th, con-
tains alarming accounts from Greece. The king-
dom is said to be swarming with small bands, as-
sembled under native chiefs conspicuous for their
dislike of the Bavarians. The writer even says
that King Otho is not expected to return, and that
the monarchy is on the eve of falling to pieces.
We have but little confidence in these reports.
It was rumored in Par.s on the 30th that the
Sultan of Turkey had consented to dismiss the
Sreis-effendi, on the demand of Lord Ponsonby.
Also, that General Villareal, chief in command
of the Carlists, recently appointed on account of
the feeble health of Eguia, and himst lf tendered
his resignation, nominally for the same reason.

From the New Orleans Bee.
LATE AND IMPORTANT FROM MEXICO.
No further movements towards the prosecution
of the war against Texas will probably be made
before fall. The last accounts from Tampico re-
r present that city as perfectly quiet-no armed
force was there, and no disposition made towards
I raising one. The U. States sloop of war 'Warren'
.and schr. 'Grampus' had arrived at Tampi.
I co-and the Mexican Government had, through
I the newly appointed commandant, apologised tc
) this Government for the .insult offered the Ame.
I rican flag, and the officers of the Jefferson, and
, removed thIe commandant of Tampico, Gomez
who gave the insult. The schooners Creole anc
' Atalanta, of this port, were wrecked on the bar
Sa short time since-cargoes in a damaged state
ti and crews saved. A French brig, called the Gus
v tave, from Bordeaux, was also lost-making five
e or six vessels that have been lost on this bar with
n in as mrny weeks.
, The treaty entered into between Santa Annr
O. and General Houston reach Mexico in the latte:
- part of June, and was immediately laid before<
C Congress; no definite arrangement had been en
tered into when our informant left, and conjec
o ture upon the subject would be useless.
t We have been favored with the perusal of a num
ber of letters received by highly respectable house
n in this city, which throw considerable 'light upor
the internal affairs of Mexico. Excitement is fol
lowing excitement, and convulsion exceeding con
e vulsion, and none can foretell the consequences
e u;s -sti~iafali oftyA js*"O f^uiza a .tbl4wy civil WBa
of some duration, but the placing the reins of Go
e government in the hands of her most intelligent an
o prudent men. The 'Pronum ciamiento' issued b2
e the State of Oajaca in favor,of the Federal Constitu
e tion, is daily gaining partizans, and the confusion
d is such, in that section, that unless a general cc
operation rarely to be met with, the overthrow c
e the General Government is inevitable. The chief


c of both parties are exerting themselves to re -es
M tablish the constitution of 1824, revised by a Ns
' tional Convention. Tore, the commandant c
r Yucatan, has been deprived of his authority, on a(
t count of his attachment to Sante Anna. Gener:
o Ftlipe Codallos has been named in his stead; and
es is supposed that Ciriaco Vasquez, commandant
n Vera Cruz, will share the same fate for like rea
i- son. And, in fact, it is believed that all the hig
is functionaries who are at all friendly to Santa Ann
le either personally or to his cause, will be remove
,e and replaced by others ot opposite sentiment
a- Gumez, the commandant of Tampico, was depri
, ed of his place partly on the same grounds, an
of partly for the insult given to our flag; his place w:
le supplied by Ferias, the same individual that was im
to prisoned in 1832 at Nacogdoches, by the colonies
*y of Texas. General Filosola has been summoned
f before a Council of War, for alleged miscondu
" in obeyingthe orders of Santa Anna, issued whi
y. he was a prisoner of war.
Ye The General Congress is busy passing a lam
Lh levying a contribution on all landed property, b
iy sides that which weighs so heavy already; at
e has for the last four months on houses. Of tl
le large number of troops who left San Louis Pot<
m forl Tampico, only 108 had arrived at Attamira,
n- town situated seven leagues from the place
edL
w embarkation. From the above it will be see
e- that little hopes of any successful campaign agair
S Texas can be; expected to take place yery soc
c. if at all.


STILL LATER.
'By the arrival of the schooner Almaltlia, frc
Vera Cruz, we learn that all was quiet in that cit,
when the Almaltia departed. There were
troops in the city, and that it was thought that:
attempt would be made to raise any. The pi
vailing opinion among the intelligent portion
the people was that no further movements agaiu
Texas would be made, at least, for some time
come. An attempt was made just before t
A ImckIA' h-ft- lh r tho* !\>whnr.! a nFf Mpvit^ --n f 1^p


island that be is at his residence near Nacogdoches,
which he reached a short time since.


MEXICO.
The following letter was written to Vincente Fi-
lisola, General-in-chief of the Mexican armies, by
Jose Maria Tornel, Secretary of the War Depart-
ment. We publish it through the liberality of a
respectable firmnofhis city, by whom it was corn
municated: ;
To His Excellency Ike General-in chief,
DOIT VIreCNTs FILISOLA:
DfEA. FliEND: Through the criminal apathy of
Congress and the;complete nullity of Government,
it becomes necesiry to put in use a certain strata.
em to save our country and ourselves. You will
ave to lend a hand to its execution, unless you
want to perish with your army, after witnessing
the utter destruction of the Republic, Such is
the boldness of olr revolutionary radical, and the
weakness of Government, that from this time up
to the moment wmen you adopt this plan, you will
neither receive money or soldiers; you must, ere
now, be convinced of the truth of the first point;
as to the second,'a more positive proof cannot be
given than the sudden halt of the army of reserve.
Such, then, is the proper method of executing my
plan: all opinions must be generalized; above all,
a letter must be written to the Government of this
capital, mentioning very particularly that all the
army want a Dictator to be appointed, who will
remain in office until Texas be restored to the re-
public. Who willbe the man? No matter; per-
haps Valencia, for he is at the same time the hope
and fear of many.
Thiis idea is nit so much to put the plan into
execution, as to get a powerless Congress to invest
the Government with all power to restrain the
revolutionary spirits, and enlist new soldiers to
carry on the war and maintain good order. I
have said enough; reflect on my words; you will
fully appreciate how timely is this measure. No
time is to be lost; and, mark me, keep carefully or
tear this letter, written by a friend on whom you
can rely. JOSE MARIA TORNEL.
This plan is JPstified by a pamphlet now circu-
lating through iexico and all the large cities of
the Mexican Republic. It is entitled, "General
Santa Anna's Tr,4" That document is the ex-
clusive production of the Liberas, and is well
calculated to raiiE every honest mind against the
Government. they want federalism-Tornel
does not want it, and therefore he would like to
get a Dictator appointed, whose power would be
sufficient to suppress those he styles revolutionary
spirits.

A letter from highly respectable source, dated
at Mptamoras the 29th ult., says: "It is an unoubted
fact that this Government (the Mexican) have
made, or are making a treaty to engage eight thou-
sand Indians to join them. Tke Cherokees are al-
ready engaged. There are fourteen or fifteen
ChiLfs of different tribes within a few miles of
here, who have d~ly communications with the of-
ficers. The commissioners were this morning
turned ilto the common prison with criminals. It
is not improbable that we shall be invited to take
SFrench leave of this country sooa."-N-ew Orleaw
SComm rercial Butldin.

L xtract of a letter, dated
MATAMORAS, July 1, 1836.
DEAkn Sin: Through the medium ot' your paper
I think it highly necessary that the Government of
the United Statesi as well as the Texians, should
Sbe informed of Niat presents itself so odious, in
my opinion, in the character of General Urrea,
" the Mexican Comnander-in-chief, loo unpardona-
I ble to be overlooked, and should be immediately
Attended to by tho United States.
We have at thj moment here six or seven In.
. dian chiefs, Cherkees and other tribes, with their
Interpreter from Aexas. These Indians are on a
Mission to the Gieral, and have had several pri.
- vate meetings witi him. There exists no doubt
I of the business they have come on, and have made
I propositions to the General to join the Mexicans
I against the TexAns, which appears now to be
Concluded. As Colonel Waterchea is to be de-
, patched to-morr w to their camp, some distance
Stip the river, where they have thirty or forty in
e number, to be tused as spies or runners. I had oc-.
casion to call! on general Urrea at his quarters on
business, when I met there three of the Indians,
a with their interpreter, making inquiries of the
r strength of the~r hibe, the General being anxious
e to ascertain whatforce thty could muster with the
other tribes.
The Commissiry of this place has orders tc
purchase 800 or? 1,000 horses for the cavalry
which he is noW doing. Every movement ap
s pears to confirmnhe belief that the negotiation i,
n concluded, with t promise to the Indians of lan,
and cattle, should they assist and succeed in ex
terminating the population of Texas.-Nw Orlean,
Bulletin.

)" From t Milledgeille paper.
T THB ChEEK WAR.
Y We have been politely furnished by a gentle
n- man of this place with the following extracts o
a letters from an officer of the army:
," (" CoLuMBUs, July 25, 1836,
'f "' An express arrived this morning from below
f stating that 98 mn under the command of Capt
sC Galhoun, had an engagement with about 300 o
the enemy, ten miles from Roanoke, on the Lump
kin road, yesterday afternoon; that five of ou


a men were killed aad fifteen wounded; our men
it had to retreat; the Indians are making their way
O to Florida. Gea. Sanford immediately ordered ai
Sthe disposable,force here to march in pursuit, con
- sisting of Capt Delkparier's, Sledge's, Byne's
and Bostwick's companies of mounted men, am
a despatched orders to Capt. Brewer's mounted
men twelve miles above, and to Capt. Greer'
S. company at West Point to follow. Maj. Hoxie'
v- battalion is ordered to embark on board the stear
d boat Metamora, and proceed forthwith to th
as nearest point to Chickasahatchie swamp, in order
n. to get in the advance of the enemy. Col. M(
ts Ginty at Fort Gaines is ordered to take them i
flank, as also the force at Fort McCrary, cons:s
ct ing of a parcel of Alford's battalion.
"le This looks like recommending the war i
earnest. Gen. Sanford will command this fore
w, in person.
e- "General Jesup has issued an order, directing .
h the Indians to be at the emigrating camp by tt
le. 1st of August; all who are not there by that tin
)s will be no longer fed by the United States, ar
oa will be treated as hostile. This I view as an ir
o portant order, and will produce important result
n either terminating the war or producing a blooc
one.
" "We shall leave here by daylight, and will ri
night and day until we overtake the enemy. T!
savage should be no longer permitted to pollu
our soil with his foot."
)m ,, LUMPKIH, STEWART COUNTY,
ty, "July 26, 1836.
no "We arrived here to-night, and shall procei
no on our course to Florida, if necessary, in pursi
re- of the Indians. Captain Jernigan engaged the
of yesterday, about seven miles below here, at
ist killed several; he lost three men.
to "The Indians (the same body engaged on Su
he day by Captain Calhoun) have made but slow pi
.....r.. f- Wta h-7 h-,a fn nvrt.taer therml hi the &1


r
If




y

i.
r


t








s
e


The report of the late trial of Lord Melbourne
copied from the London papers into several in t


the Alapaha, supposed to be Creeks, on their

way to the Ocafinokee or to join the Seminoles.
Fif'teeen of them were killed and twenty captur-
ed, seven or eight whites wounded, the whites
still in pursuit of them. The day before 18 Indi-
ans were fallen in with; 15 of them were k-.led
and three escaped by swimming the river; three
whites killed. So you see we have Indians all
around us.
"Yours, respectfully,
11"B F. WHITNER."
"Col. Whitner had this letter written for you,
sir, and on the night of the 19th, his family fortu
nately being on a visit at Mr. J. C. McGhee's,
with the exception of one son, the Indians assailed
his house and committed most awful depredations.
There were two white men there-, the overseer,
who was ill in bed, and a young man by the name
of Summerale. Summerale with Col. W.'s little
son were at supper in the back piazza, when a
negro in the passage exclaimed, "the Indians!"
He sprang from the table, seized a double-bar-
relled gun, and marched in front of the house; he
saw Indians to the number of thirty, and discharg-
ed both barrels at them; the Indians returned it
with a volley-he was wounded in both thighs,
but not dangerously; he then made his escape
round the house to the back of the garden. His
determination and bravery enabled Col. W.'s son,
the overseer, and negroes, all to make their es-
cape. They lay all night in the high growing
cotton, with the exception of one negro man; they
shot him with five balls. They then rifled the
house of every article, ripping open the beds,
emptying out the feathers, and making sacks of
the ticks to carry off their plunder-all wearing
apparel gone, even the clothes wet in the wash
tub. They were trailed, but have made their es-
cape, and it is supposed will come back in in-
creased numbers. Help must come soon, or it ill
be too late for Hickstown. The females are flee-
ing in every direction, leaving their husbands to
defend their plantations.
The Indians came to Mr. McGhee's on the
n;ght of the 1st, and stole a pair of carriage horses
from his stable. We have been too long neglect-
ed. A FEMALE.
The Indians also stole nine mules and a horse
from Col. Whitner.

We publish the official report of the battle of
We-li-ka Pond, near Micanopy, received yester-
day at the Adjutant General's office, being a copy
of Lieutenant Maitland's (3d Artillery) report, for.
warded by him to the Governor of Florida.
FORT DEFrANCE, MICANOPY, ?
19th July, 1836. 5
Snt: In obedience to your instructions to evacu-
ate the post of Fort Drane, if the commanding offi
cer, in exercising a sound discretion, should deem
it necessary, I have the honor to report that the
commanding officer, Captain Merchant, of the 2d
regiment of artillery, in consequence of the large
and increasing sick report, determined to remove
the troops to this place. The movement corn.
menced this day at eight o'clock, consisting ol
twenty-two wagons, loadt-d with commissary and
quartermaster' stores, with ani escort of a detach
meant of twenty-six dragoons of the 2d reg ment,
under the command of Captain Ashby, and thirty
six men detailed from the different artillery com
panics at the post; also a five and a half inch how
itzer, under the charge of Lieutenant Whitly, 2J
f artillery, making a force of 62 men. On our ar
rival at the Wc-li-ka Pond, within one mile of thi:
place, the discharge of several rifles apprised uE
of the presence of the enemy. Captain Ashbyim
Smediately went with his dragoons in the direction
from which the fire was delivered, and scoured th(
neighboring hammocks, without finding the enemy
It is proper to state here, that in the first fire pri
vate Holmes of the dragoons was dangerously
wounded in the abdomen, (since dead.) Pro
ceeding on our route opposite a long hammock
Within a quarter of a mile of Micanopy, we wern
Attacked by a body of Indians estimated,fiom wha
5 we saw of them, and from their firing, to be abou
S250 strong. The firing commenced near the frou
and on the right of the train, and was continue(
Through its whole length, a qiiarterofa mile. Thb
Smen returned the fire with spirit and promptness
During the engagement, Capt. Ashby, (who,
> regret to say, was, soon after the commencemen
of it, severely wounded, but refused to leave thi
; field until loss of blood compelled him, finding1
the enemy in great strength, and pressing on us
despatched a dragoon to this place for a reinforce
ment. On his way, he met two detachments un
dee Lieutenants Temple and Talcott, 31 strong
on their march to assist us. They arrived at ai
important moment, and did us good service
s Lieutenant Temple reached us, having scoured
on h:s approach, a point of hammock from whic!
the enemy had very much annoyed us. As soot
s as L.ieutenant Temple and his cumnrmn.n had. take.
thcr poiS. ,u.1. i lie, captain Aslhby ordered
charge in the hammock, which was instantly exe
cuted, and the Indians driven beyond the reach c
our fire. During this time, Lieutenant Talcol
was actively employed in removing the wagons i
f their direction to this place.
Of the good conduct and courage of the troop!
it is sufficient to say that every man did his dut'


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D. A. SMALLEY, ?
1L. H. NUTTING, 5


From the Burlington (Vt.) Sentinel. ti
The 4th Congressional District was fully repre- ri
sented in the Convention holden at Cambridge on e
Tuesday la-3t. More than one hundred delegates f
were in attendance, all animated by the flattering v
prospect, every where presented, of the speedy li
political regeneration of Vermont. It will be seen f
that CORNELIUS P. VAN NESS, late Minister n
to Spain, whom the people have delighted to t
honor, and who has conferred honor upon the S
State, was put in nomination as a candidate to rep- t
resent this District in Congress. Mr. VAN NEss
is so well known, and his eminent talents and pub- 1
lic services are so justly appreciated by the peo- b
pie of this State, that any eulogy would be suptr- s
fluous; and unless the freemen of this district are s
blind to their own interests, and utterly regardless t
of the honor of the State, they will come up to his p
support, and secure his services in the National v
Legislature. The enthusiasm with which his no-
mination is received by his political friends, arind
the panic it has created among his foes, assure tus
that he will be powerfully sustained.
There is no ooubt that Mr. VAw NEss will soon
return to the United States, and it is not improba- s
ble that he is now on his way hither. His bag-
gage arrived in New York some da)s ago, togeth-f
er with two servants who went out with him from
this place, and who arrived here on Wednesday
evening. We are thus particular in stating" these
facts, because outr opponents will attempt to ex-
cite the belief that Mr. Van Ness is not about re-
turning. But in addition to these circumstances,
we have satisfactory assurances that he would, at '
all events, leave Spain as soon as lie heard of the
sailing of Mr. Eaton, the newly appointed Minis-
ter, and perhaps sooner.
Let, then, the numerous friends of this gentle-
man rely upon it that he is coming home, and act
with the vigor which the crisis demands.

FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT CON-
VENTION.
A large number of delegates from the several
towns in the counties of Franklin, Orleaa, Grand-
Isle, and Chittenden, comprising the 4th Congres-
sional district, assembled at Cambridge, on the
26th inst. The convention was called to order by
Danforth Mott, and, on motion, Roger Enos, ot
Irasburg, was appointed chairman, and D. A.
SSmalley and L. H. Nutting, secretaries.
S On motion, a committee, consisting of one dele-
gate from each town represented, was appointed
r to present to the convention a suitable candidate
- to represent this district in Congress.
The convention adjourneduntil the report of the
committee should be received. The convention
met, and Judge Chittenden, chairman of the com-
mittee, reported the name of CORNELIUS P.
VAN NESS; which report was accepted, and af-
ter remarks by several gentlemen, the nomination
was confirmed by the convention.
On motion, a committee of three, consisting of
SNahum Stone, H. RI. Beardsley, ai.d D. A. Smal-
Sley, was appointed to draft resolutions expressive
Sof the sense of the convention, and to prepare an
f address to the freemen of the 4th Congressional
I district.
The above named committee reported the fol-
lowing resolutions, which were adopted:
Resolved, That the eminent talents and patriotic
Services of MARTIN VAN BURN and RICH-
SARD M. JOHNSON, entitle them to the confi
I dence and cordial support of the great Democratic
Party of the Union, and that we will use all fair
S and honorable exertions to secure their election
Sto the offices for which they have been put in no-
Smination.
n Resolved, That the superior capacity, extensive
e information, and unbending integrity of CORNE-
SLIUS P. VAN NESS, and the able and faithful
i- manner in which n? has discharged the dutties that
have devolved upon h;m in the high and responsi-
Y ble offices hie has filled, under the State and Gene-
ral Governments, entitle him to the support of the
1 Democratic freemen of this District, for a Repre-
et sentative in Congress
Resolved, theorefore, That we pledge ourselves to
t make use of all fair and honorable means to en-
d sure his election.
e Resolved, That in the language of the venerable
Sand beloved President of thie Unite. States, '"a
constitutional right to apply, and a necessity for
such application, are the true sources and limits
of the power to tax. When the taxes produce
e more money than can be rightfully applied, the
g appropriate remedy is reduction or repeal. To
,' continue a tax without necessity, and for the sake
of distribution, is to subvert the principles of the
Constitution, and must end in destroying the liber-
," ties of the people."
n Resolved, That we cordially approve of the nomi-
nations made by the late State Convention at

t electimm ofthe sever-,l candidates there presented
n for the sufft'ajes of the people.
a 1 nre iollowmg resolutions were introduced and
a- adopted:
f liesolved, That the thanks of this Convention be
tt presented to the Chairman and Secretaries, for the
n able manner in which they have discharged their
respect ive duties.
Resolved, That the proceedings of this Conven-
s, tion be signed by the President and Secretaries,
'" and published in the Burlington Sentinel and


I



I


From the Jonesborough ( Ten. ) Sentinel.
VISIT OF THE PRESIDENT OF TIlE UNI- t
TED S'ITATES. t
At an early hour on Monday morning, the vai- s
ous roads leading into town wvcre thronged with
people on horseback, and the favorable indications
ot a fine day gave promise of asn unusually large
concourse of citizens from the neighboring towns
and country. At eight o'clock, a very large par-
ty of gentlemen, mounted upon fine horses, and
arranged in military order by Col. Willet (MNlarshal
of thIe day) and his assistants, left town to meet
the President, having learned that he had sojourn-
ed the night previous with his old friend, Mr.
Gammon of Sullivan county, and would start for
Jonesborough after breakfast. At the distance of
seven or eight miles from the town, the proces-
sion met the President, accompanied by his Secre-
tary, (Major Donelson,) and a number of the citi-
zens of Blountville and vicinity. He was on horse-
back, and seemed in fine health and spirits. The
horsemen took open order on the right and left of
the road, and when the President had reached the
most central position, Mr. Kennedy advanced to-
wards him, and in conformity with the appoint-
ment by the meeting of Saturday, delivered to him
a brief, but feeling and eloquent address, of which

we have been politely furnished with the follow-
ing sketch:
"General AnDRSW JACKSON,
President of the United States:
"SiT: On behalf of many of the citizens- of
Washington county, I have been deputed to meet
you at thts place and give you a hearty welcome
during the short sojourn yau may make, on your
way to the Hermitage. I should not execute this
commission acceptably to the great body of the
people, or correspondent with my own judgment
ahd feelings, were I to omit to state, that as we


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bowing to the National Guard, and the rapid mo-
ion of his head, up and down, was the means of
having him from a danger which he little appre-
tended was so imminent. Some of the wadding
vas found in his hair; the ball lodged in the op-
)osite side of the carriage."

A very distressing accident occurred in Green-
ville, Nortb Carolina, a few days ago, by reason of
the bursting of a cannon among a number of per-
sons who were celebrating an election triumph.
It appears that the piece had been discharged,
intil heated, and with a view of increasing the re-
port, the persons who had the possession of it
were engaged in ramming down brickbats upon
the cartridge. A number of the bystanders, white
and colored, were-assisting in holding up the piece,
(it not being mounted on a gun carriage,) and
while thus clustered around the mouth of the can-
non, or within its range, it exploded, spreading
wounds and death among eighteen persons.
Several were killed, and the rest more or less se-
verely inj tred.-Baltimore .amnerican.

MR. MADISON.
Mr. Rives, in the touching and beautiful speech
which he delivered, when the death of Mr. Madi-
son was announced to the Senate, referred to a
letter which he had recently received, as proba-
bly the last written by this distinguished man.
He was mistaken. Professor Tucker, of our
University, had the honor of receiving the last
emanation from his mind, under circumstances
which render the incident peculiarly interesting.
It was in answer to a dedication of Mr. Tucker's
life of Jefferson, which is now in press. We learn
from Mr. T. that it was written with the usual
spirit and ability of the author, and the most
chaste and perfect letter he had ever received
from him. It was written by Mr. Todd after his
dictation, and franked by himself.

NOTICE.
D" R. KUHL respectfully informs his friends
and thIe public, that he has closed his offi-
ces in Washington and the city of Baltimore, and
-..+_ -1T. __ 1T-U1 C*- 41 6- ---- -C ___


oughout our widely extended country, o? in
srence to that peculiar affection which has been
ertained by the people of this country for you,
nearly half a century. If your patriotic scr-
es and sacrifices, through a long and eventful
, could cease to be felt dsewhere as having con-
-red singular benefits upon your country, they
ver can be forgotten in the county of Washing-
, where you first become a resident of the
te, and, with many of our forefathers, one of
early pioneers of Tennessee.
' It can be hardly necessary to state, that as we
*e, when family represented, unflinchingly stood
you heretofore, we shall hereafter be found,
far as we are concerned, amons your steady
pporters during the remainder of your adminis-
Ltion, of such measures as shall redound to the
-manent welfare of our country, and your indi-
ual fame."
The P[esident's reply vwas as follovs:
"ISiR: The cheering welcome given me on this
cnson by the citizens of Jonesborough and its
inity, is received with feelings of the deepest
nsimility. Accompanied as it has been by the
ntiments you have just declared, it excites re-
ctions in my bosom which I fear any language
iclh I can employ will but inadequately express.
rty-eighc years have passed away since I first
ne to this hippy land. Forty years ag, 1 was
sole representative in Congress; and now to
rn through the many political tests to which my
Shas been since subjected, there has been no
rnge in the confidence and partiality which its
iabitaats so early and so generously bestowed
on me, is an honor which fills my heart with
lotions of gratitude and thankfulness to that
evidence in whose hands are the destinies of us
. Allow me to assure you, sir, that at no former
rind have I been so deeply penetrated by the
ise of my obligations to the country, in whose
vice I have spent a great portion of my life,
d witnessed the most of those political events
which have influenced its prosperity.
" makingg my views of public duty from the
hool of the revolution, by which we achieved
r liberties, I have endeavored to- follow the
*hts afforded by the examples of the patriots
ho founded and who reformed our system of
government. 'If I have been so far successful as
have done nothing to impair their sacred work,
d shall leave, at the close of my administration,
r country and its free institutional -in thehappy
ite you have described, I shall feel myself fortu-
te far beyond my merits. The applause you
,ye bestowed upon me will be due to the people
hose firmness, intelligence, and virtue, have up-
;ld and stimulated my exertions.
" You have done me but justice, sir, in refusing
cr,-dit the declarations which have been made
.pecting the agency ascribed to Mr. Whitney in
e management and possession of the public
nds. These declarations have been contradict-
Sby frequent official reports, and are known to
False by any one at all conversant with the
proceedings of the session of Congress which has
st closed. The rumors which have prevailed
n the subject are like many other fabrications
which have been put afloat with the view of pre-
d(licing the republican cause, and slandering the
character of those who hav-e been bold enough to
Expose tie corruptions of the Bank of the United
states.
I beg leave to repeat my hearty thanks for
.e cordial reception given me by the citizens of
Vashington, and to assure them that I meet them
an old friend, identified with all their fortunes
y the mostsacred of ties."
After this ceremony, the President rode forward
o the right of the corps of escort, when the latter
)rmed in the rear, and the procession in this order
aoved onward to the town. In the meantime,
he number of people in the streets swelled to a
ast throng-all glowing with impatience to wel-
nome the immortal JACKSON. A well arranged
ignment on foot was formed from the entrance
& the Blountville road as far down thie street as
ie post office, and as the President and escort ap-
roached, the "spirit-stirring drum and fife" an-
ounced the gratifying fact. Every head was
ncoveied-every heart spoke out its grateful
welcome, as the venerable man passed in front of
he line of citizens. At Dr. Chester's hotel, the
scorting procession halted, and the President was
inducted in by his friends. The indications of
me popular feeling at this moment, were imposing.
a affecting. The moistened eyes of the old men
)ld, in voiceless eloquence, of a deep emotion-
nd the flush of satisfaction plainly perceptible in
he faces of the throng that surrounded the hotel;
ie heart dictated expressions, from hundreds, of
)re for the "old Chief"-all found a sympathetic
response in every generous bosom. Shortly after-
w f the hotel, and the multitude advanced, in good
rder to ezij .fy "Iieuruy -hihkc -of-ttrt Wuifhy with
heir excellent, age-worn friend and fellow-citizen.

A NEW ILLUSTRATION OF THE AD) VANTAG ES FROM
0WwNBi.-"Alibeau, having a clear vie of the
[ing, aimed at his head, and it was in; mediately
scertained that his ball passed across the very
pot which the King's head had occupied but a
noment before he fired. But, happily for the
citizen King, he wHs engaged at the moment in


0


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Id Franklin Journal, and such other papers as are dis-
d posed to publ shi the same.
cf Adjourned without day.
ROGER ENOS, President.


My gallant commander, Captain Asihby, distin
gushed himself by his courage aud activity, an
f did not leave the field, even after having receive
Sa severe wound, until feebleness, from loss (
r blood, made it absolutely necessary.
n 1st Lieut. Temple, 3d artillery, rendered th
y most essential service by his timely arrival froi
1 Fort Defiance, and the gallant mann r in wlhic
i- he charged the hammock. Lieut. Whltby, wh
, had charge of the howitzer, served it in the mo
d efficient manner; and, from his prominent pos
d tion, was a mark for the enemy, which drew
's sharp fire on him, and disabled several of th
's men.
n I regret to say assistant surgeon Weightmi
e received a severe wound in his left thigh.
,r Serjeants Smith Johnson, of company D, 2ddr
Sgoons; Smith, company F, 1st artillery; Hal
n company I, 3d artillery; Petersoa, company I,
t. artillery; Bydon, company H, 3d artillery;
distinguished themselves by their courage ai
n good conduct in discharging the duties that d
;e volved on them.
Report of the killed znd wounded at thle batt
1l of We-li-ka, ast Florida, 19th July, 1836:
ie Dangerously wounded, 5 (two since dead)
ne Severely do 5
id Slightly do 1

s, Total, 11
Iy From our well-directed fire, we no doubt kill
and disabled many of the enemy; but, as is usu
de they carry them off to the dense hammock
ie which they retreated.
te We had three horses killed in the field, a
several severely wounded.
I have the honor to be, sir,
Very respectfully,
ed Your obedient servant,
at W. S. MAITLAND,
SGeneral R. JONES,1st Lt. commanding.
nd General R. Jo S,
Adj't Gen'l U. S. Army, Washington.


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T!:E GLOPE.




WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 10, 1836

WHITE AND MANGUM.
At the request of a correspondent in North Ca-
rolina, we publish from the journals of the session
of 1832 and 1833, the votes on the passage of Mr.
Clay's land bill. Lt will be seen that Messrs.
White and Mangum voted against the measure;
and they not only voted against it on its passage,
but against every proposition made by its friends,
calculated to reconcile the country to that or any
other mode of distribution. It will be seen by
the vote below, that every southern Senator voted
in the sarme way. They voted against the land
distribution, as an indirect mode of maintaining
the tariff-and they held it to be a palpable viola-
tion of the constitution.
But Messrs. Mangum and White went further
than some other southern Senators; they voted
for the substitute quoted below, which embraces,
1 The graduation principle; 2. The gift of the
lands remaining unsold a certain number of year,
at the lowest grade of price, to actual settlers;
and 3. They voted for Mr. Benton's principle
confining the distribution to the proceeds after
deducting the amount paid to Indians,and other ex-
penses incurred by the Treasury, which would
have left little to divide.
It will he found, on examining the Journal, pages
304 and 314, that Jud.e White voted against the
graduation principle at the la had formerly supported; and Mangum, who was
absent when the question was first taken oa Mr.
Walker's graduation, joined White in voting down
Mr. Robinson's, which proposed a 'still more
gradual reduction, and was less favorable to the
setitle'rthaLthos efCered at former sessions, which
were supported by both White and Mangum.
The next glaring inconsistency of Messrs. Man-
gum and White was shown in their votes in regard
to the deduction of the expenses incurred about
the lands out of the proceeds before they were
divided. In 1832 and 1833, they joined Mr.
Benton in his utmost effort to leave nothing but
the nett proceeds to distribute, but at the last ses-
sion they turned a somerset upon this point, too-
on the question made by Mr. Benton to ascertain
the "net proceeds" by deducting.
On "Indian annuities on account of public lands,"
Messrs. MAoGUM and WHITE voted in the nega-
tive.
On deducting expenditures "for holding trea-
ties with Indians for the purchase of public lands,"
Messrs. WnHITE and MAxGUM voted in the negative.
Also, on deducting -"amount paid to Indians for
the purchase of public lands," Messrs. MAxGUM and
WHITE voted in the negative.
Also, on deducting "amount expended in removing
Indians from lands purchased," Messrs. MANGU1I
and WHITE voted in the negative. See Journal,
pages 316 and 317.
And on the 4th of May, 1836, Messrs. WHITE and
MsNGUM consummated their inconsistencies, by
voting for the obnoxious land bill, which they had
opposed in all its stages in 1832 and 1833:
We here add the substitute offered for the land
bill, and the vote on itin the session of 1832-'33.
`I he question recurring on agreeing to the
amendment reported to the bill by the Committee
on Public Lands, as follows:
After the enacting clause, strike out to the end
of the bill, and insert the following:
That so much of the public lands as have been
heretofore offered at public sale, and have been
subject to entry at private sale at one dollar and
twenty-five cents per acre, and still remain unsold,
shall, from and after the thirtieth day of June
next, be offered at private sale at one dollar per
acre.
SEc. 2. .dtnd be it further enacted, That it sha'l
and may be lawful for any hed ofea family, or any
single man over the age of twenty-one years, or
any widow, and wishing to become an actual set-
tler on any parcel of land authorized by this act
to be sold, and not exceeding one quarter section
in amount, to demand and receive, from the pro-
per register and receiver, as soon as the said par-
cel shall have been offered at the price by this act
established, a written permission to settle on the
same; and if the person so applying shall pay
down to the proper receiver the sum of fifty cents
per acre for land offered at one dollar per acre by


the first section of this act, and shall, forthwith,
settle thereupon, and cultivate it for ve consecu-
tive years, and shall be a citizen oi the United
States at the end of that time, the said person, or
his or her legal representatives, if dead, shall be
entitled to receive a patent therefore from the
United States; and if two or more persons entitled
to the privileges of actual settlers shall apply at
the same time for the same parcel of land, then
the register and receiver shall immediately decideV,
the right of preference between them according
to equitable circumstances; and, where the equi-
table circumstances appear to be equal, the deci-
sion shall be by lot: Provided, always, That no
sale, alienation, or transfer, of any settlement
right, shall be valid, and in no case shall the patent
issue in the name, or enure to the benefit of any
person but the settler himself, if living, or to his
widow and heirs or devisees, if dead.
SEC. 3. .and be it further enacted, That the re-
gisters and receivers, for services done under the
second section of this act, shall have a right to de-
mand and take, from the persons applyiag for
such services, the following fees: for a writ-
ten permission to settle, the sum of twenty-five
cents each; for taking the proof of settlement,
cultivation, and granting the final certificate, fifty
cents each.
SEc. 4. .And be it further enacted, That it shall
be the duty of the President of the United States
to cause the land offices to be closed in all
the districts in which the public lands shall be
sold out, or otherwise disposed of under the pro-
visions of this act.
It was determined in the negative-yeas 17,
nays 26.
On motion of Mr. KANE,
The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of
the Senators present,
'Those who voted in the affirmative are,
Messrs. Benton, Black, Brown, Buckner, For-
syth, Grundy, htendricks, Hill, Kane, King, Man-
gum, Moore, Robinson, Smith, Tipton, White,
Wright.
T'hnapvoA T vrn*temo>l in tbei nevari~vf are.


In relation to the same, we have seen a letter
written by an officer of a bank in one of the west-
ern States, who thus writes:
"We were at first induced to believe that this
regulation would have an injurious effect, in con-
sequence of the panic which it was feared might
be created; but on reflection, we believe that its
tendency will be beneficial. The deposit banks,
at all events, have nothing to fear from its opera-
tion, nor will the better class of other banks be
effected injuriously, unless it be by a strong cur-
rent of public opinion inducing a suspicion of all
banks, and causing a run for specie. The banks
which have excessive issues must of course curtail
their business and draw in their circulation, which
will be salutary for the country. I apprehend no
inconvenience from the measure." We have seen
letters from individuals residing in the west, of sim-
ilar import.

