The globe

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The globe
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Newspaper
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F.P. Blair ( City of Washington D.C )
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EDITED BY FRANCIS P. BLAIR
FRANCIS P. BLAIR & JOHN C. RIVES,
PROPRIETORS AND PUBLISHERS.
TERMS.
.a:Iy paper, by e .ye0 r *100'
for ter thah a year, 8l per month.
flsmi-wik y p.ae..r hi hi.. .-r 500
S",,jr i-. i,. i r,. year, 50 cents per manth.
K.ih '-iri li.,r,. ; l j I' i-. t,... ..r '* t Se- mi-
W r k l I'.'.y I n i I r. 1 < f i..'rn '.I l n I, e- u '..
SuD'titr."f- r, v i *1li''':iiillir II .. i' ;i-:i mr1r i.h. -o V pay.
ll- I ,a r.''.i n ... ... 1 t i '. f
T Kze .. h i. ;3 .-1.- i r t .. 1, ,J L , ,.. rm e of
t. :Iii : .-,i *- j ii. .*.. L,, ,, i ,3 end of it, w i b he
enuri r-. .^.i~ai...,? i r.) ir- paper* to bo stopped
and pay arrcarages
pl at rOe A VRi TI1siI.
Tvgel' li.,, r *. ;,t o ,, 10*I
B v ,:ry ,'.' i, ... 0 2 5
] .. ,<., -,, ,.. .... ... ,,..'r ,i.roportin n.
A i'..-i 1 ... . i, 1 ainverus bytha year.
Allpaymensi to be made in advance. Thosewho haee in I
an oppo0rtunity of I| f;. _- .. ;. r.- i .. .,I ;.. i lait, at our
ri-k. 1rnovfa i. in. P r, . r sucl re-
M ilin.'., r i'! i i n n .1 . 1 1 .'i .r The notes ofany
|i.l, .l.. .l t.l i .l-, .n,,,' ,., 1,,* I... n
N5i .. *' *r unl. unless the morpy,
ar d Pv. o ." tr',4 r r ,' '. 7ei rzitled, ac.
empanies it.
03- Letters to the Proprietors 7tded fit 7poit ge, will
not be taken out of te Poast Oce.



EXTRA ACCOMMODATION-WASH-
INGTON BRANCH HAIALROAD.-Oa
ar.I 'lier Wednesday next, 1st April. a .a'-,r
car will be despatched daily (except Sur.,ai %i roh
the tonnage train, which leaves th!s cy i Ili
o'clock a. m. By this conveyance passengers are
afforded an .pl..-tiniiy of reaching Baltimore in
time to connect with the evening train of cars for
Philadelphia, or with the Westernm ii i .,,1i at the
relay house, and thus enabling them to reach Phi-
ladelphia by 11, and Frederick by 84 o'clock the
same night. By order:
SAMUEL STETTINIUS, Agent
March 30



OFFICE or TRANASPORTATION B. & 0. R. R.
Washington, July 10, 1840.
N OTICE.-On and after Monday next, the
13th instant, the Evening Train of passenger
cars for Baltimore will be despatched from this
office at 4i, instead of 4 o'clock, p. m.
By order: SAM'L STETTINIUS,
July 9-tf Agent.


UNITED STATES MAIL.



DAILY TO THE SOUTH.
Via the Chesapeake Bay.
THE "MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA
STEAMBOAT COMPANY" continue to
run their splendid STEAMBOATS,
ALABAMA Captain SUTTON.
GEORGIA Captain COFBEY.
JEWESS Captain HoLmMEs.
In connection with the PORTSMOUTH and RoaNOlE
RAILROAD, leaving Baltimore, from the lower end
of Spear's wharf daily, in accordance with the fol-
lowing schedule:
Leave BALTIMORE at 9 a. m.
Arrive at Portsmouth, Virginia, 180 miles, at or
before 11 p. m.
Leave PORTSMOUTH at 11 p. m.
Arrive at Weldon, N. C. (80 miles,) at 6 a. m.
Leave Weldon, at 6Q o'clock, a. m.
Arrive at Wilmington (161 miles) same eve-
ning. Leave immediately, and arrive at Charleston
(170 miles) next day before noon. Thus com-
pleting nearly 600 miles in about 50 hours, with
but three changes of person and baggage, and com-
paratively no fatigue, while, on any other inland
route, there are not less than ten changes in the
same distance.
Travellers preferring the Southwestern to the
Southern route-that is, not going through Charles-
ton-can have instant accommodation at Weldon,
by staee twelve miles to the Raleigh railroad,
which place-. them precisely where they would be
were taey t., i,. ihniaouh WASHINGTON, FRE-
DERICKIl;URG,RICH MON D, PEF'ERSBURG,
and GASTON, without any more expense, and
one halt' the fatigue.
Pa;-engers for Richmond, who leave BALTI-
MORE by this line on Monday, Wednesday or
Friday, sleep on board the Bay boat-, and din.' in
Richmond the following day.
Nr.r the North, one of the above boats leaves
Portsmouth immediately on the arrival of the
Cars from Welden, and frequently puts passengers
into Baltimore in time to go on to Philadelphia by
the afternoon train of Cars. Those, therefore, who
select this line, are sure of arriving here as early as
by any oth'r route, and stand a good chance of
being, in PHILADELPHIA SEVENTEEN
HOURS in advance.
This despatch cannot be accomplished by any
other route than the CHESAPEAKE BAY-NOW
OR HEREAFTER.
JNO. C. MOALE,
Prest. Md. and Va. Steamboat Co.
Aug 18-dtlst Jan

Sqpleidid Carriages.
PHILADELPHIA CO3CH
."H.N*UF.IJCTORY, Nbs. 288 and
1nii., Race st.-L. KNOWLES,
for A. KNOWLES, begs lea.'. c.rv -,, .-. ,'1-
to return his grateful thanks to t "ir Cii.I-,...[ Ph !, '-h
delphia, and to his friends throughout the Union,
for the large and increasing patronage he has re-
ceived since he commeced business, and informs
them that he has now Tn hand, and is constantly
finishing, CARRI. ES of every pattern and de-
scription, nh,ch 'c ', -il warrant both as to the du-
rability of the workmanship and elegance of finish.
In consequence of various circumstances, such
a?1'h .-ii.ip saving of the cost of transportation
F.,ai the expense of the damage incident thereto,
the saving of large commissions to agents, and the
reduction in the price of labor, he will sell car-
riages and other vehicles, manufactured in a first
rate and superior style, at thirty-five pet zent. un-
der the prices of last year.
All orders thankfully received and 'promptly
executed.
In consequence of his constant personal atten-
tion to the business in Philadelphia, he is able to
warrant that all carriages shatll be in a superior
style of finish and workmanship to any heretofore
manufactured at Amherst, Massachusetts.
Carria,-' ,r. wed up and sent to order to any part
of nhe UtLii-n, at the shortest notice.
N. B. York wagons of every pattern, finishedin
the most superior manner, on hand, and will be
sold far below the prices of any which have been
heretofore offered for sale in this city.
L. K. having made arrangements with the
Trenton manufactory of Carriage Pows and best
Felloes, he will keep constantly on 'and a general
assortment of all sizes and patterns of those arti-
cles, made of the very best materials, which he will
dispose of at reduced prices.

BUTLER'S EFFERVESCENT MAGNE-
SIAN APERIENT, for dyspepsia or indi-
gestion, nervous d tity, giddiness, headache, aci-
dity of the stomach, habitual cost iveuness, cutane-
ous diseases, gout, gravel, &c. and much valued as
a renile cc-lniJ puruatiic.
This desirable preparation has received the pa-
ir,.nage rf many eminent members of the profes-
sion, and from a discerning public many respecta-
ble and unsolicited testimonials of its efficacy as a
medicine have been elicited. With all the pleasing
qualities of a glasn of coila water, it possesses the
active ne-Jicital proper',e of the most approved
salinous purjcalivi-, i. pleasant to the palate, and
grateful tI,. tie .i'..uiih.
We are not in the habit of making out certifi-
cates of commendation for unlicensed quackeries,
butwedo know of a nostrum, Ippt...vi.l, too, by
the Faculty, that cannot be ice. 'iai- ni.id too high-
ly to the attention of every family during the pie.
sent warm weather. It is denominated "Butler's
Effervescent Msgnesian Aper.ent," and its medi-
cinal properties are admirably adapted to the alle-
viation and removal of the nnumierous t.'lil, com-
plaints incidental to the summer season. We
doubt whither the whole Pharmacopiam offers a
more innocent and effective remedy, or a more
pleasant and palatable preventative. Having
seen its virtues tested in cases of severe headache
and threatened Choleia Murbus, we can conscien-
tiously t, .,iifv concerning its utility.-Ed.A'rw York
Evening Journal.
For sate at Todd's Drug Store
July 31
TALES OF THE DRAMA, by Miss Ma-
cauley, founded on the dramas of Massinger,
R..we, Go'dn,,irl, Cowley, Cumsbeiland, Murphy,
- Llko, Farqrlahar, C.m-nieve, and others, 1 vol.
embellished w.ih 135 egraving;, price 50 cents,
pualiahsd at Sl $15, for sale by
Aug 27 F, TAYLOR.


BY BLAIR & RIVES. THE WORLD Is GOV ED 'TOO MUCH."'

CITY OF WASHINGTON. -DI- 1"st- FRIDAY EV


CLAIMS ON MEXICO.
FRANCIS A DICKINS, having undertaken
to prosecute claims before the commissioners
under the convention between the United States and
Mexico, offers his services to those who may de-
sire the aidof an agent at Washington.
In this agency he has associated with him the
Hon. CORNELtOS P. VAN NESS, formerly Governor
of the State of Vermont. ri.1 tl..h- -w Extra-
ordinary and Minister P r.t .. i,. r\ u, |!.,P United
States in Spain.
Of Mr. VAN Nrss's ability as counsel it is un-
necessary to speak, and his knowledge of interna-
tional law, and 'jinii ri',, with the laws and lan-
guage of Spain, which are essentially the same as
those of Mexico, will be of great advantage in in.
vr-.ii,,'nP these claims, and in pr ntiitiij and
urging them before the board.
The charge will be moderate, and have reference
to the amount of the claim, and the degree of trouble
required.
Mr. DICKINS'S office is on Pennsylvania avenue,
between Fuller's Hotel and the Treasury Depart-
ment, and his residence on 13th street, between
Pennsylvania Avenue and F street.
All letters must be post paid. July 11-1m

-k lL' CLAIMANTS.-FRANCIS A. DICKINS
A. continues to undertake the agency of claims
before C,.n.-r':,, and other branches of the Go
vernumer t, ineu.l iii commissioners under treaties,
and the various public offices. He will attend to
pre-emption and other land claims, the procuring
of patents for public lands, and the confirmation
by Congress of grants and claims to lands; claims
for horses and other property lost in, or taken for,
the service of the United States; property destroyed
by the Indians, or while in the possession of the
United States; invalid, revolutionary, navy, wi-
dows' and half-pay pensions; claims for Revolu-
tionary services, whether for commutation, half-
pay, or bounty lands-as well those against the
State of Virginia as the United States; all claims
growing out of contracts with the Government, or
damages sustained in consequence of the action or
conduct of the Government; and indeed any busi-
ness before Congress or the public offices, which
may require the aid of an agent or attorney. His
charges will be moderate, and depending upon the
amount of the claim and the extent of the service.
He is also Agent for the American Life Insu-
rance and Trust Company, which has a capital of
wo millions of dollars paid in; and for the Balti.
more Fire Insurance Company.
Mr. F. A. Dickins is known to most of those
who have been in Congress within the last few
years, or who have occupied any public station at
Washington.
His office is on Pennsylvania avenue, second
door from 15th street.
All letter-s must be post paid. July 18-dly

REMOVAL.-E. AND S. S. ROCKWELL,
importers and manufacturers of watches,
clocks, jewellery, and silver ware, have removed
from 192 Broadway, to No. 9 Astor House, New
York, where they offer for sale, wholesale and re-
tail, a superb assortment of fine Watches of every
description, such as fine duplex, patent lever, an-
chor escapement, and lepine, and a beautiful as-
sortment of French Mantel Clocks, all of which
are warranted first rate time-keepers, a very rich
assortment of Jewellery, consisting of diamond,
cameo, mosaic, and gold work of every fashionable
variety, and a splendid assortment of Silver Ware,
such as elegant sets of tea plate, silver forks, spoons,
and every other article of silver ware, all of which
are warranted of the best workmanship, and fine
standard silver. July 6-3w

rT HE INDIAN VEGETABLE PILLS-
This extraordinary medicine s a Purgative
Medicine so justly balanced, and withal so naturalt
to the human constitution, that they cannot possibly
injure even the most delicate; at the same time,if used
in such a manner as to produce free evacuations by
the bowels, it is absolutely impossible for pain (r
distress, of any kind, !o continue long in the body.
The reason is plain: ticy cleanse the system of
those humors which are opposed to health, and
therefore invalids may use them with a certainty of
always obtaining relief, and persevere in the use of
them, with an equal certainty of being cured.
In all disordered motions of the blood, called In
termittent, Remittent, Nervous, Inflammatory, and
Putrid


77R ANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY-MEDI-
CAL DEPARTMENT.-The Lectures will
commence, as usual, on the first Monday in No-
vember, and close on the last day of February, and
be delivered by the following faculty, viz:
BENJ. W. DUDLEY, M. D. Prof. of Anatomy and
Surgery
JAMES M. BUSH, M. D. Adjunct Prof. of Anato-
my and Surgery.
JAMI-N C. Cnoss, M. D. Prof. cf Institutes and
Medical Jurisprudence.
NATHAN R. SMITH, M. D. Prof. of Theory and
practice of Medicine.
WILLIAM H. RicHARDSON, M. D. Prof. of Ob-
stetrics and diseases of women and children.
THOMAS D. MITCHELL, M. D. Prof. of Materia
Medica and Therapeutics.
ROBERT PETER, M. D. Prof. of Chemistry and
Pharmacy.
The cost of a full course of Lectures is $105.
The Matriculation fee, entitling the use of the Li-
brary, is $5. The Dissecting ticket, (which is op-
tional with the pupil,) is $10. The Graduation
fee is $20. Good boarding and lodging, including
fuel and light, from $2 50 to $4 per week.
Large additions have been made, during the past
and present year, to the Library, Apparatus, and
Museum; and the new and commodius Medical
Hall will be heady for the use of the Department.
The notes of good and solvent banks, in the
Slates whence the pupils re ptci, ely come, will be
taken for Professors' tickets.
ROBERT PETER,
Dean of Faculty.
Lexington, June 27, 1840. July 7-law6w
UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.-The next
session of this institution will commence on
the first day of September, and terminate on the
4th of July ensuing.
The schools of the University, with their respec-
tive Professors, are,
1. Ancient Languages-DR. GESNER HARRI-
SON.
2. Modern Languages-Dr. GEORGOB RLETTER-
MANN.
3. Mathematics-CHARLES BONNYCASTLE.
4. Natural Philosophy--WM. B. RoGERs.
5. Civil Engineering-The subjects of which
are divided between Professors BONNYCASTLE and
RoGEas.
6. Chemistry and Materia Medica.-Dr. JOHN
P. EMMET.
7. Medicine-Dr. HENRY HOWARD.
8. Anatomy and Surgery-Dr. JAMES L. CA-
BELL.
9. Moral Philosophy-GEORGE TUCKER.
10. Law-JoaN A. G. DAVIS.
In the department of Mathematics is included
Mixed Mathematics; in that of Engineering, Mi-
neralogy and Geology; in that of Moral Philosophy,
Belles-L'tires, Logic, and Political Economy; and
in that of Law, besides Municipal Law in all its
branches, the Law of Nature and Nations, the sci-
ence of Government, and Constitutional Law.
To be admitted into this institution, the applicant
must be sixteen years of age; but the Faculty may
dispense with this requisition in favor of one whose
brother is a student.
Every student is free to attend the schools of his
choice; but if he be under twenty-one years of age,
he shall attend at least three; unless he be autho-
rized by his parent or guardian, in writing, or by
the Faculty, for good cause shown, to attend a less
number.
It is required of students to wear, on public oc-
casions, &c. a prescdiibed uniform, consisting of
dark gray cloth; and they are prohibited from pur-
chasing, while they remain students, any oih-r than
uniform clothes: but ordinarily, and about the Uni-
versity, they are allowed to wear any clothing
which they may have brought with them.
The Faculty may allow any man of good moral
character above the age of twenty-three to attend
the lectures in any of the schools of the University,
and to reside out of the precincts, exempt from the
regulations prescribed for the government of stu-
dents, except those which enjoin respectful and or-
derly deportment.
By a resolution of the Faculty, ministers of the
Gospel, and young men preparing for the minis-
try, may attend any of the schools of the Universi-
ty, without the payment of fees to the profistors.
The expenses of the session of ten months are
as follows:
Board, washing, lodging and attendance $125
Rent of dormitory $16; for half, when occu-


FEVER pieda y two students 8
FEVERS, Fuel and candles estimated at 20
The Indian Vegetable Pills will be found a certain Use of Library and public rooms - 15
remedy; because they cleanse the Stomach and Fees, if only one professor be attended, $50;
Bowels of all bilious matter, and purify the blood; if two, to each $30; if more than two, to
".,"ii'.ji.:rilv, na they remove the cause of every each $25, say 75
.. I i n- .j'.. they are absolutely certain to cure
every kind of Fever. Total, exclusive of clothes, books, and pocket
So also when morbid humors are deposited upon money p .o
the membrane and muscle, causing those pains, in- In the school of law there is an extra fee of .,
flaminatio- ", ar it,| t..|;n' coiled
flamatilo %1n, coUed payable by students attending the senior clats.
R r t-I E^ .TI GOUT, &c. v ,The allowance for clothes is limited by the enact-
The Indian Vegetable Pills may be relied on as mentsto *il,; and for'pocket money to $40.
always certain to give relief, and if persevered with Evry .it. ri resident within the prein ts
will most assuredly, and without fail, make a per- must, on matriculation, deposit with the patron all
feet cure of the above painful maladies. From the money, drafts, &c. under his control, intended
three to six of said Indian Vegetable Bills, taken to defray his expenses while at the University, or
every night on going to bed, will, in a short time, on his return thence to his home; and the
completely rid the body of all morbid and corrupt amount so deposited must be sufficient to pay his
humors: anid rheumatism, gout, and pain of every fees, dormitory rent, for the use of the library and
description, will disappear as if by magic. public rooms, three months' board, and to purchase
For the same reason, when, from sudden changes the text books, &c. lie may want at the commence.
of atmosphere, or any other cause, the perspiration mnent. All funds subsequently received by him for
is checked, and those humors which should pass the purposes aforesaid, must also be deposited with
off by the skin, are thrown inwardly, causing head- the patron, who has charge of his disbursements,
ache, nausea and sickness, pains in the bones, wa- and is entitled to a commission of 2 per cent. for
tery and inflamed eyes, sore throat, hoarseness, his services.
coughs, consumption, rheumatic pains in various WILLIrS H. WOODLEY is proctor and patron of
parts of the body, and many other symptoms of the Institution.
CATCHING COLD, The act of the Legislature prohibiting merchants
The Indian Vegetable Pills will invariably give ina- and others, under severe penalties, from crediting
mediate relief. Three or four pills, taken at night students, will be strictly enforced. The license to
on going to bed, and repeated a few times, will re- contract debts, which the chairman is authorized to
move all the above unpleasant symptoms and re- grant, will be confined (except where the parent or
store the body to even sounder health than it was guardian shall otherwise, in writing, request,) to
before. The same may be said of DIFFICULTY OF cases of urgent necessity; and these, it is hoped
BREATHING, or ASTHMA. The Indian Vegetable that parents and guardians will, as far as possible,
Pills will loosen and carry off, by the stomach and prevent from arising, by the timely supply of the
bowels, those tough phlegmy humors which stop up requisite funds.
the air cells of the lungs, and are the cause of the Religious services are performed at the Universi-
above dreadful complaint, ty every Sunday by the Chaplain, who is appointed
It should also be remembered the Indian Vege- in. turn from the four principal denominations of
table Pills are certain to remove pain in the side, the State.
oppression, nausea and sickness, loss of appetite, J. A. G. DAVIS,
costiveness, a yellow tinge of the skin and eyes, July ll-cpw4w Chairman of the Faculty.
and every other symptom of RS.PORTER'SSEMINARYFOR YOUG
LIVER COMPLAINT; [J LADIES, 41 street, Washington, D. C.-
Because they purge from the body those corrupt The next term of this Institution will commence on
and stagnant humors which, when deposited upon the first Mondary in September. The course of
the Liver, are the causeof the above dangerous studies includes both the useful and ornamental
complaint. They are also a certain preventive of branched of a finished education. It will be the
APOPLEXY AND SUDDEN DEATH; aim of the teachers to lead the pupils to a thorough
Because they carry off those humors which, ob- acquaintance with the studies in which they maybe
structing the circulation, are the cause of a rush engaged, and at the same time so to discipline the
or determination of blood to the head-giddiness, mind, to inspire such a love of knowledge as shall
especially on turning suddenly round-blindness- fit themn for continued self improvement, when the
drowsiness-loss of memory-inflammation of the period allotted to school education closes.
brain-insanity, and every other disorder of the The scholastic year will be divided into two
mind. terms of twenty-two weeks each. It is very desira-
ONE WORR TO THE SEDENTARY! ble that, as far as possible, the pupils should be
Those who labor within doors should remember present at the opening of the term.
that they frequently breath an atmosphere which Having very spacious and pleasant accommoda-
is wholly unfit for the proper expansion of the tons, Mrs. Porter will receive a few young ladies
lungs, and at the same time, owing to want of ex- into her family, ant be-tow upon them every at-
ereise, the bowels are not sufficiently evacuated- tension that a parent can desire.
the blood becomes impure, and headache, indiges- The following are the course of studies, and
ion, palpitation of the heart, and many other dis- terms per quarter:
agreeable symptoms, are sure to follow. FIRST DIVISION.
THE INDIAN VEGETABLE PILLS Arithmetic, Geography, and History, Oith. .r.rhiv.
Being a cleanser of t:'e Stomach and Bowels, and Reading, and Writing, $5 00
a DIRECT PURIFIER of the Blood, are certain not SECOND DIVISION.
only to remove pain or distress of every kind from The above branches continued, with Grammar, Na-
the body, but, if used occasionally, so as to keep tural Philosophy, Astronomy, Botany, Goodrich's
the body free from those humors which are the Ecclesiastical History, &c. $8 00
CAUSE of EVERY MALAnY UNDER HEAVEN, they THIRD DIVISION.
will most assuredly promote such a just and equal Algebra, Geometry, Chemistry, Rhetoric, Moral
circulaton of the Blood, that those who lead a se- and Intellectual Philosophy, BurritL's Geography
dentary life will be enabled to enjoy of the Heavens, Far-u:' Natural Theology,
SOUND HEALTH, &c. $10 00
And the fluids of the body will be restored to such French, by a highly approved native teacher, 6 00
Latin, I 5 00
a state of purity, that DISEASE OF ANY KIND Drawing and Painting, 6 00
WILL BE ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE. Music on the Piano, 1 00
.gents.-ROBERT, FARnRAM, WASHINGTON CITY; Musi on thf Piano,- 18 00
Win G. C.IU, Nf ai. Gay street, Baltimore. 2 00
Wm C k, Niti Gay street, Baltimore. All the pupils are required to attend to a weekly
OFFICE AND GENELP AL DEPOb, 169 exercise in composition, and also a giver lesson
Race street PHILADELPHIA. Feb 7-1y, from the Bible.


f RAVELS IN SOUTHEASTERN ASIA-
j embracing Hindostan, Malaya, Siam, and
China, with Notices of numerous Missionary Sta-
tions, and a full account of the Burman Empire,
with Dissertations, Tables, etc. by Howard Mal-
colm, in 2 vols.; third edition. Passages in Foreign
Travel, by Isaac Appleton Jewett, in 2 vols. Also,
Rambles in Europe, or a Tour through France,
Italy, Switzerland, Great Britain, and Ireland, in
1836, by Fanny W. Hall, in 2 vols. are for sale by
WM. M. MORRISON, 4 doors west of Brown's
hotel. June 27

