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The globe
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F.P. Blair ( City of Washington D.C )
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EDITED BY FRANCIS P. BLAIR
FRLANCIS P. BLAR & JOHN C. RIVES,
PROPRIETORS AND PUBLISHERS.
TERMS.
Daiy pa or. by ue year t10000
for IBM than a year, SI per month.
emui.weekiy piper by the year 6 00()
"'1r les Litan & year, 50 rCiae per month
subecripttornsto 0ie u1aly f'or lea than itwo, or to the Semi-
weakly for leethan four mon'thsB. will r,'t be reeled.
Ib e Cribers may d,wontknue their papers at any ume by pay-
in lir he iLme they have received them; but not unthout.
la who eUticribe for a year, And do not. ai the lime of
iulbcrnbing order a dI1Onltniuanrce at the end of it, will be
smuidered eubmbt)ere until they urder the paper to be topped
=id pay nrreaages
PUIOR Pol ADVMTT3INO.
Twelve line, or lew, three Instruona, 1 *I (0
Very addiimoal tineeruun. 0 25
Longer advenitemenL charged tn roportoe.
A Liberal discount Made to the whoadvartime bythe year.
AM payments to be made in adraice. Those who bare hot
an opportunitLy of paying otherwise, may remit by mail, at our
riak. poagae pad. The Poatmafet'i,'rtLri ote.fI such re-
mittance hail bea Butficiint rceiipt therefor. The notes ofany
Ipecle-payinf bank will be leceiveTd.
No attIlentio.n wil be iTen t r tuny order, unlmes the mon.y,
of a Poalnzater'a certijtatl u t1uZ it been ermittrd, ac-
iompaniesit t .
0t Letter# to the Profprfe,eo. trared with ptaTes, tiM
Ie taken out of tI/ec Poast Offe.
WASHINGTON AND ALEXANDRIA BOAT
-The sieamb.al JOSEPHI
JOHNSON, having reutmed
her trips on the above route,
will depart as followi, viz:
LHAVE WASHINUTOM LEAVE ALEXANDRIA,
At 10 and 12 a.m. At 9 and 11a.m.
At 4 and 6 p.m. I At 3 and C ?. pm.
fiz She will also make a daily morning trip be-
tween Georgelown and Alexandria. leaving Alex-
aidria at half past six o'clock, and Genrgeiown a
quarter before eightf, until farther notice.
July I IGNATIUS ALLEN, Captain.
FOR NORFOLK AND CONE RIVER.
Til E proprietors cof the
sieamer CHESAPEAKE
i have placed her on the
i line fur the lalson. She
will Ma ee irip to Norfolk. and one down the
PotOMNac to Cone river, Northumberland county,
Va. every week. She will take off and land pas-
sengers, at ihe different landings on the Potomac,
on both trips, going and returning.
DAYS OF STARTING.
Will leave WVahington for Norfolk, Friday
mornings, at 9 o'clock, and Alexandrta at 10. Re-
turning, she will leave Norfolk on Sunday eve-
nings, at 4 o'clock. Passage and fare, $6.
Will leave Washington on Tuesday mornings,
at 6 o'clock, and Alexandria at 7, for Cone river.
Returning, she will leave Cone on Wednesday
mornings, and arrive in Washington in time for
the evening train of cars for Baltimore. Thistrip
is got up for the accommodaiinu of' passengers on
the Potomac. Passage and fare as customary.
JAS. MITCHELL, Master.
THO. COOKENDORFER, Agent.
June 17-eodtfC



SXTRA ACCOMMODATION-WASH-
,l INGTON BRANCH HAILROAD.-On
and after Wednesday next, 1st April, a passenger
car will be dispatched daily (except Sunday) wiih
the tonnage rain, which leave. ibis city at 111
o'clock a. m. By this conveyance passengers are
afforded an opportunity of reaching Baltimore in
time to connect with the evening train of cars for
Philadelphia, or with the Western mail train at the
Srelay house, and thus enabling them it reach Phi.
Sladelphia by 11, and Fredericik by 81 o'clock the
same night. By order.
SAMUEL STETTIN 1US, Agent
March 30