LITERARY.
A joint stock company has been formed at Pa-
ris, with a capital of five hundred thousand francs,
for the purpose of publishing editions of standard
works, and which are published in a style of
magnificence hitherto unknown, and at the low-
est possible prices. As a specimen of the prices,
it is stated that the works of Moliere, splendidly
printed, aid with eight hundred vignette engrav-
ings, will be sold at twenty-five francs; Gil Bias,
with five hundred and ninety-three engravings, at
fifteen francs; a collection of Latin authors, with a
French translation, in thirty volumes, and contain-
ing as much as two hundred common volumes, is
sold at three hundred francs.
The publication of those works is not confined
to the French language, but they will appear in
several foreign languages, with the French en-
gravings, so that the benefits resulting from th t
formation of the society are by no means exclu-
sive and national; foi- Ahe German, Italian, Spaii-
iard, Englishman, and American, will all be
benefited; and, indeed, every nation may be, that
is literary and liberal enough to pay for the cost
of printing, as the engravings are adapted, of
course, to all tastes and all languages. An Eng-
lish edition of Gil Bias is about to be published,
or has been, in London, with the French en-
gravings.
Why cannot a society of this description be
formed in the United States? We know of no-
thing to prevent it, and many reasons m*ght be
given why it could beldone; and, perhaps, not the
least potent is, that the stock itself would be
valuable, and would yield, we have little doubt, as
good dividends as canals and railroads in general.
If a few enterprising booksellers would identify
themselves with the experiment, It would succeed
beyond doubt; and if, by possibility, it should not,
the loss sustained would not be great, as the
capital need not exceed one or two hundred
thousand dollars. And to what purpose more
elegant or useful, or laudable, could that sum be
applied, than to a diffusion of knowledge and the
promotion of literature?
SSo popular are the editions of the works pub-
lished by the company in France, that, according
to the Paris National, near eight thousand copies
of the first numbers of Don Quixotte were sold in
two days.
A similar enterprise is now in successful opera-
tion at Havre, and the most material difference is,
we believe, that the works published on account
of the Literary Pantheon (as the Havre es'abl~sh-
ment is called) are without engravings. Sixty-
six volumes have appeared of the most approved
and popular works, the subjects being" historical,
religious, philosophical, dramatic, poetical, and
polygraphical. Guieciardini's History of Italy, a
voluminous and expensive work, as published
generally, appears in one volume; Gibbon's Ro-
man Empire in two; all the historical works of
Robertson in two, (generally in ten, octavo,) the
works of Fenelon in three, of Moliere in one, of
Rabelais in one, of Voltaire in twelve, (heretofore
from forty to one hundred and twenty.) The
volumes are all octrvoes, and the price of each
ten francs, which is a reduction, upon an average,
of not less than three or four hundred per cent.
The Harpers and others have done much of
late years in this country, towards multiplying
and cheapening valuable works in various depart-


ments of literature, but the French method of
attaining those desirable objects, number and
cheapness, appears to be, of all others, the most
practicable and the most eligible, as it involves no
hazard to individuals. If the company sustains a
loss, it is so inconsiderable, when divided among
the stockholders, that it can occasion but little
inconvenience and no uneasiness.

LORD MELBOURNE.
The London Morning Chronicle of the 23d of
June contains a full report of the trial in the case
of crim. con. in which this nobleman, the B.itish
Premier, was defendant, and the Hon. Mr. Nor-
ton, a brother of Lord Grantley, plaintiff. The
interest that had been excited was very great, not
only on account of the high standing of all the
parties, but, by accident or design, the affair had
assumed a political aspect, and the friends of the
Minister asserted that the whole concern was a
political persecution, got utip under the mask of a
pretended private delinquency: and the result
will no doubt cut firm them in this opinion. The
trial commenced on the 22d of June, at half past
nine, A. M., and continued, with a recess of half
an hour only, until half past eleven, P. M. The
jury, after consulting a few moments, gave a ver-
dict for the defendant without retiring from the
box. The court-room was crowded to suffoca-
tion, and there was a great number of persons out-
side who could not squeeze or elbow their way
into the interior.
The witnesses were principally servants-some
of them discarded ones, too, who had been turned
away for misconduct. A part of their testimony


es," if he believes in the guilt of his wife, how
indescribably miserable must he be-
Standing alone by his desolate hearth,
Where all his household goods lay shivered around him."
The great length of the trial puts it out of our
power to give even an extract from it of length
enough to be interesting; but for the benefit of
those who may have an interest in understanding
what the law is in such cases, we quote a few lines
from the charge, to the jury, of the judge who pre
sided at the trial. They express in a few words
the duty of a jury, and show at the same time
what kind of proof is necessary to secure a ver-
dict for a plaintiff.-"Having thus recapitulated
the evidence which has been adduced, (says the
judge,) he had only to leave the facts stated by
the various witnesses to the good sense and tem-
perate discretion of the jury. They ought not
to rely implicitly on facts as bearing against the de-
fendant, if in their opinion those facts were as
capable of one interpretation as another. They
should look guardedly at the various points of the
evidence, making up their own minds where they
thought it of a conclusive nature, and where not
so; and they should then ask their consciences
whether they should arrive at the conclusion, that
Lord Melbourne ha 1 committed adultery with the
wife of Mr, Norton. If, looking at the bulk of
the evidence with that caution which the case de-
manded, the conviction were to remain upon their
minds that such had been the fact, they should
give a verdict for the plaintiff. If, on the other
hand, they were to come to the conviction that
the facts alleged to have taken place between the
parties were such as did not bear out the charge
against the defendant, then they should undoubt-
edly acquit him."

Great Failure at Buffalo.-The news of the fail-
ure of Benjamin Rathbun, at Buffalo, which was
received this morning, caused a very unusual sen-
sation in Wall street. His affairs have for months
past been the subject of much speculation, and
his notts, endorsed by some ten or twelve of the
best names in that city, have been crowded upon
the market at the enormous discount of three or
four per cent. a month. They haveserved for the
quotations of some of our neighbors in giving the
condition of the money market. The credit of every
body in Buffalo of course became deeply impli-
cated, and it was said repeatedly that, if "Rathbun
failed, all Buffalo must fail."-N. Y. Journal of
Commerce, daug. 6.
NOTE.-The above mode of showing the condi-
tion of the money market, and grounding on it
tirades of abuse against the Treasury and the ad-
ministration, is very happily exposed. Webb and
Noah, it is hoped, will take warning from it.

From the following it would seem that the op-
position are finding out the imposture of their
military candidate. Always an imbecile, and vain
beyond endurance, dotage, and his course of
life at the North Bend and its neighborhood, have
rendered him perfectly contemptible.
From the New York Times.
A VISIT TO GEN. HARnisoN.-A number of
Whig gentlemen, opposed to Mr. Van Buren,
and in favor of Harrison, recently paid a visit to
the Farmer of North Bend. They had formed,
from the glowing account of the Whig journals,
a most favorable idea of the intellect of the great
available. They sought him, found him, convers
ed with him, and left him, sickened with his im-
becility and egotism, and in no good humor with
themselves at the reflection that they had been
most outrageously humbugged by a portion of
their Whig brethren. The subjoined account of
this int, resting, interview is from the Cincinnati
Republican:
"VAN BUREN TRICKS."-PEOPLE'S ECHO.
Mr. Ramsay,---Sir: Having accidently observed
in the" People's Echo," a contradiction of a cer-
tain rumor, in reference to the visit of a number of
g-cntlemen from the east to Gen. Harr son, under
the above caption, and calling upon me as the gen-
tleman still remaining in Cincinnati, to refute it,
I have been induced to make the following" state-
ment ot facts, without regard to the rumors cir-
culated by the Magician's friends, or the still more
unautho; ized contradiction of the partizans of the
Petticoat Hero. Imprimis, a number of gentle-
men from Boston, New Yoik, Philadelphia, and
some of the western States, agreed to make
a visit, during their sojourn in Cincinnati, to
General Harrison, whose pretensions to the
Presidential Chair they zealously advocated,
none more w:rrmly and sincerely than myself.
Arrangements were made for the introduction,
-nd, in due time, myself and Messrs. with
becoming formality, bowed to the General. Af-
ter a few moments' conversation with thle General,


in which he betrayed great imbecility and egotism,
we left him in disgust: the othtr gentlemen, in
half an hour afterwards, were introduced by
me, with the like result. All of them, except
one, expressed a determination to abandon the
"old Granny," and advocate the election of any
other man thtn Harrison, soine of' them openly
avowing their intention to support Mr. Van Bu-
ren. The writer of this was induced from the
representations of his brother, a resident of Cin-
cinnati, and who is s iil a misguided follower of
Harrison, to take an active p.rt in getting up a
meeting in Philadelphia in behalf of the General-
has served upon several important c'mmittces,
and sacrificed much time to rally the whigs in his
support.
The writer leaves his own name and residence,
together with the names of the other gentlemen,
with the editor of the Republican, which the in-
credulous Mr. Wood or any of his party may ex-
amine, and determine for themselves.
This is not the only instance in which honest
men of the whig party have turned away with dis-
gust and loathing for their party nominee. I will,
tor the especial accommodation of Mr. Wood, if
he wishes it, furnish several other instances.
11. O'B.
The author of the foregoing communication is
from Philadelphia, and has heretofore acted with
the opposition, was among the first to espouse the
cause of General Harrison, and i& as, until since his
arrival in Cincinnati, Secrttary of the Democratic
Whig Committee of Superintendence for the city
of Philadelphia, Chairman of the Committee to
draft addresses, Secretary of the Whig Associa-
tion of the Upper Delaware Ward, and one of the
committee on banners and placards. The gentle.
men alluded to in his communication (18 in num-
ber,) were mostly gentlemen of high intellectual
standing, and of commanding influence in their
respective neighborhoods. They were all strong-
ly opposed to the election of Mr. Van B3uren, anJ
as strong'!y in favor of General Harrison's election.
The communication wam furnished [aFy- ti-ei iutT6r
without our solicitation, and is published at his
own request. It may be well enough, however,
S L-- l .- --.c ^:-' I,., ', 1 .rv...; .. "..-


the President, speaks decisively of the support
which General JACKSON is determined to give to
all, who are independent and boll enough to hold
up these deeds of darkness to the lii;ht of day.-
Mlobile Register.

NEW BANKING HOUSE.
PROPOSALS are invited for laying the bricks
in the new Banking House, about to be
erected by the Bank of the Metropolis, and also
for laying foundation tore, by the perch. The
number of bricks to be laid, will be probably
about two hundred thousand. The works to be
done by the thousand; apd proposals are requested
to be made before or on Saturday next. Proposals
to be left at the Bank, directed to the President or
Cashier.
Aug 10-d4t (Intel.)

PO FOMAC DRAGOONS.
W E are requestedto give notice that a meet-
ing ofthe members of this corps will be
held at the Union Tavern, in Georgetown, on
Thursday, (to-morrow,) llth inst., at 4 o'clock,
to receive and act upon the reports of the com-
mittees appointed in conformity to the resolutions
of the last meeting. A. full attendance is desira-
ble of all who have joined, and who are disposed
to join the corps, in order that its organization may
take effect without delay.
Aug 10-2tdis

DRY GOOPS, &c.
J ROBINSON hasjust received a large supply
0 of Goods.
153 cases and bahs fresh imported dry goods,
embracing every article in' the line, particularly
fancy Cloths, Cassimeres,and French Goods.
Six cases Silk Hats.
100 dozen English made Cloth Caps, for chil-
dren.
At this establishment, many articles are frequent
ly to be had low, that cannot be had elsewhere at
any price; and to which he adds a desire to please
in prices, as well as otherwise.
Aug 10-3t [Tel. Int.]
BY P. MAURO & SON.
H HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, PIANO, &c.
tL -On Friday, 12th inst. at the private resi-
dence of a gentleman about removing from the
city, on New Jersey Avenue, Capitol Hill, a few
doors south of the old Bank of Washington, we
shall sell all the Household Furniture, consisting
in part of-
Mahogany Sideboard; Dining, Breakfast, and
Card, Tables; Workstand, &c.; Parlor, Chamber,
Hall, and Stair Carpets; Mantel and other Looking
Glasses; Fire Irons; a most excellent Piano Forte,
manufactured by Geib, of New York; Parlor and
other Window Curtains; Fancy Chairs; assorted
Dining and Tea China; Glass Ware, &c.; Knives
and Forks; Plated Candlesticks; a first-rate large
Mahogany Bedstead; other Bedsteads; best
Feather Beds and Hair Mattresses; Bedding; Ma-
hogany Bureaus; Washstands, &c.; also, Kitchen
requisites. Sale to commence at 10 o'clock.
,Terms: Cash for sums under $25; sixty days on
from $25 to $50; sixty and ninety days on all sums
over $50; for approved endorsed notes bearing
interest. P. MAURO & SON, Auct's.
Aug 10-3t

BY P. MAURO & SON.
F IFTY-EIGHT VALUABLE CITY LOTS.-
Will be sold at public auction on Monday,
22d inst., 58 valuable lots lying in an improving
part of the city, viz. in squares 368, 370, 401, 403,
424, 426, 427, 446, 449. -Titles good. Sale to
take place as above at the auction and general
commission house opposite Brown's Hotel, at four
o'clock, P. M., on the following terms, viz. one-
fifth cash, and the balancein twelve and eighteen
months, the purchasers giving notes with approv-
ed endorsers, on interest; and the property to be
resold on ten days' notice, at their expense and
risk, on a failure to comply, with the terms.
A more particular description of the above de-
sirable property may be obtained on application to
the auctioneers.


Aug 10-3t&ds


P. MAURO & SON,
Auctioneers.


SUMMER OIL, BRANDY, GIN,
WINE, &c.
N Friday evening next, at half past 4 o'clock, I
shall sell, without reserve,on account of whom
it may concern, at my warehouse, corner of C and
10th streets, viz: 2 caski summer pressed Oil;
quarter and half pipes French Brandy; 1 pipe
Holland Gin, very superior; 5 quarter casks
Marseilles Madeira Wine; Jamaica Spirit and St.
Croix Rum in barrels; Malhga, Sherry, and Tene-
riffe Wines of superior quality; also, to close con-
signments, 20 boxes dun Fish; 6 kegs Lobsters;
3 kegs Nails; 2 dozen lire and sand Sifters;
boxes Figs and fancy Sedp; Bags Filberts and
Almonds; barrels Rice, A~pice, &c., and many
other articles in the grocerij line, deserving the at-
tention of grocers and othd's.
EDVARD DYER,
Ang 10-3t Auctioneer.
SALE OF GENTEEL -'OD FURNITURE.
tf)N Wednesday next, he 17th instant, I shall
[ sell at the residence f Mrs. Cottringer, on
F street, between 12th ?nd 13th streets, her
Household Furniture, consulting in part of, viz:--
Mahogany sideboard, bureaus, dining and break
fast tables, washstands, canriets, high and 'ow pos
mahogany bedsteads, good father beds, mattresses,
shovels, tongs, andirons, &ci &c. Best plated silver
edged tea urn, baskets, arid candlesticks; silver
table, desert, and tea spions; china and glass.
One excellent cooking sto*e, and one small cham-
ber stove and pipe. Kitchen Furniture, grates,
&c. &c. ;
A very fine painting, portrait of Washington, by
Stewart. Sale at 11 o'clock, A. M. Terms at
sale. EDWARD DYER, Auct.
Aug. 10-3t
RAME SHOP, &c.-On Saturday next, the
13th instant, at half past three o'clock P. M.,
1 shall sell at public sale the frame Shop and
Shed on D street, between 9th and 10th streets,
lately occupied by James K. Plant as a cabinet
workshop. Terms cash.
Aug 10-3t EDW'D DYER, Auct.


FOR SALE,
VARIOUS PRINTING MATERIALS,
C UCH as Types, Cases, Stands,.Column Rules,
Leads, Chaces, Composing Sticks, and all the
implements necessary for the establishment of a
newspaper. Among the articles offered for sale
are two large fonts of Brevier and one ditto Long
Primer, and a variety of JOB and FANCY
TYPE, from Canon down to Brevier. The mate-
rials now offered for sale are of the best quality
and nearly new.
For particulars apply at the office of the WASH-
INGTONIAN, on Twelfth street, to
Aug 4-3t A. F. CUNNINGHAM.
COLUMBIAN HORTICULTURAL
SOCIETY.
r'"HlE stated meeting of the Society will be
-J_- ljdennSaturda.the 6th instant, a 4.
o'clock, P. M., when the reports or te Standing
Committees on Flowers, Fruits, and Vegetables,
or premiums awarded, will be received and con-


C LOTHS AND CASSIMERES.-We have re.
ceived by the late arrivals our full supply
of splendid Cloths, Cassimeres, Vestings, Peter-
shamns, Pilt Cioths, pliid, striped, ribbed and
plain Cassimeres. Also, super 6.4 red Paddings,
Bear Skin, &c., for over coats.
All the above will be sold'to merchant tailors at
a small advance.
BRADLEY & CATLETT.
Aug 6-3taw2w (Alex Gaz eolm)

W TOCK OF THE FARMERS' AND) ME-
in CHANIC.' BANK OF GEORGETOWN.
-On Saturday, the 13th of August inst, I will
sell at public Auction, at my Auction store in
Georgetown, about $4000 of the stock of the Far-
mers' and Mechanics' Bank of Georgetown, or so
much thereof as will pay the debt for which it is
pledged.
Sale to take place at i after 5 o'clock, P. M.
By order of the trustee:
Aug. 6-dti THOSE. C. WRIGHT.
CLASSICAL FRENCH READER for stu.
S dents, consisting of approved selections
from the works of the most celebrated French
writers, together with an Introduction facilitating
the study of the language. The extracts accom-
panied with notes, criticisms, explanations, &c.
throughout the work, by Professor Hentz. 1 vol.,
bound; 270 pages, price only 62J cents; for sale
by F. TAYLOR.
Aug 6
MARSHAL'S SALE.
N virtue of four writs of fieri facias, on judge.
ments of condemnation, issued out from the
Clerk's office of the Circuit Court of the District
of Columbia, for the county of Washington,. and to
me directed, I hall expose to public sale, for
cash,- on TUESDAY, 30th of August, instant, at
eleven o'clock A. M. on the premises, all the
right, title and interest of William Otis, in and to
part of lot No. 2, in square A, in the city and
county of Washington, beginning at the south-
east corner of lot No. 2, in square A, and run-
ning thence northwardly on the line of the Mis-
souri Avenue twenty-five feet; thence north paral-
lel with The east line of the said lot to the north
line of the said lot, and thence with the said north
line to the northeast corner of said lot, and thence
in a straight line to the place of beginning, es-
timated to contain 2,546 square feet. Seized and
taken as the property of the said William Otis,
and sold to satisfy two executions in favor of
John W. Maury, and one other execution in favor
of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of George-
town, and also one other execution in favor of
Shepherd and Semmes.
ALEXANDER HUNTER,
Aug 6-dts Marshal Dis. Col
UST RECEIVED, a supply of Champagne
Wines, Anchor, Harp, Napoleon, and Jac-
quemart brands, in pint and quart bottles. Pink
of the same brands. Port, and other wines suita-
ble for the summer season, which we will dispose
of upon the most reasonable terms.
L. DESAUQUE & HUBER,
Wine and Liquor Merchants,
Aug 8-3t 3 doors west of 4J st. Penn. Av.
ALEXANDRIA AND NEW OR-
\ LEANS PACKETS.-Brig TRIBUNE,
Samuel C. Boush, master, to sail 15th
September; brig ISAAC FRANKLIN, William
Smith, master, to sail 1st October. Thes" vessels
are of' the first class, and fitted expressly for the
trade, having excellent accommodations for pas-
sengers, and commanded by men experienced in
the business. The above vessels will at all times
take steam up the Mississippi. Persons wishing
to ship will please make early application to
JOHN ARMFIELD.
Alexandria, Aug. 8-tf

HELP 10 PRINTERS AND PUBLISH-
ERS,
Y Samuel L. Dickinson, is just published
and for sale by F. TAYLOR, being a series
of calculations showing the quantity of paper re-
quired for a given number of signatures in book
work, and the number oftokens contained therein,
carried out to great extent. Also, an extensive
table for job work, showing the quantity of paper
required for a given number of bills, labels, dupli-
cates of book work, &c. &c. &c. 1 volume.
Aug2
NE\V BOOKS.
INKLINGS of Adventure, by N. P. Willis, 2
volumes.
Lafitte, the Pirate of the Gulf, by the author" of
Southwest.
Christian Examiner, July, 1836, Boston.
Parley's Cyclopedia, part second.
Come on the Physiology of Digestion.
This day received by
KENNEDY & ELLIOTT,
In the Athenaeum.


August 2-3t


[Int.]


A TEACHER WANTFD.--An Assistant
Teacher, qualified to teach the Latin and
Greek languages and Mathematics, is wanted in
Washington Academy. The salary is three hun-
dred dollars, and board found by the trustees.
Applicants for the situation wil forward their
testimonials to thle subscriber by the fourth
Wednesday in August next, on which day the
trustees will make the selection.
WILLIAM WV. JOHNSTON,
Secretary of the Board of Trustees.
Princess Anne, Md., July 4, 1836.
July 13 law4w


NEW BOOKS.
A YEAR in Spain, by a young American, third
edition, in three volumes, 12mo., with em-
bellishments after Chapman-price $3 00.
Harry and Lucy, with other Tales, by Maria
Edgeworth, in 2 vols.-price $2 25, this day receiv-
ed by KENNEDY & ELLIOT'T,
In the Athenaeum, Pennsylvania Avenue.
Aug 6-3t
TURNIP SEED.
J F. CALLAN has just received on sale, a
O large supply of Furnip Seed, wvarranted
fresh and genuine-among them, Rutabaga, large
white Norfolk and Dales Hybria; the latter is a new
kind, and much superior to any heretofore sold in
this market. In store, a variety of Garden, Flow-
er, Grass, Bird, and other seeds. Aug 4
FOR SALE OR RENTl'.-The three
Story brick Hotuse on C, between Four
i and a half and Sixth streets, now occu-
pied by Mrs. Carlisle. It contains nine rooms, is
in good order, has a good pump in the yard, sta-
ble, &c. Two thousand dollars of the purchase
money can be paid at any time during ten years,
and the balance in payments of from six to twen-
ty-four months, or stocks in any of the city banks
will be taken at market value. Possession may
be had at once. TODD & CO.
Aug. 5-3t
FOR RENT.
s The subscriber offers for rent that
,=" very convenient and comfortable two
tU ~ ~ ~ ra m nU _V_. > .11*tntr u,....,. ;tn.,..ta.1 --


OFic1 COMMISAnY GENERAL OF SUBSISTENCE, "
Washington, July 1st, 1836.
SEPARATE proposals will be received at this
S office until the first day of October next, for
the delivery of provisions for the use of the troops
of the United States, to be delivered in bulk, upon
inspection, as follows:
it New Orleans:1
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good c.der vinegar.
Ait Fort Jesup, 25 miles by land from
Natchitoches:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
One-half on the 1st May, remainder on 1st De-
cember, 1837.
.it the public landing, six miles jrom Furl
Towson, mouth of the Chiemichi:
24O barrels of pork
500 barrels s of fresh superfine flour
220 bushes of new white field beans
3500 poundhof good hard soap
1600 pounds or good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
April, 1837, and to leave Natchitoches by 20th
February, 1837.
3t Fort Coffee, 10 miles above Fort Smith,
arkansas:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap '
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
SThe whole to be delivered in all the month of
May, 1837.
it Saint Louis or at Jefferson Barracks,
10 miles below St. Louis, at the option oJ
Government.
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of lresh supeAfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
.it Fort Crawqord, Prarie diu Chien, Mis-
sissippi river:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 pounds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
it Fort Snelling, Saint Peters:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gollons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 15th June,
1837.
lit Fort Winnebago, on the Fox river, at
the portage of the Fox and Ouisconsin
rivers:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fre.h superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 p funds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candle
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
lit Fort Gratiot:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of g'.,od hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
One-half 1st May, remainder on 1st October,
1837.
lt Fort Howard, Green Bay:


240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 pounds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered by the 1st Jur
1837.
.it Fort Brady, Satult de Ste. Marie:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white fie beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the lst Jur
1837.


ne,


dt Fod t Mackinaw:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
lit Fort Dearborn, Chicago:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of good.hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole, to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
lit Hancock Barracks, Ioulton, Mlaine:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 poun is of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered in December, 1836,
and January and February, 1837.
./It B1oston:


from all injuries and defects which may impair the
good quality of the said timber for the purposes
or which it is required by contract, and be in all
respects satisfactory to the com-nandants of the re-
spective Navy Yards where it is delivered.
Bonds, with two good and responsible sureties, .
(whose names must be forwarded with the offers,)
in the amount of one-third the estimated value of
the timber to be furnished under the respective
contracts, will be required; and, as collateral secu
rity for the faithful compliance with the terms,
stipulations, and conditions of the said contracts,
ten per centum will be reserved from the actual
amount of each payment which may be made from
time to time, until the said contracts are comple-
ted and closed, which reservations, respectively,
will be forfeited to the use and benefit of the
United States, in the event of failure to deliver
the timber within the respective periods pre-
scribed.
The moulds will be furnished to the contractors
at one of the Navy Yards, Brooklyn or Gosport.
Ninety per centum will be paid on all bills for
deliveries, agreeably to the stipulations of the con-
tracts to be' made, within thirty days after their
approval by the commandants of the respective
navy yards.

To be published twice a week in the Globe;
National Intelligencer; United States Telegraph;
Army and Navy Chronicle; Eastern Argus; New
Hampshire Patriot; Boston Advocate; Hartford
Times; Republican Herald; New York Evening
Post; New York Times; Trenton Emporium; Amer-
ican Sentinel; Pennsylvanian; Baltimore Repub-
lican; Norforlk Herald; Norfolk Beacon; Raleigh
Star; Newbern Sentinel; Charleston Patriot; Geor-
gian; Louisiana Advertiser; Mobile Register.

BYP. MAURO & SON.
.AUCTION SALES.
B EEF.-On Thursday, llth inst. at fthe Auc-
tion-house opposite Brown's Hotel, 10
o'clock, A. M. without restriction, for account of
.. I--- ... .... .. --,-.. 'r' A RBRlT I ir'Tpi


'he vinegar in iron bound casks; the beans in
'ater-tight barrels, and the soap and caudles in
Yrong boxes, of convenient size for transports-
on.
Salt will only be received by measurement of
hirty.two quarts to the bushel.
The candles to have cotton wicks.
The provisions for Prairie du Chien, and Saint
'eter's, must pass Saint Louis, for their ultimate
destination, by the 15th April, 1837. A failure
This particular, will be considered a breach of
contract, and the Department will be authorized
Purchase to supply these post.
The provisions will be inspected at the time and
lace of delivery; and all expenses are to be paid
y contractors, until they are deposited at such
ore-houses as may be designated by the agent of
ie Department.
The Commissionary General reserves the pri-
ilege of increasing or diminishing the quantities,
r of dispensing with one or more articles, at any
me before entering into contract; and also of
increasing or reducing the quantities of each de-
very one-third, subsequent to the contract, on
lying sixty days previous notice.-
Bidders not heretofore contractors, are required
Accompany their proposals with evidence of
heir ability, together with the names of their
ireties, whose responsibility must be certified by
he District Attorney, or by some person well
known to the Government; otherwise their pro-
osals will not be acted on.
Advances cannot be made in any case; and evi-
ence of inspection and full delivery will be re-
uired at this office, before payment can be make,
which will be by Treasury warrants en bands
rarest tihe points of delivery, or nearest the
laces of purchasing the supplies, or nearest the
residence of the contractors, at their option.
Each proposal will be sealed in a separate en-
elope, and marked proposals for furnishing
my subsistence."
GEO. GIBSON, C. G. 8.
July 1-3tawt20Sep. G.

LIVE OAK TIMBER.
-- NAVT COMMISSIONERs' OrFFICE,
-+ ,8th July, 1836.
E-..ED proposals, endorsed "Proposals for
S;Live O Timber," will be received at this
fice until tliee o'clock, P. M., of the thirty-first
ay of Augusl-next, for supplying the following
,ive Oak Timber; viz:
No. 1. For the frame timber, beam and keelson
pieces, and for the promiscuous timber for one
hip of the line, one frigate, one sloop of war,
nd one schooner, to be delivered at the navy yard
ear Portsmouth, N. H. -
No. 2. For the frame timber, beam and keelson
pieces, and for the promiscuous timber for one
teamerand one schooner, to be delivered at the
avy yard, Philadelphia.
The quantity and dimensions of the promiscu-
us timber for each vessel, of each class, is as
>llows:
For the ship of the line, 6,000 cubic feet, which
nust be sided 15 inchle, and be from 12 to 20 feet
n length; six of the longest pieces to side 22
iches.
For the frigate, 3,000 cubic feet, which must
e sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 20 feet
>ng; six of the longest pieces to side 19 inches.
For the sloop of war, 1,000 cubic feet, which
lust be sided 12 inches, and be from 12 to 18
eet long; six of the longest pieces to side 16
iches.
For the steamer, 1,000 cubic feet, which must
e sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 18 feet
)ng; six of the longest pieces to side 16 inches.
For each schooner, 300 cubic feet, which must
e sided 8 inches, and be from 10 to 16 feet long;
[x of the longest pieces to side 12j inches.
A part of the promiscuous timber may be got
o larger dimensions, provided the pieces will
answer for replacing defective hawse pieces, tran-
i)ms, breast-hooks, or other valuable pieces.
Separate offers must be made for each of the pre-
eding numbers, and .ach offer must embrace ad
he timber that is called for by the number to
which it refers; the prices asked per cubic foot
nust be stated separately for each and every class
f vessels embraced in the offer; and for the pro-
niscuous timber of each class, separately from the
their, which is considered moulded timber.
At least one fourth of the whole quantity of tim-
er embraced in each offer, comprising a faith pro-
tortion of the most valuable pieces, must be deli-
ered on or before the first of June, 1838, one half
f the remainder on or before the first of June,
839, and the whole quantity on or before the first
[ay of June, 1840; and if the above proportions
hail not be delivered at the respective times
bove specified, the Commissioners of the Na'Vy
reserve to themselves the right of cancelling" any
contract in the execution of which such failure
nay occur, and of entering into new contracts,
olding the original contractors and their sureties
able for any excess of cost and other damages
rhich may be thus incurred.
The said Live Oak Timber must have grown
within twenty-five miles of the seaboard, (w',ich
nust be proven to the satisfaction of the respec-
ire commandants,) must be got out by the moulds
.nd written directions, and specificatipns of di.
tensions, &c., which will be furnished to the con-
factors for their government, and must be free


ie,







[Concluded from 1st page.]
scrambles and combinations in Congress, which
have been heretofore witnessed, and the other
affairs of the country, to the injurious effects una-
Svoidably resulting from them, it would, in my
opinion, be infinitely preferable to leave works
of the character spoken of, and not' embraced in
the exception which has been pointed out, for
the present, to the supports upon which they
have reposed with so much success for the last
two years, viz. State efforts and private enter-
prize. If the great body of the People become
convinced that the progress of these works should
be accelerated by the federal arm, they will not
refuse to come to some proper constitutional ar-
rangement upon the subject. The supposition
that an equitable rule, which pays a proper res-
pect to the interests and condition of the different
States, could fail to receive ultimately the consti-
tutional sanction, would be doing injustice to the
intelligence of the country. By such a settle-
ment of the question, our political system, in ad-
dition to the other advantages derived from it,
would, in r. lation to this subject at least, be re-
lieved from those dangerous shocks, which spring
from diversities of opinion upon constitutional
points of deep interest; and, in the meantime,
the resources of the country would. be best hus-
banded by being left in the hands of those by
whose labor they are produced."
It will appear from these quotations, that whilst
General Jackson, in his Maysville message, ex-
pressed an opitiion, that appropriations for objects
which might be deemed to be of national cha-
racter, should be deferred until after the national
debt was paid, Mr. Van Buren, in 1832, went
further. He dec!'tred his opinion to be, that ap-
propriations for improvements even of this charac-
ter, should be withheld until an amendment of
the Constitution expressly authorizing and regu-
lating them, should be made. In a subsequent
message, the President, upon a further view of
the subject, adopted and announced, substantially,
the same construction.
It is to be regretted, fellow-citizens, that in the
conflicts of party, in the pursuit of a favorite ob-
ject, in attempts to advance the interests of -,'
favored candidate, or to destroy a dreaded riVal,
.persons who, in private life, may be honorable
and amiable, are often hurried into measures
which, in cooler moments of reason and reflec-
tion, they would disapprove. How else are we
to account for the attempts which have been so
sedulously, but so recklessly and unjustly made,
to connect Mr. VantBuren's name with the crimes
and follies of abolitionism, and to fix upon him a
portion of the odium which attaches-so properly
to the fanatics who propagate and support that
insane and nefarious scheme ? Is there a shadow
of evidence that he has ever participated in their
plans? or by word or action given to them coun-
tenance or encouragement? So far from this, the
proof is complete that r.Ir. Van Buren and his
:political friends in New York used every possible
exertion to arrest the progress of the abolition-
ists, and to array against them the patriotism and
intelligence of the North. One of the first meet-
ings to counteract and put down the abolitionists
was held in Albany, which has often reproach-
fully been called the seat and centre of Mr. Van
Buren's power. At this assemblage, no Icss d's.
tinguished for numbers than talents, at which Mr.
Marcy, the Governor of the State, presided, some
of the strongest resolutions any where adopted,
were passed, denouncing, in the most unqualified
terms, the principles and conduct of the abolition-
ists, and calling upon all men who were attached.
to their country, and the Union of the States, to
resist their machinations. The sentiments of this
meeting, Mr. Van Buren, in a public and written
declaration, sanctioned by his approval and adopted
as his own. At a subsequent time, Governor
Marcy, in his message to the Legislature 'of New
York, used the strongest possible language
.against the abolition party, and declared tih't if
public sentiment would not put them down, the
Assembly ought to resort to legislative enact-
ments to ,effect that object. To this message,
which the oppositionists themselves admitted to be
fraught with sentiments of lofty patriotism, devo-
tion to the Union, and a proper regard to the
rights of the South, the Legislature responded
their entire approval, especially to the part which
recognized the right and prospective propriety of
restraining, by law, insurrectionary and incendiary
publication. But Mr. Van Buren's sentiments
on abolition do nut rest on this evidence, strong as
it ought to be con-idered. His opinions were
fully developed in, his letter of the 6th of March,
1836, to Messrs. Junius Amis, Isaac Hall, and
others, in answer to one from them, from Jackson,
North Carolina.
As the subject we are discussing is one of great
importance, and one on which our opponents main-
ly rely in the warfare they are carrying on against
Mr. Van Buren, we deem it proper to insert the
following extracts from that letter:
"I am not only willing, but desirous, gentlemen,
that you should have the most thorough know-
ledge of my views and feelings upon the delicate
and interesting subject with which your question
is connected, and I shall endeavor to acquaint
you with them in the fullest manner in my power.
"Not having heretofore had the honor of being
in political communication with you, I am not ad-
vised whether the sentiments relatinge to it, which