OFFICE OF COMMISSARY GENeRAL OF SUBSISTENCE
Washington, July 1st, 1840.
SEPARATE proposals will be received at this
office until the first day of October next, for the
delivery of provisions in bulk for the use of the
troops of the United States, upon inspection, as fol-
lows:
AT NEW ORLEANS.
100 barrels of Pork
200 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
90 bushels of new white field Beans
1,500 pound of good hard Soap
40 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT TIHE PUBLIC LANDING SIX tI,.X rROM FORT
TOWSON, MOUTH *II I ;l CHIEMICH1.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
April, 1841, and to leave Natchitoches by 20th
February, 1841.
AT PORT SMITH ARKANSAS.
1,000 barrels of Pork
2,000 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
900 bushels of new white field Beans
15,000 pounds of good hard Soap
400 bushels of good clear dry Salt
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
May, 1841.
AT ST. LOUIS, OR JEFFERSON BARRACKS, MISSOURI.
500 barrels of Pork
1,000 barrels of fresh superfine Floar
450 bushels of new white field Beans
7,500 pounds of good hard Soap
200 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT FORT CRAWFORD, PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, MISSIS-
SIPPI RIVER.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field B'aus
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
2,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
80 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the 1st of June,
1841.
AT FORT SELLING, ST. PETERS.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
4,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the 15th June,
1841.
AT FORT WINNEBACO, ON THE FOX RIVER, AT
THIE PORTAGE OF FOX AND WISKONSIN RIVERS.
300 barrels of Pork
600 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
270 bushels of new white field Beans
4,500 pounds of good hard Soap
3,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
120 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the first of June,
1841.
AT FORT HOWARD, GREEN BAY.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field Beans
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
2,000 pond.. -f- 'o.d Inrd-t-aMnif Oemles
80 bushels good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the first of June,
1841.
AT FORT BRADY, SAULT DE STE. MARIE.
100 barrels of Pork
200 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
90 bushels of new white field Beans
1,500 pounds of good hard Soap
1,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
40 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the first of June,
1841.
AT HANCOCK BARRACKS, HOLTON, MAINE.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flcur
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
4,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
160 bushels of good clean dry salt
The whole to be delivered in December, 1840,
and January and February, 1841.
AT NEW YORK.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT BALTIMORE.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field Beans
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
80 bushels of good clean dry salt.
NOTE.-All bidders are requested to extend the
amount of their bids for each article, and exhibit
the total amount of each bid.
The periods and quantities of each delivery at
those posts where they are not specified, will be one-
fourth 1st June, 1st September, 1st December, 1841,
and 1st March, 1842.
The hogs of which the pork is packed to be
fattened on corn, and each hog to weigh not less
than two hundred pounds, and consist of one hog
to each barrel, excluding the ieet, legs, ears, and
snout. Side pieces may be substituted for the
hams. The Pork is to be first salted with Turks
Island salt, and then carefully packed with the
same article, in pieces not exceeding ten ponds
each. When the packing has been completed, the
contractor must furnish to this office a certificate
from the packer, that the Pork has been so salted
and packed. The Pork to be contained in sea-
soned heart of white oak or white aoh barrels, full
hooped; the Beans in water tight barrels, and
the Soap and Candles in strong boxes of conveni-
ent size for transportation. Salt will only be re-
ceived by measurement of thirty-two quarts to the
bushel. The Candles to have cotton wicks. The
provisions for Prairie du Chien and St. Peters,
must pass St. Louis for their ultimate destination,
by the 15th April, 1841. A failure in this parti-
cular will be considered a breach of contract, and
the Department will be authorized to purchase to
supply these posts.
The provisions will be inspected at the time and
place of delivery, and all expenses to be paid by
contractors untfl they are deposited at such store
houses as may be designated by the agents of the
Department.
The Commissary General reserves the privilege
of increasing or diminishing the quantities, or of
dispensing with one or more articles, at any time
before entering into contract, and also of increas-
ing or reducing the quantities of each delivery one-
third, subsequent to contract, on giving sixty days'
previous notice.
Bidders, not heretofore contractors, are required
to accompany their proposals with evidence of their
ability, together with the names of their sureties,
whose responsibility must be certified by the Dis-
trict Attorney, or by some person well known to
the Government, otherwise their proposals will not
be acted on.


Advances cannot be made in any case; and evi-
dence of inspection and full delivery will be re-
quired at this office before requisition will be made
upon the Treasury for payment, which will be ef-
fectedin such public money as may be convenient
to the points of delivery, the places of purchase, or
the residence of the contractors.
No drafts on this office will be accepted or paid
under any circumstances.
Each proposal will be sealed in a separate en-
velope, and marked "Proposals for furnishing
Army Subsistence." GEO. GIBSON, C. G. S.
f7N HE STUDENT'S MANUAL, designed, by
T specific directions, to aid in forming and
strengthening the intellectual and moral character
and habits of the student, by Rev. John Todd;
ninth edition, is for sale by
W. M, MORRISON,


N EW FALL AND WINTER GOODS, a
S reduced prices, and no mistake, at our store
Centre Market Space.
BRADLEY, CATLETT and ESTEP havy
now received their entire stock of fall and winte
Goods, Carpetings, &c. comprising a much larger
more general, and better selected assortment o
rich fancy and staple Dry Goods than ever before
offered in this city, all of which were purchased
very low at auction, and will be sold accordingly.
The following are a few of the many articles now
on hand:
CLOTHS-Blue, wool black, olive, brown, invisi
ble green, mixed, and in short all color.
and qualities
CASSIMERES-Superfine wool-dyed black, new
style, colored, doe skin, and fancy colors
of every kind
SILKS-Plain and figured black and blue-black
plain and figured colored, dark figured
Cracovienne Silks, a new and rich article
MOUSSELINES-Of the richest patterns and co
lors, mourning and plain black
BOMBASINS-At low rates, a good assortment
BEAVER CLOTHS-Black and colored, all qua
cities
MERINOS-Germanand ,i-n,'het...iipri.ngever]
color, among others, scarlet, light blue
and green
SHAWLS-Cashmere, Brocha, and Merino, em
broidered Thibet, and Tartan Shawls
SATINETS-Of every color and all qualities
FLANNELS-Rogers's pattern, gAuze, white
5.4, 4-4, and 7-8ths, plain and twilled
scarlet, and heavy milled
DIAPERS-Damask Table Cloths, 8-4 by 10-4 to
12-4 by 30-4, very fine, brown ant
bleached Huckaback, brown Tabhl
Cloths, Napkins, Birdseye Diapers, 6-4
7-4, and 8-4 Table Diapers and Russia
Diapers
LINEN GOODS-Irish Linens, Linen Cambrics
and Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs, 6-4
8-4, 10 4, and 12-4 Linen Sheetings.
CALICOES-Super French Chintz, British and
Domestic Prints
LUILTS-13.4 Marseilles Quilts
BLANKETS-Heavy Whitney and Mackinaw
Rose and Duffil, and a large assortmen
of Point Blankets for Servants
TAILORS' TRIMMINGS-Brown Hollands
silk, worsted, and cotton Serges, 6.4 Tar.
tan Cloaking, Petersham Bindings, Sill
Cords, Twist, Sewing Silk, Patent Thread.
Check Linings, Silk Velvets, Table Co-
vers, 6-4 and 8-4 worsted Table Covers
Piano and Centre Table Cloth Covers
HOSIERY-Gentlemen's woolen, cashmere, and
Cotton Hose and Half-Hose, Ladies' em-
broidered, ribbed and plain silk Hose
and Half-Hose, black, white, and colored
Mohair, merino, worsted, Moravian,
fleeced silk-also, misses' and boys'
Hose, of all kinds
GLOVES-Gentlemen's and ladies' Kid, Berlin,
Cashmere, and worsted-also, black fillet
and pic nic Gloves
CANVASS-Of all numbers
PAD DINGS-Super and medium cloth
DOMESTICS-Brown Cottons, 7-8, 4-4 and 5-4
wide, Long Cloths, Shirtings and Sheet-
ings, Cotton Tick, 7 8 and 4 4, Suffolk
Drills, brown and bleached, Canton Flan-
nels, heavy Lowell Osnaburgs, Cotton
Yarns, all numbers
CURTAIN GOODS-Damask and watered Mo-
reens, Cashmeretts, Gilt Rods, Ring,
Ornaments, and Trimmings
Also, daily receiving in our Carpet Wareroom,
fine and extra superfine Ingrain Carpets, 4.4, 3 4,
and 5-8 Venet'an Cari.th-ne. new and handsome
patterns, with te.,uiiu u[',c. to match, Hemp Car-
peting, Chintz Floor-Cr .tih b.-and Green Baize, all of
which we will dispose of at prices much lower than
the regular retail price of the same goods in this
city. BRADLEY, CATLE rT & ESTEP.
Sep 17-3t

K ENTUCKY MILITARY LANDS-James
L. Dallatn, residing in Salem, Livingston
county, Kentucky, will attend to the payment of
taxes, adjusting disputed titles, reclaim lands sold
for tax, leas's, buy and sell land held and owned
by non-residents in the State of Kentucky, and
particularly in the Green river, or lower section of
the State, upon reasonable terms. With several
years' experience as an agent, and a general ac
quaintance throughout the State, he hopes, by strict
attention to business, to give satisfaction. He has
for sale improved and unimproved lands on e
rivers Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee.
REFERENCES.
Taos. S. PAGE, Second Auditor for Kentucky.
JNo. M. FosT'rER, Register of Land Office.
COL. JAMEsa DAVIDSON, Treasurer.
JACOB SIVItGENT, Clerk of Court of Appeals.
HON. J. J. CRITTENDFN, United States Senator.
F. P. BLAiR, W lii,'i,.., city.
JAs. M. HARtRIS, Virginia.
HIRAM HARRIS, Richmond.
FRANCIS J. DAr.LAM, Baltimore.
A. H. WALLACE, New Orleans.
WILLS CcOPER, late of Norfolk.
August 28-dIm
,ENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE.-Medical De-
P apartment -The Lectures will commence in
this Institution on the first Monday of November
next, in the New College Edifice, in Filbert above
Eleventh street.
Anatomy and Physiology, SAMUEL GEORGE
MORTON, M. D.
Surgery, GEORGE McCLELLAN, M. D.
The Theory and Practice of Medicine, WIL-
LIAM RUSH, M. D.
Materia Medica and Pharmacy, SAMUEL COL-
HOUN, M.D,
Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and
Children, SAMUEL McCLELLAND, M. D.
Chemistry and Natural Philosphy, WALTER
R. JOHNSON, A. M.
The Students of Pennsylvania College are admit-
ted to the Practice cf the Pennsylvania and Block-
eIcy Hospitals on the same terms as the other Stu-
dents of the city. They besides have the advan-
tage of attending the daily demonstrations from
cases of disease at the dispensary of the College in
Filbert street.
S. COLHOUN, Dean.
Sep 8-3tawtN2 No. 15 south Seventh street.
N EW MUSIC.-Just received the following
pieces of new Music, at the old established
store two doors east of the City Post Office:
The Lament of the Irish Emigrant, a ballad,
with beautiful vignette.
0 swift we go, a sleighing song,
Land of the S;uth; words by A. B. Meek, esq.
The Tippecanoe Club Q.uick Step.
Hall's Quick Step, as played by the Boston
Band, with beautiful vignette.
The Eglantine Waltz.
The Bella do
The Adelia do
The Qtueen's Country Dances.
Aug 11 W. FISCHER.
D DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Washington
county, Orphans' Court, August 28, 1840.-
In the case of John D. Clarke, administrator of
John Pierce, deceased. The administrator, with
the approbation of the' Orphans' Court, has ap-
pointed the second day of October next for the set-
tlement of said estate, and for paying and distri-
buting, under the court's direction and control, the
assets in the administrator's hands to the creditors
of said deceased, at which time and place the said
creditors are requested to attend. This notice to


be published once a week for three weeks previous
o said day.
Test: ED. N. ROACH,
Register of Wills
I'- Those persons who placed papers in the
hand0 of John Pierce are particularly requested to
call for the same, as I have several judments in
their favor. JOHN D. CLARK.
Sep 1-law3w

ORDER BEAGLES, A TALE OF MISSIS-
USIPPI, By the author of "Richard Hurdis,"
in 2 vols. Woman's Love and the World's Fa-
vour, or the Fergusons, by the Hlon. Edmund
Phipps, in 2 vols. Also, No. 8 Humphry's Clock
-are this day published and for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,


- ----------------------


ket, for the instruction of youth in the following
branches of an English education, viz: Orthogra- l
phy, Reading, Vri.i;, Grammar, Arithmetic, Ge-
ography, and History. The Latin language will be
taught if required.
For terms of tuition apply at the school room, a
where the most satisfactory testimonials of charac-
ter and qualifications for the performance of the
above duties will be exhibited.-
Aug 12-3t JOHN M. ALLISON!
1,200 CARDS PERRYIAN PENS. d
,.., T FISCHER has just opened twelve hun- u
' dred cards of patent Metallic Pens,, which v
he has recently imported direct from the patentees, v
Messrs. James Perry and Co. of London, embrac-
ing every description of pens made by these unri- P
valued manufacturers. Among them are two kinds 8
entirely new, called the Varnished and Black Ra- 1
ven Pens. All of which are offered at wholesale
and retail, on the mest reasonable terms, at Sta- o
tioner's Hall. August 29 o
o
T OOTHACHE! TOOTHACHE!! TOOTH s
. ACHE!!!-WM. BROWN, Chemist, 481 f
Washington street, Boston, Mass. has invented an 1
article that wilt remove this tormenting pain-re- c
move all soreness of teeth, and fit them to be filled;
and will remove all unpleasant smell of the breath
when occasioned by defective teeth. It is consi-
dered by the inhabitants of Boston a great and -
valuable discovery; thousands have already availed
themselves of this never failing remedy. F.r ihe
genuine article, call for "Win. Brown's Extract of
Gall and Kreosote," and observe my signature
For sale at TODD'S Drug Store.


C17tB -Bu
.S 71r, ^ l~


t^M


isetul invention insures an instantaneous supply of
tlear, filtered ink in the cup of the filter, which can
be returned into the inkstand at any moment, where
t is secured from injury, and not affected by the
atmosphere. The ink, thus protected, never
thickens or moulds, and remains good for any
length of time, in any climate. The process of fil.,
ration causes the coloring matter to be held in sus-
pension. Hence the trouble and inconvenience oc-
asioned by unsuitableink, generally found in or-
inary inkstands, are completely obviated by the
use of the filter inkstand. Ont t.f moderate size
will contain sufficient ink for Six or twelve months'
writing.
Testimonials from all the principal paper and
periodicals published in England, may be seen at
Itationer's Hall. Ang :26-3law4w
IMPORTANT TO THE DEA F.- Doctor Price,
of Richmond, Kentucky, cures by his mode of
operating on the ear, about four canes out of five
f deafness. He has restored to hearing a number
of individuals after its loss, to a great extent, front.
en to twenty years, and in one instance for near
orty years; and this individual now hears well.
[he length of time deafness has exi ed is not con-
Ilucive evidences that hearing cannot be re-
tored.
From the fact that a greal majority of the large
number deprived ]tf the inesiimabla faculty (f
hearinu, cau be re'iored by ht mode of operaiinnf
in. treamneni, In somtine in-tances by a singlet opera-
ion, and at farltei in a few weeits or month-,
he invites all those who are deaf to come and be
restored. Cases from a distance will not be ra
quired to remain longer than a few days,


ALo~t


/








VOL. X.....No. 89.

ENING, SEPTEMBER 25, 1840.


C CENTRAL CLASSICAL SCHOOL, ELE-
VENTH STREET.-The exercises of the
subscriber's school will be resumed on Tuesday,
the 1st of September.
A quantity of second hand school furniture to be
disposed of on moderate terms.
Aug24-li* S. G. BULFINCH.

M RS. PORTER'S SEMINARY FOR YOUNG
LADIES will reopen on Tuesday, the first
of September, instead of the first Monday, as at
first advertised. Aug. 24
E EXCELLENT HOUSEHOLD FURNI-
TURE, BRANDIES, GIN, AND WINES.
-1 have on hand, at private sale, an excellent lot
of household furniture nearly all new-such as
Mahogany hair-seat Sofas and parlor Chars, Cen-
tre Tables
do. Dning and Card Tables, Workstands,
Wardrobes, and Bureaus
do. Sideboards, recumbent Chairs, hand-
Pier Table and Cabinet
do. Peir and Centre Tables, marble tops,
Sand two Piano Fortes
Very handsome Turkey Carpets and Persian
Rags, Loo Table, Large gilt Mirrors, French
Plate, Toilet Tables and Stands, a variety cfcane,
rush, and wood seat Chairs, draw Toilet Glasses,
a variety of high and low post and other Bedsteads,
shuck Mattresses, with many other articles in the
line not necessary to be enumerated.
I have also on hand at private sale, upon time
to suit purchasers, Champagne and Cognac Bran-
dies, in half pipes, Holland Gin, 15 barrels supe-
rior old Monongahela Whiskey, quarters and
eighths casks Sherry and Madeira Wine, Cham-
pagne, Madeira Port, brown and pale Sherry, Ita-
lian Wines in bottles, boxes, and baskets, of one
dozen each, all of which will be sold low, and can
be recommended. EDWARD DYER,
Aug 24 Auctioneer and Corn. Merchant.

AGENCY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK.
-EDWIN C. ESTES, at No. 167 Pearl
street, offers his services to merchants, planters,
and others, in the purchase of every description of
foreign and domestic merchandise, as well as in
the sale of cotton.
He promises fidelity and promptness in filling
any order sent to him, and making returns for any
property entrusted to him for sale, and refers to
Hon. R. Chapman, M. C. City of Washington.
Jos. Brewster, N Yok
Lester, Holmes and Co. -New York.
P. Fanning, Norwich, Connecticut.
George and A. B. Hager, Boston.
Fuerion, Dale and Co. New Orleans.
Keyes and Roberts, I
Gen. J. W. Garth, Decatur, Ala.
John J. Massey, Pickensville, Ala.
Hon. David C. Neal, Wetumka, Ala.
Bull and Files, ? Mobile., Ala.
I. D. Fuller, I one &n
Hon. J. L. Martin, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
C. C. Norvell, Nashville, Tenn.
D. A. Smith, esq. Jacksonville, Ill.
Jas. Brown, Oxford, Miss.
R. M. Williamson, Jackson, Miss.
Win. T. Lewis, Woodville, Miss.
Aug 13-2aw6m*
E CAREFUL OF YOUR COLDS.-Many
S people are very apt to consider a cold but a
trifling matter, and to think that "it will go away
of it/selfin a day or two,'t and they give themselves
no trouble about it. But to such we would say, "be
careful of your colds"-do not tamper with your
constitutions. If you desire to live to "a good old
are," be careful to take such remedies as will
effect an easy and a speedy cure. Da.
SWAYNE'S COMPOUND SYRUP OF PRUNUS
VIRGINIANA, or WILD CHERRY, has cured
more colds than any other medicine offered for
sale in this country. The certificates of cures
effected by this invaluable medicine, which the
proprietor is daily receiving, are of the most grati-
fying character, and tend to show its sanative pro-
perties, and the high rank it holds in public estima-
tion.-Medical Definer.
For sale at the book store of R. FARNHAM,
between 9th and 10th streets, stle agentfor the city
of Washington.
PATENT OFFICE, August 7, 1840.
N the petition of William Beach, of the city
of Philadelphia, praying for an extension of
the patent granted to said William Beach for an
improved Plough, for seven years from the expira-
tion of said patent, which takes place on the 27th
of June, 1841,
It is ordered that said petition be heard at the
Patent Office, on the first Monday in January,
1841, next, at 12 o'clock, min. and all persons are
notified to appear and show cause, if any they
have, why said petition C.i-'h n..,i to be granted.
Ordered, also, that this notice he published in the
Globe, printed at Washington city; the Pennsylva-
nian, published at Philadelphia, Pa; and the Bos.
ton Morning Post, printed at Boston, Mass. once a
week for four weeks, previous to the said first
Monday in January, 1841.
H. L. ELLSWORTH,
Commissioner of Patents.
N. B. The above papers will publish the above
notice and send the account to the Patent Otlice.
August 8-law4w H. L. E.
TERY LARGE AND DESIRABLE RESI-
DENCE FOR RENT.-Will be rented, and
possession given immediately, that very large and
desirable three story brick house, lately occupied
by Aaron Vail, rsq. norih of the President's
House, and fronting the public square. It is a
very large airy building, with extensive back build-
ings, carriage houses and stables, all substantially
enclosed and in good order for the reception of a
tenant. Any gentleman wishing to view the pre-
mises, can do so on application to Mr. Baty, who
is in charge of the same, and occupies the back
buildings. To a good tenant, the rent will be
made to suit. Application to be made to me, at
my auction store on Pennsylvania avenue.
Aug 24 EDWARD DYER.
P IANOS.-Mr. WAGLER has just selected
three Vienna Piano Fortes, which he hopes
will suit all lovers of music. He believes this to
be the "appointed time" for purchase or exchange,
to smooth away the dulness of the season, (politics f
always excepted.) And although a piano may be
found at every spring or watering place, he thinks
a home piano will answer in the end full as well.
Please call at the Piano-room on H street.
E DUCATION.-The subscriber respectfully
informs his friends and the public generally,
that his school (which has been closed for a short
time) will be re-opened on Monday, the 17th inst. a
in that commodious room over the Western mar-r