S Orpic- or TAN'eoiTa'rT,oN B. & 0. R. R.
Wastitngion, July 10, 1840.
N OTICE.-On and after Monday next, ihe
13:h instant, the Evening Train of passenger
ears for Baltimore will be deepalched irom this
office at 4&, insteadof 4 o'clock, p. m.
By order: SAM'L STETrINIUS,
July 9-if Agent.
Splendid Carriages.
r*~.S ... PH"LIDELPIIA COJICH
WIW 9 XIJq.'F UF.qCTORY, A'eo. 2r8aind
d B- 90, Race st.-L. KNOWL.ES,
for A. KNOWLES, begs leave very respectl'ully
to return his grateful than ks to the citizens of Phila-
delphia, and to his friends throughout the Union,
for the large and increasing patronage he has re-
ceived since he dommenced business, and informs
them that he has now on hand, and is constantly-
finishirg, CARRIAGES of every pattern and de-
scription, which he will warrant both as to the du-
rability of the workmanship and elegance of finish.
In consequence of various circumstances, such
as the entire saving of the cost of transportation
and the expense of the damage incident thereto,
the saving of large commissions to agents, and the
reduction in the price of labor, he will sell car-
riages and other vehicles, manufactured in a first
rate and superior style, at thirty-five percent. un-
der the prices of last year.
All orders thankfully received and promptly
executed.
In consequence of his constant personal atten-
tion to the business in Philadelphia, he is able to
warrant that all carriages shall be in a superior
style of finish and workmanship to any heretofore
manufactured at Amherst, Massachusetts.
Carriages boxed up and sent to order to any part
of the Union, at the shortest notice.
N. B. York wagons of every pattern, finished in
the most superior manner, on hand, and will be
sold far below the prices of any which have been
heretofore offered for sale in this city.
L. K. having made arrangements with the
Trenton manufactory of Carriage Bows and best
Felloes, he will keep constantly on t and a general
assortment of all sizes and patterns of those arti-
cles, made of the very best materials, which he will
dispose of at reduced prices.
BUTLER'S EFFERVESCENT MAGNE-
SIAN APERIENT, for dyspepsia or mndi
geation, nervous debility, giddines", headache, aci-
dity of the stomach, habitual cost iveness, cutane-
ous diseases, gout, gravel, &c. and much valuedas
a gentle cooling purgative.
This desirable preparation has received the pa-
tronage of many eminent members of the profes-
sion, and from a discerning public many respecta-
ble and unsolicited testimonials of its efficacy as a
medicine have been elicited. With all the pleasing
qualities of a glass of soda water, it possesses the
active medicinal properties of the most approved
salinous purgatives; is pleasant to the palate, and
grateful to the stomach.
We are not in the habit of making out certifi-
cates of commendation for unlicensed quackeries,
but we do know of a nostrum, approved, too, by
the Faculty, that cannot be recommended too high-
ly to the attention of every family during the pre-
aent warm weather. It is denominated "Butler's
Effervescent Mognesian Aperient," and its medi-
cinal properties are admirably adapted to the alle-
viation and removal of the numerous bodily com-
plaints incidental to the summer season. We
doubt whither the whole Pharmacopitu offers a
more innocent and effective remedy, or a more
pleasant and palatable preventative. Having
seen its virtues tested in cases of severe headache
and threatened Cholera Morbus, we can conscien-


tiously testify concerning its utility.--Ed. ,New York
Evening Journal.
For sale at Todd's Drug Store
July 31
C CONVENTION WITH MEXICO.-The Cornm-
missioners appointed on the part of the Uni-
ted States, under the law df Congress to carry into
effect the Convention with the Mexican Republic
on the llth day of April, 1839, having met at the
city of Washington, prepared to enter, in conjunc-
lion wilh iheCommissioners of that Republic, upon
the duties of their commission, but the latter not
having arrived, have concluded to adjourn until
the 17th day ot August next, when, if the Mexican
SCommi.sioners-h,*l attend, the Board will orga-
nize and proceed to business. Claimants, in the
mean time, will forward their claims and documen-
tary evidence to the Department of State.
By order of the American Commissioners:
July 31-eo2w ALEX. DIM ITRY, Sec'y.
IJEW EXCHANGE OFFICE.-THOMAS
l W. PAIRO has opened (in connection with
Lessons, Pairo and Brother, of Baltimore, and H.
T. Pairo,of Richmond,) an Exchange and Broker's
Office in the house lately occupied by Win. S.
Nichole, esq. on Pennsylvania avenue, neac, 12th
street, where he will purchase and sell specie drafts,
Treasury notes, specie, uncurrent bank notes, drafts
on Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Richmond,
Petersburg, ani Charleston, and he will receive
cash on deposiLte.
Office open from 8 i till 3 o'clok.


BY BLAIR & RIVES. "THE WORLD is GOVE NED TOO MUCoE," VOL. X .....No. 75

CITY OF' WASHINGTON. I -- WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 9, 1840.