have been avowed by'nyself and by my authority
within the last two years, have come to your know-
lege. I deem it, therefore, proper, to furnish you
.with the substance of them, Wetore I reply to your
more specific inquiry. The avowals to which I
refer, were:
1st. An opinion that Congreshas no right to
interfere in any manner, or to any).xtent, with
the subject of Slavery in the States;
"2d. Against the propriety of the'r doing so
in the District of Columbia; and,
*"3d. The statement of my full concurrence in
the sentiments express d by the citizens of Alba.
ay, in public meeting, the most important of which
.are as follows, viz: 'That the Constitution of the
United States carries with it an adjustment of all
questions involved in the deliberations which led
to its adoption, and that the compromise of inter-
ests in which it was founded, is binding in honor
and good faith; independently off the force of agree-
,nent, on all who live under its protection and part-
ticipate in the benefits of which it is the source;'
.' That the relation of master and slave is a matter
exclhsively belonging to the people of each State,
within its own boundary, and that any attempt by
the Government or people of any other S ,ite, or
by the General Government, to interfere with or
disturb it, would violate the spirit of that compro-
mise which lies at the basis of the Federal compact:',
'That we can only hope to maintain the Union
of the States by abstaining from all interference
with the laws, domestic policy, and peculiar in-
terests of every other State: 'That all such in-
terference which tends to alienate one portion of
our countrymen from the rest, deserves to be
frowned upon with indignation by all who cherish
the principles of our revolutionary fathers, and
who desire to preserve the Constitution by the
exercise of that spirit of amity which animated its
framers:' 'That they deprecated the conduct of
those who are attempting to coerce their' brethren
inmrither Stat's into-the abolition of slavery), by ap-
ipeals to the fears of the master and to the pas-
sions, of the slave; and that they could not but con-
sider them us disturbers of the public peace, and
would, by all constitutional mens, exert their in-
fluence to arrest the progress of such measures :'


whatsoever' over the Federal District does not con- Buren, and their own political friends, under si-
fer on that body the same authority over the sub- milar circumstances, it ought to be mentioned,
ject that would otherwise have been possessed by that Mr. Clay declared in the Senate, that he saw
the States of Maryland and Virginia; or that Con- no reason to doubt the power of Congress to
gress might not, in virtue thereof, take such steps abolish slavery in the District; and yet no hue
upon the subject in this District as those States and cry has been raised against him for the opi-
might themselves take within their own limits, and nion, which, there is no reason to doubt, was ho-
'consistently with their rights of so,, ereignty. nest and conscientious. In the House of Dele-
"Thus viewing the mr. ter, I would not, from the gates of' Virginia, the resolution that it was un-
lights now before me, feel myself safe in pronounc- constitutional to abolish slavery in the District
ing that Congress does not possess the power of passed by a vote of 106 to 13. Those who voted
interfering with or abolishing slavery in the Dis- in the negative were opposition members, and
trict of Columbia. But, whilst such are my pre- no strictures were made on the vote, but, on the
sent impressions upon the abstract question of the contrary, their political friends contended, in-
legal power of Congress-impressions which I deed every body thought, it was a fair exercise
shall at all times be not only ready, but disposed, of the right of opinion on a question on which
to surrender upon conviction of error-I do .not persons might honestly differ, without its being
hesitate to give it to you as my deliberate and well an impeachment of their patriotism or standing as
considered opinion, that there are objections to the public men. Such unfortunately is the nature
exercise of this power, against the wishes of the of party when carried to extremes, that what is
slaveholding States, as imperative in their nature imputed as criminal to one man, is deemed free
and obligations, in regulating the conduct of pub- from objection, if not praiseworthy, in another.
lic men, as the most palpable want of constitutional We will now notice an objection, which has
power would be. been often made, and gravely urged, to Mr. Van
"' You have alluded in your Lletter to the con- Buren's election, which is so extravagant in itself,
spicuous s::uation in which I have been placed so little sustained by facts, and so disingenuous,
before the public, and I take it for granted that it that we :holeid not deem it worthy of refutation
is to that cir,. imstance, rather than to any other, by any serious argument, if it was not calculated
that I am to Psc";Pe the solicitude felt by your- to place in strong relief the character of the oppo-
selves and your fellow-citizens in respect to my sition made to him, and the means, in the destitu-
views on this subject. I recognize, to the fullest tion of solid reasoning, to which his enemies have
extent, the propriety of this desire on your part; been constrained to resort. It has been boldly
and although there is nothing in your letter mak- asserted, that Mr. V. B. was the advocate of (what
ing the avowal necessary, I prefer that not only is called party nomenclature) Negro suffrage.
you, but all the people of the United States shall To such purposes has this objection been applied,
now understand, that if the desire of that portion that we have been informed, that in some of our
of them which is favorable to my elevation to tile State elections, voters coming to the polls have
Chief Magistracy should be gratified, I must go been asked, whether they would vote with a party
into the Presidential Chair the inflexible and who sustained a candidate for the Presidency de-
uncompromising opponent of any attempt on the sirous to place a black man side by side with them
part of Congress to abolish slavery in the District at the hustings. The ft.r import of this charge
of Columbia against the wishes of the slave-hold- was, that Mr. Van Buren was endeavoring, (by
ing States; and also with the determination equally some magical influence, we suppose,) overleaping
decided to resist the slightest interference with the all legal and constitutional impediments, to give
subject in the States where it exists., In saying the free negro an equal right to vote in Virginia
this, I tender neither to them nor to you, any with the white man. And upon what, let us ask
pledges, but declare only settled opinions and con. you, fellow-citizens, upon what colorable or plau-
victions of duty. Those who doubt that they will sible ground does this accusation rest. The facts
be carried into full and fair effect, are under no which are endeavored to be torturedto this purpose
obligations to trust me. An opportunity is afford- are these: In New York, and not in Virginia, the
ed them to exercise their free choice in the mat- first State constitution was adopted in 1777. By
ter, and they may be assured, that there is no one that constitution,the right of suffrage was confined
less likely to complain of its exercise than myself, to freeholders, or persons having an interest in the
The peculiar importance of the subject, and a soil. By that instrument, there was no distinction
desire (which you will allow me to feel) that my as to the right of voting between men of different
views of it should be correctly understood, make colors. In 1821, a convention was called, and, as
it proper that I should explain the grounds of the it would seem from the debates, that one strong
opinions above expressed. They are founded, motive was to change the right of voting, and to
amongst others, on the following considerations, give it a much wider extent. When that subject
viz: under discussion, an effort was made to place the
"' 1st. I believe, that if it had been foreseen at free negro upon an equality with the white man,
the time of the adoption of the constitution, that as he stood under the old constitution. To this
the seat of the Federal Government would be fix- Mr. Van Buren was decidedly opposed, and advo-
ed in a slave-holding region, and that the subject cated and voted for the clause adopted, and made
of slavery would be there agitated to the prejudice a part of the new constitution, which, whilst it
of those holding this species of property, the right greatly extended the right of suffrage in the free
to do so wou'd, with the assent of the non-slave- white citizens, imposed restrictions on the colored
holding States, have been made an exception to voter amounting almost to prohibition. This will
the unrestricted legislative power given to Con- appear from the section of the constitution which
gress over the District to be ceded. will be here inserted:
112dly. I cannot but regard the agitation of this Sec. i. Every male citizen of the age of twenty-one years,
who shall have been an inhabitant of this State one year pre-
subject in the District of Columbia, as a surprise ceding any election, and,for the last six months a resident ot the
upon the people of Maryland and Virginia, being town or county where he may offer his vote, and shall have
very confident, that if the state of things which within the year next preceding the election, paid a tax to the
State or county, assessed upon his real or personal property;
now exists had been at all apprehended by those or shall by law be exempted from taxation; or being armed and
States, the cession of the District would not have equipped according to law, shall have performed within that
been made, except upon the express condition year, military duty in the militia of this State; or who shall be
exempted from performing militia duty in consequence of be-
that Congress should exercise no such power; and ing a fireman in any city, town or village in this State: And,
that with such a condition the cession wou!d, in the also, every male citizen of the age of twenty-one years, who
then state of public opinion, ave been hall have been for three years next preceding such election,
then state of public opinion, have been readily an inhabitant of this State; and for the last year, a resident in
accepted. the town or county where he may offer his vote; and shall have
"3dly. I do therefore believe, that the abolition been within the last year, assessed to labor upon the public
of avery in the District of Columbia, against the highways, and shall have performed the labor, or paid an
of slavery in the District of Columbia, against the equivalent therefore, according to law; shall be entitled to vote
wishes of the slaveholding States, (assuming that in the town or ward where he actually resides, and not else-
Congress has the powerto effect it,) would violate where, for all officers that now are, or hereafter may be, elec.
the spirit f that omprom of interests wich tive by the people: But no nan of color, unless he shall have
the spirit of that compromise of interests which been for three years a citizen of this State, and for one year
lies at the basis of our social compact; and I am next preceding any election, shall be seized and possessed of a
thoroughly convinced, that it could not be so done, freehold estate of the value of two hundred and fifty dollars
Po ver and above all debts and incumbrances charged thereon;
without imminent peril, if not certain destruction and shall have been actually rated, and paid a tax thereon,
to the union of the States. Viewing the matter shall be entitled to vote at any such election. And no person
in this light, it is my clear and settled opinion, of color shall be subject to direct taxation, unless he shall be
seized and possessed of such real estate as aforesaid."
that the Federal Government ought to abstain It will be seen that the qualification required
from doing so, and that it is the sacred duty of of the colored man is extremely high, and its ef-.
those whom the people of the United States en- feet has been to exclude nearly all that descrip.
trust with the control of its action, so to use the tion of voters from the polls in New York, and if
constitutional power with which they are invested, adopted in this State, In relation to the whites,
as to prevent it. would prevent a large portion of our voters from
"I think it due to the occasion, and only a sim- exercising the right they do at present. 1 hus it
pie act of justice to my fellow-citizens of the appears that so far was Van Buren from wishing
North, of all political parties, to add the expres- to put the colored upon an equality with the white
sion of my full belief, that the opinions above ex- man, (even in New York, which is a non slave-
pressed, accord in substance with those entertained holding State,) that he voted for a discrimination
by a larger majority of the people of the non-slave- between then, which extended greatly the rights
holding States, than has ever before existed in of the one, whilst it abridged those ot the other.
those States on a public question of equal magni- And this is the head and front of Mr. Van Buren's
tude. It is alsodue to them to say, that their sen- offending in this matter. Further comment is un-
timents on this subject spring out of considerations necessary.
of too high a character, and look to consequences We have said enough, we believe, on this branch
of too solemn an import, to be shaken by slight of the subject, and we would dismiss it, but that
causes. W ih only generous confidence on the part there is one remaining circumstance so apposite to
of the South in their brethren of the North, and a the present inquiry, so illstrativ of our views, so
firm determination on the part of each to visit with satisfactory a teat of the sincerity of the sentiments
their severest displeasure any attempt to connect avowed by Mr. Van Buren, that it would be unjust
the subject with party politics, those sentiments to him and to the cause of truth, to pass it by un-
cannot be overthrown. All future attempts on the noticed. It will be recollected that the excite-
part of the abolitionists to do so, will then only ment which pervaded the southern country on tlhe


serve to accumulate an0 concentrate public odium subject of abolition, was mainly produced by the
on themselves. That there are persons at the circulation through the mail of incendiary writing
North who are far from concurring in the prevail- and prints of various descriptions. In the discus.
ing sentiment I have described, is certainly true; sions which took place, much solicitude was ex-
but their numbers, when compared to the rest of pressed to obtain from Congress some act to re-
the community, are very inconsiderable; and if strain and punish the circulation by postmasters
the condition of things be not greatly aggravated of such papers. At the last session of Congress a
by imprudence, many of them, I have no doubt, bill was introduced into the Senate, to prohibit
will ultimately adopt sounder views of the subject; postmasters from delivering from their offices, or
and the efforts of those who may persist in the otherwise circulating, incendiary publications, and
work of agitation, may be overcome by reason, or subjecting them to removal from office, as a penal-
rendered inoperative by constitutional remedies." ty for a violation of the law. On the question of
We think it impossible that any man who will the engrossment of this bill, the Senate were
read these sentiments with candor and c-.lmness equally divided. At the moment Mr. Van Buren
can hesitate to say that the charges against Mr. was absent from the Chair, which was temporarily
Van Buren, of being an abolitionist, of having the occupied by another, Mr. Calhoun inquired within
slightest leaning to their cause, any disposition to emphasis, where was the Vice PiesidentY Hle imme-
conciliate them or to deprecate their opposition, diately appeared and took his seat, and with the
are most unfounded and unjust. But it may be utmost promptitude and decision, pronounced that
said that Mr. Van Buren, in these declarations, the Senate was equally divided, and gave his cast-
intimates the opinion, on the abstract question, ing vote for the bill. Here was an occasion to
"that the p6wer of exclusve legislation in all try not only the sincerity, but the firmness of the
cases whatsoever, given by the Constitution to Vice President. It was a question of vital im-
Congress, over the Federal District, confers on portance. The prohibition of using the mail as a
that body the same authority on the subject which vehicle to circulate incendiary papers, would be a
would otherwise have been possessed by 'the death blow to the abolitionists. They knew it,
States of Maryland and Virginia, or that it might, they felt it, and their most violent exertions were
in virtue thereof, take such steps upon the subject, used to ward off this measure, so disastrous to
in the District, as -those States might themselves their cause. If they cannot circulate, it is in vain
take within their own limits, consistently with the they should print. The man who should obstruct
rights of sovereignty. But what dots Mr. Van or defeat the exercise of this privilege to circulate
Buren further say? "Whilst such are my present by the mail, must incur their eternal animosity.
impressions, upon the abstract operation of the le Mr. Van Buren was placed precisely in this
gal power of Congress, impressions which' I shall situation. But four of the Senators from the non.
at all times be not only ready, but disposed to sur, slaveholding States sustained him. How did he
render, upon conviction of error, I do not hesitate act? Did he hesitate? Did he shrink from re-
to give it to you as my deliberate and well-consid- sp nsibility? Did he waver, from the influence of
ered opinion, that there are objections to the exer- any disposition to propitiate the abolitionists? Not
cise of this power, against the wishes of the slave- at all. 14 without the slightest hesitation, he gave
holding States, as imperative in their nature and his vote for a measure calculated to give security
obligations, in regulating the conduct of public men, to southern rights. and tranquTIIittuo uUt rs foal
as the most palpable want of constztaxtu'rs zploUwer ing. The Senators fr6omi New York, the personal
would be." He further states: "I prefer that not and political friends of the Vice President, also
only ypu, but all the people of the United States, voted for the bill. And now, fellow-citizens, may
shall now understand, that, if the desire of that we not ask you with confidence, whether great
portion of them which is favorable to my elevation injustice has not been done by the opposition to
to the Chief Magistracy should be gi atified, I go Mr. Van Buren on this subject? Whether if they
--I t--: 4t a -- L.1 __-1I


in that situation, he magnanimously declined an
election, because he could not reconcile it to his
principles to advocate a local improvement by
the Gcneral Government in that district, which
was an object of particular solicitude to its inha-
bitants.
Since this address was in progress, and indeed
nearly completed, we have seen that of ths Staun-
tcn Convention, and we are bound in candor, but
with all proper respect, to say, that, so far from
removing our objections to the proceedings of the
opposition in relation to the Presidential contest,
it has tended strongly to confirm them. We
cannot consent to thie justice of the representa-
tions which they have given to the situation of the
country, or the acts of General Jackson's adminis-
tration. We must be permitted to express our
astonishment, that the Convention should expect
the people to be so much influenced by hostility
to a particular candidate as to support any other
for his exclusion, whatever may be the opinions
or principles of the person selected to effect their
object; nor can we reconcile to any ideas of con-
sistency or propriety, the sweeping denuncia-
tions of General Jackson, with the studied and
extravagant eulogium on Judge White, who
has participated most largely in sustaining
the measures of the ;Prcsident's administra-
tion, and particularly those which have exposed
him to the greatest obloquy and abuse from
the party of which the Convention were the
representatives. We find equal difficulty
in understanding how the Convention can sa-
tisfy the people of the propriety of accept-
ing the alternative of General Harrison or
Judge White, whose political principles are in
direct and irreconcilable conflict and opposition.
We can only account for these things, by suppos-
ing that the Conv2 ition acted under the influence
of the gloomy (though doubtless sincere) delu-
sions and misconceptions which seem to pervade
the whole appeal which they have made to the
public. The Convention have informed us, with
great frankness, that the only remedy for the nu-
merous evils and mischiefs which they have de-
picted in such sombre colors, is to be found -in
the total prostration of those placed in power by
your suffrages. It seems to have escaped their re-
collection, that you pronounced a solemn verdict
at the second election of General Jackson, upon
charges and accusations similar, if not identical
to those now exhibited. We thank the Conven-
tion for making up the issue which they have
done upon the destruction of General Jackson and
his political friends, and the bringing the opposi-
tion into power. It is a war of political extermi-
nation which they profess it is their intention to
wage; but we shall place ourselves on our de-
fence, are prepared for the contest, and confident
of the result. We have peculiar opportunities of
hearing from different parts of the Commonwealth,
and we assert without hesitation, that at no period
have the friends of the principles of the Adminis-
tration and of Mr. Van Buren and Judge Smith,
been more united, or more satisfied that a victory,
brilliant and decisive, will crown their efforts.
We have now finished. We leave the subject
ina your hands, persuaded that you will prove true
to yourselves, and so bestow your suffrages as will
best sustain your rights and liberties, and advance
the prosperity and happiness of our beloved coun-
try.
P. N. NICHOLAS,
P. V. DANIEL,
THOMAS RITCHIE,
WILL. SELDEN,
JOHN RUTHE1RFOORD,
:CHARLES ELLIS,
JAMES RAWLINGS,
C. W. GOOCH.
RiCaHMOND, August 1st, 1836.


THXE GLOBE.



MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8, 1836.

GENERAL SCOTT.
We have been put io possession of a letter from
General Scott to a gentleman, in relation to the
mode in which his controversy with General Jesup
has been drawn into tie -newspapers. He says:
"I have not written a word to the Bulletin;
I have not, in fact, suggested a line or a factor
any newspaper whatever. So far from doing
anything in that wal, Ihave taken care to con-
verse but little, even with my friends, on military
matters in controversy, lest my knowledge of
circumstances and my tfeelngs should find their
way into the public papers, being aware that in
the great political contest now raging, every thing
likely to change a vote would be seized upon for
the purpose."
In reference to the particular publications of
Webb and King, alliMed to in the Globe, the
General says:
This day, Wednesday week, I went over to
New York and met Colonel Webb, close by
Trinity Church; after the ordinary salutation, I
asked him whence he derived the particulars of


an article on my subject, in his paper of the dlay
oi' the day but one before? In the act of evading
the inquiry, he was interrupted by Charles L.
Livingston, who joined us. He then finished
the answer, and stated to Mr. L. my question.
After some jocose remarks, he invited Mr. L. and
myself to spend the following Saturday evening
and Sunday at his house, on Long Island. I de-
clined, on the ground that I did not wish to associ-
ate with politicians, under my circumstances, as I
might be led to speak of recent military events,
&c. Mr. L., who is a strong supporter of Mr.
Van Buren,and myself, then walked up Broadway,
and Colonel Webb down. The next day I again
want over to New York, and chanced to meet Mr.
Charles King. An article in his paper a day or two
before, headed a General in search of the Govern-
ment, had been pointed out to me. I asked him
whence lie had derived the knowledge of the
particulars? &c. He gave me no satisfactory an-
swer; when I remarked to him, as I the day before
had said to Webb, all the world will attribute the
article to me: I declare before God, that I am as
ignorant of the source of either article, as Mr.
Blair himself can be."
Upon the absolute and circumstantial denial
made by Gen. Scott himself, we unhesitatingly de-
clare, that we acquit him of the suspicion of hav-
ing prompted the attempt to divert his case into
a political channel, and make it subserve party in-
terests, and so avail himself of party support-
General Scott will certainly, however, pardon the
mistake, inasmuch as he foresaw that "all the world
would attribute the articles to him."' Webb's dis-
play of the letter, and King's hue and cry of "a
General in search of the Government," beingsimul-
taneous with the arrival of Gen. Scott in N. York,
was calculated to fasten the impression on us more
-thm bhpq' h we learned that no copy of the original letter on file
had ever been made out, but that taken on by
Gen. Scott to New York; and also, that the Gene-
ral had reported himself to the Acting Secretary of
W a- nL' 1 c,,1 l.. .. ....-. r" :,.. t.. I. 1 Lt.


might find its way to the public under the direc-
tion of General Scott, as that accusing Major Reed
of cowardice had done before. lie addressed his
letter to us, that we might at least understand that
he felt himself wronged, and meant to vindicate
himself before the public through a court of in-
quiry. His letter was of such a character that
we would have supposed he meant that it should
appear in' the columns of the Globe, if Gen.Scott's
despatch had become public, but for the circum-
stance that it was marked private; but this we consi-
dered only a precaution-a precaution observed by
many of our correspondents-against giving it in
the columns of our paper. We did not hold it to be
a confidential letter, or we would not have given it
to the files of the War Department, to be made a
public and official document. We understood
General Jesup's injunction simply to say, that he
did not wish to begin a newspaper war, but he
wished the President, and the editor of the print
which had thrown so many of General Scott's
charges before the public, to know that he looked
to the report of a court of inquiry for his vin-
d;cation; but the spies for the opposition in this
city have been enabled to drag this private letter
from the files, and thus we have been dragged
into the controversy.

NILES' REGISTER.
We are happy to see that the editor of Niles'
Register has admitted and corrected one or two
errors, which were pointed out to him by the
Globe, in relation to three or four members of the
Cabinet.
Will he correct another, in his very last num-
ber, as to one of them, caused by"ascribing the
"Chronology of Cotton," which he republishes,
to Bicknell's Reporter, when Bicknell himself
professes, as was the fact, to extract it from the
late report on Cotton made to Congress by Mr.
Woodbury, the Secretary of the Treasury?

DOUBLE FALSEHOOD.
The following extract is from the last Evening
Star:
"In confirmation of' this opinion take the follow-
ing Treasury Circular, from which it will appear
that, in direct contradiction to Mr. Senator
Wright's declaration that there would be no sur-
plus, there is actually more than forty millions of
dollars subject to draft in the several deposit
banks."
Some of the opposition are content with one
misrepresentation in one article, but M. M. Noah
is what the manufacturers call a "double speed-
er," in perverting facts.
l1t. Mr. Wright never said there would be no
surplus in the Treasury, if no deduction was made
for outstanding appropriations.
Those appropriations, already made and to be
paid, exceed the whole thirty-six and a half mil-
ions now in the Treasury; and if they were all
paid, not a dollar would be left of a surplus at this
time. That was Mr. Wright's correct and wise
view of the subject. But the wigs could not be
easy without attempting to divide, for bribery;
first, by the land bill, and then by Mr. Calhoun's
distribution money, already pledged and promised.
2d. The money now in the Treasury, subject to
draft, is not 40 but only 36J millions, as shown by
the very report the delusive Star quotes; and the
whole of that, and indeed more, has already been
voted away by Congress, and charged to the year
1836; so that it is in no sense a surplus, proper to
be given away or nearly appropriated. But as it
will not all be expended till 1837, and, in the
mean time, more will be received, Congress have
thought proper to divide or deposite with the States
all but five millions, which is in the Treasury,
and not expended on the 1st day of next January.
There probably will then be from twenty to twenty-
five millions to be so divided, though neither that
sum, nor any thing like it, will then be a surplus,
after paying all the public debts; but over half of
it will be then already appropriated and pledged.
What Webster wisdom that evinces!

COMMUNICATEDED]
A NEW BANK IN THE DISTRICT.
It is understood that a number of citizens of the
District will petition Congress, at its next session,
to grant a charter for a bank, with a capital of
TWO MILLIONS OF DOLLARS, to be located in
the District, and to be called thle DISTRICT
BANK.


The following are some of the most important
features of the charter which will be asked for:
First. It is proposed that of the capital stock of
two millions of dollars, each of the three corpora-
tions of the District shall be interested to the ex-
tent of three hundred thousand dollars, making
nine hundred thousand dollars of the capital,
which will belong to the three cor portions in the
District, viz: Washington,Alexandria, and George-
town.
The mode in which it is proposed that the cor-
porations shall supply each its portion of the capi-
tal to the bank, is as follows, viz: Each of the
corporations shall create a stock to the amount tof
their subscription, bearing an interest at the rate
of five per cent. per annum; for the redemption of
which the faith of the corporation shall be pledged,
as well as the interest which each corporation has
in the bank, to the extent of the interest of each,
for the payment of the same; the stock thus c:eat-
ed to be redeemable at the sa ne time that the
charter of the bank shall expire: this stock to
be delivered over to the President, Directors,
& Co. of the bank, in payment of the subscriptions
of the three corporations to the capital stock of
the bank. The bank shall take the said bonds,
and dispose of the same, not under par,for gold and
silver, and it shall be bound for the payment of
the principal, according to obligations of the cor-
porations. It shall also pay to the holders of the
certificates, which shall be issued by the corpora-
tions respectfully, and properly signed and authen-
ticated, in sums not less than five hundred dollars
semi-annually, the interest which has accrued; and
after doing this, the bank shall pay ever to
the respective corporations,whatever the dividends
semi-annually declared may exceed the interest
which it is required to pay upon the bonds of the
corporations.
In case the bonds which the three corporations
shall furnish, as their part of the capital of the
bank, shall produce a premium awhen the whole
.oha.ll Iav biel disposed of, then, whatever may
remain of such premium, after deducting all ex-
penses attending the sale of the same, shall be
divided equally between the three corporations.
It is believed that this bank, properly organiz-
ed and properly conducted, would, with the ex-
.- .--3 -...-- ,1..l- -a "^n *. -..... 1.1 -. ..... L -- --Ll


ately thereafter, the books shall be opened for any
individuals who think proper to subscribe for th,
balance, without any restriction whatever.
Second. That individuals of all classes may be
enabled to participate, upon true democratic prin-
ciples, the value of each share will be fixed at
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS.
Third. The bank Lhall not issue any note or hill
of a denomination less than TWENTY DOL-
LARS: nor shall it receive on deposit, or take ii,
any other way, the note of any bank whatever,
which may be issued for a less sum than twenty
dollars.
This provision will operate to exclude from
circulation in the District all bank notes for sums
less than twenty dollars, and secure to it a circu-
lation of gold and silver for all sums under that
amount.
Fourth. The bank shall be prohibited from
loaning upon the hypothecation of its own stock.
This prohibition is calculated to secure to the
use of the citizens of the District generally the
capital of the bank, and prevent, as in some in-
stances it is said has been the case, the capital
being loaned to individuals upon the stock which
they hold in the bank, at six per cent. per annum,
while the bank was dividing eight per cent. per
annum, beside extra dividends; thus giving undue
advantages to large stockholders, to the exclusion,
at times, of applicants for discount who offer the
best business paper for discount.
Fifth. The bank shall not hold any real estate
except for its own accommodation, unless taken
in payment of debts actually become due to the
bank; and then such real estate thus falling into
its hands, shall be disposed of within two years
thereafter.
The propriety of this restraining clause must be
too apparent to require any comment.
Sixth. The capital stock shall be equally di-
vided in the three cities of Washington, Alexan-
dria, and Georgetown, one third each.
Seventh. There shall be a board of directors in
each place, that at Washington having the con-
trol of the general affairs of the institution, the
whole being considered as one, excepting in the af-
fairs of local discounts, in which the respective
boards shall act independent of each other; sub-
ject, however, to the control of the directors of the
central body at Washington.
Eighth. The Board of Directors of the bank at
Washington shall be composed of.thirteen indi-
viduals, three of whom to be appointed by the
corporation of the city, one by that of Alexandria,
one by that of Georgetown, and eight to be cho-
sen by the individual stockholders. Those of
Alexandria and Georgetown to be composed of
seven individuals, who shall be residents in those
places respectively, two to be appointed by the
corporations for each place, and the other five to
be chosen by the individual stockholders annually,
at the same time and place those for the Wash-
ington bank are chosen.
.Ninth. At Washington there shall be a presi-
dent elected annually, after the election of direc-
tors; but at the branches at Alexandria and
Georgetown, the directors shall preside at the
meeting of directors in rotation, when present.
length. All notes issued shall be signed by the
president of the bank at Washington, and counter-
signed by the cashier thereof, and shall be made
payable, and be paid at the bank at the said place.
If the bank shall at any time fail to pay its obli
nations on demand, it shall forfeit its charter upon
proof thereof, an.d the three corporations, and the
individual stockholders, shall each be able for all
the debts of the bank in the proportions that each
are interested.
Eleventh. The bank may deal in gold and silver
bullion or coin, domestic or foreign bills of ex-
change; but it shall not purchase or deal in the
stocks of the United States, or of any one of the
said States, unless specially authorized to do so
by an act of Congress for that purpose; nor shall
it at any time deal in the notes issued by any bank
in the United States in any other way than by
taking those of such denominations as are not pro-
hibited, at par.
These are the mere general outlines of the prin-
ciples upon which it is intended to petition Con-
gress to incorporate a bank for the Distiict, at its
next session.
It is believed that a bank established upon some-
thing like the general principles here set forth,
will be serviceable to each individual in the whole
District, whether stockholder or not, and yield to
the immediate stockholders a reasonable profit-
be able to grant all proper facilities to the com-
munity, and afford Congress an opportunity of
giving a model to the individual States for banks.
This early annunciation of the contemplated ap-
plicationi for a charter from Congr'ess Ibor a bank
upon the foregoing principles, is maae that it may
be fairly discussed before thle meeting takes place.

We have been furnished with the following com-
munication from Governor CALL to the War De-
partment, and the accompanying report from the
gallant Captain LEE, giving a more particular ac-
count of the affair with the Indians on the 9th of
June. "lhe lamented Colonel Heileman had
promised a more circumstantial statement; but
this duty has now devolved on the officer second
in command-himself dangerously wounded. He is


only now so far recovered as to be able to dis-
charge this duty.
TALLAHASSEE, 21st July, 1836.
SIR: I have the honor herewith to enclose a copy
of the official report of Captain Lee, relative to
the engagement with the Indians near Micanopy,
on the 9th day of June last. Captain Lee explains
sufficiently the reason why this report is now made,
and why it was not made at an earlier period. The
gallant Major Heileman was brevetted for his con-
duct on that occasion, but unfortunately did not
live toreceive the intelligence of this acknowledg-
ment of his worth. It appears to me, both from
the report uf Major Heileman and Captain Lee,
that the latter officer and the two surviving Lieu-
ten.ants who acted under his orders, are equally
entitled to this distinction. I would therefore re-
spectfully suggest the propriety, as well as the
justice, of conferring brevets on Captain Lee,
Lieutenant Humphreys, and Lieutenant Talcott,
for the gallantry and bravery with which they
fought on that occasion. Thisjust reward for their
services would have a happy effect on the future
operations of the army.
I am, sir, very respectfully, &c ,
R. K. CALL,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief.
The honorable SECRMTAYT OF WAR.

FORT DEFIANCE, MICAXOPY,?
East Fordia, July 12, 1836. S
SIR: On the day following the engagement near
this place with the Indians, on the 9th of June last,
Major Heileman made a hasty and imperfect re-
port of the event to Brig. Gen. Eustis, who at that
time commanded the troops in Florida, in which
he merely gave a general outline of the occur-
rences of the morning, stating to me at the time
that, as sion as the state of my wounds would al-
low me to give him a special account of my kwow-
ledge of the affair, he should make a detailed re-
port of it, based upon the representations of Lieu-
tenants Wheelock and Humphreys and myself.
Within three or four days afterwards, Major Heile-
man was attacked with a severe illness that termi-
nated in his death, which sudden and lamented
evpnt has dtPnr;vrl ih. tha rmv Af nn nfe its nrst


fore he found himself in contact with the enemy's
left. The dragoons, led on by their intrepid and
gallant commander, Lieutenant Wheelock, whose
untimely death we have recently been called up-
on to mourn, were now warmly engaged with the
enemy's right, charging on horseback and de.
livering their fire without dismounting-the
Indians retreating before them. Having de-
livered their firzt fire, they reloaded on
their ground, charged and fired again, and
so on until the enemy were forced into
the Tuscawilla hammock, their strong hold.-
Meantime Lieutenant Humphreys gallantly charg-
ed the left-the enemy keeping up a retre-ting
fire. Lieutenant Humphreys made several efforts
to bring them to close quarters, but in vain, they
having the advantage in celerity of movements.
As the enemy approached the hammock in re-
treating, the length of his front' was neces-
sarily diminished, and, as a consequence, the
different detachments of our troops were brought
nearer together. Lieutenant Humphreys at this
time observed one or two attempts to outflank our
left, which he as often defeated by a prompt
and judicious movement in that direction.
Having given Lieutenant Humphreys his or-
ders, I proceeded :o enter the hammock, moving
in an oblique direction towards the rear of the
enemy. The trees being sparse, and the under-
growth not sufficiently thick in many places to
conceal my men, I was obliged to move with great
caution and celerity. I soon found myself in the
enemy's rear, at the distance of about 150 yards.
I continued to move on until I reached the ex-
treme verge of the hammock, being at that time
about twenty paces in front of my company. It
now became necessary to examine more particu-
larly the position ot the enemy, in order to at-
tack him to the best advantage. I therefore
crept forward about ten or twelve paces up-
on a small knoll, and found myself in full
view of about fifty Indians, as many -more be-
ing concealed behind the brow of a small hill,
the nearest about twenty and the furthest about
seventy yards off. Their backs were towards me,
and they were eagerly and intently observing the
movements of the troops commanded by Lieuten-
ants Wheelock and Humphreys. The dragoons
under Lieutenant Wheelock having a few mo-
ments previously become warmly engaged, I re-
mained several seconds in this position, my meqn
still advancing, during which time I observed two
Indians, whom I supposed to be chiefs, from their
earnest conversation and gestures, which induced
me to believe they intended to make a movement
to the rear of Lieutenants Humphreys and
VWheelock, from whom they were as yet entirely
concealed. My men had now arrived at the verge
of the hammock, and I only required about five
paces more to enable me to pour a volley amongst
them before their knowing of my presence, when
we were unfortunately discovered. Being in ad-
vance of my men, and on elevated ground, and
my dress being somewhat conspicuous, I soon be-
came a general mark. Instantly I gave the com-
mand to charge, raised my rifle, and flashed it at
one of the supposed chiefs. The scene of panic and
confusion which ensued on the part of the Indians
baffles all description. Some fired at me without
taking aim, some fled without firing at all, and
some took to trees. My company were now clear
of the bushes, and charging handsomely, throwing
in shots wherever a good opportunity offered-
myself leading about twelve paces in advance. I
had proceeded only a few steps, when I felt a ter-
rible concussion against my shoulder-a great dif-
ficulty in breathing-and was seized with bleeding
at the mouth. I found that I was badly wounded,
but having strength to keep my feet, determined
to lead the charge as long as I could stand.
I turned to my men, observed to them I was
wounded, and ordered them to push ahead.
I had scarcely resumed my front, and advanced
three or four paces, when I was brought
to the ground by a severe wound through the
thigh, given by an Indian who was about 20
yards distant behind a tree. Sergeant Hall, my
orderly sergeant, came and asked whether he
should have me carried from the field; I told him
no-to charge with every man. It was not neces-
sary to repeat the order-the men sprang forward
at the word. As the rear of the company was
about passing me, one of my sergeants and sever-
al of my men came and urged me tobe moved to
a safer place; ordered then to leave me where
I was, and cha rh e. One of them asked me to lend
him my rifte; a d in a moment more I found my-
self alone. Ha ing remained in this situation up-
wards of an hour, and the battle being over, my
orderly sergeant, with several men, returned, and
informed me that the enemy were entirely driven
off and silenced. The remainder of the company,
under sergeant Bennett, moved to tie left, ar.d
joined Lieutenant Humphreys. Lieutenant
Wheelock and his command were the first to get
into action; my company were thle next; and
Lieutenant Humphreys and his command were en-
gaged immediately afterwards. Not movie than
five or six minut: s elapsed after the first fire upon
the dragoons before all three of our detachments
encountered the enemy.
As soon as the action became general, Major
Heileman left the pickets with a six-pounder
field piece, and advanced rapidly towards the
scene of action, but when h:e had nearly arrived


within reach of the enemy, some person reported
to him that.a body of Indians were moving towards
the rear of the pickets. Apprehending an attack
in that direction, and there being but a few team.
sters and citizens, besides the sick left within the
work, under the command of Lieut. Talcott,
Major Heileman deemed it necessary immediately
to return to the pickets with the gun; but finding
on his arrival that the alarm was false, he directed
Lieut. Talcott to proceed at full speed with the
fieldpiece to where the troops were still engaged
with the enemy. This order was promptly obey-
ed :by L:eut. Talcott, who arrived on the field
just in time to render good service, in finally
silencing the fire of the retreating eaemy, who,
after a few well directed shots from the artillery,
sought shelter in an extensive and dense ham-
mock, about two miles from the pickets, and
about a mile and a quarter from where the battle
first began.
The engagement lasted about an hour and a
quarter. The Indian force is supposed to have
been at least 250: ours, you will observe,amounted
to but 70 men, exclusive of those with the field-
piece, which arrived upon the field just at the close
of the action. Three of our men were severely
wounded, one of whom has since died, and
another has lost an arm; three others are slightly
wounded. Of the officers, I was the only one in-
jured, having received two severe wounds, one in
my left shoulder, and one through my left thigh.
The enemy it is believed suffered severely, but to
what -extent cannot be ascertained, as those dis-
abled by our fire were borne off by their retreating
comrades.
In closing this report, I feel great pleasure in
expressing in this public manner, at the unani-
mous request of the officers present, the high
sense entertained by us of the unremitted exer.
tions of Mr. George Center, a citizen of this
place, in rendering every assistance in hioaower,
both to the wounded and the well amongst our
troops, not only on the day of our engagement
with the enemy, but at all times. I cannot too
highly applaud his generous and disinterested'
conduct.
I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient
servant,




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Title: The globe
Uniform Title: Globe (Washington, D.C. Semiweekly)
Running title: Semi-weekly globe
Physical Description: v. : ; 56-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: F.P. Blair
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Creation Date: August 10, 1836
Publication Date: 1830-1845
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from the Library of Congress Photoduplication Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 7, 1830)-v. 14, no. 7 (Dec. 28, 1843) ; new ser., v. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1844)-new ser., v. 2, no. 35 (Apr. 30, 1845).
Numbering Peculiarities: Continuous pagination, <Jan. 1, 1844>-
General Note: Supplements accompany some issues.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 08786335
lccn - sn 82014042
System ID: UF00073657:00001
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Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Daily)
Related Items: Daily globe (Washington, D.C. : 1844)
Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Weekly)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1832)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1834)
Related Items: Weekly globe (Washington, D.C. : 1841)
Related Items: Dollar globe
Succeeded by: Semi-weekly union (Washington, D.C.)