P ROPOSALS for eeyig na mails of thei
United Statesonthe following routes will be
received at the Contract Office of the Post Office
Department, in the city of Washington, until the
12th day of October next, at 3 o'clock, p m. to be
decided by the 15th day of said October.
NEW JERSEY.
No. 1319. From Morristown, by Mendon, Ches-,
ter, Washington, German Valley, Schoolev's
Mountain, Pleasant Grove, Anderson, Mansfleild
and New Village, to Easton, Pa. 43 miles and back,
six times a week in four horse post coaches, with
a tri-weekly branch from Mansfield by Oxford
Furnace to Belvidere, 9 miles and back in stages,
to be run in due connection.
Leave Morristown every day except Sunday a
12 m, arrive at Easton same days by 9 p m.
Leave Easton every day except Sunday at 3 a
m, arrive at Morristown same days by 12 m.
Proposals to carry but three times a week are
also invited.
The service is to commence on the first day of
November, 1840, and continue to the 30th June,
1844, inclusive.
PENNSYLVANIA.
1610. From Bedford to Rainsburg, 10 milf and
back, once a week.
Leave Bedford every Tuesday at 7 a m, arrive
at Rainsburg same day by 10 a inm.
Leave Rainsburg same day at 12 min, arrive at
Bedford same day by 3 p m.
The term of service to be as aforesaid.
INDIANA.
2591. From Terre Haute, by Otter Creek, Clinl
ton, Montezuma, Highland, Newport, Eugene,
Perryville, Covington, Portland, Rob Roy, Attfca,
Shawnee Prairie and West Point, to Lafayette, 86
miles and back, three times a week in four horse
post coaches.
Leave Terre Haute every Tuesday, Thursday.
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Lafayette the next
days by 12 m.
Leave Lafayeile every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 6 a m, arnrieat Terra Haute next days
by 12 m.
Proposals to carry in stage-; will also 'be consi-
dered.
The service is to commence on the first dy oof
November, 1840, and continue to the 30th June,
1842, inclusive.
On the following routes, the proposals for carry-
ing the mails will be received as aforesaid until the
14th day of November, 1840, and decided by the
18th day of said November.
INDIANA.
2555. From Louisville, Ky. by Jefferson-
ville, Ia. Hamburg, New Providence, Pekin,Salem,
Claysville, and Lost river, to Orleans, 54 miles and
back, 3 times a week in stages.
Proposals to carry in 4 horse post coaches will
be considered.
Also, from Salem by Walnut Ridge, Hillport,Va-
lonia, Browstown, Rockford, Reddingion, and
Azalia, to Columbus, 42 miles and back, 3 times a
week, on horseback. Proposals to carry in stages
will be considered.
Leave Louisville every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, at 8 a m, arrive at Orleans same day
by 8 p m.
Leave Orleans every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, at 10 a m, arrive at Louisville same
days by 10 p m.
Leave Salem every Tuesday, Thursday, and Sa-
turday, at 5 a m, arrive at Columbus same days by
5pm.
Leave Columbus every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, at 5 a m, arrive at Salem same days
by 5 p m.
The service is to commence on the 1st January,
1841, and continue to thlbe 30 June, 1842, inclusive.
ALABAMA.
3719. From Rome, Georgia, by Missionary
Station, Ball Play, Ala. Gatesville, Van Buren,
Marshall, Warrenton, Oleander, Somerville, and
Rock Hill, to Decatur, 141 miles and back, three
times a week in 4 horse post coaches.
Leave Rome every Thursday, Saturday, and
Monday at 4 a m, arrive at Decatur every Satur-
day, Monday, and Wednesday by 11 a m.
Leave Decatur every Thursday, Saturday, and
Monday at 1 p m, arrive at Rome every Saturday
Monday, and Wednesday by 8 p m.
The service is to commence on the first day of
January, 1841, and continue to the 30th June, 1842.
MISSISSIPPI.
3898. From Tuscumbia, Alabama by Buzzard,
Roost, Cartereville, Mi. Jacinto, Rienzi, Ripley,
and Salem, to Holly Springs, 112 miles and back 3
times a week in 4 horse post coaches.
Leave Tuscumhia every Sunday. Tuesl.ay, and
Thursday at 5 a min; arrive at Holi pnrn.g next "
days by8 pm.
Leave Holly Springs every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 5 a m, arrive at Tuscumbia next
days by 8 p m.
The term of service to ba as on No. 3,719.
ARKANSAS.
4002. From Little Rock, Arkansas, by Searcy
C. H. to Batesville, 100 miles and, back twice a
week.
Leave Little Rock every Sunday and Wednes..
lay at 8 a. m. and arrive at Batesville every Tues-
day and Friday by 6 p. m.
SLeave Batesville every Wednesday and Satur-
lay at 6 a. min. and arrive at little Rock every Fri-
lay and Monday by 4 p. m.
Proposals to run twice a week in stages six
months in the year will be considered. Also, a
longer time if practicable, the period to be spe-
cified.
The time of service to be the same as in Nos.
3719 and 3838.
TO BIDDERS.
Place but one route in a proposal, and state dis..
tinctly the annual sum, the mode of service, and
your residence. See the act of Congress of 1836
against promises, offers, or combinations to prevent
competition. Bids resulting from them are void.
Send with the bid a guarantee in the following
'orm:
"The undersigned guaranty that
if his (or their) bid for carrying the
nail from to be accepted
by the Postmaster General, shall enter into an obli-
gation prior to the first day oft next, with
good and sufficient sureties to perform the service
proposed. Dated' 1840."
*Fill this blank as to 1319, 1610, and 2391, with
'November;" and as to the other routes with
'January."
Have the guarantors duly certified to be men of
property, and able to make good their guarantee, by
a postmaster, or the fact otherwise satisfactorily
shown to the Department.
Address the letter enclosing the bid to the First
Assistant Postmaster General, and mark the letter
vith the term "mail proposals," and the number of
he route.
You are to satisfy yourselves as to the distances,
mnd take the stock of the present contractor, when
'on underbid him on a stage or coach route, and
have not stoel yourself, and be subject to fines and
'orfeitures for failures of performance, as specified
n the regulations published in the advertisement
or the annual letting.
JOHN M. NILES,
Postmaster General.
POST OPPiCi DEPARTMENT,
Washington, August 15,1840.
P ATENT PERRYIAN FILTER INIK-
STAND.-W. FISCHER has just opened
* newly patented filtering instand, which, in seve-
al sizes, he has imported direct from ,he patentees,
Mfessrs: James Perry and Co. This novel and




4wj 64


POLITICAL,

From the New Yorkc Evening Post.
Mr. Van Baren's letter, which we publish to-
day, on the subject of a general bankrupt law, will
be read with great interest. Itis An able examina-
tion of that importanir question, and a frank
statement ef the principles by which, In his opi-
nion, there who Irgislaie upon it ought to be go-
verned. The argument in favor of subjecting cor-
porations, as well as individuals, to the operation
of a general bankrupt law, is exceedingly forcible
and compact, and such as none but a mind of strong
reasoning powers could furnish.
The persons who called upon Mr. Van Buren
for this exposition of his opinions are Whigs, and
the questions they put to him in their letter seem to
Ps Purposely drawn up with a view of giving the
subject such a shape as to present its great.
eat difficulties. Our readers will see how fully he
has met, and how well he has dealt with these dif-
ficulties.
Mean time, it is worthy of remark, that nobody
asks for Harrison's opinion on the question of the
bankrupt law. It is true that he governs himself
by the rule of answering no questions; but it is
quite as true that there is not the least curiosity any
where, not the slightest scintilla of a desire, either
among friends or foes, to know what the poor old
gentleman thinks about that matter. And why
,huuld there be? Of what possible consequence is
it? Aside from bis incapacity to decide in such a
matter, General Harrison, if he should have the
misfortune to be elected, will of course do as he is
bid. He must not be allowed to expose himself to
digTace by forming and following hisown opinions.
He is seduluuoly guarded from that danger, now
that he is a candidate, and will doubtless be more
strictly superintended, if he should obtain the office
for which he is proposed.
The public opinion, therefore, in regard to this
Point, is right on both sides. All feel, his support-
ers as well as his opposers, that to ask General Har-
rison's opinion of a general bankrupt law would
be as idle a ceremony as to ask a barber's block
what it thinks of the last fashion of perukes.
MR. VAN BUREN'S LErTTER ON A GENERAL BANK-
RUPT LAW.
A letter was addressed to President Van Buren,
by Messrs. S. L. Danfield, William H. Brasher,
and others, dated New York, August 13th, 1840,
in the following words:
Sia: The undersigned, a portion of your fellow-
citizens, in view of the approaching Presidential
election and the great interests involved therein,
and desirous of knowing your sentiments in rela-
tion to a subject of great public interest, have ac-
cordingly taken the liberty of propounding a few
inquiries as to your opinions and line of policy as
the Chief Magistrate of the people, and the repre-
sentative of the popular will.
The undermined, therefore, relying on your ac-
customed candor and magnanimity in making
known your principles to the people, that they may
vote understandinglyy," respectfully propose the
following questions, viz:
I. Would you give your executive approval, if
re-elected President, to an involuntary bankrupt
law, applicable to corporations as well as indivi-
duals, or to a voluntary bankrupt law, applicable
to all classes of individuals and corporationsO
2, Would you give your approval to a bankrupt
bill, operating on individuals involuntarily, but ex-
empting corporations from its provisions?
3. Would you give your approval to a bankrupt
bill for the relief of involuntary insolvents, appli-
cable to manufacturers and traders, but exempting
corporations and the agricultural classes.
The undersigned have but one object in view in
propounding the foregoing questions: it is to be-
come acquainted with your opinions as to the
constitutionality and expediency of a bankrupt
law, and your probable course of policy in the
&vent of such a law passing both Houses of
Congress.
As well as the memory of the undersigned serves
them, your opinions on the preceding topic are
entirely unknown to your fellow-citizens. The
excitement pervading the public mind at this pe-
riod on the subject, and the influence exerted by
the passage or defeat of a bankrupt bill, on the
destines of so many of your fellow men, are suffi-
cient in themselves to prompt an early reply to this
communication.
To this letter the President has transmitted, for
publication, the following reply:
WASHINOTON, Sept. 14, 1840.
GENTLEMKS: I have had, the honor to receive
your letter of the 13th of August, desiring an ex-
. pression of my opinions upon the questions therein
stated, all of which relate to the subject of a bank-
rupt law. Your object is, doubtless, to obtain my
general views upon that measure. These shall be
fully and frankly given.
Laws having reference to the relation betw
debtor and creditor are of a twofold charac
namely:
1st. Those which, on the surrender of his proper-
ty, merely exempt the person of the debtor from
imprisonment.
2d. Those which, in addition to this, exonerate
his future acquisitions from liability to his credi-
tors, by dissolving his contracts, or extinguishing
all remedies upon them.
My efforts to abrogate the right which was given
by law to the creditor to imprison his debtor, ex-
cept in cases of ascertained fraud, commenced at
an early period of my public life, and have been
uniform, active and persevering. At the first re-
gular session of the Legislature which I had the
honfir to attend, I introduced and advocated a law
for abolishing imprisonment for debts in certain
eases. At -eteral subsequent sessions the same
subject, embracing the policy in its broadest possi-
ble even, occupied my earnest attention, and its
adoption was urged with my best abilities, and
finally with success in that branch of the Legisla-
ture of which I was a member.
My objects in bringing forward and advocating
the abolition of imprisonment for debt in the State
Legislature, were not] lost sight of, or abandoned
by me after I was honored with a seat in the Na-
tional Legislatur. There my efforts were united
with those of others to divest our civil code of a
feature so odious and oppressive. It is a satisfac-
tion to believe that my unifoan and continued
course upon thiO subject has not been without in-
fluence in amelioraimng legislation in regard to un-
fortunate debtors, and I do most sincerely rejoice
that this baibarutiirelic of antiquity-so cruel in
its effects upon individuals, and so peculiarly un-
congenial with the principles of Governments
founded on popular sovereignty, is in a fair way of
being expunged from the statute books of all en-
lightened nations.
The very fact that humanity and justice require
the surren.der, by the creditor, of all reliance upon
the power of imprisonment or of a control of any
kind over the person of his debtor, should inspire
caution in preserving unimpaired such securities
as are consistent with public policy. When a man
paits with the fruits of his o n industry to ano-
ther, Upon the faith of a contract, he is entitled,
Upon grounds of natural justice and sound morali-
ty, to the fruits of his debtor's earnings and enter-
prise until he is fully paid. This is the foundation
of credit and confidence, which are essentially ne-
cessary to the well being of society. Although this
rule as between the parties is obligatory until the
debt is honestly paid, the contract itself is, upon the
great principle which subjects private rights to the
public good, liable to be controlled, and even di-
rectly cancelled by the supreme power in the State;
it may be declared void at its inception, as contra-


vening public policy, or forfeited for not being en-
forced within a limited period, or abrogated under
circumstances having regard to the general welfare,
where the power to abrogate is given to the Legis-
lature.
The subject, as now pending before the country,
and as embraced in your questions, presents itself
in several points of view.
First. As to a general bankrupt law, applica-
ble to bankers and traders only;
Second. As to the propriety of subjecting cor-
porations to its operation; and
Third. As to the propriety of embracing, volun-
tarily or involuntarily, all other classes within its
provisions.
It is a rule, the sacred observance of which is in-
dispensable to the well being of society, that Go-
vernment should never interfere with private con-
tracts" even where the authority to do so is con-
terred by the Constitution, except upon the ground
of evident public necessity, and then with a degree
of caution and circumspection which shall guard,
in an effectual manner, against frauds and injus-
tice. That occasions may arise when those who
have the rightful power to interfere, may do so, and
are required to do so, by a regard to the best inte-
tests of the community, theie can be no doubt. I
thought there was occasion for such interference in
1827, and gave my vote for a general bankrupt
law, applicable to bankers and traders, classes
which all muru't agree were intended to be embraced
b7 the claue in ihe Constitutioun relating to this


subject. An occasion of at least equal urgencyfor
such a law exists at this time. The embarraq-
ments caused by the pernicious expansion of the,
currency, and the consequent facilities of credit and
rash enterprises, which have unficriunaely cha-
racterized the last few years, are such as to render
an interference of this kind greatly conducive, if
not absolutely necessary, to the public good. I
would, therefore, have unhesitatingly, co-operated,
at the last session of Congress, in the passage of
such a law, properly guarded against frauds, and
so framed as to secure to the creditors the present
estate of their debtors, when the latter were dis-
charged from their obligations. A bill which should
not sufficiently guard against frauds would be ob-
jectionable. The rightasof creditors might be so
far overlooked, or so inefficiently secured, that I
should be constrained to withhold from it my sanc-
tion.
It would constitute no objection with me if cor-
porations were, in a proper form, embraced by the
provisions of such a bill. An attempt was made at
the close of the discussions oa the bankrupt bill of
1827, in the Sena'e, to include banking corporations,
by inserting after the word bankers, in the descrip-
tion of the persons who were made subject to the
provisions of the bill, the words, "or any banking
incorporation." Assuming that the effect of this
amendment, if it prevailed, would be to make the
members of such corporations liable, in their indi-
vidual capacities, to the penalties denounced by their
law for acts, in respect to which their charters made
them personally irresponsible, I opposed it as an
unauthorized interference with State laws; I could
not now approve a bill containing provisions liable
to such an objection. The disastrous state of things
produced by the general suspension of specie pay-
ment by the banks in 1837, presented for conside-
ration, in a form which could not with propriety be
disregarded, the question whether the power of Con-
gress over the subject of bankruptcy might not be
brought to bear upon these institutions in a man-
ner which would steer clear of that difficulty. Upon
a careful examination of the subject, in all its bear-
ings, I was induced to believe that this might be
done in a form which, while it afforded relief to the
creditors of those institutions, and advanced the pub-
lic interests, would neither be liable to the objection
referred to, nor encroach in any other way upon the
rights of the States or transcend the authority of the
Federal Government. A provision in a bankrupt
law authorizing the bill holders and creditors of
all banks, after a specified delay in the payment of
their notes in specie, to institute proceedings to
cause their affairs to be wound up and their effects
to be applied to the payment of their debts, would,
in my judgment, be a measure of that character.
Its object and effect would only be to compel them
to discharge the obligations they incurred, and the
liabilities they were under according to the State
laws, by giving to their creditors for this purpose a
remedy which Congress alone can effectually con-
fer. The co.traets between individuals are also
made under the sanction of the laws of the States
and regulated by them. Those having claims un-
der these contracts may resort to the State courts to
enforce them, as it is also competent for the credi-
tors of banks to do. The object of a bankrupt law
would be to furnish the creditor an additional re-
medy to compel debtors of one description, to do
what, under the laws of the State, it is their duty
to do. The proposed provision in regard to banks
would proceed, although in a modified form, upon
the same principle and to the same end, without
depriving the corporation or its members of any
rights or immunities secured to them by the StAte
laws. Entertaining these views, I brought the
subject to the notice of Congress during the sus-
pension of specie payments by the banks, in 1837.
If they are correct, it would seem difficult to con-
ceive on what ground the exemption of the banks
from the provisions of such a law could be sus-
tained by those who insist on its application to
other classes of our citiz-ns. Equal and exact
justice, the only proper basis ot legislation, re-
quires that laws should extend to, and operate
upon all who are fairly within the range of the
same policy. Corporations, though artificial bodies,
are composed of men, are managed by them, and,
like private dealings, have for their main objects the
personal advantage of the corporations. The prin-
ciple ithich demands their exclusion from the ope-
ration of a bankrupt law on the Qround of inexpe-
diency, claims for that portion of our citizens whose
property is thus invested, privileges and exemptions
denied to others. It proposes to secure to them as
creditors all the advantages of such a law, without
making them liable under it as debtors. On what
principle, I ask, can so marked a preference to one
portion of the people over the other be justified?
Punctuality on the part of incorporated banks to
fulfil their engagements, is of more importance to the
community than that of any individual traders; and
their failure in performing their duty is attended
with much more injurious consequences. If, then,
there be no good reason for the distinction on the
ground of public interests, most assuredly there can
be none on that of claims to favor. The privileges
which the laws already give to those institutions,
and the limited liability of those who invest pro-
perty in them, furnish, on the contrary, the strongest
reasons against the exemption which is claimed in
their behalf.
Whilst on every dollar so invested the stock-
holder has a right to loan two, and sometimes three
times the amount, and whilst he is shielded from
all personal responsibility in case of the failure of
the bank to comply with its engagements, no por-
tion of the property of any other class of the com-
munity has such artificial value given to it by law,
nor is it protected, in like manner, from the hazards
of business; but, on the contrary, every dollar they
possess is held subject to the claims of their credi-
tors. These desirable privileges were granted under
the expectation of advantages and facilities to the
public to be derived from these institutions, not one
of which can be realized if they fail to redeem their
bills in specie when demanded. Whatever may be
thought of their usefulness under other circum-
stances, all must admit that, if they cease to per-
form this important function, they are the sources
of great mischief. The reasons, therefore, for giv-
ing to the bill holders and other creditors, whose
confidence has been in some measure obtained
under a sort of legislative guarantee, full and
prompt remedies against them, in case of failure to
perform their engagements, are stronger than in
cases of ordinary debtors. Should abankrupt law
be passed which did not embrace corporations, hav-
ing the right as creditors to avail themselves of its
advantages, individuals who failed in personally
performing their contracts with them might, by
their interference, be arrested in their business,
and have their property at once transferred to as-
signees. More than this, they might be involved
in acts of bankruptcy by the failure of the banks
themselves to fulfil their promises to them, or to
others, on whose punctuality their own depended.
The injustice of the distinction in this view of the
subject becomes strikingly clear, and I am wholly
ata loss to know on what ground it could be up-
held. This is not a mere speculation upon remote
impossible contingencies. Had there been a bank-
rupt law in existence for the last three or four
years, thousands of our fellow-ci'izens would have
been subjected to its provisions by reason of the
delays and difficulties they experienced in realizing
the demands due to them, resulting indirectly from
the suspension of payments by the banks, whilst
against the banks themselves they, and their debt-
ors who held their notes or other obligations, would
have been comparatively remediless.
The States have certainly not been sparing in be-
stowing upon these institutions special privileges,
and it has not been heard, as matter of complaint,
that they have been too vigorous in enforcing a
strict compliance with the conditions on which the


grants were made. It is not easy to comprehend
the extent to which this principle might be carried
in exempting traders as well as bankers from re-
sponsibility to this remedy for a non-performance
of their engagements, and in enlarging the sphere
of legislative privileges. The State Legislatures
have been in the constant habit of incorporating
manufacturing, and, in some forms, commercial
companies also, each of whom become tiaders of
the first class. If these companies, in addition
to the particular advantages and personal
immunities secured to them, are also to
have their effects exempted from liability un-
der bankrupt laws, the efficacy and value
of the constitutional provision on the subject of
bankruptcy may be effectually superseded, whilst
those who are not possessed of sufficient influence to
become the participants of legislative favor would re-
main subject to the utmost rigor of the laws that
may be passed under it. While I would carefully
abstain from interfering with the rights of these cor-
porations, derived from State authority, I would not
add to their privileges by exempting them altogether
from he operation of a generalbankrupt law, when
such exemption would, in many cases, operate injuri-
ously upon individuals subject to its provisions. The
corporations themselves act, in my judgment, most
unwisely, when they insist upon an exemption which
could not fail to mark yet more distinctly the line of
separation between their affairs and those of the
community at large, and to give still greaterpromi.
nenc to thke superior advantages they enjoy over the


rsst of their fellow-citizens. The constitutionality as
well ai expediency of extending a bankrupt law to
other classes of the community than bankers and tra-
Wer-, have been vexed questions from the establish-
mertfof the Federal Government to the present day.
The Constitution has now been in operation more
than fifty years, and the sanction of Congress to
such a law, though frequently attempted, has never
yet been obtained. Although the question ef consti-
tutionality could not for that reason have come be-
fore the Judiciary directly, it has often beenconsider-
ed indirectly in deciding upon the constitutionality of
State insolvent laws; and I am not aware that the
Supreme Court, in the extended discussions upon the
general subject, has ever even intimated an opinion
as to the precise extent of the authority of Congress
in the matter. We are, therefore, at this lste day,
without even a legislative or judicial opinion upon
this much agitated question, unless one can be rea-
sonably infet red from The persevering refusal of Con-
gress to pass such a law. There is not, perhaps, a
single question growing out of our complex system
of government, in respecijto the settlement of which
less advance has been made than this; and it must
be admitted that there are few if any more complica-
ted, or in respect to which it is found more difficult
to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion.
Objections to the power of Congress to pass a
voluntary bankrupt law, applicable to all classes
of debtors, have been r.-.:.a I,' founded on the
following considerations, viz:
1st. No bankrupt law as such having existed in
the United States before the adoption of the Con-
stitution, it it assumed that its framers intended to
confine the power given over the subject to bank-
ruptcy as it was thbn understood to exist in the
country from which we have derived most of our
legal definitions, and the outlines of our judicial
system;
2d. That bankrupt laws, understood in that
sense, are such acts only as provide a compulsory,
summary and comprehensive remedy to creditors
against bankers and traders; and
31. That there bad existed in all the States, for
years before, and down to the period of the adop-
tien of the Constitution, insolvent laws giving re-
lief to insolvent debtors, of all descriptions, on
their own application, as well against imprison-
ment for debt, as under certain circumstances
againstfuture liabilities for the debts themselves,
that the broad construction of the Federal Consti-
tution necessary to include bankrupt laws of the
character now referred to, would at least deprive
the States of all power to act upon the subject, in-
dependently of that of Congress-a right which
existed before the Constitution, and which, it is
claimed, was not intended to be surrendered by the
States.
The advocates of the power, on the contrary,
contend, in respect to the two first grounds of ob-
jection, that legislation on the subject of bank-
ruptcy, to be wisely adapted to the objects in view,
must vary with circumstances, and keep pace with
the changes which are every day taking place in
the pursuits of men-either bringing them within,
or excluding them from the policy of a General Bank-
rupt law; that it has so varied in England before
and since the adoption of the Federal Constitution,
and that it ought not to be supposed that the fra-
mers of that instrument designed to limit the power,
when they gave it in such general terms, to the
uages or legislation of a foreign country. In re-
spect to the last objection, it is insisted that bank-
ruptcy includes insolvency, and that it is not pos-
sible to lay down any precise distinction by which
the two subjects as matters for the legislation of
the respective Governments can be separated, and
one branch of it allotted to the States, and the other
to the Federal Government; that all attempts which
have been made by our ables judges and statesmen
to do so in a satisfactory manner have hitherto
failed; and, that it must therefore be held that the
framers of the Federal Constitution meant to give
Congress power over the whole subject, leaving to
the States only a subordinate action in regard to it,
trusting to the intelligence of the people who would
be, at the same time, represented in both systems,
for such an exercise of the power conferred as
would not interfere unwisely with those portions of
it which had been, and could continue to be more
usefully exerted by theState Legislatures.
Whatever may bs thought of the conclusiveness
of thcse views, I am ftee to say that the able man-
ner in which they h ive been presented in our courts
of justice andJ elsewhere, has given them greater
weight in my own mind that I was disposed to al-
low them thirteen years ago, when I was called to
act officiPl y rpin the subject.
But if ever the question of constitutional power
is overcome, that of expediency still romaina to be
considered. The objection which is raised to le-
gislation by Congress upon this branch of the sub-
ject is founded on the assumption that the States
are fully competent to afford all the relief in cases
of this description that can be reasonably desired,
and in that way evils believed to be inseparable
from the extension of the Federal power over it,
may be avoided. The correctness of this position
is, of course, more or less dependent upon the ex-
tent of the powers over the subject which the Sates
possess, while Congress abstains form acting in the
matter. About this there has been for years con-
siderable uncertainty, and this uncertainty has been
not a little aggravated by apparently contradictory
decisions by the courts. This arose from the use
of general expressions by the judges which went
beyond the case before the court, and were there-
fore not conclusive upon this question. The bind-
ing character of them having been disavowed, the
matter is now placed by the Supreme Court of the
United States upon a settled and simple footing.
As I understand it, and I believe there is no reason
for ccntrariety of opinion upon the subject, it is
hat the States may, in the absence of Federal le.
gislation upon this branch of the subject, pass laws
authorizing not only the discharge of debtors from
imprisonment, but also from the debts themselves,
provided the latter were contracted and to be exe-
cuted in the State, between citizens thereof, and en-
tered into subsequently to the passage of the law.
The debts and credits of bankers and merchants
extend throughout the Union, and thus present
cases which could not be adequately provided
for under an authority so limited. Not so
with the dealings of the other classes of which
we are speaking. The instances of bona
fide transactions between them in which ade-
quate relief could not be provided by the State
Legislatures under this conceded authority, would
be of rare occurrence. To the State which autho-
rizines the contract and furnishes the ordinary
means of enforcing it, would in this way be re-
served the right of granting such relief from the
hardships which, under peculiar circumstances,
may arise to the parties, restricted only by the li-
mitations before referred to. Those, with the
right to exempt from imprisonment in all cases,
would still leave to State 1. .;.la'i..n the control
and direction of the remedies to an extent under
which much might be wisely done for the benefit
of unfortunate debtors, and the evils of abandoning
in practice the strict construction of the power of
Congress over the subject avoided. Tue changes
in the relations between the States and the General
Government, as'those relations have been hitherto
und-rs'ood, resulting from an occupation of the
whole ground by Federal legislation, would una-
voidably be very considerable in respect to the
extent of the patronage of each, and perhaps most
prominent in the judicial branches of the respective
Governments. A large quantity of the business
which has hitherto been done by the State courts,
and for which they seem to be the appropriate tri-
bunals, would be transferred to the Federal courts.
It is at least very questionable whether such an al-
teration in established systems of judicature would
be wholesome in its political effect, or an improve-
ment in the administration of justice.