CLAIMS ON MEXICO.
F'RANCIS A DICKINS, having undertaken
to prosecute claims before the commissioners
under the convention between the United States and
Mexico, offers his services to hose who may de-
sire the aidof an agent at Washington.
In this agency he has associated with him the
Hon. CoNELIUrs P. VAN NESS, formerly Governor
of the State of Vermont, and late Envoy Extra-
ordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United
SLalei in Spain.
Of Mr. VAN Nzss's ability as counsel it is un-
necessary to speak, and his knowledge of interna-
tional law, anid fiamlilisrity with the laws and lan-
guage of Spain, which are essentially the same as
tho.e of Mexico, will be of great advantage in in-
vestilgaiing these claims, and in presenting and
urging, them before the bcard.
The charge will hb moderate, and havereference
to the amount of the claim, and the degree of trouble
required.
''Mr. DIcINS''s office is on Penn-ylvarnia avenue,
between Fuller's Hotel and the Trieasury Depart-
ment, and his residence on 13th street, between
Penr, ylvania Avenue and F street.
All letters must be post paid. July II-Im

T O CLAIMANTS.--PRANCIS A. DICKINS
J contnues to u and rtake the agency of claims
before Congress, and other branches of The Go
government, including commissioners under treaties,
and the various public offices. He will attend to
pre-emption and other land claims, the procuring
of patents fbr public lands, and the confirmation
by Congress of grants and claims to lands; claims
for horses and other property lost in, or taken for,
the service of the United States; property destroyed
by the Indians, or while in the possession of the
United States; invalid, revolutionary, navy, wi-
dows' and half-pay pensions; claims for Revolu-
tionary services, whether for commutation, half-
pay, or bounty lands-as well those against the
State of Virginia as the United States; all claims
growing out of contracts with the Government, or
damages sustained in consequence of the action or
conduct of the Government; and indeed any busi-
ness before Congress or the public offices, which
may require the aid of an agent or attorney. His
charges will be moderate, and depending upon the
amount of the claim and the extent of the service.
He is also Agent for the American Life Insu-
rance and Trust Company, which has a capital of
wo millions of dollars paid in; and for the Balti-
more Fire Insurance Company.
Mr. F. A. Dickins is known to most of those
who have been in Congress within the last few
years, or who have occupied any public station a;
Washington.
His office is on Pennsylvania avenue,. second
door from 15th street.
All letters must be post paid. July 18-dly

EMOVAL.-E. AND S. S. ROCKWELL,
importers and manufacturers of watches,
clocks, jewellery, and silver ware, have removed
from 192 Broadway, to No. 9 Astor House, New
York, where they offer for sale, wholesale and re-
tail, a superb assortment of fine VWaichei of every
description, iuch as fine duplex, patent lever, an-
chor eacapement, and lepine, and a beautiful as-
sortment of French Mantel Clocks, all of which
are warranted first rate time-keepers, a very rich
assortment .of Jewellery, consisting of diamond,
cameo, mo.ac, and gold work of every fashionable
variety, an.] a splendidii ai.nr'ment -.l Silver Waie,
such as elegant sets of tea plate, silver forks, spoons,
and every other article of silver ware, all of which
are warranted of the best workmanship, and fine
standard silver. July 6-3w