Full Text







, P. BLAIR & J. C-. RIVES, m.ted" and specified powers, and that no.'--h ,--
:TO.S I.Orats.2OS. I f t exercised under it but such as are expressly gie
TERMS. -- or are fairly necessary and proper tn canII sIe.o
erannum, ... ... ..$10 00 i .. fied powers into effect He repudiates oa"
.....do................. .. 5 00 L J i I .L I" cidedly the latitud.nous construction habituall
..do ....... ........... 2 50 J^ ^ N .^ -"^ -^ ^ ^ ** "-^ .":^ ^ "^- *' given by the federal party, andi denounces tb
for months,............... 1 0.I I I : 11 I '. I -". Alien and Sedition laws as palpable violation
.an a ~ r ...... -=- .......... ..... .--r _.:_: 1:1I ..... th1e nt, u o n t e s me s e c ,M .vtl
n o .:h .. ....... ..........12 00 .. .,,1 :. .._.......... : ..I.. Buren eptheo noa n f
y nto h .......................050 BY BLAIR & RIVES. ,,E Iosijsig~o M .ucB.,, :-: I Z VOB, V-I ...O. 7ie a
s to r e Daly for less than two, to I t .- -. : *: ... charter by Congress was tie first inroad made 0,
,alayear-e.th-nIfour,_ortote C_.___".O_,P WA. _T_1. -- -,-- :',--. ... those do1trin flmitostrctin
ss, than twelvemnth............. ... not....... I 00 be--_. I .-. -]..-_^ |.--- ___ .- --- .* s citation b et e he Repubinctine faIrty
I e 5T, zv C" "-". .. .. n o f diur e rimit tin e w en he R p b c n pa y
.s may discontinue their papers aI ... ..... .- '_.._. 2 V" OL .. T2.---_ z;7edandp the Federalist Mr'a
-ins for the time they have re- the work will soon be begun. Not only ths 'ten so extensively and industrioualy spread upo, of allhe opposition party o throw the election "tho .,e c6urtesi. wl,;c';h ouri o n d. ;ncinat on as tn, and .a ,.vs, the eneral, o n g lc s e P t u tisna e the oba nk.ltisosas wi the OB
buntwtot nr *,v httoeti subjct I have thought proper, in fulfilmne into the House of Represe !Jives. It nr,a n..lt "eli as the s .ir.re-pect wcurt prompt us to re- which tuiW' p0i'^8d;hisarumut w a teth iitu s o falo the ak tis addrss,(alead sw mu hie
ubyd notrwle u Indiauns within the MexCcaYn terrItory, but those of your wishes, to obtainNhis authority for this d be Zsome may be enthnsia r !noughto hope-even gard Within these -I,,s, (.wady woulo ucn ex.
subcrie fr yer, nd o ot .. ... ,. :'i1 I, I- .aw l wi~~ll~~ "0w ih ih u er-tnded)t o nrdchxrcs rm ti peh
ss yibing order discontinuance within the United Stateswillpour down as ofyore, elaration, against hope, that their fa candidate may be. how .It is possible to reconcile t(pe objects Ofthese p e a^' those who Were og lly tb a d eo- W tonten r selve withact, that th e
t, w fll be considered subscribers like the northern hordes of Europe, upon the de- Mr. Van Buren was bred in the religious prin- successful. Itn there be t ituch, his must ihre ,' Cr.reni,,,n, wilst the efforts of one are directed caresof ""er"dm1n Mla, h o opoe Wer usl of h with dstrate te
er hee aepetoto stopetopped, otd paynvotedfald inthtsuthfield bofethe south.eItsmayebe thesiPlarofstneoRethrs PsotejtantDItcavCeutcdugostspropebrnmineamnwih |n But wietterttlesehto:ssupporteJudge WuiteennaJfdItrot-ertoesad telohe tosuasGneah*Jaksnws. elPtin o bth ccsifsptrecllidedocstrateno rw Vantemsten
but .t "i nd who aveeIe td ians wnithinth enye xicnner r or gu t ad rposhea y be run wuthiac anWin G n terai Hi tsnq Gew ich Jacso si. sThis aon rguo st Virgini
subposiby offth ayexlaan authorities in this way to byterian chuctohes. t whilst he uresidedo in Kin .- election on the House, or ioe an overweening Are there not striking- .nd irreeoncileal-le dif- pro pe Ieveh lough t aid or ighto ti d rsuo c th e smen overgints
3 : orlies, thr ee n s-rt-ense. .. 1 00 relieve themselves of the troublesome struggle hook, this was the only church in the village; hlis confidence, that som e one||them m ay be elee'.ed, ferences. of political. bpiniobri-etw I~eri these gentle- But we trust'tdvi be receivel d wr ^ ^ -as more i d uL a ndt the rul e rs b wh hitof, toe beneralpoue n dent,
nalinsert~on,............. .0 25 in which they are engaged. But is it not parents attended it, and he was baptised in it; and the effect will be precise e esame. The nevi- men? Judge White, as fhasawe nd-cidaefrom enee tat ig fth optio wh0"1abo e y w c gt in to ae eIpondeb.re-e d'
.ers etseh n' propr twie duty of the Government of the United States until his removal to .he city of Hudson, he was a table consequence will otb endless Mr. Van Buren his public ts, was one of the warmestcsu porters wei h uss zeal o f t ho poisng who 'wer e originallJacoin Wed wills o a r nd Inton s o te
subscr ibi ngord erna.dis J nn pronotinuac te dIty tee e o"l6at a n s c T b geo eo o e f .ntne di rected t er so zef i talesy ato rin,.Geand Jo n op ps e so the dn r aeal Ivem
retlar attedantconsitererdisebsTheebbeing no fets nortehortihordos ofreEenouehtuponette de-ecord elentin.en wsustanedd hin thehrseierredshemseh, suc'nshful.behal-at th, seendhts mush ensureIfro a portion-oefhforppoof

secunthmadertobthosedwhoadvepyvse to fulfil the treaty, and reStraui h Indian hostilities, D tch church in Hudson, and ire. Van Burer, be- him, that the eleeont w devolve on these secon d Whi te, and o of tho ete to the General Government, 'ave on bip
tto be made n da, Those whether directed against our own frontiers, or coming' a member of the Presbyterian churchat House ofBepresentativ The number of partieularmeasures andopinionswhichffavthe Wih w he ersse t ths begam aotmy, thre sec on.dts to muc censure, fomed a porton of the oppostnmr-
tP n rn i t fy i th those of Texas? It may not be the interest nor that place, he attended with his family, until, her electios of President, or hich each Stale is greatest ofFence to a portion oftihe Jackson pary, c bytho, opposition,^ t oughtat nynhto u *oan ot ep u that r ty o n o st d po eh
tbym ,a o ur rs, potg emavs, o the- wo tfMeicoethatthepcIa se r ghfthe tr eay i death, a church of that denomination, first .at entitled, ; c fi xed by the edoe n tion to be equal to and caused Ohem to separate from those whot. haed T ,red s,' of brhed witaptee ito opuindos iu ted to hat by som noft heirap ov the
n-, or wess tf Mexico h e .$I of re t y Hudon, and afterwards at Albany, under thecare the whole number of its teisentatives i 'Con- been their political rAns Th alle ied-e ound c fn ea us e th e an be id tea top s iepuse thit b y w ere the ir o f
:er's certificate of such remittance, obliging this Goverement to prevent the Indians d Bt i i attend J n Chester. Since ti death of gross, with the addition o ', Senators. This ar- of their secession was, that Gen' Jackdrie gnler- wytfidee tarecaeo thmmerdation e M no laborted tMr. because and wed tortersao-
eent receipt therefore. oThe notes on th north of Texas fromninvading that eount,.y Dr. Chester, which occurred,At think, in the be- rangementmeven as to thea e al eol leges, givesto rained, and had advanced opinions iho patible ten. l B "hiswmmsehecomposedof nMar.y Vr us tthatduga n Mr. Adams, ad v d lr t. lf ses-
t wl l be r event o a yodrunp ssoti. ten butchering the inhabitants, stotUtld be cxe- ginning" of 1s 29, he has been a pew-holder in the the small States an advanm tic. n allowing them an with that limited and' -trict construction of the th sa e I c,,nmr,,,.(n -, cshed uofne vie, fact, ta ri ng Mr and iternao im-
statrscr~w lbeig at to ai any oreer outed; bu iti th exresl stplae dutyc church, and has usually attended, when in Alhany, equality with the large ,,'so far asthe Sena. powers conferred on the -Government by tie onu- th peopl ehpropret ( ow, es:etien,) rged pnea Ja ckahg t o proeetsb teGee aloverandmenterpnl the
on certlacth e n i ntrt of the Ree. Dr. Wes of ts the e sl te be t e e ministhation its service: T he situation, ever contended for ,by the republiat Pon t e p preoidoneyPthey o ele tn General ack-e coseetend byed Geneaag l Go ents e, w n thet
mpanies it. who f of fulis Gvernment; and what the treaty re- Baptist church, a selection, which, I presume, may main, however, the pro.,ati 'is to be considered party, of. which they claimed tt-be tne straitest on. Hoppositioncy, iempeay eouthosered o ar isti ost eted and declarffc t sae, wad st. the C
to the Editors, charged wth postage, quir.gs is enforced by nll the obligations of hu- be ascribed to personal friendship, and to the popular in its characters, 8e each State has sect, if not the exclusives, whilst their brethren now 'i110 n 'o ayohostiet r a uen T he-pron Bue' te indruth, Mr, P"an Bur ten o d.inio s up lon bt
ken out of thee -Post O_ ce. mny towardsthe people of Texas, as well as high. eharscter.eof that distinguished clergyman a vote proportioned to~i obers. But When -(who, according to their own belief,.remain fir .n ^ led i he most oomy for ebodin s, a ugthese subectsh'ave been greatly oiionsr presnted b
--. w t i aga ns ou r n frntirs or ability and eloquence P the election is thrown oHa House, tlh e vote is in the faith) they regard as no better than heretic., p .-d and-opd g n the reateshaamitiesiWo b e snte ubJacksos ma gesbee getly msreresshented.
SMORNING, AUGUST 9, 1836. considerations .connected with the safety of ou i r .u to Mr. Van Buren to add that e is no given hy Statoso resi .etd, ll Siates of Dela. Judge White continued to sstin Ge Jackson' a
t rtoporunt O Dyig thr-tos o Txa? a f heJaksn q th counvd ythey ppoin tiase of whaenverlJ aks n chs .s uce s. ommendd% m ifctoofheTrfwih


own frontiers. Mexico may have changed her sectarian, and that he uninbrmly has been and is a ware, Mics gfi n, and Abyt will have the same administration until the last session ofp Congress w h e oounearly fin iased the G er ckon 's ucctr mfo hewssth oin dd po du c ation of the nsrieu tc
RY OF THE INTELLIGENgER; policy,H bUtEn cannot N Gchange r dONrthe treaty. tar hevilnmesdecided advocatend o if freedom ueOf conscience,y our o-and weighstates a ras e n ii.,Pei atandsNew i tYok" ween lie acted wlith the opposition, Indeed' ie w ted The second t fo which ws po the eon, o te rv ent
S a t lnte ner m of the equl rights of all persons to participate in In this state of-things av votes, nd where about the time of-his last eetiontothe te i enenbea usth e d en t The tothe
in yt hen Nti onas I elig e n cer ois th i NG r e v ent I n. o th e th el ate s Jn C hes Sin c e ty o er o f S tes a he eq u a d di : iongi's- e natoe is r of ,laredrisecesetter w h ich w as ep u b lish e d T er- l deu e mit a .rec, om e nd atin ho f M r.c e, justib.e r e dti o n i ap o r t io n a i e sto eq a
Gintenti s off ,th lieernent purpoee ofpT Nashville deptiblican, attempt to turn to stituion, ed bone membe,.tsa -ae may decide the nessee,,that it was ,'feu r t,, .uppoie that ., "- ii. eMmi du r rng hs te rmof e c, utc in reltio tok-e-- d utheia lth o uorabt'ts-soud e, atonal intIr stsa
A tI haven w h tonr, tlobemi .e. contes-. Th^e-C.onadat' .sS ^ "titf at s w as. .unfiwnaiy to tl, t co.stru. Lti,.,,.--On o the "e "- "-- e..... .. ^a t t hen ve_..> t .. o. "
n w ll be g ive~nto any ore r, s ocdn? t eq the resoluton-,d etn ;llded byhe L eg i.. ,".f. Y our ....t it, ise tru as ahe r ed or eny casn t,., O ur m aytbepjsrrous lt. tthose-nterertn-." ln M r.-n
Ptlipa',i e et hei. On of this-Govenment; 'n h" the treaty.e- B... st c ur ooh,asee ,t_:tion, hcIpeu e a antoee, te. oI- t econsieedparty,-,of.herch hadG e y. clar imed has lway hesrbieen kn ow n p op th Preiona dwencythhaey incoutreas d wt apoid Bmo ns let e r t oaC m ite poied y


:ifflitoeEditorscharedtha tu, qures ifSttes corbt a lg themoe than a majority of, a e AARON VANDERPOEL. rized the Huse to decide l the th,.ee thiS h, to have been a supporter of the administration of s stcttde, out ommetv w hs wbinceased wth seapid me letin atShe to apring, Cmo rtth taporintd by n
sTffre gnp ow~ers; aond imorhurcon th sdrages of tle whole Union. This White Hen. ZAnoKc CAsEY. est voted for. But this provision was clearly Mr. Adams and Mr.' Glay. He received an ira. oti cites'o ar meincre hasin wintieaned bvreaut o eet i Oc tobr 1Sheth expr esses, hi s N o ptaoinaons
Postrgan tow sars fthe purl o T meant to provide for eases, hale, after a bona portant appointment from that administration e mnuta ctures are flourishing n t and eagiut, our, Ot obeThermrote 18i2 yte ndglts expresersad hustnions:ecame
hine.food to domestic party dissen- "UNIML DEATH ADDRESS OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE fide struggle for an election b.6 '-H people, the is now warmly sustained by the friends of Mr. mothe f alhrs, has i labors rehe a The frequent and itssaroperation whbecame
Rling questions of foreign policy with drto "iT0 T b heT IZENS OF VIRGIN1A.. c ntest coul only bedecdedyy the House. But Cay in KoDentuc and is identified in public remunerated L Our western countrycal amit s fo ill;I lrieGden. a panedth cabinet;eanc thepoaney inrlaiil to
I 'I. He hafonearly parlorithethebsectndatermhforawhich'nshouldhp


"D IN li lEN"eparted.this life, on the 30th June, the c dle- cided i a oc ous an.edo o rful ,cons er one was n t ever contemplated, that, by any ar .ange- opini with the American System, (that is, a tariff with indut iosnd cuab le i s nda l m porthresid rented 10 irr evio e ssage hac ince
disputes. To accomplish all these brated Expunging Resolution. Its untimely de- : .. ..?... Ih-s. a, "u olu .n pon -t-. pa one ment made a- pror, the eleet'in was to be taken for pi otection,) and a pl.,n of internal improvement ciis r spigngls~ s anp inluthe wienessasbitantsbeend apowtco ned, wit t hat prnk evsos wh eogest has ehare
designs, a the Intelligencer makes cease w. s aseI ere blow to many dear and loving W ch we eq aritly commend to the repuricians m uteofthe hands of the Peoplesand the will ofthe by the GeneralGvernment of the widesteete n em i rnaotbleeneiesd ait by entTe ofthe ndommn
orts to prove that Gen.-Gaines'move- friends and relatives. It left the World amid 'la- every quarter og the Union. House of Representatives, volt-ing by States, sub- Judging '*tom t he pubit e course of these' glentle- ou rev e net is b urieen gso' r mod i etat we, juan ts of the vetient o thed
5e nt i ons the Govesr nminn nfboundaryy, mentation, weeping, and great mourning.' It is ............ BB. situated for tbeir choice Wit would have been men, they are antipodes in politics., How can a ow presentehe l ovee so pe oducta e to a we waps o the wordorsw.viewto an n ustiein t of the aut uon-
SI thou that th is event will s serious Iy affect ints o D R E S thought of a proposition in th.-ederal Convention voter, ta n, give to ;its electors a powe, to ,ote for ofa nation entirely ree -oe deth a i y b ei) isn- s
purpoie o I Tli6 N I ha e t:-,,-onar..ir.e-eststnb thek counteran6tion .o-4.1-reigsLipolicy,_ -oCfJ1


was a more fallacious or iniquitous, nearest and dearest friend, Col. Benton, that lhe t, o' to give tie election of President in the first in. either of these, wbom hie may find the strongrest? T, etreasur oe flowng t o mgc degree wth at it aI y bes eti~nnSuiofull to oeinteret. an Ihv bee thus
I.Tinwe bondry isthow ben st tld.ywil -lwsotl im ef" O f -e 'lCresodn m ite, t o nteth -'T e--C" diu' .. tL



The bounday is to besettled by will follo sliortly jmself." 'Of theaCenratoCoreesoodsegoComRetee tonta seanceWtutde HouseofpRepreeetativese W uldndIsdthoprivileeetoebe extededeto Mrundstee essaiT toverrowindetoorcdeapdegre toat it appreesense onmentstI ullowconcw; audoI tae beenethu
:00111A1161" ee I Sol ag ture or st; i e.3 cqnainingffitie thanaieajin"y tfh -stIaauth rnothefhtndstridehot.ticreasd withrapidturen'


.on stipulated for in our treaty. Who- "The deceased of the expunging resolution "C Atzens of rv it not have run counter to d id our ideas of fer ee also? That gentleman is known to entertain tte inof.large sums "in th Srie f or sin-erea ndlaplatof thesep etg
e western branch of the waters, dis- would doubtless be a triumph to Judge White. ^ (rom the Richmond Enquirer.] Goenent^ ti^sW udt no Sv blende d fep r- opnos udo the 61d Federal party, it their great- external retous" 'we are6 equaly fortnte I!io, uwreb rv:itrs o oiia ^in e
ent deartmens, whih shold: beever-kptlay- est atitud.v"d' an d sticessf hand surwfhitee vr y shavemeen titionofg,; :ts h oermn o'im neo



into the seat by the river Sabine, If he had truly represented the will of the people ne de. ote a large portion of this day's paper tinct, attd converted eur freeitnstitutions cto an T em signs of the ;ines in Virginia ore st.6ng to oredu cte asing he s wi m a nd pb e ahi Oe r, consitntwhh ut s tbh ep
s~of foegn poers; an for te purrI meantto proide fo ccomicallladmiaftrtarbononoroatiappontmlntsromttht onlyinastrinistrIeaIiou



,tablished as the boundary, or tfae of Tennessee, the resolution would have been to the following unimpassioned, argumentative, tristocracyr ? Nor is the experience which the peo show that the psistion trb' Manuoitnu ts wa. w h a drec w i sthed and e gurlt urdomet ic i c onsstemProent ienpuragdmstabinto sue/i
ibranchwhichretainsthenameinthe carried at the lyst. session. It was ascertined. clear con eCusve Aaddress. We may so chr- pae have had of elections i tdIinthe House, such draw essetialy Judge White, the g ha ocerns.Th adistrto hasinf- m t atr santiall dbandit
lig q estonsof oregn oliy wthe.at-dtbi liee ntten3thiune ttocee-ohihis ashmor us ld owefulrpa eronaas tteeryont mrltedadaIptfilingtoeiour



I however, that Judge W white" b- misre-resenting er t e etho gh t sined with t gso u ein ueiaenein roaeed-rt s h sti th eiu ose e aple s bl e r.J rson, iorot sr e ars
-desin, ,,tlbeheld thelgt cru m ks cae a eee boundarymany da adlv i/ng ameichwe hearil comenn detof the h n repubitscanpst-in gswih aecaclae0o cv he io ilta enlmnpr i i. a et eue, mintisar spinigfi'ingd up and tmh eewialdernessatos wif thy s elves;witha vpro pewepcfrtarle h(e sta


,f very little importance to te United his State, would just enable the opposition to to. e recommend it to the calmconsideraion" deciding, and giving the deWrmination to thlat hne r alytosrein hene pretensonsowpersoxnsmagtOur-nationalldebwthan ofb p ,a os w o
very q arter ofthe Unio I-loos of Rep esentatiesdvotigibyosedtein su -oJudginonrom th ndabiriitywand



boundless territory in the more tern- triumph in voting down a second time the propo- of epery citizen of tle Union; and. we are au- body. I'e the ease of the c test between Mr= to whom. he las been always poii l o have al n aine nd r om mt erg a ianc with n e weanitr s or tie contto aouast ajorityed, te ple
des, there is no motive to prompt our sitio wto expunge, Itwas therefore concluded thorized to request sr pu a pr ess ef son and Mr. Burr, the attei who had note f d e t W it od eeplics.-fl o s-anthed c tst cour S areso nnt hhs
.to covets little slipoof territory nearer by the republicans of the Senate, that.they would nitt..pt se,, Globe, a repubhcatlon orwin, ndr ht upc wn h oi no t rieseen i n cas es alculated to tenim'yt sion
n e r smnaer e t f i n C l B n o t akle. t i e them ele c ti o ne of P r cs ie y n t n teafr stein."m a e ip o w e r of .t he t ms te, th e c o u rse m ay fi n h eis tr o mng e st? s m a h e h v b e v d s r clth e a w s i n-



Texas, whether that country remainsin wait until Benjamin Watkins Leigh's place was TO THE PEOPLE 0i" VIRGINIA. so by the House after forty ilallots. One singlIe traio and who woukl fI tits cabinet anda ,hTm .. ,.T "/ ... .av .bev~snu.. e The compromise (as it is called) of the "tariff
f Mexico, or becomes an independent filled by a successor who would obey instructions, ELIO'w-CITIZESS: The time is near at hand, "diinlblo t"ow in t "i scle wol ,o n ,fie ne hi, .,"-e hi to o n e ranr wbt ie nave uemanclea or no country qet o .. adutdta sujet n th ya
hav m de it re on er te Oand i o Ibraty o ef wi g osuldch tes aa adow edgree theta.t. i.. ...t .. -, .. .... he s sh ud b o sdee ob n e



gould be only throwingV our frontier far- and itntil the Senators of Michigan and Arkansas whenalyou rillbe called upon to exercise one oft it ould alts, a t i known t o p.iciplr- w nic. et aunut ; ann w st we nave nst B ti
.ont stiputathde bornin ourvtrneaay.inter-reThedate humaoafttoeexpungning ,rosolutionh *.I... ..large osums.inhthem Statentreasuries.onIy oubr rinsedeband



otectnmn, and it noth tbe reach of should take their seats; when Ln ad EwI ,a re^ men nt h firs br -.-ede
session. b The'acquh ston of thswstre p a, d SOUTl Able, and MAtrGump, and ToJLug sW next, you will have to assemble, and to declare by -] t i tI th r a e xtern l y practis ngwoe aese maxims in our in- ,res ricting ,t, a ,,
f -endear tments, whichr should: be everen ees whicheoslatitude. t I I and succ.....ful,-.and -o..... ... .. ..ave........t .. s w ns oaom lead ooofi



is not the object of the order of Ge. and Be, If c, the contumacious Senators, together youl suf-rages, to whom you are willing to confide mTsgtt have...-, ....e os dietrous 1o mark voc. y o ,lh -t' ......ea ..... true If ele .te r cursewtnuienationsoI meearthtlie cal aldinistrto of its ,aa s. '
;t bih d a h o n ay r t e o e n s e ,t e r s l to o l a e b e othe fh ll wingu nimcf p assionent and tatve, arsto rac ?'eoris he hp ren, whih he eo. sh w, hatthe op osiion ar en eav rin t wih. itiri -avediect d a d e u at ou- eometic ca



is fully explareins the instructions with the whole bodyof therconfederates, could oc lusi v "";ress nW e_ c .s"- the sense of th i peopleotte dangers at- he must conform his cow......tially....,udge o police to t he-... a.. fthe sums tobe rasedunder thetarff, as now
des shllbe eldth tre bunary ho evr, hatJuge hie, y srpee"i a /rieoi,.ecasethughit s ignd ith0 a t enourgethe inco l|nncig roced fnlitsl wts nod ofpkepigohmi tles idstedshewisoexmpegstebrM.- orfferonu ofeoutry a



.t e h w j e a. S ... e. hent of the United States aits election, tenant ou elsectons of President made by the stoles of the onnosition ...t. a .- .. .. ... t y adjusted by law, should ploys excessive; should
fetary at W ar. The view whth which be voted down by a triumphant majority. Th,.s .. ,o a House, an d g ivind ge t o the c oenst.-tion to wt-at mer y o is at a tme o ehoptetemp rtnce to ueHus ,s all n arendent as bte ellbled wito none. med toe wantsont iii ,o-.
iry anu contingent ocunpatton Of the will be done at the next session, and Judge White country, is rendered immeasurably more aso, speedily adopted, compelling the e electors to desitr. If we have succeeded in dea olitic .ally t e ...... .h.. absa the snald just described, the people, it is believed,
authorized, is not'only justified by the will find, that hias contempt for his constituents by the circumstances in which we are placed, the n.a n r ther lallot whoh.o d nut If Judge Whiould be and elercised. the ivmluabe n as ee exientei'ann. f ac l stated, and t Uetessary "
ions, under the'circumtances" upon wil" bring out from the people of Tennessee" some principes, involved in. the contest, ... ..aand the ifpor- dent, and whom as Vice Prhsident. This was ,ptiivilege of selecting for themslves ....t :,e.dhec i Ce i, te in pe ofduties, merely t0-aceumulate surplusesin .
, ..c. a .i. .. t i .t o tnaaut consequences trt eay result om the se- calculated to diminish the dangert, but not ent rely M agistrtte and haveeexhibited a t orture":} tl I 'tlPa' y at .. r citzens, and tor the Treasury. i f the tariff be kept within the
order s prec acted, but is expressly decisive ma festatn of their approbat n of the,-11hahmuhtbeteorse"fr t .. .. of a 'm h'y p We ha, o bservet seament Hethl as o "f" ate Bu
Texswhth r ha cunryre ais n ai utiBnj mi W tknsLeghs laeas TO TH P OP E.1'VI GI IA s b-teeoue-fte crtl aeos. On snge reiosetwhueml. il nst Onetsld helai-netrliy. Wehae em nddsftanco nty



or M the x oi owng artibc e of the treaty measure which eis Nashville organ would fain petr i or our cotmtr, that in the h election to the Chief made by the House of Representatives resulted in ment iuthis reset is emosdrt pa . t. ... ... g .n g, apprehend that it will be oppressive or danger-
ro: b -f suade them has been consigned to oblivion. The nMagistracy of th' e United-States, the people have .mae it. publicwil tru .. o ......t.dis t ie sl- I ..n.... wubuto m ildlyton t mjusti ce toou .
thdmseiprtnarghswichbloggt toepo h watve trbeenhith obttatte n `rmeyist b _udieter utoehisr's b vs s o ornetalr" tt ..