There is, on the contrary, reason to apprehend
that it would give occasion to numerous conflicts as
to jurisdiction between the courts of the separate
Governments, cause delay in the proc-edings, and
increase costs and litigation. The States have ex-
ercised the right to pass laws giving a liberal mea-
sure of relief to debtors since the period of their first
formation. These laws constitute an important and
valuable part of their respective statutory codes.
Their right to this branch of *ec.itl i..-ri has been
conceded to them upon the iery principle of the dis-
tinction between the bankrupt and insolvent sys-
tems. To enter at this time upon the practical ap-
plication of a different construction of the Constitu-
tion, would have a tendency to disturb the very
foundation of those proceedings by an interpreta-
tion which has hitherto had no explicit sanction
from the National Legislature or the National
courts.
Neither would it be doing juslice to the subjectto
pass wholly unnoticed the obvious unfitness of ap-
plying to farmers, mechanics, and some other classes
of our citizens, the promptand vigorous proceedings
authorized by bankrupt laws towards bankers and
irad-rs, hitherto almost the only objects of such
laws; nor could such proceedings be much modified
in that respect, without defeating the ends of such efi-
actments. The failure of debtors to satisfy the de-
mands of creditors, at the time and in the manner
specified by their contracts, has ever been regarded
under a bankrupt system as an act of bankruptcy,


and authorizes the transfer, by the operation and
agency of law, of all their estate to assignees for the
benefit of their creditors. However proper such a
procedure may be in reference to bankers and tra-
ders, it would be to all others oppressive and ruin-
ous-it would greatly multiply individual distress,
and bring to public auction, by a forced sale, not
only a large amount of personal property, but a
considerable portion of the real estate of the coun-
try. The evils of a bankrupt law, with such ex-
tended rage, would, it is justly to be feared, more
than counterbalance the benefits it might otherwise
produce. I am not aware that any Governmenthas
deemed it wise or safe to extend the operation of a
bankrupt law to all these classes of its citizens or
subjects. I am well aware that those latter objec-
tions are sought to be obviated by making the ope-
ration of this part of the law voluntary only. But it
well deserves to be remembered, that such a law
would be but the entering wedge-the first move-
ment by Congress in a new direction, under a ge-
neral power, and no one can tell what might be the
next. The same construction of the Constitution,
which gives Congress the right to pass a voluntary
bankrupt law, applicable to farmers and mecha-
nics,and oiher noa-tradingclasses,concedes the right
also to make it compulsory. As long as the debtor
interest possesses a paramount consideration in the
National Legislature, such a law would perhaps not
be thought of, but it would-not be difficult for the
opposite interest, when in complete ascendency, to
make at leait a plausible expose of the reasons why
justice to creditors requires that the rule should be
reciprocal. In this view of the subject were the opi-
ions formed that I have hitherto entertained of the
propriety of not extending the legislation of the Ge-
neral Government to classes or cases which it might
not be certain the Constitution intended to em-
brace. I was doubtless governed in so regardirg
the question, not merely by my own opinion, of the
propriety of restraining all legislation within those
limits, but by a conviction that as bankrupt laws
had been generally passed, chiefly, if not exclusive-
ly, for the benefit of the creditor, and were penal
in their character, they ought not to embrace per-
sons who bad not been regarded as coming within
their scope ; and also by the consideration, that so
far as they tend to the relief of all classes of debt-
ors from future liabilities, on the surrender of their
property, the State insolvent laws had already done
much to attain that object, without subjecting
those who are not within the class of bankers and
traders, to the rigor and severity of bankrupt enact-
ments.
I forbear to do more on this occasion, than sug
gest the grounds of some of the objections to a bank-
rupt law, under one of the aspects presented by your
question. Your own reflections will enable you to
see them ia their full force, and bring to your view
many others I have omitted to mention. My sin-
cere desire is to carry, as far as can be constitution-
ally done, and sound policy will admit, the humane
principle of discharging the honest and unfortu-
nate debtor from liabilities he cannot meet, secur-
ing at the same time to his creditors the full benefit
of his present estate. The rule which I laid down
for my own government, when the subject was
under discussion, at the last session, was to keep
my mind open to argument and conviction in re-
gard to it, until it became my official duty to act,
and -iii to approve or disapprove the bill presented
for my consideration, according as its particular
provisions should, in my best judgment, be found
to conform to those principles, and be likely to ac-
comiplish those objects. Upon careful considera-
tion of the subject in all its bearings, I am led to
believe that I shall best perform my duty in the
matter by continuing to pursue the same course in
future.
I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedi-
ent servant, M. VAN BTJREN.
To Messrs. S. L. Danfield, William H. Brasher,
and others.
P. S. My opinions upon the same subject hav-
ing been asked by others also, I have caused my
reply to be at once published and copies sent to
you.

WHIGERY DEFUNCT IN PENNSYLVANIA.
THiE FEDERAL HARD CIDER CONVENTION AT LAN-
CASTER A TOTAL AND COMPLETE FAILURE!
By a gentleman of the highest respectability just
arrived from Lancaster, we learn that the Federa'
hard cider carousal held there, yesterday, was ac-
knowledged on all hands to be a total and complete
FAILURE! It was not more than ONE-FIFTH
as large as the Democratic convention held there a
few weeks ago, and has greatly disappointed and
dispirited itle Fcdetrt fue. Tue taverns were not
half filled, and the city presented no unusual ani-
mation. Not more than one-third of the counties
were represented, and most of them but thinly.
They were counted in procession, and the number
present is stated by our informant at LESS than
3,500, two-thirds of whom were from the Federal
counties of Lancaster and Adams, and Ihe Federal
city of Philadelphia.
The hard ciderites, we are told, now charge the
failure of their exertions to the rain that fell on
Friday morning. Their "enthusiasm" must be
easily dampened, if a slight fall shower could have
such an effect upon it. Poor fellows! The reign
of Democracy will bring them a still more lamen-
table FAILURE next November. Pennsylvania is
sound to the core! No mistake whatever.
We had made ample arrangements for count-
ing with entire accuracy the delegates, that attended
this Federal hard cider carousal from Western
Pennsylvania, on their way through Harrisburg,
and give the following as the sum total of the
"tremendous outpourings" from that quarter. There
were from
DEMOCRATIC Wesmoreland 0000!
Washington, 3
Fayette, 2
Greene, 1
Armstrong, 1
Allegheny, 5
Crawford, 0
Mercer, 2
Beaver, 4
Erie, 3
Venango, 0 -
Armstrong, 1
Somerset-(fl'Charley Ogle ..Ji) 1
Cambria, 1 - 1

Sum total, Id' 231!
Of there there were twelve LAWYERS-six
BANK OFFICERS-three MERCHANTS-one
VENDER OF LOTTERY TICKETS-ONE
Mechanic-and SPOONse from Somerset. How
very great must be the "ENTHUSIASM" for Harri-
son in the West !-Harrisbarg M&agician.

The honorable John Campbell, of the House of
Representatives, from South Carolina, in answer to
a committee who have addressed him on the sub-
ject of the Presidential candidates, expresses his
preference for ,Mr. Van Buren, of whom he thus
seaks:
"Except when there may be a departure from the
ordinary course of legislation, the President is in a
great measure impotent to evil. He can make
neither peace nor war; he cannot pass a law, im-
pose a tax, or lay his hand upon a single cent of the
public money, not regularly appropriated. He is
merely the agent of the people, to carry their will
into effect, as expressed through their Representa-
tives in Congress, having no other constitutional
control over the legislation than in the veto power.
Itis in our foreign relations that the influence of
his character is most important. Since Mr. Van


Buren has been in office, our relations wiih Eng-
land and Mexico have both been of a delicate cha-
racter, particularly with the first. His enemies
will not deny that they have been conducted with
prudence, with firmness, and with ability. As an
evidence of the high confidence entertained by
Congress in Mr. Van Buren's patriotism and dis-
cretion, I need only state that, immediately pre-
ceding tho expiration of the twenty-fifth Congress,
when the clouds of war seemed ready to burst on
our Northeastern frontier, with one of the most
powerful natio s of the globe, ten millions of dol-
lars were appropriated and placed at his disposal
with almost discretionary power to adopt such
measures as the contingencies might in his estima-
tion require for the defence of the country. WHAT
TRIUMPH OF A ROMAN GENERAL, WITH CAPTIVE
PRINCES AND THE SPOILS OF CONQUERED NATIONS LED
IN HIS TRAIN-WHIAT CIVIC HONOR CONFERRED UPON
A BENEFACTOR OF HIS RACE, EVER EXCELLED IN MO-
RAL SUBLIMITY THIS TRIBUTE IN WHICH ALL PARTIES
UNITED TO THE WIsnDOM AND PATRIOTISM OF THIS RE-
PUBLICAN PRESIDENT? IT WAS AN ACT BY WHICH
THE PEACE OF THE COUNTRY, THE LIVES OF THOU-
SANDS, AND THiE PROSPERITY OF MILLIONS WERE EN-
TRUSTED TO ONE MAN. THE RESULT IS MATTER OF
HISTORY. WELL AND FAITHFULLY DID HE PERFORM
THE TRUST. THE PEACE OF THE COUNTRY AND ITS
HONOR WERE PRESERVED."
The honorable Samuel L. Southard, of the
broad seal pai ty, of New Jersey, was the only Whig
S nator who voted against reposing the nation's
confidence in the President, on the occasion above
referred to.-Yf. Y. Stanrdd.


'Lz-rER PROM TMn How. ALtNIT H. TRAcT, To
HIS FELLOW-CITIZENS OF COLLINS, ERtI COUNTY,
N.Y.
NORWICH, (Conn.) July 25,1840.
GENrxTLEmriN: I have just returned to this
place from Boston, and find forwarded from
Buffalo, your communication of the 26th ult.
requesting my views in relation to the great political
crisis at which our country has arrived.
Having withdrawn from public life, and with
the desire and design of never again assuming
official responsibility in any form, I could hardly
expect that my opinions would have been re-
garded of sufficient importance to induce your
request. But as I recognize in each one of you
an old acquaintance with whom I have been for
many years in interesting political relations,
and for whose intelligence and honesty I entertain
the greatest respect, I do not hesitate to comply
with it, so far, at least, as to put you in possession
of my own conclusions as to the fierce and fearful
conflict now going on. But the very brief space
allowed me for answering your communication,
which the necessity of my lea v;rin hb-re this evening
occasions, willpreclude the p-..t]l t) ofpre itin',
my reasons for those conclusions ai fully as I de-
sire, or perhaps as yon expect.
That the present contest is one of extraordi-
nary importance, may be considered sufficiently
established by the united concessions of both
parties. Why it is so, is a question in regard
to which very positive views are entertained.
Without impugning the motives of any who differ
from me, I shall endeavor to answer your inquiries
by assigning, in a brief and imperfect form, my
reasons for regarding the contest as a critical one,
and in doing so, shall necessarily define the position
which my judgment and conscience dictate that I
should occupy.
In the very process of establishing our glorious
Constitution, you are aware that different views
were entertained as to the powers that should be
confided to the General Government, and espe-
cially as to those that should be conferred upon
the Executive branch of it. General Hamilton
and Mr. Jefferson were the acknowledged leaders
of the two parties to which this difference of views
gave birth. The former was the able, and no
doubt honest, advocate of a strong Government.
He distrusted the ability of the people to maintain
institutions strictly democratic, and when it was
found impracticable to carry through his plan of a
President and Senate for life, he thought necessary
to strengthen the powers of the General Govern-
ment by the funding system of a National Bank,
and by such constructions of the Constitution as
should enable the Government, from time to time,
to exercise such powers as to it might seem neces-
sary or desirable.
Directly opposed to these views was the party
whichlxreccgnised Mr. Jefferson as its head, and
which, in the memorable contest of 1891, suc-
ceeded in rescuing the reins of Government from
the hands of their opponents. Ever since that
day, these two great elemental parties have existed,
though doubtless, at many times, so confused by
influences of a temporary, a local, or a personal
nature, as to obscure their distinctive marks, and
make it difficult to decide which class of politicians
were the most faithful supporters of the genuine
Democratic doctrines. Indeed for long periods the
seductive influences of the opposite creed, minis-
tering to the cupidity of men, have prevailed,
whatever name was attached to the party in
power; and thus we have seen, in both the Gene-
ral and State Governments, a constant effort to
sustain, or obtain, political power, by bribing por-
tions of the people at the expense of the whole.
Hence we have seen bank charters and other ex-
clusive privileges granted, an excessive tariff im-
posed, extravagant and worthless public works un-
dertaken, and other profl:'gate expenditures made,
or advocated, when the object was to benefit a few
at the cost of the many. The effects of this sys-
tem we have witnessed in the multiplication of un-
productive and vicious idlers, speculators, brokers,
bankers and gamblers, whose very vices, for a time,
gave a false and deceitful prosperity to the coun-
try, which apparent prosperity acting upon a more
honest, but lers crafty class, induced them into in-
judicious contracts, and unwarrantable expenses,
and finally and inevitably have resulted in that un-
paralleled condition of pecuniary distress of which
the whole nation complains.
In looking back upon the parties in our own
State for several past years, we see that in pro-
ducing these mischiefs, the conduct of all has been
alike blameable, and were we now compelled to
choose our positions, merely in view of the past,
it would be difficult to decide what it should be.
But it appears to me that a new era has arrived
which the people are called upon, and will be com-
pelled to take their positions in reference to those
great principles which, in 1801, divided the coun-
try. A National Bank, or its great antagonist mea-
sure, an Independent Treasury, in my judgment, is
to test which class of these principles is to prevail.
Whether the people are to re-assert, and endeavor
to maintain, the Democratic doctrines of Mr. Jef-
ferson, or to yield forever to the policy which Gene-
ral Hamilton contended must control-in short,
whether our Government shall be a simple Demo-
cracy, confined in its purpose to securing equal
liberty and rights to its citizens, and to defending
them against violence from within and without; or
shall become complicated and artificial, like the
Engli-h system, strengthening itse'f through its
continued interference with the affairs of individu-
als--elevating one class and depressing another-
fostering the schemes and speculations of the dis-
honest or the visionary-building up particular
interests at the expense of the whole community-
and finally consolidating its power, as the English
Government has done, by an enormous public
debt. These results, I repeat, appear to be involved
in this contest, and I declare my sincere apprehen-
sion, that the perfect success of the party which de-
nominates itself the Whig party, may end in bring-
ing upon us a condition of things that substantially
will change the nature of the Government. That
such is the purpose of the great mass of the party,
I am far from supposing, but in such questions We
are to regard not the motives of actions, but the
effects of them.
To an independent Treasury, otherwise than as
doing away the strongest argument that has been
found for a National Bank, I have never attached
the importance given to it generally by its advo-
cates, and universally by its opponents. I have
given to this measure, and indeed to the subjects
connected with it, a thorough, patient, and, I am
sure, dispassionate attention; and I declare, if my
intellectual powers are equal to comprehending it
the measure is devoid of every one of those odious
features with which its enemies have portrayed it.
Its effects upon the currency of the country, though
salutary, as far as they go, will be found, I
venture to predict, very inconsiderable. I mean
by this, inconsiderable upon sound banks, con-
fining their operations within such limits as
prudent and honest managers of them would, in
any event, wish to occupy. It is as contributing
for the purpose of keeping separate the two great
influences that forever war against the purity, and
consequently the stability of free insthiutions-1
mean the political power and the money power-
that I most highly estimate it. I am aware that
there is charged against it the inetease of execu-
tive influence, and I admit if this charge is sus-
tained, the measure is indc feasible by every true
Democrat. But I have never seen even a plausi-
ble argument for this charge. On the contrary, it
appears to be a matter of the plainest demonstra-
tion that it restricts, in an important degree, those
mischievous applications of the public money to
political ends, which the intervention of a Nation-
al Bank, acting in the views of Government, af-
ford it almost unlimited power to make. To seoa-


rate completely the action of the two besetting sins
of man-ambition and avarice-to establish
for a certainty that in our country no man could
make his political influence minister to his
pecuniary cupidity, would be to bring about a
political millennium which probably none of us
will live to see. But to labor for this event, and
to attain as near to it as may be, is the duty of eve-
ry sincere friend of Democracy-and it is incom-
prehensible to me that any such. one, unless very
much blinded by prejudice, can suppose that the
complete union of the money power and the politi-
cal power, which a great National Bank and its
kindred measures confessedly accomplish, can help
to bring it about.
The best years of my life have been spent in
serving the public. How usefully I have served it,
others must judge. How honestly, none can so
well know as myself. I have retired, and forever
from this service, satisfied with the share of public
confidence I have had, and sat'sfi'd also with tihe
manner in which I have used it. I have now no
motive for in..tliieg with political questions except
the effects which 1 suppose these questions may
have upon our country's welfare. And it is not
questions of minor importance that could induce
me to take a part in a political contest; and cer-
tainly not, that could have brought me into open
opposition with many old friends whom I highly
respect and esteem. But my judgment and con-
science have constrained me to take such a part in


this conjuncture: and, in doing so, I can safely af-
firm that considerations personal, either to myself
or others, have had no influence. Were the Presi-
dential election to be decided by my own vote, and
I had nothing to influence my decision but such
considerations, I would not cross the street to de-
posite it. But feeling as I do that mcst important
principles are involved, I should for ever condemn
myself for wanting patriotism and manhood, if I
suffered the feelings or opinions of others to de-
ter me from giving my support to that party
which corresponded, at least in its professions, with
my own principles. That the opposite party may
be as honest in its views as I am in my own, I
shall not take upon myself to question. Thi ho-
nesty and patriotism of the great body of the old
Federal party I never doubted; but their notions of
Government, and ot the mode of administering it,
differ essentially from my own, and such I find to
be the case of the modem Whig party. To what
extent this party consists of the same description of
individuals that composed the Federal party, is,
with me, totally unimportant. Their principles,
in many essential particulars, appear to me to be
the same; and I will do that justice to a great
many of the most influential members of that
party-to tslmrst every one of them in the section
of the Unian where I now am, to believe that, did
they not suppose the Whig party to be essentially
identical with the Federal party, they would not be-
long to it.
But whatever may be the views or the motives of
others, early education and the reflections of mature
years, and, more than both, the experience gained
in official life, have confirmed in my mind the opi-
nion that the duration of our domestic institutions,
and with it the prosperity and happiness of the
greatest number, depend upon administering the
Government upon the most simple principles-re-
stricting its action to the fewest possible objects,
and finally divesting it, as far as may be, of all
interference with objects relating to individual pur-
suits. I cannot be mistaken that the principles
and policy of the Whig party are the opposite of
these views.
I regret that the circumstance first alluded to
has compelled me to answer your inquiry in so
hurried and imperfect a manner; but if I have
made intelligible my opinion of this interesting
crisis, and the motives for my own conduct
in relation to it, I have fulfilled all that is im-
portant.
In conclusion, I wish to remark, that while I do
not seek to conceal my political opinions, on the
contrary, am desirous that all should possess them
who desire, I am at the same time unwilling to
have them obtruded upon those who may not de-
sire to know them; and therefore should object, in
any event, to a newspaper publication of them.
With this restriction, you will feel authorized to
make such use of this communication as you may
see fit.
With respect and friendship, I remain your obe-
dient servant, ALBERT H. TRACY.
To Messrs. Nathan Knight, Avery Knight, Geo.
Southwark, Abram Tucker, Abram Gifford, Ber-
nard Cook, Enos Southwick, and John Standcliff,
jr. Collins, Erie county, New York.

DEMOCRATIC MEETING.-A meeting
of the Democrats of Montgomery and the District
of Columbia, and all others friendly to the present
Administration, will be held at Estlin's, near the
Washington race course, sn Monday, Sept. 28, at
one o'block.
Several distinguished gentlemen will address the
meeting. Democrats, one and all, attend.
Sept 25

FOR RICHMOND AND THE WHIG CON-
VENTION.
STEAMER CHESA-
PEAKE will leave Wash-
ington at 9 o'clock, Alex-
andria at 10, on Saturday,
October 8d, for Richmond, and attend the Whig
Convention, which takes places on Monday, the
5th. The Chesapeake will arrive in Norfolk on
Sunday morning, and leave again the same fore-
noon for Richmond, and arrive that night; she will
remain in Richmond until the convention breaks.
She will stop at all the different landings on the
Potomac, to take off and land passengers. Passage
and fare, going and returning, $10; for a gentleman
and lady $18; passage to Richmond only $6.
Sep 25 JAS. MITCHELL, Master.

TWO YEARS BEFORE THE MAST.-Be-
ing a Personal Narrative of a Life at Sea,
in one volume; being No. 106 of Harpers' Fami
ly Library, is this day received for sale by
Sept 25 F. TAYLOR.

BANK O F THE METOPOLIS,
Washington, Sept. 8, 1840.
T a meeting of the. President and Directors
this day, the following preamble and reso-
lution were adopted, v'z:
Whereas it is required by law that a general
meeting of the stockholders of this institution shall
be held within six months from the 31 day of Ju-
ly last, for the purpose of deciding on the propriety
of authorizing the President and Direc'ors thereof,
for the time being, to file their declaration, in
writing, in the office of the Secretary of the Trea-
sury, absenting to and accepting the extension of
its charter as granted by the act of Congress pass-
ed on the 3d day of July, 1840, entitled, "An act
to continue the corporate existence of the Bank in
the Dis'rict of Columbia for certain purposes:
Therefore, be it
Resolved, That a general meeting of the Stock-
holders, for the said purpose, and for the purpose
of considering other subjects that may be submitted,
be, and the same is hereby accordingly called for
Monday, the 9th day of November next, to be held
at !the banking-house of the institution, in this
city, at 12 o'clock, m.
Extract from the minutes.
RD. SMITH, Cashier.
Sept. d5-3tawifi9N

VERY GOOD AND NEARLY ALL NEW
FURNITURE.nOh Tuesday next, the 29th
inst. at 11 o'clock, a. m. I shall sell, at the two
story brick building on F street, next door west of
A. Carothers's Grocery Store, the very good and
nearly all new Furniture of a gentleman declining
housekeeping; such as-
Superior Sofa, maple Parlor Chairs, Mantel
Lamps
Mahogany Centre and Work Table, Mantel and
olher Glasses
Plated Candlesticks, &c. excellent Parlor Car-
pets and Rugs
Passage and Stair Carpet, Andirons, Fenders,
Shovels and Tongs
Mahogany Sideboard, Breakfast, Writing and
Toilet Tables
Hand. Dinner Ware, Glass, &c.
Britannia Tea and Coffee Set, Knives and
Forks, Spoons, &c.
Mahogany Bureaus, Wardrobes, Bedsteads,
good Beds, Maitre sees, Washstands, Cribs, &c.
With good kitchen utensils, and a "Davy
Crocket" Cooking Stove.
Terms: All sums of and under $20, cash; over
$20, a credit of 90 days, for approved endorsed
notes. EDWARD DYER,
Sept 25-3t Auctioneer.
5 ALE OF EXCELLENT AND HANDSOME
f^ FURNITURE,-On Wednesday next, the
30th instant, at II o'clock, a. m. I shall sell, at the


two story brick house on G street, a few doors west
of the War Department, and recently occupied by
Governeur Kemble, esq. the handsome and very
good FURNITURE of the establishment, such as
Mahogany hair seat Sofa
Mahogany Chairs, damask seats
Very handsome pier Tables, marble top
French plate Mirrors
Mahogany card, centre, dining, writing, and
chamber Tables
Handsome and nearly new Brussels Carpets and
Wilton Rugs
Handsome silk Window Curtains and Ornaments
Astral and other Lamps-
Very handsome alabaster Clock and Ornaments
Two Chandeliers; plated Coffee Urn
Handsome cut glass Decanters, Tumbler$,Wines,
Champagnes, &c. &
Brussels passage and step Carpets
Hall Lamp; Rods and Eyes
Office Tab'e and Screen
Fiench and other Bedsteads
Good Beds, Mattresses, Comfortables, &c.
Imitation maple Wardrrbes
Mahogany Toilet and other Bureaus ,
Brussels chamber Carpets
Rush seat Chairu; Washstands, &c.
With other articles, not necessary to be enume-
rated.
TERMs.-AII sums of and under $20, cash; over
$20, a credit of four months, for notes satisfactorily
endorsed.
Sept. 25 EDWARD DYER, Atct'r.


t NNALS OF QUODLIBET-With an al -
thentic account of the origin and growth of
the rough, and sketches of the most remarkable
and distinguished characters of that place and vici-
nity-now made public at the request and under 4
the patronage of the Great New Light Demrcratic
Central Committee of Quodlibet-"Maxima de
de nihilo nascitur historia"-in one volume. Just
published and this day received for sale by
Sept 25 F. TAYLOR.
SPLENDID LOTTERIES.
D. S. GREGORY & Co, Managers.

VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For the benefit of the Monongalia Academy.
Class. No 8 for 1840.
To be drawn at Alexandria, on Saturday, 3d Oc-
tober, 1840.
GRAND CAPITALS.
$30,000-$10,000-$5,000-$3,500-$3,070-
$3,000-$2,500.
11140 prizes of $1,500.."3
50 of $250-60 of $200--63 of $150-i3 of $100,
&c &c. &c.
75 No. Lottery-12 drawn ballots.
Tickets only $10-Halves $5-Quarters $2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do do 25 quarter do 32 50

VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For the benefit of the town of Wellst.urg.
Class No. 8 for 1840.
To be drawn at Alexandria, Va. on Saturday, Oc-
tober 10th, 1840.
SCEMIE.
$35,294-$12,500-$10,000-$5,000-$2500-
$1,975-$3,000-$2,000-$1,600-$1,500.
2 prizes of $1,250-2 of $1,200.
tl2f20 prizes of 1000 dollars !4I3
20 prizes of $500 20 prizes of $400
40 do of 300 50 do of 200
100 do of 150 100 do of 100
&c. &c. &Q.
78 No. Lottery-14 drawn ballots.
Tickets $10-Halves $5-Quarters $250.
Certificates ofPackages of 26 Whole tickets $130
Do do 26 Half do 65
Do do 26 Quarter do 32 50

VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For endowing the Leesburg Academy, and for other
purposes.
Class No. 8, for 1840.
To be drawn at Alexandria, Va. Saturday, 24th
October, 1840.
GRAND SCHEME.
$30,000-$10,000-$6,000-$4,000-$5,000-
$2,000-$2,500-.$1,747*-25 prizes of
$1,000-25 of $500-28 of $306-200
of $200-62 of $100, etc.
75 No. Lottery-13 drawn ballots.
Tickets 810-Halves $5--Quarters $2 50.
Certificate of package of 25 whole tickets, $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do do 25 quarter do 32 50

VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For the benefit of the Monongalia Academy.
Class No. 9, for 1840.
To be drawn at Alexandria, Va. Saturday, October
31st, 1840.
BRILLIANT SCHEME:
$40,000-$f 5,000-$5,000-$3,000_$2,500-
$2,297-50 prizes of $1,000-50 of
$300-50 of $200-130 of
$150-65 of $200, etc.
78 No. Lottery-13 drawn ballots.
Tickets only $10-Halves $5-Quarters $2 50.
Certificate of package of 26 Whole tickets $130
Do do 26 Half do 60
Do do 26 Quarter do 30

For Tickets and Shares, or Certificates of Pack-
ages in the above splendid Lotteries, address
D. S. GREGORY & 00.
Managers, Washington City, D. C.
Drawings sent immediately after they are over,
to all who order as above.
Sept 25-d&e3w
tALE OF VERY HANDSOME HOUSE-
Z3 HOLD FURNITURE.-On Mon lay next,
the 28th inst. at half-past 10 o'clock, a. m. I shall
sell at the residence of Mr. Powell, on 3d street,
next adjoining Mrs. Pittman's boarding-house, his
very handsome household furniture, consisting of
in part-
Handsome mahogany hair-seat Sofa and maho-
gany Chairs
Mahogany pier Tables with marble tops, and
handsome Pier Glasses
Handsome gilt Chandelier and Candelabras to
match
Handsome Mantel Clock and ornaments-Plated
Candlesticks
Brussels and ingrain Carpetings and Rugs-Foot
Ottomans
Mahogany Card, Centre, Dining, and Breakfast
tables-Rocker
Very handsome Moreen and Muslin Curtains
and Ornaments
Handsome Cut Glass Decanters, Wines, Tum-
blers, Champagnes, &c.
Dinner sets-Gold, Band, and other Tea China
Brass Fenders, Andirons, Shovels and Tongs--
Spittoons
Mahogany Sideboards, Cane Chairs, Venetian
Blinds
Handsome China Vases, Plated Coffee Urn,
Ivory handled Knives and Forks
Oil Cloth, Hat Rack, Cut Hall Lamp, Step and
Hall Carpets and Rods
Mahogany Dressing Bureaus, Wardrobes, Cane
and Stump Chairs
Mahogany Washstands, Toilet sets, &c. Bed and
Window Curtains

Highpost and French Bedsteafi, excellent Beds
and Mattresses
Chamber Carpets, with a quantity o6 Bedding,
Sheets, &c.
And an excellent lot of Kitchen Utensils, 4 .si
Kettles, Safes, Stoves, &c. ..-
Terms of sale-all sums o( and under $25, casb;
over $25, and not exceeding $100, a credit of 60
days; over $100, a credit of four months for notes
satisfactorily endorsed. ED. DYER, '
Sept 22--4t Auctioneer.
OFFICs' Os THE CoMMiiaiONaR Ou THE PtsStUL BoiLnIuOS,
City or Washington, August, ito.
PJROPOSALS will be received at this office un-
It til the first of October next, to deliver at the
new General Post Office building in this city, thir-
teen thousand superficial feet of best quality
finished marble flagging ui'~ble for paving, of
sizes not less than a foot square, alternately white
and black or of a dark color; the thickness not less
than one inch-the time of delivery to be in all
the moath of May, 1841. The proposals to state
the price per superficial foot, delivered, and the
quarry or place from whence the marble would
come. Aug 27-dtOcti [Nat. Intel.]
ASSINETTS, FLANNELS, &c.-Juat re-
ceived-
50 pieces Cassinets, all qualities
10 do low-priced Cassimeres, suitable for boy's
wear
10 do Valencia Vestings
20 do 6-4 Flannels, white
30 do 4-4 do do
20 do 78 do do
3 bales red and yellow Flannels, assorted
With a great variety of Domestic Goods, all of
which will be offered at very reduced prices.


Sept. 16--3t D. CLAGETT.
EFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE OF
PHILADELPHIA.
SESSION OF 1810-41.
The regular Lectures will commence on the first .lMon-
day in .ovember.
The following are the professors in the order of
their appointment:
1. JacoB GREEN, M. D. Chemistry.
2. GRANVILLE. S. PTTI.ON, MN D. Anatomy.
3. JOHN REVERz, M. D. Practice of Medicine.
4. RoBLeY DUNOLISON, M. D. Institutes of Medi-
cine and Materia Medicsa.
5. ROBERT M. HOSTON, M. D. Obstetrics and
Diseases of Women and Children.
6. JosXPs PANCOAST, M. D. Surgery.
Oa and after the 1st of October, the dissecting
rooms will be kept open, and the Professor of
Anatomy will give his personal attendance there-
to. 'Lectures will likewise be delivered regularly
during the month on various branches, and oppor-
'uiiit.-. ,.r clinical instruction will be afforded at
,he Philal- phiq Hospital, under the Professors of
Institutes o1 Medicine and Surgery; and at the Dis-
pensary of the College, under the Professors of
Physic and Surgery.
JOHN REVERE, M. D.
Sept. 15-6t Dean of the Faculty.
OR RENT-and possession given the 1st day
Sof October next, that large boarding house
over the sIores of Messr. SEmmesand Phillips, cor-
ner cf 7th sireet west, and north of Market Space.
For terms apply to ANN R. DERMOTT.









THE GLOBE.
FRIDAY EVENING, SEPT. 25, 1840.

APPOINTMENT BY THE PRESIDENT.
JOHN V. INGERSOLL, Register of the Land Office
at Mineral Point, Wiskonsin, vice JohurP. Sheldon,
removed.

WHIG TACTICS.
That in the elections the present year, the Op-
position have generally exhibited an increased
vote as compared with the results of the elections
of last year, cannot be denied.
How has this been effected? Is the Administra-
tion becoming unpopular? No; there is not a
single fact thatgoes to prove that this is the case.
It has adopted no new measures, nor has it done
any act operating upon the interest of any class,
except the Independent Treasury bill, and that is
so manifestly salutary in its influence, that the
Whigs themselves have ceased to assail it, as they
know that many of their friends are in favor of it.
There has been no new cause for a change of
opinion against the Administration, nor, in fact,
have any changes lab un place the past year. All
the statements on this subject are fabrications in-
tended for political effect.
How, then, it may be asked, have the Whigs
increased their votes? We answer, by a more
perfect OROANIZATIOt, and a systematic course of
electioneering, brought home to every individual
whom it was supposed there was even a possibility
of deceiving, or in any way influencing; and all
this helped out with frauds. '
Their organization is so perfect that it has given
to the Opposition the character and efficiency of an
organized military force, which has enabled them
to bring almost every man to the polls.
This organization was first attempted to be car-
ried out in Maine and New York in the fall of
1837, and was adopted in consequence of the en-
couragement which the general bank explosion
gave them. It was carried out more perfectly in
the spring of 1839 in Connecticut, and again in
the fall of that year in New York.
Taking courage from the success which had at-
tended this new system of tactics, the convention
which nominated HAtRISON, adopted measures for
introducing it into all the States, and also made
some additions to the plan of operations, with the
view of catching the votes of the laboring men.
Their log cabins, hard cider, and other fooleries,
were added to their scheme. But the essential
parts of the plan had been in operation before, in
several of the States, and consisted of an organiza-
tion on military principles. First, a National ES-
eeutive Committee, to be established at Washington;
then a Central State Committee in each State, with
County, Town, and Precinct Committees; and, as is
stated in one of their circulars now before us, "de.
seendiag to the minutest subdivisions known to our in-
stitutions-."
The leading members of the Harrisburg Con-
vention came en to Wakhington, and in concert
with the Whig members of Congress, adopted mea-
sures for carrying this system into operation in
every State in the Union.
An Executive Committee was appointed, consist-
ed of the most violent and unscrupulous members
of Congress. This committee was authorized to
appoint a Central State Committee in each State
whose duty it was to appoint county committees,
which were to name town and precinct committees'
down to the minutest subdivisions.
Measures were also adopted for raising funds.
The Executive Committee here, which has been in
perpetual session ever since, were to direct and
give all the necessary orders for the execution of
the plait of the campaign. They were al-o to
cause to be published, and circulated under their
franks, lives of HARRISON, of which they have had
no less than four, adopted to the different sections
of the Union, and such political speeches, pam-
phlets, and other electioneering matter, as it was sup-
posed would be likely to agitate the public mind,
and deceive the people.
Resolutions were introduced in Congress, and
speeches made for the express purpose of beirg
published and circulated over the country, through
the agency of these committees. Of this character
were honest JOHN DAvis's speech, the resolution
of BoTs as to Lieutenant Hooe's case, OOLV'S om-
nibus of lies, and various others.
The county and town committees were immedi-
ately instructed to cause a thorough and accurate
canvass to be made of all the voters within their
limits, and arranged in their lists, Whigs, Demo-
crats, and doubtful; and instructed to pay particular
attention to the doubtful; and to supply them with
all such publications as should be thought calculat-
ed to have an influn!e upon them. They were
also enjoined _,see them personally, or to get
such ctherprsons to see and talk with them, as
might ihrmnost likely to have an influence with
There were also travelling agents appoint-
t'ed in each State, whose duty it was to visit the

towns, and to see that the town and precinct corn-
mittees did their daty, and if any were negligent,
to cause others to be appointed.
The town committees were to report te the coun-
ty committees, and the latter to the State Commit-
tees, who communicated directly with the Execu-
tive Committee in this city.
Not only the names of active political partisans
in each town and neighborhood, but those of the
doubtful men, were sent on to the Executive Com-
mittee and other members of Congress, to whom
documents, speeches, etc. have been freely sent.
There was a double object in this; the one to be-
wilder and deceive them with misrepresentations
and falsehoods, and the other a belief that the frank
of an honorable member of Congress would have
great influence on the mind of a poor laborer or
mechanic.
The town committees, or those selected by them,
were required to put speeches or pamphlets into the
hands of the doubtful men, and particularly such
as were not in the habit of taking regularly any
Democratic newspaper.
It will be perceived that, under this new system
of Whig tactics, less reliance was placed on the
press and on public meetings, than has heretofore
been done.


To stimulate the town committees to the greatest
possible exertion, and swell the votes of the towns,
they were required to report the largest Whig vote
their town had ever polled, and were then told by
the county committee that, as the present was an
extraordinary crisis, it was expected they would
increase the vote of their town five, ten, twenty, or
more, according to the size of the place; and ex-
pressly informed by the committee that they should
depend on their doing it; and in such case, they
would come in for a large share of the honor of the
victory. When it could be done, the committee,
or other active partisans, have been induced to givi
distinct pledges that they would hold themselves
responsible that their town should poll a certain
number of votes. This created an obligation,
which they felt to be not only a duty, but a point
of honor, to fulfil.
By a system like this, perseveringly carried out,
and with ample funds to meet all expenses, the en
tire energies of the Opposition have been called
into action, and almost every voter brought to the
Polls. This plan of the campaign has brought ou
their lull force in every town and neighborhood;
whereas by the usual modes of electioneering, when


a party generally comes out strong, there will be
4ome towns and precincts where, from neglect,
there will not be a full vote. This appears to have
been the case on the Democratic side at the late
election in Maine.
It is this perfect system of organization, and the
astonishing exertions which have been made in
pursuance of it to deceive the people, which ac-
counts for the increase of Wnig votes; and whilst
they have so perfect a system for agitation and dis-
seminating falsehood, they had as complete a sys-
tem for manufacturing them.
With an enemy thus organized, and by falsehood
and lies excited to the highest pitch of exasperation
and violence, and perfectly unscrupulous, reckless,
and profligate, as to means, the Democracy must
not suppose that they can be safe in conducting the
campaign in the usual way, of relying on the
press, public meetings, speeches, etc. These are
useful and important; but still ORGANIZATION AND
PERSONAL EXERTioNS in this struggle, are inditpen-
sable. Every intelligent and active Democrat
should devote a large portion of his time, from this
to the elretion, to the cause of his country. They
should go among the people of all classes, contra-
dict the lies of the Whigs-impart information--
explain difficulties-remove doubts-encourage the
desponding-confirm the wavering, and stimulate
the zealous and active to redouble their exertions.
There must be a thorough organization where it
has not been done, and an accurate canvass of all
the voters.
You cannot fight Indians according to the or-
dinary rules of civilized warfare, nor can regulars
be successfully opposed by militia, however brave
or enthusiastic. They must have discipline as well
as valor and patriotism. Remember, Democrats,
that this is a struggle for LIBERTY, for your own
rights, and those of your posterity; for if the Bank
aristocracy, who have been for forty years striving
and plotting to gain the ascendency, once get pos.
session of the citadel of power, God only knows
whether they can ever be dislodged or not. Your
destinies are in your own hands; you have ths ma-
jority. Will you not take the necessary measures
to bring them to the polls? Will you, by supine-
ness, or the neglect of proper exertion, suffer ycur
dearest rights to be wrested from you, and be made
"hewers of wood and drawers of water" to the
Bank aristocracy? There is yet time enough to
supply any omissions. But what you have to do,
let it be done quickly. The crisis demands action,
exertion, and determination. With as complete an
organization, and half the exertions of your enemy,
you would be sure not only to discomfit him, but to
overwhelm him with confusion and infamy. Do
not trust too much to the goodness of your cause;
for, as JEFFkRSON said, falsehood will travel over
the country, while truth is putting on its boots.
Permit us to remind you of an example in Eng-
lish history. OLIVER CROMWELL, although a fatal.
ist and a fanatic, when about to encounter the
king's troops at Worcester, admonished his soldiers
"to put their trust' in God, but to keep their powder
dry." We say, therefore, rely on the truth and
justice of your cause, but keep your powder dry;
depend on your own exertions to defend it.
This is only at outline of the machinery which
has been put in operation to agitate and alarm the
public mind, and mislead and deceive the people
The Tippecanoe clubs, the hard cider orgies, the
songs made for the occasion, the cider barrels,
gourds, and coon skins, and all their ridiculous
mummery intended to catch woodcocks with; their
itinerant song singers, speech makers, and news
mongers, to preach about hard times, and circulate
all sorts of reports of "changes every where;" their
anecdote makers, travelling agents, pilgrims to
North Bend, and various other matters, webavenot
attempted to describe.
But there is one thing we must mention. The
Whig party comprises all the trading politician-.
all the bankrupts in politics as well as bankrupt
speculators in traffic. They of course understand
the bargaining principle, and have applied it to the
utmost extent. It is their settled policy to buy up
any special interest or class which is distinct from
the general interest; and this they do by direct
pledges and promises. The Whig leaders have
pledged themselves to the Abolitionists, to the
Northern manufacturers, to the friends of a Na-
tional Bank, to the opponents of the naturalization
laws; the advocates of the American system and
internal improvement, to the capitalists and stock-
holders at home and abroad, who are interested in
the assumption of the State debts, to the politicians
in the old States who favor a division of the public
land, or its proceeds, and, in the new States, to the
friends of pre-emption laws-to all these classes
of opposite interests they have pledged themselves
and General HARISatON to favor their particular
views and objects: the Abolitionists of the North,
the slaveholders of the South, the ultra-tariffites of
New England, and the anti-tariff men of the Caroli.
nas and Georgia, the National Bank men and the
State bank men, the advocates of the protective
system and of free trade, all are assured that,
should HaRRISON be elected, his administration
will pursue a policy friendly to their interests and
objects. This is the "credit system" in politics-
to buy up every interest on credit, purchase libe-
rally, promise freely, but pay only in credit. Such
is modern Whigery.
When we began these remarks, we intended to
have published a Whig circular, issued from this
city, which we have before us, and that exhibits
the outline of the system we have described; but,
having occupied so much space already, we must
defer its publication.

"THE REMOVAL OF THE DEPOSITED."
The "removal of the deposits "from the United
States Bank is regarded by many as the efficient
cause of the increase of local banks. A few facts
may convince those whose minds are open to con-
viction, that this measure had less effect than many
imagine, though, no doubt, the hope of making a
profit: out of the public deposits did, in some in-
stances, lead to the establishing of new banks un-
der State charters.
In 1830, according to Mr. GALLATIN, there were
in the country 330 banks, with capitals of the


amount of 145,000,000, and current credits (bank
notes and deposits taken together) of the amount
of 116,000,000.
The next statement we have of the banks is for
January, 1834, prepared under the direction ot
the c!erk of the House of Representatives.
Many of the particular statements from which it
was compiled, are of an early part of 1833. If it
ihows an increase over 1830, that increase cannot
be owing to "the removal of the depositss" for in
July, 1833, the Bank of the United States com-
menced a contraction, and compelled the other
banks to contract also. This statement refers
*o a period when, by thle great panic," the
establishment of new banks was prevented, and
old banks were compelled to draw in, yet it shows;
n increase of one hundred and seven -six in the
number of banks, of fifty.five millions in their
capital, and of fifty-four millions in their current
.redits.
If there was such an increase:of banking opera-
ions in the three or four years preceding the remo-
/al of tile deposits, the fair inference is, that a
,reat part of the increase that took place subsequent
to it, was owing to other causes than "the removal
it the depositss" Those who seek the truth, will


find some of these causes in the rise in the price of
our staples in foreign markets, in the abundance
of capital in England, and in the condition of
things generally throughout our country being such
as to excite a spirit of speculation. There would
have been a great increase in the number of local
banks if the deposits had not been removed; and
judging by the manner in which the United States
Bank has conducted its business, we have no rea-
son to believe that, if it had had possession of the
surplus revenue, it would have managed it better
than the local banks. Without any share of the
public money, it increased its loans and discounts
in the amount cf twenty millions of dollars in
eight months. What would it have done if it had
had possession of forty millions of the funds of
Government?
FEDERALISM AND ABOLITION UNITED.
If any doubt has rested upon the mind of a sin-
gle reflecting and candid citizen of the South, since
the rejection of CLAr by the Harrisburg Conten-
tion, the elections of Vermont and Maine must re-
move it. Surely THE ELECTION OF SLADE
in the former BY THREE THOUSAND MAJO-
RITY, and the DEFEAT OF ALBERT SMITH
in the latter BY FESSENDEN, A THOROUGH-
GOING ABOLITIONIST, prove the complete
coalition in this canvass of Federalism and Aboli-
tion.
If more is wanting, look at the following peti-
tion. It was presented in the Legislature of New
York in April last by Mr. HUMPHREY, a leading
Federalist. Among the signers are THURLOW
WEED, the Whig STATE PRINTER and Fidus
Achates of GOVERNOR SEWARD; Mr. HOFF-
MAN, one of the proprietors cf the Slate Paper,
and three people ot color, W. H. TOPP, MI-
CHAEL DOUGE, and BENJAMIN PAUL-the
last a clergyman. The politics of the signers, as
far as known, are designated by the letter W,
indicating the Whigs.
Of the residue, one is known to be a Conserva-
tive, and some may be seduced or deceived Demo-
crats; but we give the the copy of the document as
it is, submitting it to the calm reflection of our
friends at the SOUTH:
To the HONORABLE the SENATE and ASSEMBLY of
the State of New York, the petition of the un-
dersigned inhabitants of the city of Albany, (re-
specting the right of suffrage of the colored citi-
zens,) respectfully represents:
That, under the original Constitution of this
State, no disqualification was made of electors on
account of color-that the present Constitution,
adopted in 1821, which requires that every man of
color, as a qualification for the right of suffrage,
shall possess a freehold of two hundred and fifty
dollars, operates the more oppressively upon the
colored inhabitants, because, being by the Consti-
tution debarred from any office of honor, trust or
profit, and by public usage from lucrative occupa-
tions or professions, they are rarely able to accu-
mulate so large an amount of property.
That the colored people are among the oldest
inhabitants of the State, and have contributed by
their labors to its support, and, by rents of tene-
ments, &c. to the taxes; and it is a political max-
im that taxation and representation should accom-
pany each other, and it is unjust that this portion
of the citizens of this free State should be disfran-
chised. That the States of MASSACHUSETTS, VER-
MONT, and MAINE, make no disfranchisement on
account of color, and it is trusted that New York
will not be less liberal than any of her sister
States.
Your petitioners, therefore, respectfully request
your honorable body to take the necessary prelimi-
nary measure (by the passage of a law) to enable
the people of the State to abrogate the act of disfran-
ciisement of the colored people, contained in t!e end
of the 1st section of the second article of the Con-
stitution.
All which is respectfully submitted.
W-Henry Rawls W-THURL. WEED
W-Jonah Scovel W-Henry Greene
W-Wm. Crapo James King
W-S. M. Fish John I. Kane
W-Wm. Tillinghast W-Wm. H. De Witt
W-Clark Durant W-Horace B. Webster
W-Augustus James W-Nathaniel Safford
W-Ashley Scovel W-Ira Harris
W-James Lamonreux Anthony Gould
W-James Isdell W-E. B. Slason
W-G. D. Rankin W-Robert Evans
W-Isr'l Smith W-Stephen Paddock
W-Wm. Humphrey W-J. V. L. Da Witt
W-G. T. Blucker W-Joshua Tuffs
W-George Crawford W-F. Van Vranken
W-George Cuyler W-Elisha S. Youngs
W-Stephen Weaver W-Elisha Putnam
W-Milo R. Evans W. H. TO?P
W-R. M. Seymour W-Charles Hepinstall
W-Julius R. Ames W-Gslen Batcheldor
W-G. G. Olmsted W-*William -
W-John D. Lewis W-George A. Hoyt
W-Weare C. Little George Warren
W-John G. Wasson MICH'L DOUGE
W-Joseph Detison W-A. G. Alden
W-J. H. Greene W-Truman Seymour
W-Henry Greene W-E. A. Robinson
W-James A. Morse W-William N. Strong
W-BENJ'N PAUL W-Tho's H. Cushman
W-Arthur H. Root J. Stockton
A. B. Shaw W-0O. N. Chapin
W-E. M'Coy W-L. P. Noble
C. Johnson W-Horace Greeley
A. Knower f --
W-John H. Wardwell W-E. Van D. Werken
W-H. M. Woolverten W-I. Wood
W-Smith Shelden W-E. W: Goodwin
W-John H. Eacker W-John Alden
W-Albert Blair W-S. N. Parmelee
W-Gavlor Sheldon W-W. A. Tweed Da'e
W-S. Witt Samuel Martin
W-E. J. Cuyler Thomas Thompson
| E. P. Freeman W-Ichb'd Cunningham
W-B. HOFFMAN W-Joseph Cook
A. S. Harrison W-Erastus H. Pease
M. M. Van Alstine Calvin Pepper
John Thornton, jr. W-William Mayell
E. Westerlo W-Hiram Fanning
W-W. Barney W-John H. Mulfcrd
W-P. C. Barney W-John V. Hazard
W-John N. Wilder Surname illegible.
W-Wm. G. Boardman f Name illegible.