3. Itis likewise anm reed that the two maj krety ofthepresent Legslature of-Tennessee, y ute mntrol nethe n hands ann tatt('f they incidentaof the Presidential contes i and subs. ...er- regula.t .e ind du ac tion..... ..y proveha t he sel vesiwearr ". rrelatton to internal, mproement, the only
parties shall, by allathe means in tleir ie Judge White, hypocritically secured their tinguished and most honorable station t r ied ta s i i a o f c nts g ers W speed arye n the t
,t'te S srn.y1nd e aIt in iiua f hIE eutv ov,- ,I r lm .. 1: .. .. .....fthe .. .. teBuren ,a-o i oe l h 'u bra dra



ian n ot hon ewh o inh f b th eo l and s o d seats n b p retendi n g the ntsm i p to e n a restoden t. th e fr e ex ercise of to e p uhom c w ill in g e p o w e rs cn osen m i p rehv w ttn a cost v cit on,'a tr at s o le oc-a their u nblic a11 z eaToh athr so ,.c .... w as 'ustai ne_ ... ..... Mh, .. ..... J e .:; off er so n .n
ltihe ilyespan rivers which form the Like the Judge, they will endeavor to make of the President under the constitution, it must tionresultednts.om the forms of the constitution, Wens w frmo urseof'elloicytostate e o. rrd a ontest o greasttoo erey a nea grounds peculiar to jit, nin ut6 thedipo,-
'to s adt e impression that the State would have the b te so n e ofteY s limp rtc o Our -Ho se, "An"P a e m tto ,o itosyouw-ath ran nt aheswi t hw..e
try andte contingente occupatttihodncaredtofrethes willshobe, donet attimtthe next,,tlsess-mann.-is....... ..... White .., h_ mann.......ions, ,fbhy 1 twh.ich rour
'J. P ... .... rad fCly fulim eahmnttoreai uo Bt hemoe.exeniv hshowrs impg r e nterd om s. s- polesoudrtainandexrcise ..he ,,nvaluable seinit, m ampe taunder on orew to n oh atn an "


p-n a t e su lt from i t lated trestrinh, nyheon iebutno nel tionlandlea ve enh .t a p t u e
or der i sawi r o s erbth is e xp .-es s y o e iti v e- m a nif- est at i o s e en t t oe r a sth ti e to d on e ,- ,.n,,p,-s,o ns l i nf e s deisttor m .the p ubli c (nnd o wof ha v e s ben th e re suptn fu b ich n we il, e d o ) t e ser titior ti d o f wort une, or oh e fello w -citio n wf t hawe irresieepatte ntio n of thenou

t'~ e~ Y r eh fofcro -e -oen et an th "i"a cante- peoped beindth et td ~to arcins uctit ot p er o dof lfe up t o tnex"ionrs e n tsta i me b or othee and th, oe osatn he l-k ea-gding obet on rhc ,,v .,, =- "\ ",^-^-^r^.^^i.*revc
Inns nh e in w hi ch may .a. It in Tennessee lnalr rlmt i. aThe o t he the election tak e helrang e rsn e shi c howhe thi r ,o,"i.. of sbtt thert- ee fe ted b the settlomento s of lon gstan du B. fl eo t v e t t
Staintes efol n arti clt e ofIldlstre aty m easurewhic -i .. ....lleorgan oldo f ai.Betn sper- ceor o urc ntrtateintheu selection ot o til e rse m debythe Houseofindhespre senstnaativestresulthedned paents hishlyresp ect ab e poed, b thw y ere an ten in rcompensaiong mfo r thejPri esknl uc y 9!ltra~ te~ ~ ~ trand a~ i ; ....



withle UnitedSe a n uc s o the peo ple h is ou t thepe ubn ic and th .T 14trutan he f t hi the doubet then a cnly g res, wh ed a e cis tobe n a dn the ureope ex top vsonso we woldl addetstof o the ol lio flo r oad uesan a t noreu end
0 t i to c m it h stuctioes wme hasi boeen ose dtapp o"ob Theivion. Thei thei ownend tlaro s ; ndi at (m i thm i tncint s nof th e e x teme edicin eoft eect ing he i a l to o m the ale wit mn w o eatr i ...

alGazens onf rs th o Untd tts onnuf a jxe reouin as tonoprshoedment orth ewr Ju dg neWht' the' pr net, slonienf torm t h at pb is m ssntiallyhei consctitutri o te woldlbe toade eatsal thea? Butbh t wetl t, h a nd n,.est the adett ousea of ofi cialuwegh o ofm llo-ifiei n s wtihe Uted exaties (p aps breflyso .andw itre ndusingr theireg adaUmeinistrtin01arhsould eonsgawsut.
3 iteis tatli ewiseanygr a nne r edt- t tiet o nma fit tof the presetn ythe posttu te d a h b ruSe l by so aca s to s ahd lLave e ion tae n d re lin ntica o naid etion s, s on his ab n a-kb on al ts eofone y i p id the so eaccountsnaomn as on exp se ro nuri
pr t ies tn sh allb al of t e m M e aico ie tthe Tenness e Whinte thyo critic ally sec ur e i we ru tt o a Bd o them e l les) om a h ca n sar iv uea t s tha ot tfeev hto select, af t t o o gon-ehsf s d, t.mo um u dp4ra sth n iber(and
te on7 the pohde n udya al the that t-e "n r c nsnt thnatt ete meW e d cit is th out hhhehhlphtoentedd with ae n with vendle and oem arkable d o th atire o inuby an d the i ratto itsreference)oth eons atisoators of
'atai npe acendfr m o t o ns teructtinguisheitd of theosen ...o... .. .. .stati....o. done, the choice o f t6est reldensta t ad W icrom y p g of t r l o d i th is ,rs speechei ;tasau
.. .. --- We parent astonishes, men, ^are v thee groteatl. bidda t he ld teop themsew ;-or, Whaptol in Ja nuar y constietec tions? i sojul dgb e 'ants e co "ting enth, an d to resistethe adv er of t heaa wei tin g the Uhite di pao lte i cal op one .nts ithorieduving thea iist rat er af Mr. Jong
W w rn IsreSpeut res b oundreen' t fre ex c ia of the o er el )tli a p M Vowu beao v e e d s d e f t s iie p t i we
Fnnt ios Wh inhbi .... l.... ad Tnesepit hul ao omk h makes-fthe Prs ide n y theundaensch enor th e..tiuioitmstecli osanid b some, leth cn vichioose dee his, nd leav te i r a nd oitedandombeatious Hesup o nrat.ainfed an A ck aont xested) ofng e hatsdffculy end expoeliac gounhedispoiino h1ertr f h ttsn a



the a ind s t nh e ri v ne s io fo r.e n e a r t h w-"ik e t the, u th a t th e y w il bend e a v rsse0 o r s ulted f r o mrnfom smof h w Y th on e p rin s ir n o- ", W" i sprocfe f ells bio en s ,s t e r u tome to y th eo o re asane vnt n e r a t ioul d a be e e x tend h St es t ro w hcs se .y h
Teata11, o t tnat W eate w hat at ths bex session; ttat tne ot N ew York. Bidi B onta tman ce nr m. S ale fr, t h isecore sywa ndst he d aLi terof tonc s ahnt pr ofee) t o haintain, tn his
reto asn theont d tcouueies;ndnd t ebetter totheaimpressondtht other S ato hae the e" ad mitte dare tve ry iteive. motd not them ndos ee thought thiscadi the reason ateowhi shouldne-n t h p o f ,,in--ey the U id isles expofato poifhcawrse pursued ben th le a c ic fa


rh. Thsex pepesetled to e trai eb forte, h t" t..e.e exns tm mB reoum 6~ a oeen es:gn es.. "" "nte Stts tran extaordin ayth choiefrom this pssueoleyt thepv the rns I fhe R epubians of artoy, wnhics own Sate, wobserance ofehe ruese of dcorum itn, histakeethes lund 2 l :[a heneran vl~stl dev lopment of rl. Va
j esrth u'slops o f th e Sarbof ne cn an d will gons i trmn to .. .. gr av to lic td lesstnhown o yu.uiee tlour csiu ort tof M ork. w s that and w s .. .... ... ... re no b t to the...... oub;g
S .,ec :,b pas r t es tbn d a ie s t sulrand o ef o ut ouapy eueye me m r to re ain .uon ven the m r e t the Cxonstioejand tspors de estimablet rst Who ist .ull they cns ent to conve t ian e t tht ofe, twan" arppoitted by en ralJa ksincsdonoritheowfr e nv sti aton int t e hadnocom itee
pevsctzn tteU ie tts >e,.dctr esouina grv thifm ,f to oueallaradhnrbeeetosUe eletr w o ugtobecndee meelycoot v Sec-f retr ofSaeofo eU itdSaes n ins in o ulc eteyrqie rosofcags .. pnin elae yth rdeti h
"lh ', y P ......




n we, ise s,..... '-t hmh te U.ps a -and t con t hem ith the itrbeco aes -thed e e lts agnt 1her hattornes to eecteteud e a tl e Ct Vn BSt.n waes- brou g ht calledm w ict ahe beenex pecited thathsoeedegreetfrogur and frii pnu p p beeto upon thd bs and anual m sa wer, aeI
reas been, no t hen e xican .- .. byN fo IS .... Reub ican" cor posines the firstCelettora C Mr Itl? ioe hem vobtes of" theirftewo so fari a-1ps nthe fopu iee nd thae een ofatned ue tothe, wa bearaneown by u rwoun d c ens e le nd"es tand t-em, ars e as fol ows1 t
.. .. '" l',Il h' "av" .. .. ..C. :,..I."I "s- PQI t'e diz.-adlI htiye.-neos--i- -aL LF- ,-l,1Vrol- 1,11







tersrit h ethebeundan~hein worthtofqa rtbe t'urer Jug~anlw te avn dat th D n IExthSe I NSHtnote SeCao ACH. ,en"e-esn.V e w -, Jeffson .,s l ti hn ue n, d o f it te Cov ention,. ce hoie mof rsiet o oos, concned Iae....... t hi s pre tet trea- mpres ntl t e.H oeleted "to t ate Prsdencybytor, denn cao, Sc wepnued towmd dt. rirmn esto Y g'rie pss doe nt posses,l t. e prowesse to mamta.ande n,,
.. .. .. of .h Meuanoenmna-"^^ soi hihteops ti n mod i~e commndeJdg Smto you r the epe offVircan a. voter,,l When he oeshto thiscn ae polls kn wa aou rwardsgelycntrtobuted Senate bof vehv epo theUntd i e ofohm al wat'in r t he ave bee hrledke a td trm.juisnictio tofthhe sextentd mIehandoe statiedn
uoin ,ll thy a t -mina o nd u.n iruat. i rltin scadd es"r hedstngi"e ffcNoorwhmheisvtig ora PeidntBs evoin ee n eaonthrgrtnTe uee o heedicrmnae cusrsotlneeehnddjutieotgato(i te ihtfhh popetht h on
Unit- The beonles ettled to the litne' r _conn enl s, gotmeagain, st ot, w put th1of rein t- mP, a nd Wi'logia Sm ith, of Alaba m,, forditi on, est G .Wi llc vhe _eplca n eno t tll.. .. to delegati .unques. n,,Ehtio hahe serv aed fodelany.y te.ars'stand" pom, witho utme ry h ald wt ther oun stint. Those n- re ca l Gover"m a pe.
zN.acegdohels a1 irnm ; th seh! =n-their those ei prfcesoiroleri ves whiheub'n taatsoisverld"av""b". "t hse en the wore p o fr lt, m is tsUelydeperv-e nt hefist rns o h s d a bodyo wa onowledg wof makhne -lkely be dan unoe t he w eap, msketh or ahe monsttuio eennera ltdealop et poer. qan d



whichform he bm darze of te two wtesw ^ & w^^^ oriinal.ewitethe Oint ma: :n a simple, and inte alligibe issue to the mse ha s plce tlie prand geon deidon g eys. how seine ; ofohealneststt, mend oef-posesshn. I e ch arte oftsu h eunsp riega t'dv oioent Tbsis, ey hare as Bu ren s triews n ia s toxuernal e wthro efeutsce
,A o terlinesl anot r esu whic h or theiI. atd s-ftn n ithl som c paeto fI e ".cidc forflo -iies ntetlesu ilo 0h clcorw o n he la madef the keepers d ur aniy, o m ner H LI'?llY tl!if,t'-rea s his J,-o lqp mens n fdm en ae ed to thei nqiytw ehrtA itm to fhsb httergt





f :tnpnnre tma apn ^usnes: 7:t ha n any :: ;'a r r credulous wi ;, odut ^ ^:ysnmiae o tl i e in qe ton of this con sci ene, ain d t my live u tha s surne- wans wthe expect ad G o urey n vernrone ok whilst tlneru r as obethbey aore ov just; onhlt the wy ex ot :aprorit ion inu,,;,, tacs of hsc letterntl the
CRarUnt unSad s theIda s, -ay -a-^ tl,..e- i nt En-ls h-ors66es, -publish ,,ip.-tiiya We ioosr-o rely empha' iall--o7--a-ci-e-',ic.-evry-.r-e an-s ,old conider a ayby"pssioipor horfedhetorindscretiog and(aneta ormidalesrnvalwnoetandsmnatter ^ gg general acted upon, nd;soong 1,
ciftiz enst o ien t oh Uni ted i the d resens t etsl r~eres Wce i themtheyll a do0send prtoin ee thoot sacewasapotdd te aiena W r qe bueta B ato thn of toand thes r am bon Eee es an a no w- Shoceo om ytthe e
ians inh itd ee (w ich, toandslthatexter i t h vindic agtobor thy ofsoluio a btae o inf y it eri na otiontse i ba nu in or e new. o "t he Welach o ht t tobe onsiton o' te redScfaryif te of the piutie. of ts and inis- tedge of tli e r equld p o cha rgles the onstitaed by eacresdt insthf
opi niono dr i ne ie to ndntoeff t, hte contest t the duty f Pe their aen tsoIheirn a t ne y W t oa Presidtentd aend ts th re boto Slat e a nd bee r eal l e d whitha a re po itc e, ans w lla ndvdmoder permitvti tem t ays ief bt th at it isP rse vedilness, ah t
n Stos pr the ai ndianstresidny that A T OR OLof.B t hon undpre, sirnedomposin e tra .omo fwio, itou s e arbitspreies th f, so fate e act thanexpeence yn d knowledfe nf the otwen pu t ri dw b uound e nse u r e em prwopesa der s thandti even suc a rop towsh. Th on-
,ablishtextatopicconalwhichiweashalle, withsa ron,






rterri stories to'y, o mmistak sutlitieoiesdhe so k rst an Burendds of ario sCandidatesh t o m t le wieple thain apoeros th ae El etos I the po Els, nowet pc o u w e v and particularly the ease fr eckless in he s diction t o t he etent haestrated; a t
sete et in t er ctae o e i rf o or s o d n," hos en rte(>f H ns etions, whior til e pu lcamndi >t of their (If s o~L rnage av e o n etesdilb to se rvat e ,pu lior ll have dd riie n e et o h o nry oh frig v r ay q aii d to flb heato f he h u e, be c n ,b o spbheirs n t e

c otizens all ofntheyn t eso man the hole i ofna n uaat w ine cient ashingt on, dvniaidsfoandidne ote oi r the-ostilnow-citedzffi lw is, pledgd the slvye sn f to xaamirne i shbentfs ofte vo dting seenaso to regre. Them tie a e sinet senate aeeusect to elevenate h s tiem of p uari m iit, i the harb ors at the ron-
arn y ao ng th i sev eral i a s t ohna Ben, ersoraly a outante wnish Mr w t hav pees n te s renentesad, a orrcanve pe opleb er bn r e bsot r, Ju White, dr e vtio be sonuatio n Buren oi se by thaed wity and call, somehdn the eadin ecton s hih wec t th W it e S orh he s urtad by
the therechien offic ther of th re nt and tNew Y k n ui k w te lc a t e a tt Vi P i c a osig a d orey I-dhd t a
United Strytat tes in dany mannfersht- ai 'of 'th e n cnttuin byte i prostityueled uponk s the beain land infl e side ntfp ialc i selections adu Wiols twe ye sot acc tabl to havlti poiinpry W doae the election tki eygon iswnuaddxnosof l Mis V an i bueen, uorged by te r o pp onet of Mr nBre m ttao n. ul ^naot ioa detf ai.3.Tati tb






inhaity ho tands adjaosit;o to rhestrines B n v8^ 1a S car'irEgihtote, fa ieage wihtor hym k' "'^^ c did yte we "o g emHt ar risonav i called tel Heoisevting tmeta aun uet iounayohler ailtandiv idualitye upoT ohe hara- poisne hBu he, a teoptshvei oeen lips. Th rae in-Gvrmntsol erstitdt
wtieh form the boundaries of and wo that-esais tonn hiys.a-lianfe wthpepea. The quar sfiesdior, orlernlyv esihatsl er an w etlin dfon an th o rst f tlhe m tepr iess at tri p icn tgrity thm aro ,gsho iew ayanwiled baer f efrej iee liey to w bewouald Phe mise mpl ent onsittion o oner a t pot e r, that foe-
,alaGames oof, of Bank emory, an hrs been epewe e f to ne f identy sndfr es deWlly onis te o nttlnmi ati le e xy to tememe ics neong the ofialiero torse, he nd wi t h tar le raness mist b en Yhoadasewred sonhre st to supp os w e s rid of sh e nta te, ro andsens bl
,sa full warrantwlfed r whis ch o rm ther Wepaed not storisen ndth withatoJuceh itentythe pe operd i u fie ie nsaordwhati his essent illotuthoulet m ashoileh bread s to feprs i t.w andtu r enity of tannepower a t e alts hisoo-e Weat i au ni t en a t S edtot he P durys he thernd state oi t
nf tha t ties .en ns s ee prin ts aou s the nis n areds ob tneof the pooest hofbt, g e S pcowing ha v isa niy i ,lence, a t wou he l astr s urran dl r- v eent d ilespctm ob opination. gHot an ven aei dsted In ra l G objexcnentedo, tl e 4ut of M he wtl b of een appropation, oshbefieilhet th e r
;tre nin and ndof the -sraitof res brao ofth d o ti'ensomr their oel th at importnt ri t ote xe a ercising hto t le tintere that b y oam s t tc e onfsicts of p Vityhe P iinecenynosea haoecis, n a er carried othr uc ore me asu red vitu perauti to pre-e a ppropito n ad suh ntra
Mex aic not ruh, atnt lg hands day r e biev es thetpgn re s atiBrnh a idee t an the object, onse as, tvna.wnghka the otficee ic weeencuner
suffcie Intdsience to settle t hes degre a nl i riageness tw it whh Engeycirorses Engish sePofton Weli ch oo te lywie epaicals y ota a anshiser wi, t h e rc Tfr ee opleo heatheracn idas ofll always bee c te cs on t iwhe nrtao those t e orvic e the Sh s. ad ir fty tnd aeresdy Sthed Pedn, ad o ptng
s ob t m enti nsE n gli shthi v e ri e sf te I n d ia n 's toy is t k nt ri ns Ic cci s tdp r t e son sbfthe rvd -a n ceac ed t o b efi nth e W t hrhs e qleii e s o fi d eocio ruumtat inpt h of h e rimb ti n Eper e n ecn dh e so ui e e e i brt e ed r a a d t a e o v r n
and logtd ,( hc ,t th us su oorred ere d, isto ewoudr el f oiev ce, gety.C ne to edbttluaiolitaur ateetr? W o st u g fth otn ec ?addvtdtsina vne etcfterei itn rtn s to ad i oiiclo p n nsng w ti hi esetv onareI .jri
il e pas ed tr um c nform ably tedw ith athe ion variable usagest Of r the T he- win te r s no emin, a vinJu ge thi s ltef r r sitdentAir p nl ofies b oth V antu e an d edtasbroe ughsy t h aem thas t po lithave men ,expe te l is ndvdutatlsom e de ree ofriov, ate
setlem nt in ther rus de f ee- the wh le n .i eswit o n; the e s o natit e on ateuw h ,ic h e mepu lc n Tri t ys o inalc ndi ae sfirs mt l .e -c io f M r.loe d.ain hem ,sons tn e Ef or s;thetm i ho e pr inheiplesc it public a ifeir, and pasre n utai nedaruy tfthe gtorbetanr anemova l of M r. pan rt nfwould av misle n 'hextend-wn t htile.e pto( u h a r la e t lg t
W e h v e t r i o a o r s on e t h p nt t c f r t u c r a n y w o t m c ndY ~ eork fw s lth e o s i a ed h v o snte o s r e r b re d v r ii d i t rest, otath e ou n atory ba r ind e veryo w a yr q uahim d fi l, b t e cion onh o s s con b o s p b i i rs n t e
t he et es tra in the a td i quarter hantlony e n p r o al c u i t d w t M mwl e i r s n o t s r s nsat en- onve ti o bn oxin o uesec, andy hv et ile pr J de W htext deg-res e ,n t otm : ebe u efu n t e of c f C i f M g c n h m e i t r c r o fs. e dleci nt fthe 1U nit ed S a e f rt e se uiy ad1clt
or str ul ,tain th he Indians m nf s JVefre ,a dfe isre ai e i e or ,a d l r soy nw ph si ip htearaf ir ." 'H te V ae, isunn wntuterenc ha t esonfna i at "th i eorsi en yanr f ifronmp ac d thfisfo egn eo eall d td, at le s
tod comnehoJlteuti sdgeywhose stantemenoth a erimSenatorlyrpeen--.,yrcomne oyurRei11ed-i ad- etogtthscniaeth a fewad ett heSnt ftleUieuislepfpltaoafrnae.enhre t ~l'utc
bec us w beieeoha havee om ine moegnnhe ruadew*eiworcrred nogansinr "It wsh f i3peple th t he age cy ofth
trayt ak osto t etri V nBtrnnve. wr.danEgainsthit, rripugte, oft Pesdetan d which preceded then, wof hrewreiAVrinalw ud p ea rom prioSfthates nu hlesev.frm n eassad.iwthu ec n itotsit s
seriushst upeopltwucsetdatseweetbruthtparyhrtnh" alld thenirtiotoonettaittu-nttsaygoterendivdualtltotportofrtenge-sVn.Benatte ptshevepeenmadetoccentenedratoovereengshotd b retrited Illh
a o d c e p r i u a l t o s o n t e s a png tlis h h ars es -- D s s i o o fr e p p u b l i c a is mnh t o f ;V i c e ef i deld o ft i l e U n i tedSt a t e.ng y ,'F i l et h i sa uxtrord in a rye4 h o w e r ?yhi s ist ,s ur t e l ye x p re s s p u u bi cn tp afr s yt hra n s o Fug h o d y t he U i c htu le d S t a t e s .k enfrej u ieusei o f ur m n d ecauo s e mi st ak eit i zen ppro pria tio nooe, adet eddihtfr
a ful knoledg that the merl and il o nsig n themo t heo r ave to hic. the y s etorysint n omio n at taed yt haeetibodyntha prv e a reedt nc e po se vsof n mn tinhen.pariieeofdcin g whoi s omee g eid neof'tiablets, w e irely o fn h es u nan i emousracmi- of tNewAmer ic'an ps o pelsem. Th.sp oey a e as iuren' ofs uc n etkns w e are n
e at ern h brdianchofwted Sablintetiontor- setteEgldcrig s fh o res fgve, aydthae pexpressedtheon-,cordiha livepr. Theis tobeten Presdet Win l l-theyd gind sopftris tt wil asiu ythen l ct onverntonratfBaetimore whis ge nerousg as toh. ey a eSou sthern d resie t. they Gexer- tater autho rtheteocaiut mnead
se lves cin otize ns of the U n ted rtoySh f bI cai n f h p oitI on g ande nofhinf am y. oterm i wnation to I the al lfa rs lidon orbe t e xi s id nown g the re anflec o s h uen he, t wo uldbe natuid r ad 'lyto Sp ee r dietry fsty of topi nion m St ha ve existedlin r l G v r m n o h t f M r h n x w l t e e t u t h p r p i t o s o l e m d
w h a t t hesw eria b u t a nda d n l y toLd p e s tono s e hth a t i llxp e r te-d v ern dy tti l e ivi n dtic a t o r yd a sroet eso fi c e of.i c e P r e s d e n i s t ot hi o b e u o fe x i t enli co t y -ien ,t ytr sed u rneq uhi rue e er oooC o n s i t u i o n l r e u l e i o n
M e x c o a m m e t hln e r h aM i e i s p a h i t r e s f t e p r y m r han t oh c r ryth e mi ntal ot s t r tef m u fec t hb e i rchoies T h i s o f' J ude r g e nW ht e.- t h eir A no m ine y s to e x e u t e h er tri s ontr eV n o u r t e n o th aer e as pbeingfe ct n n m t I h c i e i i i al lteer edd ne.f r '"ThVi ew c ou r e a d I le i spr
rs e enprs s n i ho t l t e ~ n e nlam eagyrneP S sITIO NwhU B G Tich th e M cR c l t i P or.asAfairRd ealing T h re ere nowesele into the M r b ity er, hse'pofithir cate, o pi iof ar e a s te f r uethe nc tb ytheis jcn e tion w af m uh c v l d atw h i h rty -t h ibitedr and win lludnot p e rm t tema tck o n' as t ie a eln t e i e l ie h c e e e c u t r
.. .... :o ,," ... .. ehnnr'v aced u on th und r- ay thie bu har oniou wit eac oth r. Ths wil al ays b thecaseon tte pat of tthse to'm oesereneette, outh1}as.hpdtt do.wnobyyedandoxpresed bcthePresdent_.wholadotan.


th at our G overnm ent never has viola- souls! they consider an E english carriage th e acm e .... ..... t o 1- .. a -a- .tyee..
emn pledges-upon what ground, we of human grandeur, and they would seat Mr. Van h d between the candidates, and that both of their numbers, and representing but a few unanimity in their political opponents, will be fta- South, even if she had it in her power, to insist ernmebe t r t a
some act shall evince such disposition, Buren i one, to impress the people with the idea ides looked to a election by thePe pie. This counties, some of which are known to be decidedly tal to their interests. Such was the fate of the that we should still exclude the other States m of works which might be regarded as of a nation
ntelligencer, or any other advocate of that e would ride over them ina foreign vehicle, course wasin nrmitywitthe spit ofRepubli- favorabtoMr. Van Buren, cannot be supposed former Baltimore Convention which nominated a participation in the Chief Magistracy? Neither al characterdifficulties which arose as well fr
teret oa thera te on a e o d tempted. The Ameriean can instiutions,and withte meaning of the Consi- to exert much influence on the election. But, so General Jackson asid Mr. Van Burene and yet, Pennsylvania nor New York has ever had one of the dnger of considering( mere usage ti fonnd
teet, su e .ten rahm n"n s fdeaim n e a tution ,.which contemp~sated the election's being far as tile voters at the polls are concerned, the the proceedings of that Convention were sustained their citizens in that office. How often have to f th ri ta fom he xr meu c tin
ights is intended, instead of a faithful people care not how Mer. Van Buren rides, but too
made by the people, through tht ir electors. But effect of two, Conventions belonging to the same by the people, and their nominees elected by those great States assisted in choosing" one of' ot thebetreththdorbeuape,
oft ete t ?prevent broken down federalism from poisoning what is the case now is h rea y o -ok n party, having nominated different candidates, will large majorities. Mr. V ant Buren was also nomi- our citizens.? W ou hld not the'conten dling" for tile t hiat-c oul nt e a s n e of oii ec ntt
ico has now no power over, or posses- itself with envy, we must state that Mr. Van Bu- opposed to Mr. Var, Buren, who isadvoc.ited with have a tendyn eey to make "confusion worse con- nated with like unanimity, by the Republican right in a particular section of country, to fin ex- tionls p objsion, b e founded '>reason u
r-.yrrtoyinnto ic iwhichposd its ish suppposedu ianveicebultatth sghes epetaio o tepatis asmot ude."aini myrepubltdthtictouhnonenvehieclaeteapto buJuilytad luivt the highest of'flees, haveilailtendencyftoiwbich these objections worebe ebpeced, tareltougsonvntin ul.
e Territo zealous partisans, that le .stands any chance of tlhe nomination by the Staunton Convention of a by various conventions and. meetings in other introduce heart-burning, and jealousies amongst sted in the documentreferred to and have bee
'sines may have advanced--as the force home, and by Ameriean hands. g amjor h Let any candid uifierent candidatelfrom the one selected by the States. These modes of concentrating public the members o the Confederacy, and ultimately s, extensively promulgated, thatit isunecessr
t was proposed torecover and maintain The falsehood about Mr. Van Buren's popery tinan, who is at all inbrined of'the situation ofpar- whig meeting at the capitol, presents the appear- opinion, have been, resorted to by the Republican to destroy the Union?forllt rSh
.,ion has actually abandoned the whole we put down by the republiieation of' Mr.Vander- ties, answer the question. IIntile two 1115t leetionIS, ante of division or dissension, still tile efl'ects of party, ever since Mr. Jefferson's first election, un- Thei enemnies of Mr. Van Bnuren have endeavor, lion ant eprec aecofre yapee
through which the bonedry is to be poet'sletter. W iti of Mr he- h o e ,f hb a t atnOWetshalhnknsaihityoeorureheendefthetenaeAnderteClation, (as tile same electors are recom- dethe general ticket system, and the ecessith ed to induce the people of Virginia to believe, ;ons c e:injurioscs ee:*w h
hroagh ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ten under the bonde hope tolo tbe belief, lettet tehaosepi ntye sth p e eJ nitnied in both instances,) may be to unite and for them rnivst be apparent to those who will re. not only that his opinions are erroneous oi cer- flow I)mtereupinofapo
w o t d k ,wg entseweniw oes abM select d .oA tt orrstntthn aop h nes tsi eh em s ps b u t t h e a n eh mt r e f
3ther party, concerned in the establish. impulse to the falsehood. position are ad w, neing the Pretensions of'Mr. W en- ilow can thtis be clone.? Is it believed that the harmony of actionn amongst pe trson~s having a coin.- tim cnts as to the powers of the Go vernrment de- gove rn mcto o g est~h to w ih a
trerpartyi s, cofher session ns es -WopR 's. ter at the north, r.White il tieotwst, Convention who nominated Judge White would men object, and animated by a similarity of poli- rived from the Constitution, are incompatible s n do nt hesitate to express it as
,ee the objects Unless all faith in this 9th April, 1836 Sand General Harrison n hio. iOhio s there a man have voted for General Haririson? Is i,ot the au- tical sentiments. Nor caln our opponents with a with the principles held sacred by the Republi- opinion, ticat ;be general and true interest of
Lit: I have just received your letter of this witho bel ieves tha t either of these ca lget anything tity of that Conyention in full force? and are good gice, o-.ject to sc measures, since they can party in this State, as explained and enforced c untr be best consulted by withhold
nt is relinquished by Mexico, that power -date requesting me to state, for t he information of hke a majority!? W hat Lenis the object? So not he electors appointed by it bound to vote r have u uniformly Ms.d tAams Mr. Clsm ex diT tusb. ncelebratedw u d erte ae to san, a- e, the wi th toe e cptions h al e aheg a
,nly as well trust tie country on which certain citizens of Ilinois, whether Mr. Van Bu. far as a part of the oppositionii concternedi we Judge VWhite? Wihereisete dispensing power to i nuthe elect irons when, Mr. Adamns and Mtr. Clayions.Theseassertnswiundere.a Irerte s ct soben tn a re g
ed boundary is to be run, in the hands -en is, or has been, a.nember of the Roman Ca. take the public prints as true exponents, we be fburd, Which couhl relieve them freom the were candidates, thir iendsneld RCmoenuons n entirely gratuitous and nt' In tis avowal, I am certuonly not influx
States, as in those of the revolting helle Church. have a right to say, becauttsit is -avowed, that tile implied pledge resulting from the acceptance of, Baltimore, at tile Capitol ill Richmond, and in We have before us Mr. Van Buren's speech in "intesbjc abennae
Agreeing with you in the great prineip'e to e Cl .ion 'is, by splitting the votcs, to throw the .heir nominations? Such power, certainly, was other places. They got up a Convention during 1827, in the Senate of the United States, oniMr. by feelings of indifetenc tch less of host
But it may be that Mexico would whichh you refer, as well as also inthebelief that election into-theHouse of Representses. That not vested in the Staunton Convention nore if it the last winter at the Capitol, which n nominated" foot'ss motion, to amend the rules 61that body, by toanvemnt o tey
their to resign it to the keeping of the there can, notwithstanding, be no valid objection.his is the cculaton, is further prove., by the ere, is it probable that either the members of the Judge White, and the same party, oi- a portion oftwhich tt was proposed to give to the Vice ,res haven mye, tor
The despatches of General Gaines con- to have the fact upon the point to which your in. umiusfact, that h.ere is as intci r inning in White oonventon, or its electors chosen, it is to it, have more recently held one in Stanton, fr dent the right to call to order for words (poke 1 1 tl tps he m i nmy phertcr we
nation that the idea is broached among 4uiry relates truly stated, 1 cheerfully comply t "e public prints, the orgas of t'the opp osit on, at be supposed, from a knowledge of their senti. th e purpose ofpsustaining Ge neral Harrison. T ih wi ae, w(which has bee lextensiwdly published ,) by e t he e is I honest a s t'
with your request. a lly fppos pect 01 success to on of these ments, wou'd be disposed to avail themselves of objection of the opposition, is o ot in reality to ie which he, with great ability and in the most de- not 1 i re t oest t
.ns, that Mexico is willing to relinquish o ha e been. acquainted with M r. Van Buren and opposition candidates, as to any other operatee against them- cided manner, ma .intains the construction g iven to i u h bit does ows tonsee.ct
ory to them, to get rid of the obnoxious s family Irom my earliest recolkction.1 was ttimprisobviously theirappiopriaterottu. If oppositionConventions, as individual, we meant selves. Thefyruits of their own meetings of this.o, theonstitution by Mtr. Jeflersouand A-Jr. Madi- prosper; ut thei on n .
'once invited to settle the country and )orn in, and now reside in Kinderhook, which is each candidate and his friends meant to rely on use no language, of asperity or unkindness; for sort, they are very ready, aud anxious to reap, if, "son,won the subject of implied orconstrulctive ,1 wh1,b an1d 11ve sb ,
lo doubt if the agricultural people of ti le native town of both of uf IHe is not, ad.d their own strength, arc their own popularity, why many of them we have feelings of' respect and indeed, they could be made to produce ay. powers. He advocates With great, force tile ruleoe. te. te ag ieose o
Doubt, i t th e ag rib u ltu ral p eop le o thi ever h as been a R om an C ath olic. "I' att th /e do th eey act to w yards tl~e oth e -r op p osifi ontciii is 'o c p ublic m te lipnoh- b ec au s he n is s rwonmly 0d hi. s ho re q i e s e th th e st interpretastio u puwers h te exe corrup ton th"
are outlawed by Mexico, and the Indian o n n longer be any excuse for the further sir- dtes, not as rivals, but friend, and coadjutors? and measures, wth ti e freedom whichtl.e subject him to the people, because he is strongly ideti-sould be impsed on the grants of powers by l
ed the territory as a reward for massacre, cultion of the statements which haye already But it is alletled by some, tat it is.Othe'object requires tStifiCs but without14violation of fled with t4 measures of the prcdnt adtministra- tthat instrument; tbya oours isA Government of ti- soT ... ......



































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us! w deuce of the law. Notso. The conteutsof the bill should ap- lowing
A tihc earliest acts or Congress, under the Oonsti- near on the journal, if we are to look in it to find ie law. The ,.
aet was approved on tie lath of September, 1789, tonstituiun does not reirethat. Butasthe exercise of the uion,
cgarded as the otemnporaueout exposi.iou of thee ssa0iiaeshf a5itii's u-toei-
__________ >-ii- "*"'*--"""T eu a sa uen cases will generally be of lhc first importance, the
tea a unletsto l, dtiniot contain such provisions as Constitution requires that the political issue between the Presi. ver e
ation usnce "o sa dent and Congress should be fairly made up and presented, so prudent
1789, in substance, provides that the Secretary ofthat the t ryrs, the voters of the country, may have the case the Stat
pre-erve ihe original bills, resolutions, &c, and ruolly stated when they come to sir in judgment. S uch wis the tion is
al 'ctoe oeoor ed in his office. The Secretary of great object of the Convention in those constitoionat provisions
ied, as s as convening may e ae he wich relate to the objections of the Pesidentantheyea and is such,
hilts and resoltiions, to cause the same to be Pub- tays son reconsideration.
ispapers, and to cause one priutied copy to be de- 'Tbs question before us derives additonealimportaice atthe
ch Senator sod Representative, "and two printed present time, .from theidoctrintessatee on the subject of ex the Ge:
aenticated, to he sent to tite-.xecurive author- pung=in*. WIhat willtbe the coneeluencesofeablishing
.ere t : tp.r i'e, i pt n a ge, andjustifying the oduct, ofthe S secretary of tablish0
a teresir, is the place where I.io I.. 6. t c 11ts itt l The most fearful and corrupt results mayt n l
-is, Tite act pror ir es or tuia i ll' ..... -t., tt E enue. -.i i1 Senate, iorgltitl of the roties and reasons 0
.he .sereary's .1 ard then tpro ides- for a which induced tit rather of tie Constitutionsto institute their Y ucatai
so letiares that ...'a copies(tof records ant papers body, host to' every sense of personal dignity and setl-rtcpect, Count Of
Mee, auttenttitd 'oiner I tie said altil, shail be Lither ,itidivid ually or in the aggregate, til fitted by degrade .
ally as the oririalat r-cord or paper." Now, the ti"it to otrer the incense of flattry to the nostrils of-powerso attipe C
is, i vten the fscordeto matte up r til t e state o- that thrift may follow ftwning," ran, by uniting the toctrines is suppe
ptrus.nce of th :,act. tf.1789, can you .impeach ofsecpigitg with the practiceoftre Secretaty,coneirtct Vo
ariry, y opposing to It the journals of ittheror engine of Executive despotism strong enough to crusts the I!-
3f uOngre. i. an, a if' this salits dote, wht.t "irn- beries ofthiscountry. When atPresident wants a pretext tp- soil.
; lsd9ItdiC.3 Ist, S secretary of War authorized on w
ri-etoit Itt5 h ertr fWretircdo which to refuse the execution of a law or a treaty, tie has fuinctioro
ateiti~ a 1^s ^^ sS
^*a^ a^^S^^ S^^.^KfSW^^ S funto


hat the jndiel tribunal of the nation (and i nothing to do" button t his minions towork, and to have the either
hat thetilealtitanl o the.ntli)onu, anditjouinat jo h'ingtipvote on its passage, or the advice and con- eie
de, Lfei t a.-s,.or L ot a (
2 to st athe ntid is riot. law) ouhin t, ti s sent of the Senate Ia treaty cases, expunged, and then, air, lie atid rte
"mt t ..u. uthetitttrasiptsner the sealt t ni ty say thIere is ino lt ere is no leanty, and set up for him- Gomez,
01 State. tobe impeaalisd, by bringing it in c on.sell
jrali.How. arc you to akptittleis Itel l y be asked whether there is n remedy in case a bill, ed of hi
tI i.:.l I.te utt- b ertainlyit is question t msuesono take, should boigne by the presiding offirers o partly fi
byi1 the tAnure irien t eile aqetoteaci Houseaperoved by the -'resiJent, and find its way to the supplier
d by the Counrt. Aid how irted I have never records in tie tate Departmen? Tnere is a remedy. It is, to
Ilt er way i, which to try ouch a question, liut repeatieac. Congress most apply the remedy, anil, indo- private

.. ..r^ & S rpa teat ap re p ^ ie^
f the record. now, ir, hat the aws of a o- c upothe propriety of a repeal, it legitimate inquiry of Texa
^^TSm'^ te ; rc., lawsor c" l," m .t^ 'a;.,:;n levyi
..u.. ; .. ..rne.rao^tfa t. utth. law.s of whniterori.ot.any mistake wsct in te" in the passage O1 before a
p. in "ileltmanner. Oar Judges tle bill.tUpon such isquiry, the entimat may be received as i
A. It .,- .isOrd andl be sn, and how, are evidence, atd may hae such weight as cactimember o es inobi
oI tak. e tile record asCeilr- to give itothem, end they oight be repelled by patrol etitforoy. lie wtas
'tia t o f Sio, ad. c eo n cl tmi, s n : l O r s h a lt t h e y r e O f a ll th is C o n g r e s s h alltie s e e x c lu s iv e r i g hit t to ttu -. t tilth e T h e
a1t *- t.i.. e in. ..the jous-u. n i esaTs- c f War has Cio t rih lt, tie i- ii on. He lecr
aa It ii tI ,, or nn.ict,,.. o tI at. record in cua aact o rCngelta. Psasa o-',- a I slevyingi
;t to .sr 'eor cusy made ',,-.-.. Coulis ill ",tl ie relief otAlfocud Mty land(lie Sntaryn y ides tha
1i" ial heca e neither"tine Constitution S "
llit, h- .,oe neither t.e Civttralone fnor i refuse to exeeutc any of tihlitr, atgino g the existiene ofoiskle- has forlt
Es pa vda how it- saltae "thel -ticated. he e Itieeattwer t t le c t youtwouldipneac illin for re e nt-
t ii--noh. -enosetitltsofoffice out ed adrefisa,ia sto iuc conduct woida tlnifent corruption. He tlagea r
item, a iiiand tiers is onact tiC ay honestly refus e obedienice in every case, ifyoun allow tim aft I.aml
,- -."ud.... .tis...no.ttttsthtrtersnunit be tedrua

a-'d" -... I.. n. to decide rhoi tw upon vision u o impeach ament, uie s corruption iset-unluhd`tchwd st
furnished )rtinpu.tia-, ico irt er a of'.178. Cai l nid fixed upon rits accused. My gunti A in ittendetd to sowtt em bat-e
,e- i '-'.. Coa netle is atteexecte oicer lsio dicretionnothe "rigton "looki t- that littl
oba it,, I-t -. ,ta -,,, or alone bringthe titd the law as publish edlytieipropelrathority. Texas cat

---ti bill. ..... ..., .r 'f hen xc upoul tte ^ v erv l e;~lr a **b tt ruhn a e
i gi tt hie record ithe SatDeprenT Asajuicil question, there is ot intelligetriual in

et .. 'e,-, ,n .i .1..i r, alm ii ., .; ...;,,, t atnnex
: ro, gi..' ..he ...ien States which would te Eitiat a moment in punseualc- if atpall.
,Orion pravite that all urevsue bills -sait lri lg iate fothe benefit of Alford ind Brush tde latw f o I t
Ole:. Suipp 0S a reviuee ill is drly signed by n. No layercoulfrnmer ii rl-.I.,_m1 the
:anti Pt.- -- i .. -*r, it a the record intho Slats o eparo me) t al.l ic -
l"ie lflt'.-u, '." l,. r.. thi ut ",,-iI,- l a y Itih a nsrinly ofbe ohyc. cI.,
I the airhali or Collector of the tax,be junstifiet I have'ius, sh, presenedyeeofis singularan novel by th
obsyit, iI,... .i.i,,ti ..t-a ori the journal of case. I believe tle Secretary is erreiut tiougt 0n 1 *a Vr Cri
at rhe bitlt 1,', r, a r if he should see otive. e
Sought he not rather to iay, ob Clerk lsae ssl mo las te
-' -,,'.l t...t'- t. eiitid e th.4, 1.,, lo .1d Htroops it
u J'~ttli.,,,rair-lit ,'-.t snt ,S ,t vdt t n'o rSit .s
iV f tho eo,-.,iu,,ioeI ,, fVORY LETTER FOLDERS of unusually attempt
eI. ..10., it e s. il, ,i tL.... Iarge size and of the finest quali ty and finish, V.ai.ig
1, ti,..ue I, 'rech a ease bthe resunption is Ivory, Bone and Lignumvit Seals and Wafer tie peol
that; fe itvld, I.e., '.o', t, tiake, iitiltte Stamps;-Bronze, Boxwood, ls, Metallican Tex
n improperly I.,.e I'l. .it, aii, I. ,' ail. i. t es aGlTe a
*ostttionl b- ,.eorce, a y Ir.- nld o r ane stand snd Sand Boxes of evelrye v- come.
treaty-making power is vaestd by the Cnrtitut riety Almtis
evident, byand witi the advice and consent of the A ftul supply of the shove Is just opened, and a tax al
)pase a treaty isn made wl a foreign natol, is for sale at fair and reasonable prices, by dent for
Ad by proclamateion br the n information of the F a n oi e d
.'usual san( legal form, may every one refuse t t h F YO ojed
is t hsydoiot find in the journal of the Senate athe verley Circulating Librardy, testslat
-of the adviceeadtcoe-o that-baOl'iy-ey P e. andi
td"'l-fuound, from the published journal of thi%
we, instead of the Senate, had advised andt corn. s, byrt a recent importationa lent to a
reaty, and n rn lth1eCjourild n of the Senate, that English Letter Paper and Englsh Note Pa -Govern
certain reve-ne, madot cery by the provi- highly ot
teaty, rigeinated there, instead ao tiers wohlitt (Of English tap Paper A supply Will shortlybe
i law be void, because of the rdiculous appear- received ie
thingse upon the journatti' Al ,st uhte Tntosn nls Qis n ag upywr p
should be enforced, tanal youeshoulds a h Trient t sa F w i eure
appearance of thei junalsi to, a itake rfth of Terry's British Writing il ed ad Black
eri, ratherttanirilulg,: ;I-. A'a,'- u. -tll oh which are imported byteadvertiset. Guanaja
led its constitutional .t' --- ,. ii,'1,t,, -ire' a
deludedibytiteirtprdsiring officers. Onhand-ftish, English, German, and AmeOi-i c prs
sid that the contents ofthis pulibihedjouria canl Sealing Wax; a large assortment ofEn tic ep
re iednlitotataling on t he lerks gh 'edeutte
erelted CalinoOss alrkofthenes -Cutlerv- Riodg~ers', Crorkes', NWolotenhtolm'so and
Wht, has autihority to Ctall Atie clerks of either ohr.Avr compete atd arvuried assortment m f
W hethih. authitey correpttntdt cal 'te:vithclurk sit tna ftheos. A very pc a
Ih........ ,I,. 1.. -duie the original tant- Of AL, Of tile most esteemed Metallic Pens. placedn
.. f '.. '. ,,.. is to admini ateran oath to E tt e sa i lle- t can baued
1 1 -i.t', 'iA', it he made stuttr *tme usual e yve ryarticleftatonery thaty c'nbese
posed on witnesse? Could yon convict him of i tie counlinghose or pubic office, is o be
'prodcedatheOriginaljournal, and stated it to found i a above seat pains have been taken to
cluh, wag0 not thi journal' Could.you puniol him pr
'ttend ietbre the Stretay o Wa porcr e an oelierin till a 0a y
esr, wit thEis journal Car thi Secretary issue, a tWhih will bear comparison (having regard to Sncei
n& est, andI inflict ithe hielaltie.-for a contemspt, quality) with those of any establishment in those furthr in
tsobeyed 7 t I ask tha se qutesti ons, sir, for tae par- U tnitedrrstates, of two nit
g ihie muisd~ of muteibers to inveeiais, fds
1-o answer its-tn, t an oslfe sc e-nta o- eio
that it is impraflicalsle ta oascessf. 0 from tis PROPOSALS -o e4i th
ii or is not ht lw LL be received at this D amnti tiit
i s... .... cI it- onteni ,..- u-,,I.1 t ,#, .nne epc ntm en t
...ol.and rh, .i.. 1.. .... uf. the1st day of Sept-mber ext, for carry party wat
~~ ~ I.uti.-i"I t ,,. tg the mail on the falloivimn,potun t rtl i e-thce
.. .. ,, ... ... ",; -in Kei ..F e e
u. .. .t. 1 ..... t ck y The contract- itnencoonthest of ion; Slat'
L ht.n2- October next, tinid conhitiue until tilte 31 lt Dce- too witls
S',,"' "u r.i:, .. .. t: .:;.... 'It her, 1837..cared for;
titS.', lleI carefor;
No. 33,403. From Munrfords% illetGlsotwsa'
1. '..,20 miles antd back, three ties a week.c
I... LeaviaM u rnfordinville every Moniday, Wednesday,
'-,.t.. .. h. .r,.,Arive.at Glasgow sae days by 12 M. No fur
Cs-' ,,,.sit "iu'i i t.. 'V Leave GII-,owever'y Tuesday, Turda, and tiv,,tn
.. ."..' 1.t.' alii
.... -,,I .. j ., I,:l. ... ,I .. 1.

'I*' r Ill.. r teno4 Arruive at Mtnforda~vile sanme slays by 6 P 'M. :rrry ant
a -, tu r or o ak, s pectetillI

.... r N,, er... b for rotte No. 3,403, Ky. uston Jit
r M KNDLL WChae;b


flM.i UfairAS of Mexico. Excitement is fol-
excitement, and convulsion exceeding con-
, and none can -foretell the consequences.
ie duation, diNu t he placing the reins ofGo-
nt in the hands of her most intelligent and
t men. The 'Pronum ciamiento' issued by
te of Oajaca in favorofthe Federal Constitu-
daily gaining partizans, and the confusion
in that section, that unless a general-co-
in rarely to be met with, the overthrow of
neral Government is inevitable. The chiefs
Parties are exerting themselves to re-es,
th'e onstitution of 1824, revised by a Na-
Convention. Toro, the commandant of
t, has been deprived of his authority, on ac-
f his attachment to Santt Anna. General
Codallos has been named in his stead; and it
iosed that Ciriaco 'Vasquez, commandant of
ruz, will share the same fate for like rea-
And, in fact, it is believed that all the high
varies who are at all friendly to Santa Anna,
ieesonally or to his cause, will be removed
placed by others of opposite sentiments.
the commandant of Tampico, was depriv-
3 place partly on the same grounds, and
fr the insult given to our flag; his place was
d by Ferias, the same individual that was im.
A in 1832 at Nacogdoches, by the colonists
.s. General Filosola has been summoned
Council of War, for alleged misconduct
ngthe orders of Santa Anna, issued while
a prisoner of war.
General Conrigres, is busy passing a law,
a contribution an all landed property, be-
lat which weighs so heavy already; and
the last four months on houses, Of the
imber of troops who left San Louis Potosi
pico, only 108 had arrived at Attamira, a
tuatcd seven leagues from the place of
nation. From the above it will be seen,
e hopes of any successful campaign against
an be. expected to take place very soon,


STILL LATER.
e arrival of the schooner Almaltia, from
iuz, we learn that all was quiet in that city,
lie Almaltia departed. There were no
in the city, and that it was thought that no
would be made to raise any. The pre.
'pinion among the intelligent portion of
ile was that no further movements against
aould be made, at least, for some time to
An attempt was made just before the
, left by the authorities of Mexico, to levy
the persons of all resident and non-resi.
eigner; to this every minister strongly
, and unitedly drew up and sent in a pro-
ing that if the objectionable measure was
nto effect they should consider it equiva.
declaration of war against their several
nents; it is unnecessary to say that the
ffTensive step was abandoned.
ements in various parts of the country
oken of at Vera Cruz; revolutionary move-
ere rife in several provinces, Guadalajara,
ato, and Puebla, and had not been sup.
by the Government's troops: the general
pears to be for thle re-establishment of the
Government. In the absence of paper,
here were any no dependence can be-
n them, we rely wholly on tle information
from gentlemen arriving from Mexico,
brought 250 doubloons to master.


rie %b 4p.;- prmtlee Yar Co .,
-* -
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ... -Si. ^ *
....\ V \ \ ''*"*, i.r ,a -

uhiehltneamr~eniei tt~ttMes^bts, thespsaker of the Its an.^ .^- JOT the -New Yor Cosmnmereirl.
N A President of ithe Senate are to sip 'arn bill wlib is ER.
S SSION AL. pa.-ed, and they are to do it "in their respective Holso"-
mot enact er lodgings, but publicly, in the prenei of those B C tmepacket ship Poland, from Havre, arrived
-t. nor at their lodgings, bat pubh cly1 ideprsneo ns Byju al
who enact the laws. When al this is done, the Commit-
TiB) ACT OF CONGRESS. tee of Enrohlents are directed to present tie bill to the this mot nine, we havereceived our Paris
t Pre ,identm for his appiobation. flow is lie to diapoe of il to the 1st July, from which we extract the follow-
.FM. UNDEi IOtn n o:ltD Ths Constitution says, "if he approve, he shall sign it but i -
F R. UNDt, W UU ncot hseShall return it with his objections to that House in i tg:
....... of Mar to place Bend- which it shall have originated." The President did appro Te
rt Brusho te list of Pen- and sign the bill for the benefit of Alford sod Brush, and, ban Alibeau, to establish a boy-guard, but would not
obert rs- n g dose so, hue perfornmsdall theuConstitionl tedof h i cy
exce t taking c ar to ave itthfuy execute e n it, saying that bayonets had not been
it n does not ire ,tth president sha do wihthe wanting, andthathe would rather expose his life
maid miat ES tmcase presented for coni. enrolled bill after lie has signed it. It does direct him to send than submit to such servitude. His tlajesty had
tuns was one novel il its character, and t back swith his objections to the House in which it originaueda
,Vas desirous to submit a few remarks, if hlie will not approve and sign; and, by the joint rules, le is to addiesctIthefollovg tter to the rblShOP
aker of this House, and the presiding m e informed in which Iouse the bill originated, by a certificate and bishops of France:
,li regularly affixed their signatures to 1 ii.. i. ... .1 .i, the bill. But where he approves and "Rv N S : A nw attempt has just
t th a t rIme s a m e w a s p re s e us me d to th e 1'u I it. '- it p re s e rv e d a md ho w is th e l aw t mab e
t. States, w,'o, i lte30thly of Jne, .. ....' i- 'siion furnishes no answer, butheth.eatened my life. Providence lias preserved it.
ned it; adthat ttie bill or act thus au-. st or 1789 gises one. Tit act requires the Secretary of Ssate My gratitude is raised toward Him who hascover,
id recordd in the officeoftie Secreory ive i from the Prosidet, and to proceed with it byre- powerful hand'a lif entirely devoted
rovitles for thI payment of persons o iiu idpublihing in the manner Ihave mentioned. This d w h p h l elir o
tbert rushi, and lhs been duty published act also provides, in substance, that if a bill shall be passed by to the welfare of France. I have the firm cop
First session of the 231 Congress. hotut wu-irdt of both Houses of Congress, notwithstanding the ob- fiction that their perseverinig protection will ad
r has 'refused to execute it, upon thile jctions of rte President so theocontrary, the Secretary of State
e of the United States ihd nut pass the sihall receive such bill "from the President of the Senate or the me in maintaining in my country peace nd s-
tbe Senate states that thie bill was inde- Speaker of ihe House of Representatives, in whichsoever pect f, religi rde and My inten
House it shall last have been approved," and proceed to recor thata solemn Te and thanksgiving
it was the duy of tle Secretary tt exe- and publish the same, as hewould if the Presidnthad approv- s h i speolem n all tl hu tegii
he was bound to regard it as a part o f ed and signed it. Thus, sir-, you perceive that it requires the Ia s ulbe celciaen d ill e churches OfYOU
nid, as such, to respect and obey it. He, no union of le provisionsof the Constitution, an act of Congress, diocese. LOUIS lllILIPPE."
inous, (lbr certainly there is here no cause anid the rules of the two Houses, to complete and carry out the PAIs, 27th June, 1836.
bad mntive,) believes that he has anutho. work of legislation in all its parts, and to make it known to the
act as earulleds, l iue, ndi approved, filed, People. You also perceive the safeguards which tte system Alibeau had attemptetl suicide. Galignani's
ice of State, into the journals of the two furnishes to detect error and prevent mistakes. I contend, Messenger gives the following account of it.
upon what ha uluiy there find, that the when a bill passes through the ordeal providedby this system, for a mo-
and void; because those journals, or one and is recorded in the police of the Secretary of State, inthere is O fis keepers havig gone ouit
ind that ithe act was never passed aceoid- becomes a record of what the law is, and, as such, is to be veri ment to get some tobacco to chtw, lie equested
s of the Constitutionm. fled under the seal, and cannot be controverted by opposing to he other, who was with him, to go and hasten his
es tihe'Secretary iof War, a mereexecu- it the manuscript or printed journal, orthe oral testimony ot the
thornity for overhauling the journals of clerks of the two Houses, or of any man. return. Te latte had sca-cely turned his back,
rolled bill su igted by Ihe presiding of- do not mean to assert that the guards are so numsrons that when thie prisoner attempted twine to dash out
the Presidni, and as recorded in the there is no possibility of mistake, and that a bill, which never brains against the' wall; but the keeper
Supul his examnirmtion, in effect to de-. pase, d both Houses, could not possibly meet With ti appro- r n t m tn av b h k
isthed to ithe nation,. an d sanctioned by alof the President, anti find its way to the record in the a was too quick or m. a seized i y
scribed for manifesting to the People the Department. I mean no such thing; for I well know that all the clothes, sayint-, 4' Ala! my fime fellow! You
Stich authority has not been confer- butnan transactions proceed from imperfect h cings, prone to to play me a trick, which would have
ovisionof the C-nltsitlwion, or by aniy err and liable to mistake, and therefore I admit thspossiiiy,
i, irislha creatreof inference, a deduc or, if you choose, the prability, in the n s h been the ru of me! Alibeau at rst enea
known andialmitied principles and pro- exIsuence f a mistake. rIt nay be that the bill for file benefit s ored Co turn it off as a joltk, but afterward ac-
trio and list. Froun whaipart of thie ,,tfAford and thrush never did pass both H ouses;and uniless it htserting that it
it statute, will you deduce such author did, it is not law. lut the fact of its having been sgned by the kowi dged his real intenin, sa i
cer presiding officers, approved and signed by the President, exam- was not for want of courage that he attempted his
.elstarticle of the Constitution requires ioed by the Committee of Enrolments, and by them presented life but that he had become disgusted with his
a journal of its proceedings, and from to the President, and recorded in the Secretary s office, are evi-
sh the same, excepting such parreos mar, dence that the bill (lid pass both Houses; and all that can be present state of existence, and wished to save him-
mire secrecy." I admit the obligation on urged against it, to the contrary, is the statement in the journal self from eight more wearisome days. He is at
comply with this mandate; but suppose of the Senate, that it was indefinitely postponed. If there be times prodigal of his expressions. One of them
'ollow as a consequence front such omis- conflicting evidence, which shall prevail'! Certainly that which
leers are thereby justified in refusing to is recogrised by law and made evidence by expiens provision. is- Myname begins with the first letter of the
harepromulgatedl't Can they legitimate- Such is the evidence to be derived from the records in the alphabet, and the king ims yet to fear all tie rest
cause they do not see all the steps taken Stae Departmentwhereas the evidencederivedfrom thejournal the letters." Another is-a" whatever may
passageofthebill, setout at leogthina has no validityimparted to it, either by the Constitution or b)
it had been the intention of the Conven. any statute, nor is there any mode provided for obtaining the e my fate, my name will be know through all
tory force of a statute depend upon the evidence thejourmnal may furnish when wanted. Europe, and my devotion of myself honored by all
-a, anil upo e-thibhtilng on the ace of I n the- nature of things, there is no more reason forconfiding patriots
ed a fulfilment of every constitutional re- in thie statements of the journal, than in the aets of the pre- rue a .
such intention, most certainly, would siding officers of the two Houses and the Committee of Enrol- Advices from Msdiid, of thm 23d June, speak
in clear and explicit language. The nmenta. Their acts declare thattie bill did pass. Thesigning of of an arrangement about to be entered into by a
t have left a matter of such impor- bills by the presiding officers is a very solemn act: al oilier
y upon inference. Thu fact that- business is suspended; the title of the bill. or act, about to be reunion of tIne grandees, to g iarantee a loan
es constitutional provision making the signed, is distinctly read aloud in the presence of each Should this fail, it is said the Queen will pledge
Congress tidepend upon the journals ol Hiuse, ad if it never iadpassed, any member might rise and the royal domain.
heir contents, is to my mrnndi conclu- make the question. Here is opportunity to correct and detect tter from Sm na dated J 3d, bish-
tie journals and statutes are not 8 mistakes. Who can say tha the agents engaged in this work A lter from Smyrna, ad u d, ui
a an examinatiion of the journals no- are more liable to blunder and mistake Shan the Clerk who ed in the Journal du Commerce of the 30th, con.
ecide upon the obligatory force of the makes up the journal' Has it come to this, mhawe are 's asc tains alarming accounts from Greece. The king-
s also manifest from the express tan- certain whether an act published in thie statute book is or is not
on. The journals are to be published hlaw, by entering into the inquiry, or rather by allowing an Ex- dm is said to be swarming with small bands, as
How often, at wmat interval B Here is ective ollcer to go into ie inquiry, whether the presiding sembled under native chiefs conspicuous for their
otgreess may publish them annually, officers oh the two Houses, or thet clerks, are most-liable to dislike of the Bavarians. The writer even says
li the obligatiout of a statute depended make mistakes' In postponing billt indefinitely, Ihe Clerk may
t journals, their publication should pre- mistake the title of a bill which was passed for that which was that King Otho is not expected to return, and that
pany, tin h promulgation of the statute, so postponed, and make his entry accordingly on the journal, tie monarchy is on the eve of falling to pieces.
icers of'Government might be furnished The mistake may escape dtectuon; and if it should, according We have but little confidence in these reports.
inning whether the statute imposed any to the practical doctrine of the Secretary of War, then the
tay soppreSs ithe publication of the mistake of tite Clerk would actually nulliy an act ofCongress. It was rumored in Par.s o the Mh th at the
,ution expressly confers authority to do Suppose the manuscript or printedjourualshould state rat a Sultan of Turkey had consented to dismiss the
hIt as may, in their judgment of Conugress, certain bill was indefinitely postponed, when a member of onsonby.-
the exercise of their judgment, Con- Congress, paying particular attention to thesubject of that bill reis-effendi, oi the demau'd of Lort o nsn
their proceedings in reference to this or remembered distinctly, and was willing to swear, rhat the bill Also, that General Villaieal, chief in command
elercy. They might give to the nation was duly passed antd approved and regularly signed by the of the Carlists, recently appointed on account of
eraions in the form of a statute, and Speaker: would not the affidavit of the mber beas satisfac- alth of Euia, and himsf tendered
iof every previous step. In such a case story evidence in favor ofihe law as the journal would be tIe le ea gu, a im
ns to resist the obligation of the statute, against itl I state this case to show the absurdity of departing his resignation, nominally for the sime reason.
ild nuot see that the steps taken by Con- from the record evidence of what the haw is, as furnished in the
e regular and constitutional. Department of State, and adopting other tests heretofore oin-
so remarks for tile purpose of maintain- known.
a nation is not to determine what is or is The journal of the last day of the session is not read by therom the New Orleans Bee.
aion of the journals of the twi Houses. Clerk in the presence of the members of Congress, and they LATE AND IMPORTANT FROM MEXICO.
ow, in the sequel, that the validity of a have no opportunity to correct any mistake which, in the hurtm- ..
turned and nutlilified by arraying the con ry ofl business, may be committed by th Clerk. No further movements towards the posecuton
aiust it. It may he said that the Costitution gives force and effect to of the war against Texas will probably be made
must necessarily provide some mode of tme journals, and makes them equivalent to records, asid im- before fl. The last accounts from Tampico re-
S whichiare to be.enforced. They must paris to then the intrinsic verity of 'records. Thatlia Consti-
ti by which their officers and their citi- ution intended the journals of eacliHouse to be evidence for present that city as perfectly quiet-no armed
In, and justify their conduct under it, some purpose,, no one can deny- sut that the Cunstiturion de- force was there, and no disposition made towards
r their conduct may be quttestioned be- signed to make the Journals tho highest and best evidence, and The U Sates slo of warWaren
als of rthe country. This may be done in the fountain whence you must draw your information to decide raising oe- T sl p o war rr 1
erniamnnis like oars, based upon written questions like ,ilis belbre us, Ideny. Theroll789isuncon-' and schr. 'Grampus had arrived at Tampi-
nit to ordinary legislation, the mode inmay stitutional, if the journals alone are to be consulted in order to co-and the Mexican Government had, through
constitution iself;antd, ilt so, then -it is ascertain what die law is; for that act provides a diflerent
.rol of thie legislature. TIe constitution mode, which could not be done if tue Constitution prescribed the newly appointed commaandant, apologised to
es not purport to regulate and fix the the mode. Why, then( did the Constitution require journals to this Government for the-insult offered the Ame-
ithi laws are to be made known and be kept and publishedl S answer, that the leading object, it irican flag, and the officers of the Jefferson, and
Sis not altogether silent on the subject, not the only one, was, to lay before the People the conduct ol
it is to be regarded; but where it makes their representatives, and to exhibit their legislative history. removed tIe commandant o Tampico, Gomez
en is left under the control of ordinary The great value of te journals consists in the yeas and nays. who gave the insult. The schooners Creole'and
safely affirmed that the conistitutioa no. The People in a representative Government have aright-a Atalanta, of this port, were wrecked on the bar,
extract from the journal, or the predue- right of all others the most valuable- to corol their represent. s tm s c i dma slte
ll be evidence of what the law is. Itis attives, to dismiss them whenever theit course is disapproved,
the journals contain the provisions of a and to select ethers to nmianage their affairs. ThePeopiecannot and crews saved. A French brig, called the Gus-
n would give no light on the question ol binig their repressoativee no a settlement without keeping an ttve, from Bordeaux, was also lott-makinsg five
The journals purport, and do give a his- account against them. The journal contains ihe account;m the
congress upon certain bills, by their titles, yeas and tays-exhibit the items iabramd against each represen- om six vessels that have been lost on this bar will-
t not conclusive evidence to show these active; and the publication of the journal enables thie citzein in as meny weeks.
ejected, or postponed by Congress. But voter, who is the judge Ibr the occasion, to sum up the items, The treaty entered into between Santa Anna
n information as so the contents of the and balance the atcouLt. The representative is accountable to
and when you desire to know what the his constituents. The requirements of the Constitution, in re. and General Houston reach Mexico in the latter
youuwish to kno .v how much tax has guard to thejournali, were intended to secure and enforce a prac- t of June, and was immediate laid before
alln what articles levied, you must ical responsibility on the part of the representative. In this Congress;- no definite arranagemennt had been en-
a in the journal to find it. The view,-the yeas and nays on propositions which never become
haye required that every statute haes, are as important as on those wtich pass. tered into when our informant left, and conjec-
Sat large upon the journals, and If the President objects to the passage of a bill, and refuses to ture upon the subject would be useless.
certified by the Clerk of either House, sign it, lie is required to return it, with his objections, to that fusa of a num
what the law is. But it has made no Htouse in whichit originated. Insuch cease tie Constititondi- We ave een ored witthe pemus oanm-
i the absence of all"constitutional regu-. rectsthat his objiecions(noi the contents of the bill) shal be en- ber of letters received by highly respectable houses
nt for Conress to take n thie subiect. ,e..,1 ,lari n tho irtirnl tant it voteanren at; ain r.5 5 ,;t, t L


and cattle, should they), assist and succed in ex-
terminating the population of Texas.-Net Orleans

From a Miledgeille paper.
THE CHEEK WAR.
We have been politely furnished by a gentle-
mnian of this placei with the following extracts of
letters from an officer of the army:
"COLUMI0BUS, July 25, 1836.
An express arrived this morning from' below,
stating that 98 men under the command of Capt.
Calhoun, had an engagement with about 300 of
the enemy, ten miles from Roanoke, on the Lump-
kin road, yesterday afternoon; that five of our
men were killed and fifteen wounded; our men
had to retreat; the Indians are making their way
to Florida. Gen. Sanford immediately ordered ail
tlie disposableforce here to march in pursuit, con-
sisting of Capt Deleparie's, Sledge's, Byre's,
and Iostwick's companies of mounted men, and
despatched orders to Capt. Brewer's mounted
men twelve miles above, and to Capt. Greer's
company at West Point to follow. Maj. Hoxie's
battalion is ordered to embark on board the steam
boat Metamora, and proceed forthwith to the
nearest point to Chickasahatchie swamp, in order
to get in the advance of the enemy. Col.Mc-
Ginty at Fort Gaines is ordered to take them in
flank, as alsu the force at Fort McCrary, consist
ing of a parcel of Alford's battalion.
This looks like recommending the war in
earnest. Gen. Sanford will command this force
in person.'
"General Jesup has issued an order,directing nIl
the Indians to be at the emigrating camp by the
1st of August; all who are not there by that time
will be no longer fed by the United States, and
will be treated as hostile. This I view as an im-
portant order, and will produce important results,
either terminating the war or producing a bloody
one.
"We shall leave here by daylight, and will ride
night and day until we overtake the enemy. The
savage should be no longer permitted to pollute
our soil with his foot."
LuxPxrx, STEWA'T COUNTY,
"July 26,1836. S
"We arrived here to-night, and shall proceed
on our course to Florida, if necessary, in pursuit
of the Indians. Captain Jernigan engaged them
yesterday, about seven miles below here, and
killed several; he lost three men.
"The Indians '(the same body engaged on Sun-
day by Captain Calhoun) have made but slow pro-
gress. We hope to overtake them by the d.y
after to-morrow. Captain J. is yet in pursuit.
The Sunday fight otn tlhe enemy about twenty-
five or thirty, who a ere killed."
In addition to the above, the passengers who
arrived here on yesterday'morning in the stage
from Columbus, stated that information had been
received o! Captain Jernigan having had an en-
.-.., with the Indians on Wednesday the
lb'.I, :,..l '.-i on Thursday the 28th. The loss
ofthe ln!ndians was stated to have been about forty
on VWednesdciay, and some nineteenor twenty on.
Thursdtly. The loss n the part of the w'i.'
not reported. When our paper went to press ,
had heard nothing affirming or contradicting the
report.


MonrLE, July 27.
By the schooner Columbus, Captain Haskins,
dit-et, f tO a .I.- atum- oi- tne u i i4-nt


-ie rom Velasco, ailed on tte I1in slant,
we learn that the Texians iow feel no apprehen-
IMiPORTANT. sion of being attacked by the Mexicans before
the above was in type, we havereceived November or December.
information. It appears that a force loan An extract of a letter by her says: They can-
illionas);d been declared in the city of not Imach at this season, nor before tie fall rains:
that the English and French ministers en- many of their men, during their retreat, perished
it protest, calling upon foreigners not to lfor te want of water. Our army is aboutt 3,000.
e towards the amount. Santa. Anna's TIhe people are determined to stand, and have no
s considered to be out of power, and that more moving off."
ral party was succeeding in every direc- The family of William H. Jack, Secretary cf
e after State wae revolutionizing, and th.it State, came passengers in the Columbus.
little bloodshed; the priests were little
; the treasury was completely exhausted. Extract of a letter tothe editor of the Augusta
id that the new party would not, on any Sentinel, mailed at Tallahassee, an dated
prosecute the war in Texas.. .1"HicKSTOWN, (Flo.) July 18
"Dr.cA SSin: We had a marauding party here
TEXAS. two weeks ago, who stole some horses and rob-
her change has taken place in the rela- bed some houses, hut shed no blood, and got off'
ions of either the Mexican or Texien with impunity-and 1o I suppose we shall have it
I no movement of importance may be ex-. until winter amp ng begins; hat is, unless
Stewards the close of September. Both Powell chooscs to come in larger force and cut our
e awaiting reinforcements, General ithrots, take off our negroes, and lay waste our
]as not yetjoined the Texian army, and cr ps. On the l5th1 a party of 150 Indians were
been iflbrmnied hIe Wil not, We under found 50 Miles above us, in Lowndes county, on 1


island that he is at his residence near Nacogdoches, I
which he reached short time since.

'IEXICO.
The following letter was written to Vincente Vi-
lisola, General-in-ichief of the Mexican armies, by
Jose Maria Tornel, Secretary of the War Depart-
ment. We publish it through tie liberality of a
respectable firmofithis city, by whom it was coin
municated:
To His Excelklncy {ie Gemeral-insrcief,
Dos ViitqCEirTcEFX1.SOnA:
DEAi Flux)En: Tir ough the criminal apathy of
Congress and the complete nullityofGovernment,
it becomes necessato put in use a certain strata-
gem to save our country and ourselves. You will
have to lend a handto its execution, unless you
want to perish with your army, after witnessing
the utter destruction--of lie Republic, Such is
the boldness of our revolutionary radical., and the
weakness of Government, that from this time up
to the moment wh". you adopt this plan, you will
neither receive m6t or soldiers; you must, ere
uow, be convinced.f the truth of the first point;
as to the second, -a sore positive proof cannot b C
given than the sudd"n halt of the army of reserve;
Such, then, is the poper method of executing my
plan: ail opinions tust be generalized; above all,
a letter must be wrItent the Government of tins
capital, mentioningpery particularly that all the
army want a Dicta ar to be appointed, who will
remain in office xn ii Texas be restored to the re-
public. Who will be the man? Nomatter; per-
haps Valencia, for i s at the same time the hope
and fear of many.'':
This idea is not so much to put the plan into
execution, as to ge-apowerless Congress to invest
the Government ith all power to restrainthei
revolutionary spi'its, and enlist new soldiers to
carry on the wa" and maintain good order. I
have said enough reflect on my words; you will
fully appreciate tw timely is this measure, No
time is to be lost and, markme, keep carefully or
tear this letter, bitten by a friend on whom you
can rely. JOSE MARIA TORNEL.
This- plan is j ified by a pamphlet now circu-
lating through s ico and all the large cities ofI
the Mexican R luhic. It is entitled, "General
Santa Antis's ru1." That document is the ex-
clusive production .of the. Liberals, and is well
calculated to ram every honest mind agai-st the
Government. They/ want federalism-Tornel
does not want it, knd therefore he would like to
get a Dictator aa'bointed, whose power would be
sufficient to suppress those he styles revolutionary
spirits. -

A letter from afighlyrespectable source, dated
at Matamoras the g9th ult., says: "It is an unoubted
fact that this GoTernment (the Mexican) have
made,or are making a treaty to engage eight thou-
sand Indians to join them. Tke Cherokess areal-
-ready engaged. There arc fourteen or fifteen
Chirfs of different tribes within a few miles of
here, who have d4iy communications with the of-
ficers. The cdinmissioners wmre this morning
turned ito the comon prisonwilh criminals. It
is not improbableti at we shall be invited'to take
French leave-oftdlas country soton."-New Orleas
Commercial uelejin.-

Axlreit of a letter, dulted
SMATAoNEAS, July 1, 1836.
DEAn Snit: Thmiugh themedium os0your paper
I think it .highly ecessary that the Government of
the United StatesZ as well as tIe Texiansshould
be informed of tliat presents itself so odious, in
my opinion, in ttie character o General Urrea,
thIe Mexican Comaander-in-chief, too unpardona-
ble to be overlooked, and should be immediately
attended to by thl United States.
We have at 'this momen here six or seven In-
dian chiefs, Cherl'kees and other tribes, with their
interpreter front) exas. These Indians are on a
mission to the Geertal, and have liad several pri-
vate meetings witli him. There exists no doubt
of the business they have come'on, and have made
propositions to th., General to join the Mexicans
against the Texii s, which appears now to be
concluded. As Colonel Waterchea is to be de-
spatched to-morrow to their camp, some distance
uip the river, whbe they have thirty or forty in
number, to be itsed as spies or runners. I had oc-
casion to call oin general Urrea at his quarters on
business, whenI lmet there three of the Indians,
with their(interpreter, making inquiries of thie
strength of theI tr ibe, the General being anxious
to ascertain what force thty could muster with tie
other tribes.
The Commissary of this place has orders to
purchase 800 or 1,000 horses for the cavalry,
which he is now-. doing. Every movement ap.
nears to coitfirmthe belief that the ner-otiation is


man, all of whomu had been discarded a long time
before the separation between Mr. andi Mrs. Nor-
ton. Their testimony does not seem to have pro-
duced the least effect, and the jury, the moment
the Judge had finished his charge, without leaving
their places andt without an instant's hesitation tc-
quitted Lord Melbourne. So that American read-
ers are served for their entertainment with the
indecent falsehoods of two abandoned women and
a worthless servant, suborned mo.t probably for
the occasion, and to whose statements no credit
was given on the trial. Divested uf tis portion of
the proceeding., the report would be barren W'
any kind ofiutereat.-Baltimore Ameican.