"SUB-TREASURY PRICES."
From a table published in the New York Herald,
we extract the following, showing the prices of dif-
ferent kinds of domestic produce, at New Orleans,
previous and subsequent to the passage of the In-


dependent Treasury law:
June, 1840.
Sugar, La. lb. 3
Cotton, La. and Miss. 8
Tobacco 6
Flour, bbl. $3 25
Corn, bush. 40
Oats 38
Pork, clear, bbl. 17 00
mess 16 00
prime 12 50
Bacon, sides, lb. 8
hams 8
shoulders 5
Lard, lb. 10
Whiskey, gall. 27


August, 1840.
6U
9
6
$6 50
(68
54
21 00
20 00
17 00
10
11
8
12
25


It will be seen, on inspecting the above, that but
a single article of domestic produce has fallen in
price since the passage of the Independent Trea
scary law-that only one article has remained sta-
tionary-and that all the others have advanced, and
some of them considerably. This was not caused
by any depreciation of the local currency of New
Orleans; for spcie was at 6 per cent. premium in
June, and only 4 in August. The rise in the price
of domestic products is owing to a variety of causes
n .w in operation, and which, if not interfered with
by the Whigs, will restore things to a healthy stite
throughout the country.
We may be asked if we rank the passage of
the Independent Treasury bill among these causes.
We reply that confileAce is one of the elements of
prices, and that so far as that bill establishes a
conviction that the standard of value is not to be
interfered with, it has a tendency to raise the price
of domestic products wherever they have by bank
contractions been reduced below their natural
rates. If the financial principles which the Demo.


cratic party sustains, be faithfully carried out in
practice, prices will never be as high as they have
heretofore been in times of bank expansion, and
never as low as they have been in times of great
contraction. They will be comparatively steady,
and this is what the industrious, non-speculating
classes want, in order to bring their enterprises to
a successful issue. To gamblers, whether in stocks
or lands, or merchandise, steadiness of price will
be destruction. No wonder, then, that a measure
which is likely to impart stability to the currency
should receive from them a sturdy oppotilon.

NATIONAL DEMORALIZATION.
We have heretofore given proofs of the demorali-
zation which the system of electioneering now
adopted by the moneyed power, is spreading
throughout the land. The Fort Meigs scenes of
riot and drunkenness-the political war dance held
upon the very graves of the brave men butchered
at Tippecanoe-the outrages perpetrated through-
out the country, as these intoxicated bands returned
to theirhomes-the bloody scene at Quincy, Illinois,
and that at Dayton, of which we, a few days since,
gave an account, where one of HARRISON'S own re-
lations, and one of his suite, beat a citizen for hav-
ing expressed his opinions on some previous occa-
sion unfavorably as to the General's courage-the
excitement, revelry, excesses of all sorts which
have distinguished e..',,a'itly those gatherings at
which HARRIaSON himself (as the personification of
hard cider) has presided, manifest a depravation in
the tone of morals never before exhibited in any
political contest in this country. Many pious, tem-
perate, peaceable men, who have been prejudiced
against the Democracy for years by the outcry of
Jacobinism, Locofocoism, and all that, try to blunt
the senses to the shocking course of the party to
which they belong, by a sort of forced incredulity.
But what will they say to the facts authenticated
by the first men of Nashville, in regard to the late
Federal convention there, Mr. CLAY being the pre-
siding genius? Can they disbelieve statements
made in writing, and verified by the signatures of
such men as Governor CARROLL, General ARM-
STROXG, the venerable WEAKLY, and fifty others of
like character?
From the Nashville Union.
TO THE PUBLIC.
The undersigned, citizens of Nashville, have
seen a card to the public in two of the city newspa-
pets, signed by Thomas R. Jennings and forty-five
others, which the common ends of truth and jus-
tice require them to notice. In the Advance Guard
of Democracy, a Nashville periodical, of the 28th
ult. appeared an article of which the following is
an extract:
"The late ridiculous parade in Nashville has dis-
gusted hundreds who were first induced to favor a
Convention. The desecration of the Sabbath-
singing camp-meeting hymns from the stump and
calling up mourners-all which actually took pluce
-have had an effect upon the popular mind which
will be felt by the hard cider declaimers at the
polls. The moral portion of all classes condemn
it."
These remarks were made upon the proceedings
of a "Whig Convention" held at Nashville on the
17th ult. and by the forty-six citizens are quoted;
and the signers say they "are calculated, if credit-
ed, to wound the feelings of a very numerous and
respectable religious denomination," and "think
they will be justified in not permitting these (the re-
marks) to go off wholly unnoticed." The signers
of the card further say, that "taking into view the
difference in point of numbers," they feel quite sure
that the desecration of the Sabbath on this occasion
was not greater or more unnecessary than is "wit-
nessed on the square of Nashville on the Sabbath
preceding the meeting of every session of the Le-
gislature."
It is due to truth and to the author of the re-
marks quoted from the Advance Guard, that the
undersigned assure the public, of their own know-
ledge and belief, that the parade was both "ridicu-
lous" and "disgusting;" that early on the morning
of Sunday, the 16th August, some persons com-
menced firing cannon, and continued to fire at in-
tervals during the day, and until a late hour at
night; that, at several periods of the day, and while
our people were at worship in the churches, they
were marching through the streets with the shrill
fife and the noisy drum, bearing flsgs of various
devices, and gathering in their train the negroes
and boys, hallooing and shouting as they advanced.
No one was heard to approve this conduc,; but the
moral portion of all classes condemned it. It is
unnecessary for the undersigned to add their belief
that the holy Sabbath was shamefully desecrated
by these turbulent proceedings.
Most of the undersigned have resided in Nash-
ville many years, and hesitate not to say, that on
no Sabbath preceding the meeting of the Legisla-
ture have they witnessed such desecration.
Wm. Carroll, T. Kezer,
A. D. Duval, Thos. J. Haile,
John Waters, L. L. Loving,
S. E. Benson, Chas. Sayres,
J. Irwin, Phineas Holmes,
J. M. Smith, Allen Fisher,
S. B Marshall, C. A. Turley,
C. P. Buckman, Jos. Anderson,
Sam. H. Bugg, Jesse Thomas,
Jacob M'Gavock, R. B. Turner,
J. A. W. Donihoo, Richard M'Connell,
B. F. Allen, John Armstrong,
C. Connor, J. Peabody,
R. Armstrong, W. G. Billion,
Jos. H. Hough, J. B. Connelly,
W. M. Sneed Ridley, John Purdy,
L. E. Temple, Joseph Barnard,
Win. H. Carroll, S. M. Barner,
B. H. Brown, Jos. Miller,
A. Morrison, Thos. Crutcher,
A. Bonville, Jas. P. Grundy,
Win. H. Bedford, A. Carrington.
Nashville, September 12,1840.

To ThE EDITOR OF THE UNION:
Being called on to state what we know with re-
gard to the "desecration of the Sabbath," we state
that, during the 16th, (Sunday,) many of those who
came to attend the Convention coinmenced firing
the cannon early in the morning-continned it at
intervals during the day and until late at night; and
at several periods daring the day they were march-
ing through the streets, after the beating of the
drums, with hoisted flags of various devices, and
shouts were often issued from the different compa-
nies. We heard no man approve the conduct, but
frequent express-ons of condemnation, and fre-
quently from some of our most moral citizens,
churchmen, &c.
Joseph Litton, John E Breathitt,
J. H. M'Ewen, John Carson.
T. L. Gaines.
NASHVILLE, Sept. 12, 1840.
NASHVILLE, Sept. 13, 1840.
SiR: In a late number of the Advance Guard, I
stated (the common rumor at the tiime) that, during
the sitting of the Whig Convention that a.ssmbled
at Nashville on the 17th ultimo, camp meeting
hyms were sung from the stump, and mourners
called up.


A card "to the public" signed by forty-six citizens,
has since appeared inr. the papers, in which the
signers "pronounce the statement utterlyfalse."
Will you be kind enough, sir, to inform me
whether you witnessed any thing of the kind while
the Co ivention was in session? Answer (for pub-
lication) will be thankfully received.
Very respectfully,
J. GEO. HARRIS-
To Capt. Jos. M. IRwin, Nashville.

NASHVILLE INN, Sept. 14, 1840.
FIR: Your note ofyestarday is at hand. I can
only inform you that on one of the evenings dur-
ing the sitting of the Whig Convention in this city,
there was public speaking in front of the Nashville
Inn. After the close of the speaking, I heard se-
veral voices say "call up the mourners." A me-
thodist or camp meeting hymn was then sung from
the block or stone steps which had been occupied
by the speakers. A gentleman of this city, who is
a Whig, walked up to the man in my presence,
and asked him whet'uer he was Whig or Demo-
crat. He replied that he was a Whiz. I did not
suppose these facts would be doubted, for there
were many persons present who witnessed th' pro-
ceedings.
Respectfully, J. M. IRWIN.
Mr. J. GEO. HARRIS,
Editor Nashville Union.

To THE EDITOR OF THE UNION :
SSia: I have been requested by some of the most


respectable citizens of Nashville to give my opinion
relative to the profanation of the Sabbath in Nash-
ville, on the 16th of August, last past, the day be-
fore the Whig meeting in said town.
I have resided in Nashville and the vicinity for
more than fifty years. I now live within two miles,
and I can truly say I never heard as much firing of
cannon and beating of drums on the Sabbath day,
to the,.best of my now recollection, in my whole life,
as was on the said sixteenth of August in Nashvile.
The firing of guns commenced in the fore part of
the day, with beating of drums, and continued at
intervals during the day and more abundant late in
the evening; the drums as well as guns were heard
very distincly at my house. You may make such
use of this statement as you may deem best.
Yours, respectfully,
R. WEAKLEY.
Lockeland, Sept. 12, 1840.

NEAR NASHVILLE, Sept. 12, 1840.
DEAR SIR: In answer to the several inquiries
made of me by sundry gentlemen of Nashville of
high standing, requesting me to state what I know
of the proceedings that took place in Nashville on
Sunday, the 16th ult.-the day before the Whig
Convention in Nashville-I will observe that I
live one mile and a quarter from the Nashville
Bridge-therefore could not see the marching of
companies, &c. through the city. The cannon, as
all the inhabitants of Nashville must remember,
fired at intervals during the day, and the beating
of drums was distinctly heard at my residence. I
will further state, (as the whole city, I presume,
well recollect,) that late in the evening a prodigious
noise was heard. On inquiry, I found it was occa-
sioned by the arrival of a canoe. Every person
can judge of the propriety or impropriety of these
things. In former times they surely would have
been considered a profanation of the Sabbath. It
would seem unnecessary for me to make the above
statement, for I am sure thousands in Nashville
could have given the same information; but, being
called upon, I state the facts as far as I know
them.
Respectfully, GEO. S. SMITH.

MAINE ELECTION-FEDERAL FALSEHOODS.
The Federal press are industriously circulating
as facts, false statements of the result of the recent
election in Maine. They claim to have carried
their Governor by between 500 and 1,000 majority,
both branches of the Legislature, and five of the
eight members of Congress. These statements
are heralded with every variety of typographicall
emphasis, such as italics, exclamation points and
capitals, and accompanied by equally deceptive
comments to prove the downfall of Democrats in
that State, and the object of them is to intimidate
and discourage the friends of the Administration in
GEORGIA, so that they may be induced to let that
State go by default at the approaching election.
We are assured that the Federal electioneering
and franking committee of members of Congress,
who are still in daily session here, (Sundays not
excepted,) have sent thousands of these false ac-
counts into that State. We therefore caution our
friends to put no faith in them; they are wholly un-
authorized by the official returns, which show that
FAIRFIELD, the Democratic candidate, has a plu-
rality over KENT, and can only be defeated (if at
all) by the scattering votes. The following is the
very latest information, and may be relied upon:
Extract from a letter, dated
NEw YORK, Sept. 24th, 1840.
"The Saco paper of the 22d says, we have elect-
ed members of the Lgislature in Limerick and
Cumberland. The Whigs have eighty-six in the
Lower House, and must have ninety-three to have
a majority. I believe. Fairfield is re-elected, and
that we have the House."
There is no choice in the 7th Congressional Dis-
trict.
Mr. NOTES, about whose election the Whigs
have been making a great deal of noise, has not
come within a hundred votes of an election.
Our friends in Maine are entirely confident of
their ability to carry the State in the fall, and the
Federalists have really no failh in their unlocked
for and ill-gotten gain.

MAINE.
Extract from a letter, dated
"AWGUSTA, Me. Sept. 21, 1840.
"It would seem that there is much misrepresen-
tation about the vote of this State, and lest you
should be deceived, I have been to th Aae office
this morning to make inquiry as to the true state
of the case. According to the Age calculation,
upon a correction of the returns, Kent now leads
two votes, and there are nine towns and plantations
to be heard from, which, in 1838, gave 144 for
Fairfield and 32 f,,r Kent. -
"As for my own opinion, and you have it for
what it is worth, I am satistied that, by proper ex-
ettion, the State will give Van Buren a handsome
majority in November. Our friends are not dis-
coutaged, but more ready to work than ever.
"P. S. An extra 'Journal,' (Fed.) just issued,
states that Kent now leaIs Fairfield, from what
they have heard, 220 votes, and that if the towns
to be heard fiom come in as in 1838, Kent will
stand 138 ahead. These returns, as given, are
incorrect in one instance certainly, and that is
Aroostook county, where we have a gain. Mr. C.
is here, and brings the returns corrected."

FLORIDA.
A letter received from Second Lieutenant B. H.
ARTHUR, commanding company E, first infantry,
under date of August 12, states that about nine
o'clock on the night of Saturday, the 10tih of that
month, an express rider arrived at Fort Barkee,
and reported an encampment of Indians on the
road to Fort Mitchell, about seven miles from the
former post. The Lieutenant ordered out a de-
tachment of his company, and guided by the ex-
press, proceeded within one mile of the camp,
where he halted and formed his men in one rank,
placing a recruit and an old soldier alternately, and
divided them into three parties, with directions to
advance on different points, and encircle the camp.
They then advanced cautiously through the pal-
metto bushes and swamp, till Sergeant FALCONER,
who led one of the parties, saw and Indian stir,
and fired, which was immediately followed by |the
discharge of about twelve muskets. Three Indians
started to their feet, of whom two fell, when the
Lieutenant, fearing his men might shoot each other,
ordered a charge, and was obeyed with alacritjs
The remaining Indian engaged private BROMLEI"
and threw him to the ground, but being attacked
by Sergeant FALCONER, quitted his hold and ran;
and though seen to fall several times, could not be
found that night. The two Indians who had fallen
were killed before they could regain their feet
When the affray was ended, the fire was put out,
and the detachment returned to the Fort at 3


o'clock on Sunday morning. On the next day, in
consequence of another alarm, a portion of the
company returned to the battle ground, when they
found and buried the two Indians, who were killed
by the fire, and, with them, their beef, tallow, lard,
and coontee cakes, sufficient fo ten men for ten
days. They also brought away three rifles, with
the pouches, powder horns, bullets, and powder,
together with their moccasins, blankets, and other
articles. The Indian who engaged BROMLEY and
FALCONER was found dead two days after by some
men of company F, who were attracted to the
spot by the buzzards. None of the sold ers were
injured, but two muskets were rendered unfit for
service, by being bent in the struggle.

APPROPRIATE.-It is sail that the Whigs in Mas-
sachusetts, when they heard that Kent was likely
to be elected by Abolition votes and BRITISH GOLDn,
illuminated their log cabins with "BLUE LIGHTS."
Truly, they are where they always mean to be!
[Baltimnore Republican.
MARRIED,
On Thursday evening last, by the Rev. Mr. DA-
vis, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. BEN-
JAMIN H. DUVALL, to Miss LYDIA BIRTH,
all of Washington City.


MR. VAN BUREN AND THE RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE.
The following article from the Albany Argus is
in the right spirit. The patience of the country
has been too long abused by the unblushing impu-
dence of the anti-war and anti-suffrage Federalists,
who pretend to charge Fr. VAN BuREN with oppo-
sition to the war, and to the extension of the right
of suffrage-two points upon which his career has
been so eminently praiseworthy. Their reckless
falsehoods should thus be thrust back upon them
wherever and whenever they are put forth, until
they show some degree of shame for their depravity.

THE ALBANY HARRISON LEADERS, AND
THE RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE.
lir-THE PARTIES TO AN INFAMOUS FRAUD..-Cl
Be it remarked, that the partisans who assail Mir.
VAN BUREN as the opponent of the extension of
the elective franchise in the State Convention in
1821-with personal and actual knowledge of the
fact that he was literally the champion of that great
and desired measure of Democratic reform-are
JOHN C. SPENCER and THURLOW WEED.
These individuals have clubbed together to de-
ceive the public by a false and garbled account of
the "votes and proceedings" in the convention "on
the subject of the right of suffrage." This false
and garbled account is printed and published by
one of the parties to the imposition, with the reluc.
tant! official "verification" of another of the par-
ties, the Secretary of State of this State. By sup-
pressions of all the test votes on the subject of the
franchise, and by selecting the isolated questions
of the election of justices of the peace and the
motion to strike out the word "white," they attempt
to convey the impression that Mr. Van Buren op.
posed the extension of the right of suffrage. They
report to this artifice for the double purpose of con-
veying a falsehood in relation to Mr. Van Buren,
and to conceal their own course of inveterate hos-
tility to the extention of that right--l__' THEIR
OWN COURSE BEING THAT WHICH NOW, BY DASTARD-
LY SUPPRESSIONS AND DECEPTIVE "VERIFICATIONS,"
THEY ATTEMPT TO FASTEN UPON MR. VAN BUREN.
This we shall show-and shall hold up the au-
thors of this fraud as detestable both for their opi-
nions and their conduct on this subject.
WHO IS JOHN C. SPENCER?
He is the son of Judge Ambrose Spencer, a well-
known Federalist, who, as a member of the Coun-
cil of Revision, voted a2a;n.- and defeated a bill
passed by both branches-of the Legislature calling
a State convention-who, as a member of the con-
vention, proposed and advocated with vehemence,
and with the most disparaging assaults upon the
"standing army" of voters who would be admitted
by the propositions and efforts of Mr. Van Buren
and his Democratic friends to a participation in the
enjoyment of the franchise, the exclusion of every
man firom voting who did not o'wn real property worth
$250; and who refused to affix his name to the Con
stitution as adopted by the convention, and voted
against it when presented for rejection or ratifica-
tion by the people, because it abolished the pro-
perty qualification, and contained the liberal and
equal provisions conquered by Mr. Van Buren
and his associates from Judge Spencer, John C.
Spencer, Thurlow Weed, and the other Federal,
now Harrison leaders, in that great conflict for
elective priviles between the Democracy and the
Arietocraoy of the day.
He is the same John C. Spencer who was a
member of the Legislature in 1820-21-who,
when Mr. Uishoeffer, now Judge Ulshoeffer, a De-
mocratic Representative from the city of New
York, brought forward a bill (Nov. 10, 1820) pro-
viding for the election of delegates to a State con-
vention, for the revision of the Constitution,
moved to postpone the farther consideration of
the subject until the next session, and urged his
motion, along with Elisha Williams, General Kirk-
land, Richard P. Hart, and other Federalists-who,
when the Democratic majority voted down his mo
tion, voted against the bill-who was found in hos-
tility to the measure, and voted against it with 45
other Federalists-whoconcurred in, and defended
the rejection of the bill by the Council of Revi-
sion-who, at the next session, attempted to fore-
stall the report 'of the committee of which Mr
Ulshoeffer was chairman, by giving notice of a bill
to obtain a sense of the people upon the question
of convention or no convention-who proJessed to
ae in favor (f the bill with such a provision-but
who, when a sutibstitute had been adopted, em-
bracing such provision, and which, he admitted, ob-
viated the objections of the Council, voted against
the bill '
He is the same John C. Spencer that sought to
carry out in the Legislature and before the people,
the views of his father and his Federal associates,
in the Convention-TO ARREST THE COURSE OF P0-
PULAR REFORM, AND TO PREVENT THE ADMISSION .POF
THE GRAT BODY OF THE WORKINGOMEN OF THE STATE
TO THE RIGHT OF VOTING FPOR THEIR RULERS:
VWHIO IS THURLOW WEED ?
He was the adjunct of the Spencers and the Fe-
deralists then, as he ii their auxiliary now. He
resisted then, to the extent of his ability to falsify
and misrepresent the popular sentiment, the efforts
of the Republicani to carry through the convention
measure, and to obtain for a large class of citizens,
the bone and muscle of the Democracy, an exemp.
tion frcm the aristocratic distinctions which the Fe-
deralists labored to retain. He opposed the abro-
gation of the property qualification-denounced the
course of the convention as "incendiary" and
"destructive," and would, no doubt, had the desig-
nation been in existence, have assailed it as "Loco
Foco," because it had-ventured to enlarge the pri-
vi'eges of the people. In this spirit, also, he re-
sisted the ratification of the amended constitution,
and denounced the people as DEGRADED," and as
" ESTRANGED FROM ALL THAT WAS NOBLE AND VIR-
TUOUS," because they had dared to demand and olb-
tain their just political rights against the utmost
efforts of ALL that was noble and virtuous" and
aristocratic! But hear him:
oa- From the Onondaga County Republican, October 10,
1821, edited by THURLOW WEED. _.C
ll "UNIVERsAL SUFFRAGE and annual Go-
vernor elections, (alluding to the prneeedin.- of the
convention, then in session,) wll i \Fc.i.r THE
STATE OF NzEv YORK TO THE WORLD, A MONUMENT
OP HER OWN INFATUATED MADNESS AND FOLLY.
These will be the two great watchwords for un-
principled politicians. Under the.e banners will
demagogues array themselves. The spirit of fac-
tion will ride in the whirlwind, while the genius of
anarchy directs the storm; and the people will
soon be called upon to chant a funeral knell to
the departed remnants to political virtue and pa-
triotism."
pr3-From the same paper, January 23, 1822, by THURLOW
WE ED.-03
Kit' "CONSTITUTIONAL ELECTION."-'"There is
but loo much reason to FEAR that the late elec-
tion has resulted IN THE ADOPTION OF THE NEW
CONSTITUTION; but while there remains a loop to
hang a doubt upon, we shall refuse to believe
that the freemen of New York are so ESTaANOED
PROM ALL THAT IS NOBLE AND VIRTUOUS, AS TO
HAVE RATIFIED AN INSTRUMENT WHICH DEGRADES
AND ENSLAVES THEM. But if fate has decreed our
downfall, we must submit; and if a day of retri-
bution does not overtake the AUTHORS OF OUR RUIN,
we must be contented with the reflection that their
crimes and their memories will be perpetuated by
the curses and execrations of posterity."
EJThe same paper contains the following post-
*cr~r':.-jr
.--; In. morning's mail furnishes THE MOST
AFFLICTING AND MELANCHOLY INTELLIGENCE. The
Constitution of our fathers is cast away BY THEIR
DEGENERATE AND UNGRATEFUL POSTERITy. What
adds poignancy to grief is, that a majority of the
people of this Slate are opposed to the new Constitu-


tion, but they did not turn out. We are NOW in the
flood tide of experiment, running headlong to de-
struction, in 'the broadroadto ruin.' When it is too
late to retrieve the fatal error, the people will find
that they are deceived and ruined-that aristo-
cracy has gained a proud triumph-and that we
have sold our birthright for a beggarly mesa of pot-
tage"
Every citizen has an opportunity to see precisely
where John C. Spencer and Thurlow Weed stood
on the great test propositions to extend the right of
suffrage; and every citizen will rightly estimate all
efforts from such quarters to disparage and misre-
present Mr. Van Buren's course at that time-a
course antagonist to their course then, and ever
since.
The-.e are rite two partisans who have the auda-
city, and the profli-acy too, to thrust upon the pub-
lic a garbled and false account of "the votes and
speeches of Martin Van Buren', in the State con-
vention for the revision of the Constitution. Th,'e
are the persons who plotted that imposition; and
who have sent it abroad to cheat and mislead such
as are ignorant of the history of those times. They
hope, by suppressions, by garbled statements, and
c [,c.c,ty by an official "verification," to deceive
the American people into the belief that the course
of Mr. Van Buren, eminently Demoaratic and
able as it was in defence of the rights of the people,
was, like their own, hostile to the wishes and labo-
riously active against the extended franchise then


conquered by the Democracy, and securend by the
amended Constitution.
It will surprise no one when such barefaced and
and disgraceful imposiat;ions are played off under
the seal of the Secretary of State, by persons hold-
ing high official stations under the present State
Government, that your Bill Chestnuts and Victor
Posts walk abroad unmolested, and commit their
depredations upon society, secure in the favor of a
party Governor, or the levity of a party Bench!
It will be perceived that our t'iographical no-
tices of the personages who have "manufactured"
the garbled account of "the votes and speeches of
Mr. Van Buren" in the convention, are confined
to that period of their political lives. The mate-
rials for a morn extended notice are rich are co-
pious, and shall be reduced to shape in good time.
It is sufficient to say now, that this is a fair speci-
men of the entire political course of each-that
their whole lives are as tortuous-as deceptive--
as vindictive against the principles and the candi-
date of the Democracy.