The British East India Company enjoyed, as is
wt Ill known, the monopoly of thie tta itrade with
China for Great Britain and Ireland until within
two or three years. The good effects of tIle
abrogation of this monopoly are already felt in
various ways. IThere was in the first year of the
fiee trade twenty per cent. more tea imported
into Great Britain thIan usual, and the quality was
better than the average under the monopoly sys-
em. ThIe Government revenue has gained in
Proportion. It is estimated that hereafter the
Iuties on tea will not f all short ot five million- o
pounds, being lthe largest revenue from any one
article of consumption. The principal mercantile
irms in Cantont consist i f eight English establish-
ments, seven Amterican, and one joint French and
)utch.-B.,B/ti.Umore dmerica.
,111,288 in specie has been imported from fo.
reign countries, into the port of New Orleans, from
lie ISih to these 24td of JLuly, 1836,


the Alapaha, supposed to be Creeks, on their
way to the Ocafinokee or to join the Seminoles.
Fifteeen of them were killed and twenty captur- s
ed, sitven or eight whites wounded, the whitesI
still in pursuit of them. TIe day before 18 Indi-
tan were fallen in with; 15 of them were killed i
and three escaped by swimming the river; three F
whites killed. So you see we have Indians all
around us.
Yours, respectfully,
"BF. WHITNER."
"Col. WVhitner had this letter written for you,
sir, and on the night of the 19th, his family fortu
nately being on a visit at Mr. J. C. McGhee's,
with the exception of one son, the Indians assailed
his house and committed most awful depredations.
There were two white men there, thie overseer,
who was ill in bed, and a young man by the name
of Summerale. Suimmerale with Col. W.'s little
son were at supper in the back piazza, when a
niegro in the passage exclaimed, the Indians!"
H[e sprang from the table, seized a double-bar-h
relied gun, and marched in front of the house; he
saw Indians to the number of thirty, and discharg-
ed both barrels at them, the Indians returned it
with a volley-he was wounded in both thighs,
but not dangerously; he then made his escape
round the house to the back of the garden. His
determination and bravery enabled Col. W.'s son,
the overoeer, and t negroes, all to make their es-
cape. They lay all night in the high growing
cotton, with the exception ofonemnegro man; they
shot him with five balls. They than rifled the
house of eiery article, ripping open tie beds,
emptying out the feathers, and making sacks of
the ticks to carry off their plunder-all wearing
apparel gone, even the clothes wet in the wash
tub. 'They were trailed, but have made their es-
cape, and it is supposed will come back in in-
creased numbers. Belp must come soon, or it 'will
be too late for Hicksatown. The females are flee-
ing in every direction, leaving their husbands to
defend their plantations.
The Indians came to Mr. McGhee's on the
night of the 1st, and stole a pair of carriage horses
from his stable. We have been too long neglect-
ed. A FEMALE.
Thei Indians also stole nine mules and a horse
from Col. Whitner.

We publish the official-report of the battle Of
We-fi-ka Pond, near Micanopy, received yester-
dcay at the Adjutant General's, office, bing a copy
of Lieutenant Maitland's (3d Artillery) report, for-
warded by him to the Governor of Florida.
FoRT DErIANCE, MICAueoRY, Z
19th July, 1836. S
Sit: In obedience to your instructions to evacu-
ate the post of Fort Drane, if the commanding offi-
cer, in.exercislig a sound discretioN, s6o0uld deem
it necessary, I have the honor to report that the
commanding officer, Captain Merchant, of the 2d
regiment of artillery, in consequence of the large
and increasing sick report, determined to remove
the troops to this place. The movement com-
menced this day at eight o'clock, consisting of
twenty-two wagons, loaded with commissary and
quartermasters' stores, with an escort of a detach-
ment of twenty-six dragoons of thie 2d regmeit,
under the command of Captain Ashby, and thirty-
six men detailed from the different artillery com-
panies at the post; also a five and a half inch how-
itzer, under the charge of Lieutenant Whitly, 2d
artillery, making a force of 62 mon. On our ar-
rival at the We-li-ka Pond, within one mile of this
place, the discharge of several rifles apprised us
of the presence of the enemy. Captain Ashbyim-
mediately went with his dragoons in the direction
from which the fire was delivered,and scoured the
neighboring hanmmocks, without finding the enemy.
It is proper to state here, that in the first fire pri.
vate Holmes of the dragoons was dangerously
wounded in the abdomen, (since dead.) Pro-
ceeding on our route opposite a long hammock,
within a quarter of a mile of Micanopy, we were
attacked by a body of Indians estimated,frot what
we saw of them, and from their firing, to be about
250 strong. The firing commenced near the frout
attlnd on the right of the train, and was continued
through its whole length, a quarterofa mile. The
men returned the fire wits spirit and promptness
During the engagement, Capt. Ashby, (who, I
regret to say, was, soon after the commencement
of'it, severely woundL.d, but refused to leave the
field until loss of blood compelled him, finding
the enemy in great strength, and pressing ont us,
despatched a dragoon to this place for a reinforce-
ment. Ot his way, lie met two detachments un-
der Lieutenants Temple and Talcott, 31 strong,
Ioi their march to assist us. They arrived at an
important moment, and did us good service.
;i iji-t Ion lius approach, a point of hamitoc from which
the enemy had very much annoyed Ls. As soon
as L.ieuteamsCTeamtetall
charge in the hammock, which was instantly exe-
cutetd, and the hIndians driven beyond the reach of
our fire. During this time, Liutenant Talcott
was actively employed in removing tie wagons in
their direction to this place.
Of thle good conduct and courage of the troops,
it is sufficient to say that every ian did is duty.
My gallant commander, Captain Ashby, distin-
guished himself by his courage aud activity, and
did not leave the field, even after having received
a severe wound, until feebleness, fiom loss of
blood, made it absolutely necessary.
1st Lieut. Temple, 3d artillery, rendered the
most essential service by his timely arrival from
Fort Defimace, and the gallant mann-rin which
he charged the hammock. Lieut. Wihtby, who
had charge of the howitzer, served it in the most
efficient manner; and, from his prominent posi-
tion, was a mark for the enemy, wlich drew a
sharp fire on him, and disabled several of the
,in.
I regret to say assistant surgeon Weightman
received a severe wound in his left thigh.
Serjeants Smith ,lohinson, of company D,2d dra-
goons; Smith, company F, 1st artillery; Hall,
company I, 3d artillery; Petersoa, company I, 3d
artillery; B.uydon, company H/ 3d artillery; all
distinguished themselves by their courage amd
good conduct in discharging tie duties that de-
volved oc them.
Report of the killed ond wounded at the battle
of We-li-ka, u ast Flo-ida, 19th July, l836:
Dangerosusly wounded, 5 (two siice dead)
Severely do 5
Slightly do 1

Total, 11
From our well-directed lit-, se so doubt killed
and disabled many of the encmy; butr as is usual,
they carry them off tn the tense hammock to
which they retead.
We hid three horses killed in Clue field, and
several severely sounded.
I have the nonor to be, sin,
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
W. S. MAINLAND,
1st Lt. commanding.
General R. JOSES,
Adj't Gen'l U. S. Army. Washisgton.

The report of tIhe late trial of Lord Melbourne is
copied from the London papers into several it this
country. Some of the details are of so disgusting
a character that no correct minded petsoi would
willingly permit the report lobe put into the bands
of the young members of his family. Moreover,
th~e testimony oftthe witnesses, which constitutes
the chief "interest" of the reptmt, came from two
housemaids of bad characte- and a drunken coach-


stant supporters ofyour administration; an admin-
istration which,we are proud to acknowledge, ias
been prompted by enlightened wisdom and patri-
otism, and which, it our history, will be distin-
guished fobr the benefits it has confer.-ed on out-
beloved country.
"When you were inaugurated, ourtforeign rela-
tions were in a most perplexed condition. The
commercial countries of Europe had committed
depredations on our commerce, in violation of the
laws of nations, and had, by one pretext or other,
withheld indemnification; and it became your ardu-
ous duty, through the instrumentality of judi-
cious treaties, to re-esablish thie harmony which
lad been interrupted between oui own Govern-
ment and several of thIe European powers, and
thereby obtain that justice which before lt it time
had been withheld. We rejuice that we have
lived to see these difficulties adjusted under your
administration.
"At home we had a large amount of national
debt to pay, which is now dicliarged. Intestine
dissensions wero subdued by your patriotic inea-
sures, and that Hydra to civil liberty, in the form
of a bank of the United States, with its hundred
millions of bank paper, and its consequently cor-
rupting influence, has been ctushed, and we trust
forever, by thie wise and energetic ideasures that
you have employed against it. We have heard it
again maid agiun stated, that a certain Mr. Wlitney
hiad by sonicnmeans o Ilier, obtained the ootm-
mand of some of the finds of the Treasury
without law, and against tie plain rules of con.
mnon honesty-this we cannot credit, and we claim
t as due to your friends to know whether it is true
ir olth'rwise.
"We have now thIe happiness to meet y,
under circumstances the most grateful to tilts
feelings, whether in reference to in overflowing
treasury and the peace and prosperity that prevail


From the Burlington (Vt.) Sentinel. t
The 4th Congressionail District was fully repre- r
rented in the Convention holden at Cambridge on e
Tuesday last. More than one hundred delegates f
were in attentlance, all animated by the flattering v
prospect, every where presented, of the speedy 1'
political regeneration of Vermont. Itwillbeseen r
that CORNELIUS P. VAN NESS, late Minister r
to Spain, whom the people have delighted to
honor, and who Ihas conferred honor upon the
State, was put in nomination as a candidate to rep- t
resent this District in Congress. Mr. VAN NEs
is so well known, and his eminent talentsand pub- I
lic services are so justly appreciated by tIe peo- I
pie of this State, that any eulogy would be super-
fluous; and unless the freemen of this district are
blind to their own interests, and utterly regardless
of the honor of the State, thcy will come up to his
support, and secure his services in the National
Legislature. The enthusiasm with which his no-
mination is received by his political friends, std
the panic it has created among his foes, assure us
that he will be powerfully sustained.
There is no dioubt that Mr. VA NEss will soon
return to the United States, and it is not improba-
ble that he is now on his way hither. His bag-
gage arrived in New York some di)s aago, togeth-
er with two servants who went out with him from
this place, and who arrived here on Wednesday
evening. We are thus particular in stating these
facts, because our opponents will attempt to ex-
cite the belief that Mr. Van Ness is not about r'-
turning. But in addition to these circumstances,
we have satisfactory assurances that he would, at
all events, leave Spain as soon as lie heard of the
sailing of Mr. Eaton, the newly appointed Minis-
ter, and perhaps sooner.
Let, then, the numerous friends of this gentle-
man rely upon it that he is coming home, and act
with the vigor which the crisis demands.

FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT CON-
VENTION.
A large number of delegates from the several
towns in the counties of Franklin, Orleas?, Grand-
Isle, atnd Chittenden, comprising the 4th Congres.
sional district, assembled at Cambridge, on the
26th inst. ThIe convention was called to order by
Danforth Mott, and, on motion, Roger Enos, ol
Irasburg, was appointed chairman, and D. A.
Smalley and L. [I. Nuliug, secretaries.
On motion, a coimmittee-, consisting of one dele-
gate from each town represented, was appointed
to present to the convention a suitable candidate
to represent this district in Congress.
The convention adjourneduntil tie report ofthe
committee should be received. The convention
met, atnd Judge Chittenden, chairman of the com-
mittee, reported the name of CORNELIUS P.,
VAN NESS; which report was accepted, and af-
ter remarks by several gentlemen, the nomination
was confirmed by-the convention.
On motion, a committee of three, consisting of
Nahum Stone, H. R. Beardsley, ard D. A. Smal-
ley, was appointed to draft resolutions expressive
of the sense of the convention, and to prepare an
address to the freemen of the 4lh Congressional
district.
The above named committee reported the fol-
lowing resolutions, which were adopted:
Resolved, That the eminent talents and patriotic
services of MARTIN VAN BURN and RICH-
ARD M. JOHNSON, entitle them to the confi
dence and cordial support ofthe great Democratic
Party of the Union, and that we will use all fair
atid honorable exertions to secure their election
to the offices for which they have been put in no-
mination.
Resolvild, That the superior capacity, extensive
information, and unbending integrity of CORNE-
LIUS P. VAN NESS, and the able and faithful
manner in which na has discharged the duties that
have devolved upon h;m in the high and responsi-
ble offices lie has filled, under the State and Gene-
ral Governments, entitle him to the support ofthe
Democratic freemen of this District, for a Repre-
sentative in Congress
Besolved, therefore, That we pledge ourselves to
make use of all fair and honorable means to en-
sure his election.
Resslved, That in the language of the venerable
and beloved President of the United States, "a
constitutional right to apply, and a necessity for
such application, are the true sources and limits
of the power to tax. When the taxes produce
more money than can be rightfully applied, the
appropriate remedy is reduction or repeal. To
continue a tax without necessity, and for the sake
of diistribution, is to subvert the principles of the
Constitution, and must end in destroying the liber-
ties of the people."
Resolved, That we cordially approve of the nomi-
nationi made by the late State Convention at
a 'STtx.r-p^Ktft7t'WV~~ V.-s-e a=toritOM-oC1B to0 SeOnUc tire
election of the severnt candidates there presented
tfor he suffgagpcs)Lie.4peoDle
..----eoIliO g resolutions were introduced and
adopted:
lHesolved, That the thanks of this Convention be
presented to the Chairman and Secretaries, for the
able manner in which they have discharged their
respect ive duties.
Resolved, That the proceedings of this Conven-
tion be signed by the President and Secretaries,
anti published in the Burlington Sentinel ast
Franklin Journal, and such other'papers as are dis-
posed to publish the same.
Adjourned without day.
ROGER ENOS, President.
D. A. SMAI.I.T,5 x
L.H. NUTTIN, S'ecetaries

J-om the Jonesborouglh (en.) Sentinel.
VISIT OF THE PRESIDENt OF THE UNI-
TED STATES.
At an early hour on Monday morning, the vari-
ous roads leading into town wtyre thronged with
people on horseback, and the favorable indications
of a fine-day gave promise of in unusually large
concourse of citizens from the neighboring towns
and country. At eight o'clock, a very charge par-
ty of gentlemen, mounted upon fine horses, and
arranged in military order by Col. Willet (Marshal
of thie day) and his assistant, eft town to meet
the President, having learned that he had sojourn-
ed the nigbt previous wtth his old friend, Mr.
Gammon of Sullivan counts, atd would start fo-
Jonesboroug-h after breakfast. At the distance of
seven tor eight miles f-m thse tows, the proces-
sion met the Presilent, accompanied by his Secre-
tary, (Major Donelsou,) anda number of the citi-
zens of'Blountville and vicinity. He was on horse-
back, and seemed in fine alth and spirits. The
horsemen took open order on the right and left of
the road, and when the President had reached the
most central position, Mt. Kennety advanced to-
wards him, and in conformiry with the appoint-
ment by the meeting of Satu-day, delivered to hin
a brief, btt feeling arad eloquent address, of which
we have been politely finished with tnIe follow-
ing sketch:
"General Aananav JACuSON,
President of the United Stotes:
"Sta: On behalf of many of thne citizens' of
Washtington coumaty, 1 have beets deputed Cto meet
you at tI-s place and give you a beauty welcome
during the short sojourn you may make, os your
way to the Hermitage. I should not execute this
commission acceptably to the groat body of tne
people, or correspondent will my own judgmeis
aid feelings, were I to omit to state, that as ye
were amongst the first to invite yoe Ca become a
candidate for the Presidetcy, so from the com-
mencement to the present, we have beet the con-


RESTORER OF THE BLOOD,
For Chronie and other Diseases, and other e 11
rules.
A G E 1 T S.
Lewis Johnson, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washin
tom City.
Dr. C. Farqnhar, Al-xandria, D. C.
Joseph Camp, No. 100, Baltimore street, Bh
more, Md.
0. M. Linthicum, Druggist, Georgetown, D.
Eustace & Temple, Druggists, Richmond, Va.
Brown & Corling, Druggistt, Petersburg, Va.
.1. D. Randiolphi & Co., Uoksellrs and Stati
ers, Norfolk, Va.
Dr. James Cooke, IFredericksburg, Va.
Fie.d & Goss, Drugg:sts, Ctarlottesville, Vm.
HIenry Hiden, Merchant, Orange Court House,
James Brown, Druggist, Charlestown, Jeffer
County, Va.
William Loomis, Ashford, Windham County, C
necticut.
Or to any respectable Druggist in the U. Sta
July 19-ditc3t

CARRIAGE AND HARNESS, FURl
T'URE, MILCH COWS, &e.
^ 1 HIS afternoon, at 5 o'clock, in frout of
A auction store, I shallsell without rse
for cash, one close Carriage withi Harness; I
ning geer in good ouder: is very suitable f
hack, or with a little expense will make a N
excellent fianily carriage; set single Harn
S:tddle, S.c.; One Buggy, &c.; ite-er which var
nti-icles of new and gtood household (urniture.
(2i'This morning, at 8 o'clock, in front of
centre Market, a large assortment ol house
articles; two very fine milch cosws and calf,
ic. EDW. DYER,
Atig 6 Aictionee


- s i'


throughout our widely extended country, o? in
reference to that peculiar affection which has been
entertained by the people of this country for you,
for early half a century. If your patriotic ser.
vices and sacrifice, through a long and eventful
ife, could cease to be felt elsewhere as having con
erred singular benefits upon your country, they
never can be forgotten in tie county of Washing.
on, where you first become a resident of the
State, and, with many of our forefathers, one of
thlie early pioneers of Tennessee.
"It can be hardly necessary to state, that as we i
have, when fail ly represented, unflinchingly stood
by you heretofore, we shall hereafter be found
so fatr as we are concerned, among- your steady
supporters during the remainder ofyour adminis-
tration, of such measures as shall redound to the
permanent welfare of our country, and your indi-
vidual famea"
The Pi resident's reply was as filo\ws:
"Sin: The cheering we-chome given me en this
occasion by the citizens ofJonesbororsgh and its
vicinity, is received with feelings of le deepest
sensibility. Accompanied as it has been by the
sentiments you have just declared, it excites re-
flections in my bosom which I fear any language
which I can employ will but inadequately express.
Fort)y-eighc years have passed away since I first
came to this h-,ppy land. Forty years ago, I was
its sole representative in Congress; and now to
learn through the many political tests to which my
life has been since subjected, there has been no
change in the confidence and partiality which its
inhabitants so early and so generously bestowed
upon me, is an honor which fills-my heart with
emotions of gratitude and thankfulness to that
Providence in whose hands are tle destinies ofus
all. Allow me to assure you, sir, that at no former
period have I been so deeply penetrated by the
sense of my obligations to tle country, in whose
service I have speht a great portion of my life,
and witnessed the most of those political events
which have influenced its prosperity.
making my views -of public duty from the
school of the revolution, by which we achieved
our liberties, I have endeavored to' follow the
lights afforded by the examples of the patriots
who founded and who reformed our system of
Government. 'If I have been so far successful as
to have done nothing to impair their sacred work,
and shall leave, st the close-of my administration,
otur country and its fiee institutions in the happy
state you have described, I shall feel myself fortu.
nate far beyond my merits. The applause you
have bestowed upon me will be due to the people
whose firmness, intelligence, and virtue, have up-
held and stimulated my exertions.
You have dulone me butjustice, sir, in refusing
to ere-dit the declarations which have been made
respecting the agency ascribed to Mr. Whitney in
the management antd possession of the public
funds. These declarations have been contradict-
ed by frequent official reports, and are known to
be false by any one at all conversant with the
proceedings of the session of Congress which has
just closed. The rumors which have prevailed
on the subject are like many other fabrications
which have been put afloat wiLh the view of pre-
judlicing tihe republican cause, and slandering the
character of those who have been bold enough to
expose the corruptiors of the Bank of-the United
States.
"I beg leave to repeat my hearty thanks for
the cordial reception given me by the citizens of
Washington, and to assure them that I meet them
as an old friend, identified with all their fortunes
by the mostsacred of ties."
After this ceremony, the President rode forward
to the right of the corps of escort, when the latter
formed in the rear, and the procession in this order
moved onward to the town. In the mean time,
the number of people in the streets swelled to a
vast throng-all glowing with impatience to wel-
come the immortal JACKSON. A well arranged
alignment on foot was formed from the entrance
of the Blountville road as far down tie street as
the post office, and as the President and escort ap-
proached, the "spirit-stirring drum and fife" an-
notunced the gratifying fact. Every head was
uncoveied-every heart spoke out its grateful
welcome, as the venerable man pasedin front of
the line of citizens. *At Dr. Chester's hotel, the
escorting procession halted, and the President was
conducted in by his friends. The indications of
the popular feeling at this moment, were imposing.
ly affecting. The moistened eyes of the old men
-told, in voiceless eloquence, of a deep emotioh-
and the flush of satisfaction plainly perceptible in
the faces of thie throng that surrounded the hotel;
the heart dictated expressions, from hundreds, of
love for the "old Chief"-all found a sympathetic
response in every generous bosom. Shortly after-
w.irdl, the President appeared on lIe poc'i in front
of the hotel, and the multitude advancc-d, in good
-o:dert.tcoe.iyy-a '. -ty-he.- ake of thl hand" with
their excellent, age-worn friend and fellow-citizen.
A Sr' aILLsTRATIo OFv THE ADVANTAGE e_'S FROM
ROWING.- "Alibeau, having a clear viet of the
King, aimed at his head, and it was immediately
ascertained that his ball passed across the very
spot which the King's head had occupied but a
moment before he fired. But, happily for the
citizen King, he was engaged at the moment in
bowing to the National Guard, and the rapid mo-
tion of his head, up and down, was the means of
saving him from a danger which ae little appre-
hended was so imminent. Some ofth. wadding
was found in his hair; the ball lodged in the op-
posite side of the carriage."

A very distressing accident occurred in Green
ville, North Carolina, a few days ago, by reason of
the bursting of a cannon among a number of per-
sons whlo were celebrating an election triumph.
It appears that the piece had been discharged,
until heated, and with a view of increasing the re-
port, the persons who had the possession of it
were engaged in ramming down brickbats upon
the cartridge. Anumberoftliebyslanders wlite
anJ colored, were-assisting iti holding up the piece,
(it not being mounted on a gum carriage,) and
while thus clustered around the mouth of te can-
non, or within its range, it exploded, spreading
wounds and dealh among eighteen persons.
Several were killed, and the rest more an lens se-
verely inj ared.-B-ltimore .se-ican.

MR. MADISON.
Mr. Rives, in the touching ard beautiful speech
which he delivered, when the death of Mr. Madi-
son was announced to thC Senate, referred to a
letter which he had recently received, as proba.
bly the last written by Chis distinguishnd man
He was mistaken. Professor Tucker, of our
University, had Ihe honor of receiving the last
emanationt from his mind, under circumstances
which render the incident peculiarly interesting
It was in answer to a deuication of Mr. Tacker'
life rfJefftrson, which is noy in press. We lean
from Mr. T. that it sas written sith the rstu
spirit and ability of tne author, and tne mon
chaste and perfect letter he had ever receivac
from him. It was written by Mr. Todd after hi
dictation, and franked by himself.

NOiICPE,
-R. KUHL respectfully imtborn his friend
and tIme public, that he has closed 1ms off
ces mn Washington and thn city of Baltimore, an
proceeded to New York for the purpose of opem
ing aan office, where he aill be glad to hear fro
his agents and others, who nay be desirous to pu
chase his


_1_~__1~1


m~nndal~rhi\n.C .~nlun~~nJnllhnn~j~airnRh-ahnTSi~


U..an.lhlw PAU Inb- '.I l -- .- %.- X. -


-, W -nt i -a nb" "t-W,









"'" ...... In relation to the same, we have seen a lett(
S G L?0 E written by an officer ofa bank in one of the wes
,' E* ern States, who thus writes:
51 W^S -' iti& "We were at first induced to believe that th
regulation would have an injurious effect, in cot
Y MORNING, AUGUST 10, 1836 sequence of the panic which it was feared migl
be created; but on reflection, we believe that i
IITE AND MANGUM. tendency will be beneficial. The deposit bank
est of a correspondent in North Ca- at all events, have nothing to fear from its oper
dish from the journals of the session tion, nor will the better class of other banks b
133, the votes on the passage of Mr. effected injuriously, unless it be by a strong cur
sill. U will be seen that Messirs. rent of public opinion inducing a suspicion of a
.angum voted against the measure; banks, and causing a run for specie. The bank
mnly voted against it on its passage, which have excessive issues must of course curta
-ery proposition made by its friends, their business and draw in their circulation, which
reconcilee the country to that or any will be salutary for the country. I apprehend n
f distribution. It will be seen by inconvenience from the measure." We have see
r, that every southern Senator voted letters from individuals residing in the west, of sim
aay. They voted against the land ilar import.
is an indirect mode of maintaining
I they held it to be a palpable viola- LITERARY.


institution.
t. Mangnum and White went further
other southern Senators; they voted
.ute quoted below, which embraces,
ration principle; 2. The gift of the
ng unsold a certain number of years,
grade of price, to actual settlers;
voted for Mr. Benton's principle
distribution to the proceeds after
amount paid to Indians,and other ex-
red by the Treasury, which would
e to divide.
uund, on examining the Journal, pages
that Jud.e White voted against the
inciple at the last session, which he
supported; and Mangum, who was
the question was first taken on Mr.
duation, joined White in voting down
n's, which proposed a still more
action, and was less favorable to the
lose offered at former sessions, which
:ed by both White and Mangum.
glaring inconsistency of Messrs. Man-
ite was shown in their votes in regard
.ion of the expenses incurred about
t of the proceeds before they were
1 1832 and 1833, they joined Mr.
is utmost effort to leave nothing but
eeds to distribute, but at the last ses-
ned a somerset'upon this point, too-
on made by Mr. Benton to ascertain
cweeds by deducting.
on annuities on account ofpublic lands,"
c U. and WRITE voted in,the nega-

ting expenditures "for holding trea-
ians for the purchase of public lands,"
TE and MAtUMu voted in the negative.
leduicting-"amnount paid to Indians for
of public lands," Messrs. MAseu t and
d in tlhe negative.
sducting "amount expended in removing
i lands purchased," Messrs. MANGlur
voted in the negative. See Journal,
ad 317.
i 4th of May, 1836, Messrs. WHITE and
insummated their inconsistencies, by
-e obnoxious land bill, which they had
ill its stages in 1832 and 1833:
add the substitute offered for the land
: vote on it-in the session of 1832-'33.
stion recurring on agreeing to the
reported to the bill by the Committee
hands as follows:
enacting clause, strike out to the end
ind insert the following:
nuch of the public lands as have been
offered at public sale, and have been
entry at private sale at one dollar and
cents per acre, and still remain unsold,
iand after the thirtieth day of June
'ered at private sale at one dollar per g
nd be it further enacted, That it shall
lawful for any head of a family, or any
ver the age of twenty-one years, or
and wishing to become an actual set- I
parcel of land authorized by this act f
nd not exceeding one quarter section
to demand and receive, from the pro-
and receiver, as soon as the said par- t
'e been offered at the price by this act 6
a written permission to settle on the
if the person so applying shall pay
proper receiver the sum of fifty cents
land offered at one dollar per acre by a
tion of this act, and shall, forthwith, n
pon, and cultivate it for Qve consecu-
and shall be a citizen or the United
end of that time, the said person, or c
-gal representatives, if dead, shall be I
receive a. patent therefore from the I
es; and if two or more persons entitled I
leges of actual settlers shall apply at
e for the same parcel of land, then t
and receiver shall immediately decide i
preference between them according
circumstances; and, where the equi-
stances appear to be equal, the deci-
e by lot: Provided, always, That no
tion, or transfer, of any settlement
e valid, and in no case shall the patent
name, or ensure to the benefit of any c
the settler himself, if living, or to his I
leirs or devisees, if dead. t
nd be it further enacted, That the re- .
receivers, for services done under the I
ion of this act, shall have a right to de- c
ake, from the persons applying for p
es," the following fees: for a writ- .
-ion to settle, the sum of twenty-five
for taking the proof of settlement,
nd granting the final certificate, fifty I

nd be it further enacted, That it shall
of the Presideit of the United States
e land offices to be closed in all t
.in which the public lands shall be a
otherwise disposed of under the.pro- a
is act.
termined in the negative-yeas 17, J

a of Mr. KAXE,
and nays being desired by one-fifth of t
, present,
o voted in the affirmative are, a
enton, Black, Brown, Buckner, For- 1
', Hendricks, Hill, Kane, King,,Man-
, Robinson, Smith, Tipton, White, 0
o voted in the negative are, '
Ill, Calhoun, Chambers, Clayton, Dal-
n, Dudley, Ewing, Foot, Frelinghuy- -
, Johnston, Knight, Miller, Naudain, t
Prentise, Robbins, Ruggles, Seymour,
ague, Tomlinson, Tyler, Waggaman,

on the final passage of land bill in the
'S2-'33: i
o voted in the affirmative are,
-I, Chambers, Clay, Clayton, Dallas,
oudley, Ewing, Foot, Frelinghuysen,
Holmes, Johnston; Knight, Poindex-
, Robbins, Ruggles, Seymour, Silsbee,
umlinson, Waggam n, Wilkins.
o voted in the negative are,
enton, Black, Brown, Buckner, Cal-
th, Grundy, Hill, Kane, King, Man-
Moore, Rives, Robinson, Smith, Tip-
Tyler, White, Wright.

SPECIE CIRCULAR.
ure of the President appears to give
satisfaction in nearly every part of the
rd from thus far; particularly in the

ord IPatriot thus speaks of it:


'sident has directed the Secretary of
, to issue a Circular forbidding the re- -
.ny other money than Gor ) and SiL.-
public lands after the 15th of August
in case ofactual settlers, who may pay
December next. Thisis a bold and
sure, and will scatter dismay among
ors. The reasons are given in the
ch we publish below. It will go to
western States with a hard currency,
hem from the necessity of adopting
em of banking, so hostile to every
Democracy,"


A joint stock company has been formed at Pa
ris, with a capital of five hundred thousand francs
for the purpose of publishing editions of standard
works, and which are published in a slyle o
magnificence hitherto unknown, and at the low
est possible prices. As a specimen of the prices
it is stated that the works of Moliere, splendidly
printed, aid with eight hundred vignette engrav
ings, will be sold at twenty-five francs; Gil Blas
with five hundred and ninety-three engravings, at
fifteen francs; a collection of Latin authors, with a
French translation, in thirty volumes, and contain-
ing as much as two hundred common volumes, is
sold at three hundred francs.
The publication of those works is not confined
to the French language, but they will appear in
several foreign languages, with the French en-
gravings, so that the benefits resulting from thel
formation of the society are by no means exclu-
sive and national; for -the German, Italian, Span-
iard, Englishman, and American, will all be
benefited; and, indeed, every nation may be, that
is literary and liberal enough to pay for tile cost
of printing, as the engravings are adapted, of
course, to all tastes and all languages. An Eng-
lish edition of Gil Blas is about to be published,
or has been, in London, with the French en-
gravings.
Why cannot a society of this description be
formed in the United States? We know of no-
thing to prevent it, and .many reasons mnght be
given why it could beidone; and, perhaps, not the
least potent is, that the stock itself would be
valuable, and would yield, we have little doubt, as
good dividends as canals and railroads in general.
If a few enterprising booksellers would identify
themselves with the experiment, it would succeed
beyond doubt; and if, by possibility, it should not,
the loss sustained would not be great, as the
capital need not exceed one or two hundred
thousand dollars. And to what purpose more
elegant or useful, or laudable, could that sum be
applied, than to a diffusion of knowledge and the
promotion of literature?
I So popular are the editions of the works pub-
lished by the company in" France, that, according
to the Paris National, near eight thousand copies
of the first numbers of Don Quix6tte were sold in
two days.
A similar enterprise is now in successful opera-
tion at Havre, and the most material difference is,
we believe, that the works published on account
of the Literary Pantheon .(as the Havre establish-
ment is called) are without engravings. Sixty-
six volumes have appeared of the most approved
and popular works, the subjects being historical,
religious, philosophical, dramatic, poetical, and
polygraphical. Guieciardini's History of Italy, a
voluminous and expensive work, as published
generally, appears in one volume; Gibbon's Ro-
man Empire in two; all the historical works of
Robertson in two, (generally in ten, octavo,) tlhe
works of Fenelon in three, of Moliere in one, of
Rabelais in one, of Voltaire in twelve, (heretofore
rom forty to one hundred and twenty.) The
volumes are all octr.voes, and the price of each
en francs, which is a reduction, upon an average,
of not less than three or four hundred per cent.
The Harpers and others have done much of
ate years in this country, towards multiplying
and cheapening valuable works in various depart-
ments of literature, but the French method of
attaining those desirabile objects, number and
cheapness, appears to be, of all others, the most
practicable and the most eligible, as it involves no
hazard to individuals. If the.company sustains a
oss, it is so inconsiderable, when divided among
he stockholders, that it can occasion but little
inconvenience and no uneasiness,

LORD MELBOURNE.
The London Morning Chronicle of the 23d of
June contains a full report of the trial in the case
if crime. con. in which this nobleman, the British
Premier, was defendant, and the Hon. Mr. Nor-
on, a brother of Lord Grantley, plaintiff. The
ntcrest that had been excited was very great, not
only on account of the high standing of all the
parties, but, by accident or design, the affair had
assumed a political aspect, and the friends of the
ministerr asserted that the whole concern was a
political persecution, got up tnder the mask of a
pretended private delinquency: and the result
will no doubt couifirm them in this opinion. The I
trial commenced on thee'2d of June, at half past
nine, A. M., and continued, with a recess of half
in hour only, until half past eleven, P. M. The
ury, after consulting a few moments, gave a ver-
dict for the defendant without retiring from the
box. The court-room was crowded to suffoca-
tion, and there was a great number of persons out-
side who could not squeeze or elbow their way
into the interior.
The witnesses were principally servants-some
of them discarded ones, too, who had been turned
iway for misconduct. A part of thiei~ testimony
was decidedly unfavorable to the lady, (Mrs.
Norton,) and had it been believed by the jury, the
rial could hardly have resulted in a verdict for his
ordship, the defendant. The examinations, and
cross examinations, were severe and searching;
and a perusal of them can scarcely fail to leave
upon the mind the impression, that the material
witnesses had been tampered with and drilled, if
not actually suborned; not by the honorable
plaintiff, we presume, but by so'e of the subor-
dinate law agents who had been employed to pre-
pare the cause for trial.
If the lady is innocent, (and public opinion, we
suppose, will presume her so,) after a legal scrutiny
has failed to establish her guilt, she of course will
resume her station in society, to which she had
been a:n ornament and an honor. She is well
known in the literary world as an authoress of no
small share of talent and of considerable populari-
ty. Many articles from her pen have appeared
in this country, and have elicited, we believe, the
approbation of ttose who have read them. She
is of the Sheridan family, many of which have
been famous for their talents, wit, and eccentrici-
tles. ShIe has beauty and grace as well as talents;
and had his lordship, who hlias the affairs of thee


British empire on his shoulders, succumbed to her
charm, he might have taken for his motto, All
far love, or the world well lost."
But the husband! If he believes in the guilt of
his wife, (and of that there seems to be no doubt,
for the defendant's counsel charge him with no-
thing worse than of being made "a tool, and that
he had been abused for party and political purpose.


er es," if lie believes in the guilt of his wife, hov
st- indescribably miserable must he be-
Standing alone by his desolate health,
is Where althis household goods lay shivered around him.
n- The great length of the trial puts it out of ou
ht power to give even an extract from it of length]
ts enough to be interesting; but for the benefit 0
s those who may have an interest in understanding
a- what the law is in such cases, we quote a few line
)e from the charge, to the jury, of the judge who pre
r- sided at the trial. They express in a few word
11 the duty of a jury, and show at the same time
:s what kind of proof is necessary to secure a ver
il diet for a plaintiff.-" Having thus recapitulates
h the evidence which has been adduced, (says the
o judge,) he had only to leave the facts stated by
n the various witnesses to the good sense and tern
n- per-ate discretion of the jury. They ought not
to rely implicitly on facts as bearing against the de-
fendant, if in their,opinion those facts were as
capable of one interpretation as another. They
- should look guardedly at the various points of the
evidence, making up their own minds where they
d thought it of a conclusive nature, and where not
f so; and they should then ask their consciences
- whether they should arrive at the conclusion, that
Lord Melbourne has1 committed adultery with the
wife of Mr. Norton. If, looking at the bulk of
y the evidence with that caution which the case de-
manded, the conviction were to remain upon their
t minds that such had been the fact, they should
give a verdict for the plaintiff. If, on the other
hand, they were to come to 'the conviction that
the facts alleged to have taken place between the
parties were such as did not bear out the charge
against the defendant, then they should undoubt-
edly acquit him."

Great Failure at Buffalo.-The news of the fail-
ure of Benjamin Rathbun, at Buffalo, which was
received this morning, caused a very unusual sen-
sation in Wall street. His affairs have for months'
past been the subject of much speculation, and
Ihis notts, endorsed by some ten or twelve of the
best names in that city, have been crowded upon
the market at the enormous discount of three or
four per cent. a month. They have served for the
quotations of some of e of our neighbors in giving the
condition of the money market. The credit of every
body in Buffalo of course became deeply impli-
cated, and it was said repeatedlythat, if "Rathbun
failed, all Buffalo must fail."-Jy. Y. Journal of
Commerce, Aug. 6.
NoTE.-The above mode of showing the condi-
tion of the money market, and grounding on it
tirades of abuse against the Treasury and the ad-
ministration, is very happily exposed. Webb and
Noah, it is hoped, will take warning from it.

From the following it would seem that the op-
position are finding out the imposture of their
military candidate; Always an imbecile, and vain
beyond endurance, dotage, and his course of
life at the North Bend and its neighborhood, have
rendered him perfectly contemptible.
From the PNew York Times.
A VIsIT To Gat. HanPRiso-.-A number of
Whig gentlemen, opposed to Mr. Van Buren,
and in favor of Harrison, recently paid a visit to
the Farmer of North Bend. They had formed,
from the glowing account of the Whig journals,
a most favorable idea of the intellect of the great
available. They sought him, found him, covers
ed with him, and left him, sickened with his im-
becility and egotism, and in no good humor with
themselves at the reflection that they had been
most outrageously humbugged by a portion of
their Whig brethren. The subjoined account of
this interesting interview is from the Cincinnati
Republican:
"VAN BUREN TRICKS."-PEOPLE'S ECHO.
Mr. Ramsay,--Sir: Having accidently observed
in the People's Echo," a contradiction of a cer-
tain rumor, in reference to the visit of a number of
g-intlemen from the east to Gen. Harr.son, under
the above caption, and calling upon me as the gen-
tleman still remaining in Cincinnati, to refute it,
I have been induced to make the following state-
ment of facts, without regard to the rumors cir-
culated by the Magician's friends, or the still more
unauthorized contradiction of the partisans of the
Petticoat Hero. Imprimis, a number of gentle-
men from Boston, New Yolk, Philadelphia, and
some of the western States, agreed to make
a visit, during their sojourn in Cincinnati, to
General Harrison, whose pretensions to tihe
Presidential CiChair they zealously advocated,
none more warmly and sincerely than myself.
Arrangements were made for the introduction,
.nd, in due time, myself and Messrs. with
becoming formality, bowed to the General. Af-
ter a few moments' conversation with the General,
in which he betrayed great imbecility and egotism,
we left him in disgust: the other gentlemen, in
half an hour afterwards, were introduced by
me, with the like result. All of them, except
one, expressed a determination to. abandon the
"old Granny," and advocate the election of any
other man than Harrison, some of them openly
avowing their intention to support Mr. Van Bu-
ren. The writer of this was induced from the
representations of his brother, a resi-lent of Cin-
cinnati,_and who is s ill a misguided follower of
Harrison, to take an active part ins getting up a
meeting in Philadelphia in behalf of the General-
has served upon several important committees,
and sacrificed much time to rally the whigs in his
support.
The writer leaves his own name and residence,
together with the names of the other gentlemen,
with the editor of the Republican, which the in-
credulous Mr. Wood or any of his party may ex-
amine, and determine for themselves.
This is not the only instance in which honest
men of the whig party have turned away with dis-
gust and loathing for their party nominee. I will,
for the especial accommodation of Mr. Wood, if
he wishes it, furnish several other instances.
SR. O'B.
The author of the foregoing communication is
from Philadelphia, an.l has heretofore acted within
the opposition, was among tlhe first to espouse the
cause of General Harrison, and tas, until since his
arrival in Cincinnati, Sere tary of the Democratic
Whig Committee of Superintendence for the city
of Philadelphia, Chairman of the Committee to
draft addresses, Secretary of the Whig Associa-
tion of the Upper Delaware Ward, and one of the
committee on banners and placards. The gentle-
men alluded to in his communication (18 in uum-
ber,) were mostly gentlemen of high intellectual
standing, and of commanding influence in their
respective neighborhoods. They were all strong-
ly opposed to the election of Mr. Van Butlen, aol
as strongly in favor of General Harrison's election.
The communication was furnished by the author
without our solicitation, and is published at his
own request. It may be well enough, however,
to state that it was elicited by the following para-
graph from a weekly paper called the Echo, which
is edited by a renegade Jackson man, and nauseates
every Saturday evening ,the delicate stomachs of
some hundred or two Whigs, who, while they


despise the dose, swallow it something in the style
that a man swallows poison administered by a
Quack.

Copy of a letter, dated
SFitAxKOaiT, Aug. 2, 1836.
Messrs. BLArnt & RRIVEs: Gentlemen: at the close
of the polls in this county, last night, the vote stooj
for Flournoy, (democrat,) 295
Clalk, (federalist,) 284
Hise, (democrat,) 291
Wickliffe., (federalist,) .256
Crockett, (democrat,) 306
Brown, (federalist,) 318
No serious opposition to Wingapte; his competi-
tor only got one hundred votes.

INDIAN FRAUDS AND COLLECTOR OF
MOBILE.
Colonel Jmo. B. HooAN of this city, late Inves-
tigating Agent of fiauds in the sales of Creek
lands, has received Irom Washington a commis-
sion as collector of the port, in the place of Col.
George W. Owen, resigned.
This appointment speaks distinctly for the
ground which the administration takes in regard
to the land stealers ani speculators, in the Indian
nation, to whose sordid and heartless schemes, the
late Indian war owes so much of its extent and
exasperation, if it did not spring front them al-
together. It was the zeal of Colonel HloAN, ex-
posing their villanies, which kindled so much re-
sentment Against him, among the speculators and
-heir party, and his is the report and documents
which have been communicated to Congress and
produced there such just and virtuous horrorat
tbe profligacy of the transactions developed. His
immediate appointment to an office of trust, by


the President, speaks, decisively of the support
which General JAcxKso.is determined to give to 0f LOTHS AND CASSIMERES.-We have re-
all, who are independent and bold enough to hold ] ceived by the late arrivals our full supply
up these deeds of darkness to the light of day.- of splendid Cloths, Cassimeres, Vestings, Peter-
mZobile Register. haim'5s, Pildt Cioths. plid, striped, ribbed and
.... ..... plain Cassimeres. Also, super 6-4 red Paddings,
NEW BANKING HOUSE. l3eau- Skin, &c., for over coats.
All the above will be sold to merchant tailors at
ROPOSALS areu itiited for laying the bricks a small advance. e s!to merchant taors at
P ;n fl


SE in me new BanKing House, about to be
erected by the Bank of the Metropolis, and a!so
for laying foundation stone, by the perch. The
number of bricks to be laid, will be probably
s about two hundred thousand. The works to be
done by the thousand;apgd proposals are requested
to be made before or ortSaturday next. Proposals
to be left at the Bank, directed to the President or
Cashier.
Aug 10-d4t (Intel.)

PO0 OMAC DRAGOONS.
W E are requested to give notice that a meet-
ing ofthe members of this corps will be
held at the Union Tavern, in Georgetown, on
Thursday, (to-morrow,; 11th inst., at 4 o'clock,
to receive and act upon the reports of the com-
mittees appointed in cformity to the resolutions
of the last meeting. full attendance is desira-
ble of all who have joined, and who are disposed
to join the corps, in order that its organization may
take effect without dela.
Aug 10-2tdis

DRY GOODS, &c.
J ROBINSON hasj t received a large supply
of Goods. I, -
153 cases and balesf esh imported dry goods,
embracing every article n the line, particularly
fancy Cloths, Cas-mer;i, and French Goods.
Six cases Silk F-1'.
.100 dozen Englih mide Cloth Caps, for chil-
dren.
At this establishment, Ii iy articles are frequent
ly to be had low, that can it be had elsewhere at
any price; and to which b adds a desire to please
in prices, as well as otherit se.
Aug 10-3t [Tel. t.]1
BY P. MAUI & SON.
HOUSEHOLD FUIt ITLiRE, PIANO, &c.
-On Friday, 12th i at. at the private resi-
dence of a gentleman about removing from the
city, on New Jersey Avenue, Capitol Hill, a few
doors south of the oldBatik of Washington, we
shall sell all the Househola Furniture, consisting
in part of-
Mahogany Sideboard; ining, Breakfast,' and
Card- Tables; Workstand&c.; Parlor, Chamber,
Hall, and Stair Carpets; M'antel and other Looking
Glasses; Fire Irons; a most excellent Piano Forte,
manufactured by Geib, ofiNew York; Parlor and
other Window Curtains;'Fancy Chairs; assorted
Dining and Tea China; Gltss Ware, &c.; Knives
and Forks; Plated Candleticks; a first-rate large
Mahogany Bedstead; oTher' Bedsteads; best
Feather Beds and Hair Ma tresses; Bedding; Ma-
hogany Bureaus; Washsta ds, &c.; also, Kitchen
requisites. Sale to corn ence at 10 o'clock.
,Terms: Cash for sums un $r $25; sixty days on
from $25 to $50; sixty an ninety days an all sums
over $50; for approved endorsed notes bearing
interest. P. MA1 RO & SON, Auct's.
Aug 10-3t

BY P. MAUlo & SON.
F IFTY-EIGHT VALIABLE CITY LOTS.-
Will be sold at public auction on Mondays
22d inst., 58 valuable lotsplying in an improving
part of the city, viz. in squares 368, 370, 401, 403,
424, 426, 427, 446, 449. 'Titles good. Sale to
take place as above at the auction and general
commission house oppbsitetBrown'ys Hotel, at four
o'clock, P. M., on the following terms, viz. one-
fifth cash, and the balancein twelve and eighteen
months, the purchasers giving notes with approv--
ed endorsers, on interest; ahd the property to be
resold on ten days' notice,{ at their expense and
risk, on a failure to complyjwith the terms.
A more particular description of the above de-
sirable property may be obtained on application to
the auctioneers.
P. MAURO & SON,
Aug 10-3t&ds Auctioneers.


SUMMER OIL, -tRANDY, GIN,
WINE, &c. '
N Friday evening next at half past 4 o'clock,I
shall sell,without resetve,on account ofwhom
it may concern, at my warehouse, corner of C and
10th streets, viz: 2 casks summer pressed Oil;
quarter atnd. half pipes Frinch Brandy; 1 pipe
Holland Gin, very superior;, 5- quarter casks
Marseilles Madeira Wine;'2amaica Spirit and St.
Croix Ruth in baerels;Maaga, Sherry, and Tene-
riffe Wines of superior quality; also, to close con-
signments, 20 boxes dun Yish; 6 kegs Lobsters;
3 kegs Nails; 2 dozen wire and sand Sifters;
boxes Figs and fancy SPap; Bags Filberts and
Almonds; barrels Rice, Alspice, &c., and many
other articles in the grocerj- line, deserving the at-
tention of grocers and others.
EDWARD DYER,
Aug 10-3t Auctioneer.
SALE OF GENTEEL GOOD FURNITURE.
O N Wednesday next, the 17th instant, I shall
sell at the residence of Mrs. Cottringer, on
F street, between 12th and 13th streets, her
Household Furniture, consisting in part of, viz:--.
Mahogany sideboard, bureaus, dining and break
fast tables, washstands, carpets, high and low pos
mahogany bedsteads, good feather beds, mattresses,
shovels, tongs, andirons, &c.&c. Best plated silver
edged tea urn, baskets, and candlesticks; silver
table, desert, and tea spoons; china and glass.
One excellent cooking stove, and one small cham-
ber stove and pipe.' Kitchen Furniture, grates,
&ce. &c. -
A very fine painting, portrait of Washington, by
Stewart. Sale at 11 o'clock, A. M. Terms at
sale. EDWARD DYER, Auct.
Aug. 10-3t
I RAME SHOP, &c.-On Saturday nest, the
F 13th instant, at half past.three o'clock P. M.,
1 shall sell at public sale the frame Shop and
Shed on D street, between 9th and 10th streets,
lately occupied by James K. Plant as a cabinet
workshop. Term- s cash.
Aug 10-3t EDW'D DYER, Auct.


FOR SALE,
VARIOUS PRINTING MATERIALS,
UCH as Types, Cases, Stands,.Column Rules,
v. Leads, Chaces, Composing Sticks, and all the
implements necessary for the establishment of a
newspaper. Among the articles offered for sale
are two large fonts of Brevier and one ditto Long
Primer, and a variety of JOB and FANCY
TYPE, from Canon down to Brevier. The mate-
rials now offered for sale are of the best quality
and nearly new.
For particulars apply at the office of the WASH-
szseoIToAxT, on Twelfth street, to
Aug 4-3t A. F. CUNNINGHAM.


COLUMBIAN HORTICULTURAL
SOCIETY.
THE stated meeting of the Society will be
.holden, on Saturday, the 6th instant, a 4.
o'clock, P. M., wN'ei'the reports of the Standing
Committees on Flowers, Fruits, and Vegetables,
or premiums awarded, will be received and con-
sidered. Aug. 5-3t
LAW BOOKS.
C ONDENSED REPORTS of Cases decided in
the High Court of Chancery in England-
edited by E. D. Ingraham, Esq. Counsellor at
Law.
Peters' Supreme Court Reports; an ad.litional
supply this day received by
Aug 6-3t KENNEDY & ELLIOTT.
7 ISHING TACKLE.-The suberiber has for
sale a general assortment of Fishing Tackle,
to which he invites the attention of those inclined
to indulge in that delightful amusement.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Snuff, Tobacco and Fancy Store, between l11th
and 12th streets, Pennsylvania Avenue.
Aug 6
CARD.-As it is necessary to close all the
accounts of the late firm of D. Clagett &
Co., as speedily as possible, it is respectfully re-
quested that all persons indebted to the late firm
will settle with E. Coolidge, who is duly authorized
to receipt for the same. '
Aug 6 D. CLAGETT.
S%'HE, WASHINGTON LIME KILNS, on the
S Canal, near Georgetown, having recently
changed owners, are now in full operation, and a
constant supply of the best lime will be kept for
sale, at lower prices than any in the District. Ap-
ply to ROBERT SPEIDEN,
May 28-2olm On the premises
NJ EW BOOKS.-A Practical Treatise on Lo-
J comotive Engines upon Railways, with prac-
tical tables, &c. by De Pambour, complete in
one volume, price $2 25.
Agnes Serle, by the author of "The Heiress,"
in two volumes, price $1 00.
For sale by P. THOMPSON,
July 28


BRADLEY & CATLETT.
Aug 6-3taw2w (Alex Gaz e0om)

S TOCK OF THE FARMERS' AND ME-
CHANICS.' BANK OF GEORGETOWN.
-On Saturday, the 13th of August inst, I will
sell at public Auction. at' my Auction store in
Georgetown, about $4000 of the stock of'the Far-
mers' and Mechanics' Bank of Georgetown, or so
much thereof as will pay the debt for which it is
pledged.
Sale to take place at 4 after 5 o'clock, P. M.
By order of the trustee:
Aug. 6-dts THOSE. C. WRIGHT.
C CLASSICAL FRENCH READER for stu-
dents, consisting of approved' selections
from the works of the most celebrated French
writers, together with an Introduction facilitating
the study of the language. The extracts accom-
panied with notes, criticisms, explanations, &c.
throughout the work, by Professor Hentz, 1 vol.,
bound; 270 pages, price only 621 cents; for sale
by F. TAYLOR.
Aug 6
MARSHAL'S SALE.
IN virtue of four writs of fieri facias, on judg.
it ments of condemnation, issued out from the
Clerk's office of the Circuit Court of the District
of Columbia, for the county of Washington,. and to
me directed, I hall expose to public sale, for
cash; on TUESDAY, 30th of August, instant, at
eleven o'clock A. M. on the premises, all the
right, title and interest of William Otis, in and to
part of lot No. 2, in square A, in tie city and
county of Washington, beginning at the south-
east corner of lot No. 2, in square A, and run-
ning thence northwardiy on the line of the Mis-
souri Avenue twenty-five feet; thence north paral-
lel with the east line of the said lot to the north
line of the said lot, and thence with the said north ,
line to the northeast corner of said lot, and thence
in a straight line to the place, of beginning, es-
timated to contain 2,546 square feet. Seized and'
taken as the property of the said William Otis,
and sold to satisfy two executions in favor of
John W. Maury, and one other execution in favor
of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of-George-
town, and also one other execution in favor of
Shepherd and Semmes.
ALEXANDER HUNTER,
Aug 6-dts Marshal Dis. Col
UST RECEIVED, a supply of Champagne
QJ -Wines, Anchor, Harp, Napoleon, and Jac-
quemart brands, in pint and quart bottles. Pink
of the same brands. Port, and other wines suita-
ble for the summer season, which we will dispose
of upon the most reasonable terms.
L. DESAUQUE & HUBER,
Wine and Liquor Merchants,
Aug 8-3t 3 doors west of 41 st. Penn. Av.
ALEXANDRIA AND NEW OR-
LEANS PACKETS.-Brig TRIBUNE,
Samuel C. Boush, master, to sail 15th
September; brig ISAAC FRANKLIN, William
Smith, master, to sail 1st October. These vessels
are of the first class, and fitted expressly for the
trade, having excellent accommodations for pas.
sengers, and commanded by men experienced in
the business. The above vessels will at all times
take steam up the Mississippi. Persons wishing
to ship will please make early application to
JOHN ARMFIELD.
Alexandria, Aug. 8-tf

HELP '10 PRINTERS AND PUBLISI-I-
ERS,'
Y Samuel L. Dickinson, is just published
and for sale by F. TAYLOR, being a series
of calculations showing the quantity of paper re-
quired for a given number of signatures in book
work, and the number oftokens contained therein,
carried out to great extent. Also, an extensive
table for job work, showing the quantity of paper
required fora given number of bills, label, l dupli-
cates of book work, &c. &c. &c. 1 volume.
Aug 2
NEW BOOKS.
INKLINGS of Adventure, by N. P. Willis, 2
volumes.
Lafitte, the Pirate of the Gulf, by .the author of
Southwest.
Christian Examiner, July, 1836, Boston.
Parley's Cyclopedia, part second.
Combe on the Physiology of Digestion.
Tills day received by
KENNEDY & ELLIOTT,
In the Atheiieum,
August 2-3t [fit.]
A TEACHER WANTFD.--An. Assistant
"-Teacher, qualified to teach the Latinii and
Greek languages and Mathematics, is wanted in
Washington Academy. The salary is three hun-
dred dollars, and board found by the trustees.
Applicants for the situation wi;l forward their
testimonials to the subscriber by the fourth
Wednesday in August next, on which day the
trustees will make the selection. .
WILLIAM W. JOHNSTON,
Secretary of the Board of Trustees.
Princess Anne, Md., July 4, 1836.
July 13 law4w
NEW BOOKS.
A YEAR in Spain, bya young American, third
edition, in three volumes, 12mo., with em-
bellishments after Chapman-price $3 00.
Harry and Lucy, with other Tales, by Maria
Edgeworth, in 2 vols.-price $2 25, this day receiv-
ed by KENNEDY & ELLIOTT,
In the Athemeaum, Pennsylvania Avenue.
Aug 6-3t


TURNIP SEED.
J F. CALLAN has just received on sale, a
large supply of I'urnip Seed, warranted
fresh and genuine-namong them, Rutabaga, large
white Norfolk and Dales Hybria; the latter isa new
kind, and much superior to any heretofore sold in
thllis market. In store, a variety of Garden, Flow.
er, Grass, Bird, and other seeds. Aug 4
r FOR SALE OR RENT.-The three
s story brick House on C, between Four
U and a half and Sixth streets, now occu-
pied by Mrs. Carlisle. It contains nine rooms, is
in good order, has a good pump :in the yard, sta-
ble, &c. Two thousand dollars of the purchase
money can be paid at any time during ten years,
and the balance in payments of fom sixto t wen-
ty-four months, or stocks in any of the city banks
will be taken at market value. Possession may
be had at once. TO)D & CO.
Aug. 5-3t

FOR RENT.
The subscriber offers for rent that
very convenient and comfortable two
S story fame Dwelling House situated on
131 street, between" C and ID streets. It
is well adapted to the accommodation of-a mode-
rate sized family, and a pavement extends from
the Avenue to the door of the house.
W. W. BILLING,
Agent for the proprietor.
July 18-2aw2w
TO PRINTERS.
IHE one-half of a profitable Newspaper Es-
IL_ tablishment, located in a populous county
of Maryland, is offered for sale. -To a young
man who is a Printer, a friend of the present
National Administration, and who could conduct
the editorial department, it presents a good open.
ing. For further information apply at the office
of the "Globe."
Aug 3-cod6t
r5'nHE "OLD MANSION HOUSE" AND
VALUABLE LOTS.-At private sale, if
applied for before Wednesday, 10th August next,
the highly valuable and beautifully situated pro-
perty, well known as the '"Old Mansion House,"
with the Lots on which it is situated and adjoin-
ing, lying on and near the margin of the Potomac,
commanding one of the most beautiful views in
the District. The Lots are Nos. 13, 14, 15, 16, in
square 389, and 20 in square 390.
The above will, if not.previously sold at private
sale, be offered at auction on Wednesday, 10th
August, at 5 o'clock, P. M. on the premises.
Terms at sale. Application to be made to
EDWARD DYER, Auct'r.
July 3 --eodts
A YEAR IN SPAIN.-A new edition of the,
above, in three volumes, is this day received,
for sale by F. TAYLOR, at the Waverley Circu-
lating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's
hotel.
Also, Harry and Lucy, by Maria Edgeworth,
new edition, in two volumes. Aug 9


120 barrels qf pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1
1837.
JIt Fort Dearborn, Chicago:


st June,


120 barrels of pork,
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 Sushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of goodhard soap
,800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt.
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1st Jurne,
1837.
.at Hancock Barracks, Houlton, Maine:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 poun is of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered in December, 1836,
and January and February, 1837.
Ait Boston:
300 barrels of pork
625 barrels of fi'esh superfine flour
275 bushels of new white field beans
4400 pounds of good hard soap
2000 pounds of good hard tallow candles
100 bushels of good clean dry salt
1125 gallons of good cider vinegar.
t VNew York:
1200 barrels of pork
2500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
1100 bushels of new white field beans -
17600 pounds of good hard -oapl
8000 pounds of good hard tallow candles
400 bushels of good clean dry sail
4500 gallons of good cider vinegar.
Ait Baltimore:
480 barrels of pork
1000 barrels of fresh superfine flour
440 bushels of" new white field beans
7040 pounds of good hard soap
,3200 pounds of good hard tallow candles
160 bushels of clean dry salt
1800 gallons of good cider vinegar
NOTE.-All bidders are requested to extend thel
amount of their bids for each article, -and exhibit!
the total amount of each bid
The periods and quantities of each delivery, att
those posts where they are not specified, will be.t
one-fourth 1st June, 1st September, 1st Decem.-
ber, 1837, and 1st March, 183ft. '
The hogs of which tilse pork is packed to b'e
fattened on corn, and each hog to 'weigh not lee s
than two hundred pounds; and, except where the
qu.dity is otherwise designated, will consist of one
hog to each barrel, excluding the feet, legs, ears,
and snout.
Side pieces may be substituted for the hams
The pork is to be carefully packed with Turk's
island salt, and in pieces not exceeding ten pounds
each. The pork to be contained in, seasoned
heart of white oak or white ash 4arrels,fil hooped


OFFICE COMMIsAny GENERAL OF SUBSISTENCE,
Washington, July 1st, 1836.
S EPARATE proposals will be received at this
office until the first day of October next, for
the delivery of provisions for the use of the troops
of the United States, to be delivered in bulk, upon
inspection, as follows:
At New Orleans:!
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of.good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good c.der vinegar.
11t Fort Jesup, 25 miles by land from
Natchitoches:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
One-half on the 1st May, remainder on 1st De-
cember, 1837.
,at the public landing, six milesfrom Fort
Towson, mouth of t1/e Chiemichi:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 pounds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
April, 1837, and to leave Natchitoches by 20th
February, 1837.
At Fort Coffee, 10 miles above Fort Smith,
Arkansas:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
May, 1837.
Jit Sint Louis or at Jefferson Barracks,
10 miles below St. Louis, at the option oJ
Government.
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of freshl supafine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar.
Alt Fort Crawford, Prarie du Ctien, Mis-
sissippi rover:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 pounds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
At Fort Snelling, Saint Peters:
360 barrels of pork
750 barrels of fresh superfine flour
330 bushels of new white field beans
5280 pounds of good hard soap
2400 pounds of good hard tallow candles
120 bushels of good clean dry salt
1350 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 15th June,
1837.
Sit Fort Winnebago, on the Fox river, at
the portage of the Fox and Ouisconsin
rivers:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
3500 p..unds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candle
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
Ait Fort Gratiot:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white field beans
1760 pou-ds of V',cd hanrd soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles.
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
One-half 1st May, remainder on 1st October,
1837.
AJt Fort Howard, Green Bay:
240 barrels of pork
500 barrels of fresh superfine flour
220 bushels of new white field beans
350.0 pounds of good hard soap
1600 pounds of good hard tallow candles
80 bushels of good clean dry salt
900 gallons of good cider vinegar.
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
Jit Fort Brady, Sault de Ste. Marie:
120 barrels of pork
240 barrels of fresh superfine flour
110 bushels of new white fie beans
1760 pounds of good hard soap
800 pounds of good hard tallow candles
40 bushels of good clean dry salt
450 gallons of good cider vinegar
The whole to be delivered by the 1st June,
1837.
At .Fo t Mackinaw:


and other goods, to reimburse advancements.
The above sales without reserve, for cash.
P. MAURO & SON,
A.ug 9--3t auctioneerss.
SUPEIK{OR GERMAN COLOGNE
WATER
HE subscriber has just received an invoice o
genuine German Cologne Water, warrant
superior quality, at $2 50 per box.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Between 11th and 12th streets, Penn. Al
Ang 9
P. S.-A general assortment of Perfumeriet
Scented Soaps, Hair Ols, &c., for sale at the lowe'
prices as above.
C ARPETINGS, RUGS, CURTAIN ORNA
MENTS, &c. &c.-Tlhe subscribers liaviai
entered largely into tie Carpet and House Fill
fishing trade, will receive by the 20th August,
splendid assortment of the following, in part, viz:
4,500 yards super Brussels Carpeting
6,500 do do Ingrain do .
3,500 do Venetian do to match
125 Imperial Rugs
150 Wilton do
50 rtufted do
800 yards Green Floor Cloth
900 do Figured do do
100 pieces Danimsk Moreens
100 do Curtain Moslins
And a great variety of rich Curtain Ornaroln
Bindings, Laces, Frintigs, &c. &c.
rThe above goods will be sold unsiually low, s'
'we invite customers to call and example. V
J BRADIEYsV T CA.lA;'
i,tg6-3mw6w (Alex Gaz)
1 1 -


The vinegar in iron bound casks the b in
water-tight barrels, and the soap and can" i
strong boxes, of convenient size for transport.
tion. .
Salt will only be received by measurement of
thirty.two quarts to the bushel.
The candles to have cotton wicks.
The provisions for Prairie du Chien, and Saint
Peter's, must pass Saint Louis, for their ultimst
destination, by the 15th April, 1837. A failure
in this particular, will be considered a breach oL
contract, and the Department will be authorized
to purchase to supply these post.
The provisions will be inspected at the time and
place of delivery; and all expenses are to be paid
by contractors, until they are deposited at such
store-houses as may be designated by the agent of
the Department.
The Commissionary General reserves the pri.
vilege of increasing or diminishing the quantities
or of dispensing with one or more articles, at any
time before entering into contract; and also of
increasing or reducing the quantities of each de-
livery one-third, subsequent to the contract, on
giving six*y days previous notice.-
Bidders not heretofore contractors, are required
to accompany their proposals with evidence of
their ability, together with the names of their
sureties, whose responsibility must be certified by
the District Attorney, or by some person well
known to the Government; otherwise their pro-
posals will not be acted on.
Advances cannot be made in any case; and evi-
dence of inspection and full delivery will be re-
quired'at this office, before payment can be make,
which will be by Treasury warrants on bands
nearest the points of delivery, or nearest the,
places of purchasing the supplies, or nearest the
residence of the contractors, at their option.
Each proposal will be sealed in a separate en-
velope, and marked proposals for furnishing
army subsistence."
GEO. GIBSON, C. G. S.
July 1-3tawt20Sep. ..
LIVE OAK TIMBER.
NAvr COMMISSIOsNEss' OrFICE,
8th July, 1836. 5
SEALED proposals, endorsed "Proposals for
Live Oak Timber," will be received at this
office until three o'clock, P. M., of the thirty-first
lay ot August next, for supplying the following
Live Oak Timber, viz:
No. 1. For the frame timber, beam and keelson
pieces, and for the promiscuous timber for one
ship of the line, one frigate, one sloop of war,
nd one sconeschooner, to be delivered at the navy yard
near Portsmouth, N. H.
No. 2. For the frame timber, beam and keelson
pieces, and for the promiscuous timber for one
steamer and one schooner, to be delivered at the
navy yard, Philadelphia.
The quantity and dimensions of the promiscu-
ous timber for each vessel, of each class, is as
follows:
* For the ship of the line, 6,000 cubic feet, which
must be sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 20 feet
in length; six of the longest pieces to side 22
inches.
For the frigate, 3,000 cubic feet, which must
be sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 20 feet
long; six of the longest pieces to side 19 inches.
For the sloop of war, 1,000 cubic feet, which
must be sided 12 inches, and be from 12 to 18
feet long; six of the longest pieces to side .16
inches.
For the steamer, 1,000 cubic feet, which must
be sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 18 feet
long; six of the longest pieces to.side 16 inches.
For each schooner, 300 cubic feet, which must
be sided 8 inches, and be from 10 to 16 feet long;
six of the longest pieces to side 12- inches.
A part of the promiscuous timber. may be got
to larger dimensions, provided the pieces will
answer for replacing defective hawse pieces, tran-
soms, breast-hooks, or other valuable pieces.
Separate offers must be made for each of the pre-.
ceding numbers, and each offer must embrace all
the timber that is called for by the number to
which it refers; the prices asked per cubic foot
must be stated separately for each and ev.ry class
of vessels embraced in the offer; and for the pro-
;miscuous timber of each class, separately frorn the
other, which is considered moulded timber.
At least one fourth of the whole quantity of tim-
ber embraced in each offer, comprising a fair pro-
portion of the most valuable pieces, must be deli-
vered on or before the first of June, 1838, one half
of the remainder on or before the first- of June,
1839, and the whole quantity on or before the first
day of June, 1840; ard if the above proportions
shall not be delivered at the respective times
above specified, the Commissioners of the NaIvy
reserve to themselves the right of cancelline any
contract in the execution of which such failure
may occur, and of entering into new contracts,
holding the original contractors and their sureties
liable for any excess of cost and other damages
which may be thus incurred.
The said Live Oak Timber must have grown
within twenty-five miles of the seaboard, (w!ich
must be proven to the satisfaction of the respec-
tive commandants,) must be got out by the moulds
and written directions, and specifications of di-
mensions, &c., which will be furnished to the con-
tractors for their government, and must be free
from all injuries and defects which may impair the
good quality of the said timber for the purposes
for which it is required by contract, and be in all
respects satisfactory to the commandants of the re-
spective Navy Yardi where it is delivered.
Bonds, with two good and responsible-sureties,
(whose names must be forwarded with the offers,)
in the amount of one-third the estimated value of
the timber to be furnished under the respective
contracts, will be required; and, as collateral secu
rity for the faithful compliance with the terms,
stipulations, and conditions of the said contracts,
ten per centum will be reserved from the actual
amount of each payment which may be made from
time to time, until the said contracts are comple-
ted and closed, which reservations, respectively,
will be forfeited to the use and benefit of the
United States, in the event of failure to deliver
the timber within the respective ,periods pre-
scribed.
The moulds will be furnished to the contractors
at one of the Navy Yards, Brooklyn or Gosport.
Ninety per centum will be paid on all bills for
deliveries, agreeably to the stipulations of the con-
tracts to be'made, within thirty days after their
approval by the commandants of the respective
navy yards.

To be published twice a week in the Globe;
National Intelligencer; United States Telegraph;
Army and Navy Chronicle; Eastern Argus; New
Hampshire Patriot; Boston Advocate; Hartford
Times; Republican Herald; New York Evening
Post; New York Times; Trenton Emporium; Amer-
ican Sentinel; Pennsylvanian; Baltimore Repub-
lican; Norforlk Herald; Norfolk Beacon; Raleigh
Stat; Newbern Sentinel; Charleston Patriot; Geor-
gian; Louisiana Advertiser; Mobile Register.

BY P. MAURO & SON.
AUCTION S.ALES.
EEF.-On Thursday, '11th inst. at hle Aucl
tion-house opposite Brown's Hotel, 10
o'clock, A. M. without restriction, for account of
whom it may concern, TENI BARRELS BEEF.
.IATTING.-On Thursday, after the sale of
Beef, five large India Matting Floor Carpets.
FURNITURE.-On Thursday, 11th inst., aftel
the above, a great variety of Household Furniturt