MR. TRACY'S LETTER.
The New Era contains an excellent letter from.
Mr. TRACY, which will be found in another column,
which presents with admirable clearness and force
the great questions involved in the present contest
for the Presideney. What can speak more strongly
for the cause of Democracy, as involved in the
coming election, than the manner in which such
men as JACKSON, TAZaWELL, MoDuFSiZ, and
TRACY, distinguished patriots and statesmen of the
highest talents, though withdrawn from public life*
and with no ends of personal ambition to attains
utter their warning voices from the retirement
which they have chosen?

VIRGINIA.
Extract from a letter, dated
RAPPAHANNOCK, Sept. 21, 1840.
DEAR SiR: I know you will be pleased in this
time of need to hear that John S. Barbour has
taken the field. The mention of his name is'enough.
his fame as an orator and forcible reasoner is too
well known to need any praise from me. It has
been his lot to differ with General Jackson and Mr.
Van Buren upon some points; but he is now at no
loss to decide between General Harrison and Mr.
Van Buren. He and Col. Banks addressed a
large gathering of the people at Flint Hill, on Sa-
turday last, (Rappahannock county.) The Colonel
led the way; his speech was precisely such a one as
the people wanted to hear. I think impartial minds
who heard him will need no fuiher debate upon the
Hooe case and standing army humbug, ai well as
many other unfounded charge. Mr. Ogle and his
pitiful researches into the President's kitchen,
amongst his dishrags, towels, tin buckets, &c. and
his humbug about the gold spoons (but gilded only)
which were purchased by Mr. Motroe;and lie about
the imported bedstead and English carriage, re-
ceived that just rebuke it so richly deserved. I
have not read this compound of stuff, said Mr. B.
but heard it delivered, which was enough for me;
and I heard the author receive the rebuke he richly
merited, from that distinguished man, Mr. Lincoln,
three times Governor of Massachusetts, and I be-
lieve an honest man, and I know an able
one; but he is a Harrison man on prin-
ciple; he is for a bank, a tariff, internal
improvement, &c. and he cannot be blamed
for supporting Harrison. Be assured, sir, that the
people in these parts confide in this faithful ser-
vant. He tells them he is only an advocate of
truth and his country's rights--he seeks no office in
the gift of the President, nor would he accept the
best in his gift-he never has asked office from any
source, save from the fountain head, the people
themselves. He spoke about three hours, and gave
way to Mr. Barbour, who was loudly called for
from all parts of the crowd. Every thing was said
by Mr. Barbour in the brief time allotted him,
(about two hours,) appropriate to the occasion. He
closed by the light of the candle; and many did I see
in the crowd at the conclusion, who lived six and
ten miles distant, but could not leave while enjoy-
ing such a delightful treat. Mr. Barbour asked the
people if he had not, in his younger days, served
them faithfully? and as a mark of approval, had
they not honored him with their almost undivided
support? Then (says he) if I served you according
tO your principles and lfaith, you eaanot aow be
Harrison men, if you are the same people; for be
it known to you that General Harri- a and myself
at that day stood directly opposite t.,..,n matters of
national policy, he voting in the Senate with the
Federal party, and I in the lower house contending-
for the principles of Jeffersonian Democracy. I
can only say (he continued) to every inquirer after
the true way, as Jeremiah said to the Israelite4
look out for the plain old track-contend for the
ancient landmarks. I know General Harrison and
his leaders, the Federal party; and if they bamboo-
zle and cheat you, fellow-citizens, they shall not
cheat me. It has been my lot to differ with Mr.
Van Buren upon some points, but not of a consti-
tutional nature; but who of you would not leave
the pigs which youmight be routing from the corn-
field, to save your helpless wife and children from
massacre, and your house from the flames? Mr.
Barbour said a great many appropriate and
highly important things, more of which I would
relate, would time permit. It is probable that his
speech will be published. He concluded by saying
to the people that self had nothing to do in this
great, unprecedented contest, and peril of country;
that he would not accept any office in the gift of the
people; and nothing had now called him out but
that love of country and regard for his family,
which he hoped had ever characterized him, at
home and abroad.
Extract from a letter, dated
LocusT DALE, FATATP. Co. VA.
September 18,1840.
I am happy to inform you that so far as I have
had an opportunity of observing, the finest spirit
animates the Democracy of Western Virginia. I
have never seen them so completely aroused, and
so determined! to do their duty to their cause and
principles. The Whigs brag of great changes in
this section of the State, but be assured, that the
change, so far as any has taken place, is in our
favor. This Senatorial district, which was nearly
equally divided at the last Presidential election will
give a decided Democratic majority in November.
The above you msy state with a perfect confidence
that the result will verify it. In relation to the
State, we have, we can have no fears; this good old
Commonwealth will never desert her ancient prin-
ciplec; our opponents are makih, the most gigantic
efforts, but we are d,-tei mtned t0 meet effort with
effort, energy with energy, zeal with zeal.

F,'r the Globe,
WHIGERY AND ITS LEADER.
BY A WOaKSNOMAN.
True, on your flag inscribed we see
"Republican Democracy"---
"God and his saints" might be as well
Inscribed upon the flag of hell.
Look at your leader !-not your dupe
Who sips his crab-juice at North Bend.
But him the'banks and Barings feeo
The poor man's foe, the Britonrs'fsiend
Whose votes upon your journals stand
Like damning blood-spots on the hand
Of murder; him whose voice was loud
And sword half drawn, against a bowed.
And bleeding country; who denied


Her armies bread-the parricide!
With such a chief, what but a crew
To your log cabin rendezvous,
Mustered by beat of coonskin drum,
Of hearties,, tank-boogl I rknaves would come?
Think you a true b.-in Democrat
Would march beneath a chief like that?
No! rather would he prove the wretch
Your laws would make him, roofless stretch
His toil-worn limbs-a iwhip-seturged serf
Forfines and costs sold-ori the turfil',
Starve, hang-in short do aught but swig
Hard cider, and turn Fed and Whig.


1Oi 4 REWARD.-I will give ONE
S OG HUNDRED DOLLARS for:a,
apprehension and conviction of the individual wh,.
wounded Mr. R. S. CLEMENS at the meeting of the
Workingmen last night. Who wil add to the
amount? AMOS KENDALL.
Sept 24-tf

$D -h REWARD.-FIFry DOLLARS
Swill be given for the arrest and con-
viction of the scoundrel who inflicted a severe
wound on the person of Mr. R, S. Clemens, at the
meeting of the Workinemen on Wednesday night
last. By order of the Demneranic Assoniaiion:
W. KING, P sident,
C. W. C. DumNtsovole, Scretary,
Sep 25-tf








BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE ITNITET) STATES.
1 5 patsuaact of law, I, MARTIN VAN BUM
BEN, President of he Unied States or Amer
rica, do hereby declare and make kn.wn, that a
public sale will be held at ihe land office al loniaj
in the Stale of Michigan, commenrcing on Monday
the twelfth day of October iat, for ite disposal of
the public lands within the inair of the under
mentioned townships, to wit:
Aorth f tflh base lin, and west of the meridian.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twentyr
ihree, tweniy-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty.
seven, twenty.-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty, of
range eight. ,
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, and
twenty-sevei, ana Iracuiorial townships twenty.
eight,twonly-nine, and ihiri, bordering on Grand
Traverse Bay, of range nine.
Townahipstwenmty.one, wenitv-two, twenty-three,
twenty.four, and twOnty-five, oif range ten.
SAt the same placa in continuation, commencing
on Monday,the twenty-siXth day of October next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, and frac-
tional townships, to wit:
NMrth of the base line and west ofthe meridian.
Township iwcnt y-six, fractional township twen-
ty-seven, twenmy-eight, ti rnty-nine, and thirty,
bordering on Grant Traverac Bay, of range ten.
Townships twenty-one,twenty-two, twenty-three,
wenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, and frac-
itonal t.wnshqp twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twen-
ty-nine, and thirty, bordering on Grand Traverse
Bay, of range elever-n.
Townsbipi twenty-one, iwenty-two, twenty-three,
twenty-fc.ur, twenty-five, itwen,)-six, twenty-seven,
lwenlty-etght, and frariu-.rnal townships twenty-
nine and ihirty, bordering un Lake Michigan, of
range twelve.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be ex-
cluded from sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, wll be admitted until after the
expiration of the Iwo weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-fouith day cf April, anno Domini,
1840. M. VAN BUREN.
By the Presidenti:
YA8. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS,
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any of the land designated in the above procla-
mation, is reqne-'r.l to prove the same to the sa-
tisractiod of itt iR. sister and Receiver of ihe Land
Office, and make payment therefore as soon as prac-
tcable after seeing this notice, in order that the claim
may be adjudicated by those officers agreeably to
law, in due lime, prior to the twently-second day of
Junie ntext, when the pre-emption law of 1838 will ex-
pire Ib liinitattmi: and all claiirs not duly made
known and paid fi.'r prior to that date, are declared
by law to be forleit,.d.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Conmmissioer of the Gf,,ral Lant Office.
April 25-lawt260
BY THE rREMDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
SRBEN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that
public sales will be held at' the undermentioned
land office' in the State of Michigan, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the lard office at Ionia, commencing on Mon-
day, ihe twenty-ihird day of November next, for
the disposal ot the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
.N'ort af the base line, and west of the meridian.
Townuhips iwenly-eigtii, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range three.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range four.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range five.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range six.
Townehip- twenty-seven, twenty.eight, twenty-
nine, and thiity, of range seven.
At the lai I office at Genesee, commencing on
Monday, ih-! twenty-third day of November next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Townships tswetly-eighi, twenty-nine, and thirty,
Sof range one.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range two.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale,
The saies will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
lonpeter; and r.. private entries of land, in the town-
ship.- sn offeiers., will be admitted until after the ex-
viraiien ,f ihe twoweeks.
G,,en und;r my hand, at the City of Washing-
ton, this third day of August, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
J.M[, WiTCo .MB,
CommissiMoner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right cf yre-emption to
land in any of Ihe'iownships designated in this pro-
clainam.on, in vir ue of the provisions of the act of
2i2d Jr.e, 1838, as.extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter, ai ertiirrig certain privileges to another
class of --eller-., is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
proper land office, and makes payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and before
the day appointed for the commencement of the
public sale 0of the lan,] a- above designated; other-
i.se -uerh ,.laimE will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Coimnnsi'ontr o the General Land Office.
Aug 4 -la'1rt3N
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
I Ny nsrsnance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
RE.N, Pr.-.i_-tnt of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that a
public sale will b.e t,elil at the land office at Bur-
lington, in the Territory of Iowa, commencing on
Monday, the twelfth day of October next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, and fractional
townships. to wit:
.North o/fthe base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships
v.eventy and siventn-.Lx, of range five.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships
seventy, seventy-four, seventy-five, and seventy-
six, of range six.
Town-hhp seventy-one and seventy-four, of
range seven.
Township sizy-eeeht, of range ten.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks,
(unle.a. the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer, and on private entries of land, in the town-
ships so oft red, will be admitted until after the
expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-fifth day of May, anno Deaii-
ni, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.


By the President:
JAMES WmToPMA,
Commissioner of the Genieral Land Offeice.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any qf the lands designated in the above procla-
mation, is reqursied to prove the -ame to the sa-
lisfacriQn of the Register and Receiver of the Land
Office, and make payment iherelor, as soon as prac-
ticable after seeing this notie, in orler that the claim
may be adjudicated by those offic.-rs agreeably to
iaw, in due time, prior to the tuwnty-seeond day of
Fune nwx, when' the pre.-impiri l.aw of 1838 will
-pire by limitation; anl all claim,- not duly made
mnown and paid forprior to that date, are declared
i law4 to be forfeited.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
^!ay 2>-wts
SW. EXCHANGE OFFICE-THOMAS
PW. PAIRO ha t.pf.e,.- (in connection with
ct sons, Paliro and Brother, of Baltimore, and H.
t'. Pairo,of Richmond,) an Exchange and Broker's
f' ei iln the house lately occupied by Wmin. S.
Ft'elolr, esq. on Pennsylvania avenue, near 12th
f Pet, where he will purchase and sell specie drafts,
i asurynotes, specie, uncurrent bank notes, drafts
SBaltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Richmond,
ersburg, andi Charleston, and he will receive
,on deposit.
liee open from 81 till 3 o'clock. -


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES-
I iN pnrsuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
it SEN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known mathai pub-
lic -alos will he held at the undermentioned larid
,ffnc-, in the Siate of Illinois, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Danville, commencing on
Monday, the fourteenth day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships and fractional
townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the second
principal meridian.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty,
af range fourteen.
North of the base line, and east of the third princi-
pal merdian.
Townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-
nine and thirty, of range nine.
Townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-
nine and thirty, of range ten.
Fractional townships twenty-seven, twenty-
eight, twenty-nine and thirty, of range eleven.
At the land office at Chicago, commencing on
Monday, the twerny-eighih day of September next,
for the disposal cf the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and east of the third principal
meridian.
Townships forty-two, forty-three and forty-five,
of range eight.
Townships forty-three, forty-four and forty-five,
of range nine.
The northeast quarter of reaction eight, in town-
ship thirty-three, of range seven.
The northeast quarter of section twenty four, in
township thirty-six, of range eleven.
At the land office at Quincy, commencing on the
twelfth day of October next, for the disposal of the
following detached tracts, not heretofore offered at
public sale, to wit:
North of the base line, and east qfthe fourth principal
meridian.
The west half of the southwest quarter of sec-
tion twenty-three, in township four, of range one.
The west half of the southeast quarter of section
two, in township ten, of range two.
The east half of the northeast quarterof section
twenty-six, in township four, of range three.
North of the base line, and west ofthefourth principal
meridian.
The east half of the southeast quarter of section
twenty-six, in township four, and the west half of
the southwest quarter of section nineteen, in town-
ship twelve, of range three.
The west half of the northeast quarter of sec-
tion five, in township two, and the east half of the
southwest quarter of section six, in township ten,
of range four.
The east half of the southeast quarter of section
twenty-six, and the east half of the northeast quar-
ter of section thirty-five, in township one, and the
east half of the northwest quarter of section two,
in township four, of range five.
The east half of the northeast quarter of section
seven, and the west half of the northwest quarter
of section thirty, in township five, of range six.
The west half of the southwest quarter of sec-
tion fourteen, in township four, of range nine.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this eighth day of June, anno Domini,
eighteen hundred and forty.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the
act of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified
by the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions
of the latter act, granting certain privileges to an-
other class of settlers, is requested to prove the
same to the satisfaction of the Register and
Receiver of the land office, and make pay-
ment therefore, as soon as practicable after seeing
this notice, and before the day appointed for the
comnmencement of the public Fate of the land as
atove ,te.ienated, otherwise such claints will be
forfeited. JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
BY THiE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
IN puisuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU.
SREN, President of the United Slates of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices, in the State of Arkansas, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Batesville, commencing on
Monday, the seventh day of September next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships eight, nine, and ten, of range fif-
teen.
Townships eight, nine, and ten, of range six-
teen.
Townships eight and ten, of range seventeen.
At the land office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday, the fourteenth day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships and fractional
townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships eighteen and twenty-one, of range
twenty-nine.
Township eighteen, of range thirty-one.
Fractipnal township twelve, bordering on the
Cherokee boundary, of range thirty-three,
At the land office at Littl Rock, commencing on
Monday, the twenty-first day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships, to wit.
.Worth of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
That part of township seven, lying north of the
old Cherokee boundary, of range sixteen.
South of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships two, three, and four, of range seven.
Township four, of range eight.
Township four, of range nine.
Townships six, seven, and eight, of range ten.
Atthe land office at Johnson Court House, com-
mencing on Monday, the twenty-eighth day of Sep-
tember next, for the disposal of the public lands
within the limits of the undermentioned townships
and fractional township, to wit:
.'sMrth of the base ltie, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township two, of range eighteen.
Township ten, of range thirty.
Fractional township eleven, bordering on the
Cherokee boundary, of range thirty-three.
At the land office at Washington, commencing
on monday, the twelfth day of October next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of the
'andermentioned townships, to wit:
Seioh of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township twelve, of range thirty.
township twelve, of range thirty-one.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from


salt,
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the
townships so offered, will be admitted until after
the expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the City of Washing-
ton, this fourth day of May, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any of the lands designated in the above procla-
mation, is requested to prove the same, to the satis-
faction of the Register and Receiver of the proper
land office, and make payment therefore as soon as
racliutt) Otti seeing this notice, in order that the
claim may be adjudicated by those officers, agree-
ably to law, in due time, prior to the 22d day of June
next, when the pre-emption law of 1838 will expire by
limitation; and all claims not duly made known and
paid for prior to that date, are declared by law to be
forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

ASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK, Nos. 5
and 6, are this day published and for sale
by W. M. MORRISON,


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
. REN, President of the Uaited States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that
public sales will be held at the undermentioned
land offices in the State of Arkansas, at the peri-
ods hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Batesville, commencing on
Monday, the fifth day of October next, for the dis-
posal of public lands within the limits of the un-
dermentioned townships, to wit:
,North of the base line, and west of the ftfth principal
meridian.
Fractional township nineteen, on the south side
of White river, of range fifteen.
Township eighteen, of range sixteen.
Township nine, of range seventeen.
At the Land Office at Little Rock, commencing
on Monday, the twelfth day of October next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and west of the principal meri-
dian.
Townships three and four, of range six.
At the Land Office at Johnson Court-House,
commencing on Monday, the nineteenth day of Oc-
tober next, for the disposal of the public lands with-
in the limits of the undermentioned townships, to
wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township three, of range eighteen.
Fractional township six, on the north side of
Arkansas river, of range twenty.
Township ten, of range twenty-four.
At the Land Office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-sixth day ef October next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships and frac-
tional townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township fourteen, of range thirty.
Factional townships eighteen, nineteen, and
twenty, bordering on the Cherokee boundary line,
of range thirty-lour.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept oper for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the city of Washington
this twentieth day of June, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President,
JAMES WnITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in anyo ef the townships designated in this
proclamation in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the register and receiver of the
proper land office, and make payment therefore,
as soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
the public sale of the land as above designated;
otherwise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WH1TCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 26-lawt260

BY THE PRESIDENT OF TIHE UNITED STATES.
N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN B1-
AI N, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that
a public sale will be held at the Land Office at
Mineral Point, in the Territory of Wiskonsin,
commencing on Monday, the fifth day of October
next, for the disposal of the public lands hereinaf-
ter described, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the fourth principal
meridian.
Sections one, eleven, twelve, thirteen, and four-
teen, in township twenty-two, of range five.
Sections one to ten, inclusive, section fifteen,
sections seventeen to twenty-one, inclusive, and
section twenty nine, in township twenty-two; sec-
tions thirteen and fourteen, sections twenty-one to
twenty-nine, inclusive, and sections thirty-one to
thirty-six, inclusive, in township twenty-three; sec-
tions one, two, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and thirty-
six, in township twenty-six; and sections thirteen,
twenty-four, twenty-five, thirty-five, and thirty-six,
in township twenty-seven, of range six.
Sections two to six, inclusive, in township twen-
ty-two; sections one, two, and three, and sections
nine to thirty-six, inclusive, except section sixteen,
in township twenty-three; sections one to five, in-
clusive, sections eight to fifteen, inclusive, sections
twenty-one to twenty-seven, inclusive, and sections
thirty-four, thirty-five, and thirty-six, in township
twenty-four; sections one to fifteen, inclusive, sec-
lion seventeen, sections twenty to twenty-nine,
inclusive, and sections thirty-two to thirty-six, in-
clusive,i n township twenty-five; sections three to
ten, inclusive, section fifteen, sections seventeen to
twenty-two, inclusive, and sections twenty-six to
thirty-five, inclusive, in township twenty-six; sec-
tions one to twelve, inclusive, sections fourteen and
fifteen, sections seventeen to twenty-three, inclu-
sive, and sections twenty-six to thirty-four, inclu-
sive, in township twenty-seven; sections one, two,
three, and four, sections nine to fifteen, inclusive,
sections twenty-one to twenty-nine, inclusive, and
sections thirty-two to thirty-six, inclusive, in town-
ship twenty-eight; and sections twenty-five, twenty-
six, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, thirty-three, thirty-
four, thirty-five, and thirty-six, in township twenty-
ty-nine, of range seven.
Sections three to eleven, inclusive, sections four-
teen and fifteen, sections seventeen to twenty-three,
inclusive, and sections twenty-six to thirty-four, in-
clusive, in township twenty-three; sections six, se-
ven, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, and
twenty-one, and sections twenty-eight to thirtr-
four, inclusive, in township twenty-four; sections
six, seven, eighteen nineteen, thirty, and thirty-
one, in township twenty-five; section six in township
twenty-seven, and sections six, seven, eighteen,
nineteen, thirty, and thirty-one, in township twenty-
eight, of range eight.
Lands appropriated by law, for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be exclu-
ded from sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks, (uno
less the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no long-
er; and no private entries of lands in the townships
so offered, will be admitted until after the expira-
tion of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
tan, this twentieth day of June, anno Domini
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22di June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of
the latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
land office, and make payment therefore as soon as


practicable after seeing this notice, and before the
day appointed for the commencement of the pub-
lic sale of the land as above designated; otherwise
such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

TO THE PUBLIC.
The lands here proclaimed are situated in the
valley and on both sides of the Wiskonsin river.
They were ceded to the United States by the Meno-
monie Indians on the 30th September, 1836, and
are described in the treaty as follows: "Beginning
at a point upon the Wiskonsin river, two miles
above the grant or privilege heretofore granted by
the said nation and the United States to Amable
Grignon, thence running up and along, said river
forty-eight miles in a direct line, and being three
miles in width on each side of said river," and are
represented to be of great value on account of the
pine timber abounding thereon.
JAMES WHIYCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 30-lawt5Oct

A SYSTEM OF PRACTICAL MEDICINE,
comprised in a series of original disserta-
tio arranged and edited by Alexander Tweedie,
M. D., F. R. S. Fevers and Diseases of the Skin,
is this day published and for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,
Aug 4 Four doors west of Brown's Hotel,


P ARTIAL POSTPONEMENT OF PUBLIC
' LAND SALES ordered to be held at Du
Bique, in the Territory of Iowa; at Chicago and
Galena, in the State of Illinois; and at Detroit, in
the State of Michigan.
Notice is given that the postponement is hereby
declared of the public sales ot certain townships of
land heretofore ordered to be held at Du Buque, in
the Territory of Iowa, and at Chicago and Galena,
in the State of Illinois, and at Detroit, in the State
of Michigan, as follows:
The public sale of townships numbered eighty,
eighty-one, and eighty-seven, of range one; of
township numbered seventy-nine and eighty of
range two; of townships seventy-nine and eighty of
range three; of fractional township seventy-eight
and townships eighty, eighty.one, and eighty-five of
range four; of fractional township eighty and town-
ships eighty-one, eighty-two, and eighty-six of range
five; of township eighty-two of range six; and of
fractional township eighty-two of range seven; all
north of the base line and east of the 5th principal
meridian, advertised on the 22d of January last to
be held at the land office at Du Buque, on the
fourth day of May next, is postponed until, and
will commence on, Monday, the sixthh day of July
next.
The public sale of townships numbered eighty
and eighty-one of range one; of township eighty-
eight of range tw 0; of townships eighty-three,
eighty-eight, and ninecy-one of range three; of town-
ship eighty-eight of range four; of townships e-
venty-nine, eighty-four, and eighty-five of range
five; and of township seventy-nine (with tire excep-
tion of sections two, three, four, nine, ten, eleven,
fourteen, and fifteen, as heretofore designated,) of
range six, all north of the base line and west of the
5th principal meridian, advertised on the 22d of
January last to be held at the land office at Du
Brque on the eighteenth of May next, is postponed
until, and will commence on, Monday, the third
day of August next.
The public sale of townships numbered forty four
and forty-six of range eight, and townships num-
bered forty two and forty-six of range nine, all
north of the base line and east of the third principal
meridian, advertised on the 22d day of January
last to be held at the land office at Chicago, in the
State of Illinois, on the fourth day of May next, is
postponed until, and will commence on, Monday,
the seventh day of September next.
The public sale of fractional township numbered
twenty-three (with the exception of the~north halves
of sections one and two, as heretofore designated,)
of range three, and fractional township numbered
twenty.three (with the excepon of the north halves
of sections one to six, inclusive, as heretofore de-
signated,) of range four, all north of the base line
and east of the fourth principal meridian, advertised
on the 22d day of January last to be held at the
land office at Galena, in the State of Illinois, on
the eighteenth day of May next, is postponed until,
and will commence on, Monday, the fifih day of
October next.
Notice is also hereby given that the public sale
advertised on the sixth of February last, to be held
at Detroit, in the State of Michigan, on the
eleventh of May next, for the disposal of the pub-
lic lands within the limits of the west half of town-
ship six north, of range thirteen, east of the princi-
pal meridian, is postponed until, and will com-
mence on, Monday, the sixth day of July next.
Of course the residue of the lands, the sale of
which is not hereby postponed, will be sold at the
times and places, as heretofore advertised.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this third day of April, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any land the public sale of which is hereby post-
poned, is requested to prove the same to the satis-
faction of the Register and Receiver of the proper
land office, prior to the 22d day of June next,
otherwise the claim to such pre-emption will be for-
feited by law.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
April 6-wt50
BY lilI li' -rI'N[ OF THE UNITED STATES.
iNppr.uanc'o-.-.l law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and make known, that a pub-
lic sale will be held at the Land Officeat Genessee,
in the State of Michigan, commencing on Monday,
the ninth day of November next, for the disposal
of the public lands within the limits of the under-
mentioned townships and fractional townships, to
wit:
KNorth of the base line and east of the meridian.
Townships twenty-one and twenty-two, of range
three.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, and twenty-five, of range four.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of

T.,ii hi p, twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of
range six.
Fractional townships twenty-one and twenty-
two, bordering on Lake Huron, townships twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of
range seven.
Fractional township twenty-two, bordering on
Lake Huron, townships twenty-three, twenty-tour,
twenty-five, and twenty-six, of range eight.
Fractional townships twenty-two, twenty-three,
twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, bordering
on Lake Huron, of range nine.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be ex-
cluded from sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks (unless
the lands are sooner disposed of) and no longer;
and no private entries of land, in the townships so
offered, will be admitted until after the expiration
of two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-eighth day of July, anno
Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840; or of the provisions of
the latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the tame to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of
the proper land office, and make payment therefore
as soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
the public sale of the land as designated; otherwise
such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
July 29-wt9thNov
BY TiIE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
N OTICE is hereby given that the pubLc sale o(
lands ordered to be held at the land office at
Natchitoches, in the State of Louisiana, on Mon-
day, the tenth day of August next, by proclama-
tion issued on the fourth day of April last, is post-
poned until, and will commence on, Monday, the
twenty-third day of November next.


The lands to be then offered, are described as
Township numbered twenty, of range nine.
That part of township seventeen situated north
of Red river, of range thirteen.
Fractional sections three, nine, ten, eleven, four-
teen, fifteen, and twenty-one, section twenty-two,
and fractional sections twenty-three, twenty-six,
thirty-five, and thirty-six, all situated south of Red
river, in township twenty, of range fourteen.
Given under my hand at the city of Washing-
ton this fourth day of August, anno Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAs. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
August 7-lawtN23

MfRS. GARDINER'S INDIAN BALSAM
OF LIVERWORT.-For the cure of
Coughs, Golds, Whooping Cough, Phthisic, Sore
Stomach, pain in the side, and all diseases of the
Lungs. For the above complaints, this medicine
stands unrivalled for its efficacy-It is prepared
wholly from vegetables. Also, its efficacy for the
cure of the Liver Complaint, is full established. I
mention the names of but a few of thousands who
have been cured by this invaluable medicine-for
places of residence, see inside directions. Price 50
cents.
C. Ellis, M. D. Elisha Horton, D. F. Woodbury,
Thos. Haskins, jr. B. F. Brown, Horace Gall,
Miss L. Howard, and E. Williams.
For sale at
Jan 29 TODD'S Drug Store.


BY THE PRESIDENT OP THE UNITED STATES
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and make known that
public sales will be held at the undermentioned
land offices, in the State of Alabama, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Mardisville, commencing
on Monday, the ninth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands hereinafter de-
signated, bordering on the line dividing the States
of Georgia and Alabama, viz:
South of the base line and east of the meridian.
Fractional sections three, ten, fifteen, twenty-two,
twenty-seven, thirty four, and thirty-five, in town-
ship fourteen, fractional sections two, eleven, four-
teen, twenty-three, twenty-six, thirty-five and thirty-
six, in township fifteen, and fractional sections one,
twelve, thirteen, twenty-four, twenty-five, and
thirty-six, in township sixteen, of range twelve.
Fractional section thirty-one, in township six-
teen, fractional sections six, seven, eighteen, nine-
teen, twenty-nine, thirty, and thirty-two, and sec-
tion thirty-one, in township seventeen, fractional
sections five, eight, seventeen, twenty, twenty-one,
twenty-eight, and thirty-three, and sections twenty-
nine and thirty-two, in towinship eighteen, fractional
sections four, nine, fifteen, twenty-two, twenty,
seven, and thirty-four, and sections twenty-ons-
twenty-eight, and thirty-three, in township nine-
teen, fractional sections three, ten, eleven, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-sit, and thirty-five, and sec-
tions fifteen, twenty-two, twenty-seven, and hlfr
four, in township twenty, and fractional sections
two, twelve, thirteen, twenty-four, twenty-five, and
thirty-six, and sections eleven, fourteen, twenty-
three, twenty-six, and thirty-five, in township twen-
ty-one, of range thirteen.
Fractional section thirty-one, in township twenty-
one, and fractional sections six,seven, and eighteen,
in township twenty-two, of range fourteen.
At the land office at Montgomery, commencing
on Monday, the ninth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands hereinafter desig-
nated, bordering on the line dividing the States of
Georgia and Alabama, viz:
North of the base line and east of the meridian.
Fractional sections one, twelve, thirteen, twenty-
four, and twenty-five, in township twenty-two,
fractional sections two, three, eleven, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-six, and thirty-five, in town-
ship twenty-three, and fractional sections three,
four, ten, fifteen, twenty-two, twenty-seven, and
thirty.four,in township twenty-four, orange twenty-
eight.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washington,
this twenty-third day of July, anno Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions ofthelat-
ter act granting certain privileges to another class
of settlers, is requested to prove the same to the
satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the.
proper land office, and make payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
the public sale of the land as above designated,
otherwise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
BY TIHE PRESIDENT OF TIIE UNITED STATES.
N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that pub.
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices in the State of Illinois, at the periods here-
inafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Chicago, commencing on
Monday, the ninth day of November next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships and fractional town-
ships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the third principal
meridian.
Townships forty-two, forty-three, and forty-four,
of range ten.
Townships forty-two and forty-three, of range
eleven.
Fractional townships forty, north of the old In-
dian boundary line, except sections one to six in-
clusive, townships forty-two, and fractional town-
ship forty-three, except the northeast quarter of
section ten, of range twelve.
Fractional townships forty and forty-one, lying
north of the old Indian boundary, and fractional
townships forty-two and forty-three, bordering on
Lake Michigan, of range thirteen.
Fractional township forty-one, north of the old
Indian boundary line, and bordering on Lake Mich-
igan, of range fourteen.
At the land office at Palestine, commencing on
Monday, the sixteenth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township five, north of the base line, of range four-
teen, west of the second principal meridian.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the City of Washington,
this twenty-third day of July, anno Domin
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITGOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
proper land office, and make payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and before
the day appointed for the commencement 01 the
public sale of the land as above designated; other-
wise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General L-nd Office.
J OTICE OF THE DISCONTINUANCE OF
THE PUBLIC LAND OFFICES AT
MARIETTA, STEUBENVILLE, ZANES-
VILLE, CINCINNATI, AND WOOSTER, -IN
THE STATE OF OHIO.-Under the provisions
of the second section of an act of Congress, ap-
proved on the 12th of June, 1840, which declares,
"that whenever the quantity of public land re-
maining unsold in any land district shall be re-
duced to a number of acres less than one hundred


thousand, it hall be the duty of the Secretary of
the Treasury to discontinue the land office of such
district; and if any land in any such district shall
remain unsold at the time of the discontinuance of
a land office, the same shall be subject to sale at
some one of the existing land offices most conve-
nient to the district in which the land office shall
have been discontinued, of which the Secretary ot
the Treasury shall give notice."
Notice is accordingly hereby given, that in the
prosecution of his duty under the above section,
the Secretary of the Treasury has advised this
office that the land offices at Marietta, Steuben-
ville, Zanesville, and Cincinnati, in the State of
Ohio, are to be discontinued by law; and the lands
in said districts, respectively, remaining unsold at
the time of the discontinuance, are to be thereafter
subject to sale at the land office at Chillicothe; alsr,
that the land office at Wooster, in the same State,
is to be discontinued, and the lands in that distr ct
remaining unsold at the time of the discontinuance,
are to be thereafter subject to sale at the land office
at Bucyrus.
La ids remaining unsold, and unappropriated by
law, and subject to private entry within the limits
of the districts of Mari-tta, Steubenville, Zanes-
ville, Cincinnati, and Wooster, will cease to be
subject to entry as heretofore at those offices, from
the date of the receipt of this notice at each of
them respectively; and the land officers at Chilli-
cothe and Bucyrus will give further notice of the
day on which they wll be prepared to receive ap-
plications for entrie, of any such lands.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner.
GENERAL LAD OFFitCE, July 28, 1840-w4t


BY THE PRESIDENT OF TI E UNITED STATES
N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare andmake known, that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices in the Slate of Arkansas, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Johnson Court-house, com-
mencing on Monday, the twenty-third day of No-
vember next, for the disposal of the public lands
within the limits of the undermentioned townships,
to wit:
North of the base line and west of the meridian.
Township two, of range twenty-one.
Township five, of range twenty-two.
Township two, of range twenty-three.
Townships three and seven, of range twenty-
four.
Township five, of range twenty-five.
At the land office at Washington, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-third day of November
next, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Township twelve, of range twenty-eight.
Fractional township fourteen, north of Red river,
orange iren'v r,-'.I
Fractional townships thirteen and fourteen, north
of Red river, of range thirty.
Fractional township fourteen, north of Red liver,
of range thirty-one.
At the land office at Little Rock, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-third day of November
next, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
Seuth ofthe base line, and west of the meridian.
Township one, of range eight.
Township one, of range nine.
Township fifteen, of range seventeen.
At the land office at Helena, commencing on
Monday, the thirtieth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned fractional townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and east of the meridian.
Fractional township nine, north of Arkansas
river, of range one.
Fractional township four, except the north half
of section two, and sections three, four, five, six,
nine, and ten, of range three.
South of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Fractional township nine, north of Arkansas and
south of While river, except sections two, three,
and twelve, of range one.
At the land office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday the thirtieth of November next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township sixteen, north of the base line, of range
eighteen, west of the meridian.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer, and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the City of Washing-
ton, this seventh day of August, anno Domini,
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the Presldent:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the
act of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified
by the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions
of the latter act, granting certain privileges to
another class of settlers, is requested to prove the
same to the satisfaction of tha Register and Re-
ceiver of the proper land office, and make payment
therefore as soon as practicable after seeing this no-
tice, and before the day appointed for the com-
mencement of the public sale of the land as above
designated, otherwise such claims will be for-
feited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
Aug 10-law30N

BY TIlE PRESIDENT OF TItE UNITED STATES.
.N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that a
public sale will be held at the land office at Ge-
nesse, in the State of Michigan, commencing on
Monday, the seventh day of December next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships to wit:
North of the base line, and east of the meridian.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three,
twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven,
and twenty-eight, of range one.
Townships twenty-one, twen'y-two, twenty-three,
twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven,
and twenty-eight, of range two.
Townships twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-
five, twenty-six, twenty-seven, and twenty-eig-t, of
range three.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks (un-
less the lands are sooner disposed of) and no lon-
ger; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washington,
this twenty-ninth day of August, anno Domini
one thousand eight hundred and forty.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act Of 1st June 1840, or of the provisions of the lat-
ter act granting certain privileges to another class
of settlers, is requested to prove the same to the sa-
tisfaction ot the Register and Receiver of the Land
Office, and make payment therefore as soon asprac-
ticable after seeing this notice, and before the day ap-
ptinted tor the commencement of the public sale
of the land as above designated, otherwise such
claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
August 29-lawtDec7
THE STATE Or MARYLAND, so.
At an Orphans' Court for Saint Mary's County,
held at the Court-house in Leonardtown on the
lhh day of August. in the year of our Lord 1840,
present, Chapman Billingsley and John M. Thomp-
son, e-q'rs, Justices, G. W. Morgan, esq. Sheriff,
and Geo. Combs, B e.t,-tr, asminri other proceedings
were the following, vrz:
ON application of Rev. Thomas Mulleday by
George D. Coad, e'q. his attorney-It is or-
dered by the Orphans' Court of Saint Mary's
county, th's 11th day of August, 1840, that admi-
nistration on the personal estate of William H.
J. Dorsey, late of Saint Mary's county, deceased,
will be granted at the discretion of the Court or or
after the second Tuesday in October next, unless
cause be shown to the contrary, provided a copy of
this order is published in the Globe newspaper, in
the City of Washington, once a week until the said


second Tuesday in October next.
In testimony that the aforegoing is a true copy,
taken from one of the records of proceedings of
the Orphans' Court of Saint Mary's county, I
have hereunto subscribed my name, and set my
seal of office, this 11th day of August, in the
year of our Lord 1840.
G. COMBS, Register.
Leonardtown, Aug 31, 1840-lawi2O
ENGLISH BOOKS.-Just received for sale
by F. TAYLOR.
Gulliver's Travels, 1 octavo vol. embellished
with more than 400 beautiful engraved illustra-
tions from designs by Granville.
Charles Lamb's Works, complete in 1 vol. 8vo.
Illustrated edition of La Martine's Travels in
the Holy Land, many engravings.
The complete Works of La Marline, in French,
all in one large 8vo vol. Brussells edition.
Miscellanies and Literature, by D'Israeli, 1 vol.
8vo.
Hook's lr'v..ry of Rome, 3 vols. 8vo.
Oxford Bibles, with very beautiful steel en-
travings, numerous.
The Complete Works of Beaumont and Fletcher,
in 2 vols. 8vo.
The Dramat c Works of Massinger and Ford,
complete in one 87o vol.
All the Dramalic Works of Ben Johnson, com-
plete in 1 vol. 8vo.
The Ladies' Flower Garden, by Mrs. Landon,
1 vol. 4to, fil ed with splendidly colored groups of
Flowers.
And many others, of which the list will be con-
tinued in a subsequent advertisement. Sept 7


ROTHER JONATHAN, the largest and
most beautiful newspaper in the world-!
larger, by fifty oquase inches, than any other news-
paper in the United States-published Saturdays,
at 162 Nassau street, New York. Price three dol-
lars a year. Two copies for five dollars.
The proprietors of this mammoth sheet-the
"Great Western" among the nc wspapers-have
the pleasure of spreading before the reading public
a weekly periodical, containing a greater amount
and variety of useful and entertaining miscellany,
than is to be found in any similar publication in
the world.
Fach number of the paper contains as large an
amount of reading matter as is found in volumes of
ordinary duodecimo, which cost S'2, awd more than
is contained in a volume of Irving's Columbus, or
Bancroft's History of America, which cost $3 a
volume; and all for three dollars a year. For $5
two copies will be forwarded one year, or one copy
two years.
Since the publication of our original prospectus,
the Brother Jonathan has been enlarged, and its
size, ample before, has been so much increased,
that much more than the former quantity of the
most interesting literature of the day is embraced
in its immense capacity. Selections from all the
most prominent and celebrated writers of the day
assist in swelling its contents; and whatever is new,
rich, or rare, is immediately transferred to its
columns. All the contributions to periodicals of
American writers of repute appear in its pages; and
the issues of the foreign press are laid under con-
tributions, as soon as received in this country. To
the Miscellaneous and Literary Department, the
closest attention is paid; and in all the selections
and original contributions, strict care is devoted to
avoid all that may touch upon the opinions of any
party in religion or politics.
Experience having taught us that we had marked
out a path for ourselves, in which all sorts of peo-
ple delight to follow, the Brother Jonathan shall
continue, as it began, to be a bold, gentle, weighty,
ligift, grave, merry, serious, witty, smooth, dash-
ing, inrit. ine, inspired, and incomparable news-
paper. It shall be a stupendous mirror wherein all
the world will stand reflected. It shall contain the
most beautiful of Novels, Romances, and Stories
for both sexes-Fairy Tales for lovers of the mar-
vellous-Legends for antiquarians-Pasquinades
for wit mongers-Nuts and Raisins for short-winded
readers-Serenades for musical lovers-Sonnets
for ladies-Sentiment for old bachelors-Statistics
for politicians-and Lectures, Sermons, Criticisms,
Epigrams, &c. &c. &c. for all the world.
Letters should be addressed to
WILSON & COMPANY,
Publishers of the "Brother Jonathan,"
March 13-tawtf New York.

A COLLECTION of Political Writings of
William Leggett, selected- and arranged,
with a preface, by Theodore Sedgwick, in two
volumes, is for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,
April 14 Four doors west of Brown's Hotel.

SAWS OF ETIQUETTE, or Short Rules
S and Reflections for Conduct in Society: by
a gentleman. I pocket volume, price-50 cents.
Also, The Canons of G.,od Breeding, for gentle-
men: by the author of Laws vi Etquette. 1 small
volume, price 50 cents. Giving hints on personal
appearance and apparel, on manner, on conversa-
tion, behavior on particular occasions, on good
breeding, on morning culls, evening visits, on re-
ceiving company, &c. &c. &c. For sale by
June 2F. TAYLOR.
KILLER'S PATENT AIR-HRATUNG
IISTOVE-For producing an equal distribu
tion of heat in Rooms, Halls,Academies, Churches,
Steamboats, Railroad Cars, &c. Also, for warm-
ing several apartments by one stove.-Combining
all the advantages of the Stove and Furnace.
A lot of the above invaluable Stoves has been
received, and for sale at Francis Naylor's Tin
and Sheet Iron Factory, Pennsylvania avenue,
south side, near Ttinrl street, west. Comfort,
economy, and neatness, combined; all who have
an eye to those three essentials, would do well to
call and examine before purchasing other Stoves.
ADVANTAGES.
I. Durability.-The ,case can never burn out.
The interior Stove is rendered stronger and more
durable by the patent flange conductors.
2. Comfort.-It ditrituies a mild, summer-like
temperature equally in every part, so that it is not
uncomfortable near the Stove, from the heat, nor
uncomfortable at a distance, from the cold.
3. Economy.-A considerable amount of fuel s
saved by securing the radiated heat usually lost.
4. Security.-No injury is done to furniture or
goods by radiation.
5. Conoenicnce.-Several apartments may be
heated agreeably by one Stove. Though intended
for the Parlor and Hall, it may, if preferred, be
used to heat them from below, in the manner of a
furnace.
6. Cleanness.-No dust from the coal is thrown
out, nor does the exterior of the Stove lose its color
mom heat.
7. Ease of management.-The management is
simple and similar to that of a common Stove.
8. Ventilation.-I has an arrangement for ad-
mitting the air to be heated, in any way desired.
TESTIMONIALS.
From J. B. Burleigh, esq. No. 29, Fayette street,
Baltimore.
"Mr. Miller put up his Patent Air-heating Stove
in my office about two months ago. It keeps up a
lively circulation of heated air, and has decided
advantages over any that I have ever seen in use
in regard to health, comfort, and economy.-March
1839.
From Rev. E. Hutchinson, Principal of Academy,
Fayette streer,-Baltinwre.
"I have used Mr. Miller''.i" u" ly invented Air
heating Stove for -veral mi--i.and am con-
vinced that it is much ,iper,..r io vr,'l other Stmve
that I have seen. It i- .-r'- e-n'iructed',it it may
be made to heat several r.',.mn witr verv lioteytra
expense. I cordially ie-..-mn end it 1. he purlhIo
From Mr. D. Barnum, Proprietor of the City Hotel,
Baltimore.
"I put up two of Mr. Miller's Air-heating
Stoves in my City Hotel, and have found them
admirably adapted both to large and small rooms,
in preserving an equality of temperature, and in my
opinion more conducive to health and comfort than
the ordinary Stoves. I think them also much more
econotmical in respect to saving of fuel."
From Messrs. .McLauglin and Stannari.
"We have used Mr. Miller's Air-heating Stoves,
and our opinion coincides with that expressed
ahoc e by Mr. Barnurm.-Balti more, Feb. 1839.
Extracts from Public .Notices.
"The invention of Mr. James Miller of this
city strikes us as being unsurpassed by any of the
modern apparatus for warming apartments. It
'tffiie-s a mild and uniform heat throughout the room,
and is so constructed that two apartment may be
heated with it at about the same expense of fuel as
is required in ordinary Stoves for one."
Baltimore Transcript and Coin. Gazette
"We attended the examination of an Air-heat-
ing Stove placed in the Reading room of Mr. Bar-
num's City Hotel. It has a decided superiority
over every other Stove which we have seen.
[February, 1839.-Ba/t. Republican.
From Rev..1. C. Thomas, Philadelphia.
"I have had opportunities of witnessing the ope-
ration of Mr. Miller's Air-Heating Stove, and have
no hesitation in recommending it for several desira-
ble qualities: 1st, The inconvenience and discom-
fort of radiation is nearly avoided, thus adapting
the stove to school rooms and meetings for public


worship, and 2d, the fuel consumed is considerably
less than was required to produce an equal degree
of heat, by the Stove removed to make room for
Mr. Miller's improvement.-March, 1839.
Extract from a letter ef Rev. S. W. Fuller, Phila-
delphia.
"DEAR Sia: The model of Air-Heating Stove,
submitted to my examination last winter, led me
to believe that in several essential provisions it
was decidedly superior to any Stove I had ever
seen, and I am happy to add, that my belief in its
superior properties was soon after fully confirmed
by seeing one of the Stoves in operation. Your ef-
forts and success in providing a Stove so well cal-
culated to promote the comfort of your fellow-citi-
zeus, deserve, and I doubt not will receive the pa-
tronage of a discerning public."--May, 1839.
From the Proprietors of the Globe.
We are now using Miller's Stoves in our office,
and consider them superior to any we have ever
seen.
For sale at F. NAYLOR'S,
Nov 8-ly Pennsylvania avenue.

f)R. JEBB'S RHEUMATIC LINIMENT.-
Its operation is often immediate. The Li-
niment has frequently cured rheumatic affections,
of years standing, in four-and-twenty hours, and is
recommended with crnr.fi.ince a onr.e of ihe besi ap-
phcai.rsi lI;nc.rwn tfor chilLImn;, sInfness ol the
joint, nurnihneis, sprain., and bruises. Price, 50
cents per boule. For sale at
April 10-3m TODD'S Drug Store,