TU'HE INDIAN VEGETABLE PILLS-
This extraordinary medicineis a P.wgatve
Medicine so justly balanced, and withal 5o namt-a
to the human constitution, that they cannot possibly
injure even the most delicate; at the same time,if used
in such a manner as to produce free evacuations by
the bowels, it is absolutely impossible for pain cr
distress, of any kind, to continue long in the body.
The reason is plain: they cleanse the system of
those humors which are opposed to health, and
therefore invalids may use them with a certainty of
always obtaining relief, and persevere in the use of
them, with an equal certainty of being cured.
In all disordered motions of the blood, called In
termittent, Remittent, Nervous, Inflammatory, and
Putrid
FEVERS,
The Indian Vegetable Pills will be found a certain
remedy; because they cleanse the Stomach and
Bowels of all bilious matter, and purify the blood;
consequently, as they remove the cause of every
kind of disease, they are absolutely certain to cure
every kind of Fever.
So also when morbid humors are deposited upon
the membrane and muscle, causing those pains, in-
flammations, and swellings, coilled
RHEUMATISM, GOUT, &c.
The Indian Vegetable Pills may be relied on as
always certain to give relief, and if persevered with
will most assuredly, and without fail, make a per-
fect cure of the above painful maladies. From
three to six of said Indian Vegetable Bills, taken
every night on going to bed, will, in a short time,
completely rid the body of all morbid and corrupt
humors: and rheumatism, gout, and pain of every
description, will disappear as if by magic.
For the same reason, when, from sudden changes
of atmosphere, or any other cause, the perspiration
is checked, and those humors which should pass
off by the skin, are thrown inwardly, causing head-
ache, nausea and sickness, pains in the bones, wa-
tery and inflamed eyes, sore throat, hoarseness,
coughs, consumption, rheumatic pains in various
parts of the body, and many other symptoms of
CATCHING COLD,
The Indian Vegetable Pills will invariably give im-
mediate relief. Three or four pills, taken at night
on going to bed, and repeated a few times, will re-
move all the above unpleasant symptoms and re-
store the body to even sounder health than it was
before. The same may be said of DIFFICULTY OF
BHREATHING, or ASTHMA. The Indian Vegetable
Pills will loosen and carry off, by the stomach and
bowels, those tough phlegmy humors which stop up
the air cells of the lungs, and are the cause of the
above dreadful complaint.
It should also be remembered the Indian Vege-
table Pills are certain to remove pain in the side,
oppression, nauseau and sickness, loss of appetite,
costiveness, a yellow tinge of the skin and eyes,
and every other symptom of
LIVER COMPLAINT;
Because they purge from the body those corrupt
and stagnant humors which, when deposited upon
the Liver, are the cause of the above dangerous
complaint. They are also a certain preventive of
APOPLEXY AND SUDDEN DEATH;
Because they carry off those humors which, ob-
structing the circulation, are the cause of a rush
or determination of blood to the head-giddiness,
especially on turning suddenly round-blindness-
drowsiness-ioss of memory-inflammation of the
brain-insanity, and every other disorder of the
mind.
ONE WORR TrO THE SEDENTARY!
Those who labor within doors should remember
that they frequently breath an atmosphere which
is wholly unfit for the proper expansion of the
lungs, and at the same time, owing to want of ex-
ercise, the bowels are not sufficiently evacuated-
the blood becomes impure, and headache, indiges-
ion, palpitation of the heart,.and many other dis-
agreeable symptoms, are sure to follow.
THE INDIAN VEGETABLE PILLS
Being a cleanser of tie Stomach and Bowels, and
a DItKCv PuatiRiB of the Blood, are certain not


only to remove pain or distress of every kind from
the body, but, if used occasionally, so as to keep
the body free from those humors which are the
CAUSE of EVERa MALADY UDnER HEAVEN, they
will most assuredly promote such a just and equal
circulation of the Blood, that those who lead a se-
dentary life will be enabled to enjoy
SOUND HEALTH,
And the fluids of the body will be restored to such
a state of purity, that DISEASE OF ANY KIND
WILL BE ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE.
.gents.-RosERT, FARNHAM, WASHINGTON CITY;
Wm. G. Cook, North Gay street, Baltimore.
OFFICE AND GENERAL DEPOT, 169
Race street, PHILADELPHIA. Feb 7-1y


T RANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY-.,MEDI-
CAL DEPARTMENT.-The Lectures will
commence, as usual, on tihe first Monday inNo-
vember, and close on the la-ItL day of February, and
be delivered by the following faculty, viz.
BEzNJ. W. DUDLEY, M. D Prof. of Anatomy and
SurgeryI
JAMES M. Boss, M. D, Adjunct Prof. of Anato-
my and Surgery.
JAMES C. Caoss, M. D. Prof. cf Institutes and
Medical Jurieprudence.
NATHAN R. SMTiT, M. D. Prof. of Theory and
practice of Medicine.
WILLIAM H. RiCHARDsON, M. D. Prof. of Ob-
stetrics and diseases of women and children.
TunoAS D. MITrcnELL, M. D. Prof. of Materia
Medical and Therapeutics.
RoPsRT PETER, M. D. Prof. of Chemistry and
Pharmacy.
The cost of a full course of Lectures is $105.
The Matriculation fee, entitling the use of the Li-
brary, is $5. The Dissecting ticket, (which is op-
tional with the pupil,) is $10. The Graduation
fee is 20. Good boarding and lodging, including
fuel and light, from $2 50 to $4 per week.
Large additions have been made, during the past
and present year, to the Library, Apparatus, and
Museum; and the new and cmrnmodius Medical
Hall will be seady for the use of the Deparlment.
The notes of good and solveat banks, in the
States whence the pupils respectively come, will be
taken for Professors' tickets.
ROBERT PETER,
Dean of Faculty.
Lexington, June 27, 1840. July 7-law6w
U UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.-The next
session of this institution will commence on
the first day of September, and terminate on the
4th of July ensuing.
The schools of the University, with their ics'pac-
tive Professors, are,
I. Ancient Languages-Da. GESNER HARRI-
SON.
2. Modern Languages-Dr. GEROMB RLETTER-
MANN.
3. Mathematics-CHARLES BONNYCASTLE.
4. Nattval Philosophy-WM. B. ROGERS.
5. Civil Engineering-The subjects of which
are divided between Professors BONNYCASTLE and
ROGERS.
6. Chemistry and Materia Medica.-Dr. JOHN
P. Emmir.
7. Medicine-Dr. HEiry HOWARD.
8. Anatomy and Surgery-Dr. JAMEs L. CA-
SELL.
9. Moral Philosophy-RGonoE TuCKER.
10. Law-JoHN A. G. DAvis.
In the department of Mathematics is included
Mixed MalthemaiTcs; in that of Engineering, Mi-
neralogy and Geology; in that of Moral Philosophy,
Belles-Lntres, Logic, and Political Economy; and
in that of Law, besides Municipal Law in all its
branches, the Law of Nature and Nations, the sci-
ence of Government, and Constitutional Law.
STo be admitted into this institution, the applicant
must be sixteen years of age; but the Faculty may
dispense with this requisition in favor of one whose
brother is a student.
Every student is free to attend the schools of his
choice; but if he be under twenty-one years of age,
he shall attend at least three; unless he be auiho-
rized by his parent or guardian, in writing, or by
ihe Faculty, for good cause shown, to attend a less
number.
It is required of students to wear, on public oc-
casions, &c. a pr-citibed uniform, consisting of
dark gray cloth; and they are prohibtied fiom pur-
chasing, while they remain -tudenis, any othr than
uniform clothes: but ordinarily, and about the Uni-
versity, they are allowed to wear any cloihtng
which they may have brought with them.
The Faculty may allow any man of good moral
chbaracier Atbove the Age of twenty-three t1.) aend
the lectures in any of the schools of the Lni. er.itv,
and to reside out of the precincts, exempt from the
regulations prescribed for the government of stu-
dents, except those which enjoin respectful and or-
derly deportment.
By a resolution of the Faculty, ministers of the
Gospel, and young men preparing for the minis-
try, may attend any of the schools of the Universi-
ty, without the payment of fees to the professors.
The expenses of the session of ten months are
as follows:
Board, washing, lodging and attendance $125
Rent of dormitory-$16; for half, when occu-
pied by two students 8
Fuel and candles estimated at 20
Use of Library and public rooms 15
Fees, if only one professor be attended, $50;
if two, to each $30; if more than two, to
each $125, say 75

Total, exclusive of clothes, books, and poker
money$ .243
In the school of law there is an extra fee of $20,
payable by students attending the senior class.
The allowance for clothes is limited by the enact-
ments to $100; and for'pocket money to $40.
Every student resident within the precincts
must, on matriculation, deposit with the patron all
the money, drafts, &c. under his control, intended
to defray his expenses while at the University, or
on his return thence to his home; and the
amount so deposited must be sufficient to pay his
fees, dormitory rent, for the use of the library and
public rooms, three months' board, and to purchase
the text books, &c. he may want at the commence-
ment. All funds subsequently received by him for
the purposes aforesaid, must also be deposited with
the patron, who has charge of his disbursements,
and is entitled to a commission of 2 per cent. for
his services.
WILLIS H. WOODLEY is proctor and patron of
the Institution.
The act of the Legislature prohibiting merchants
and others, under severe penalties, from crediting
students, will be strictly enforced. The license to
contract debts, which the chairman is authorized to
grant, will be confined (except where the parent or
guardian shall otherwise, in writing, request,) to
cases of urgent necessity; and these, it is hoped
that parents and guardians will, as far as possible,
prevent from arising, by the timely supply of the
requisite funds.
Religious services are performed at the Universi-
ty every Sunday by the Chaplain, who is appointed
in turn from the four principal denominations of
the State.
J. A. G. DAVIS,
July 1l,--cpw4w Chairman of the Faculty.
RS. PORTER'S SEMINARY FOR YOUNG
LADIES, 41 street, Washington, D. C.-
The next term of this Institution will commence on
the first Mondary in September. The course of
studies includes both the useful and ornamental
branches of a finished education. It will be the
aim of the teachers to lead the pupils to a thorough
acquaintance with the studies in which they maybe
engaged, and at the same time so to discipline the
mind, to inspire such a love of knowledge as shall
fit them for continued self improvement, when the
period allotted to school education closes.
The scholastic year will be divided into two
terms of twenty-two weeks each. It is very desira-
ble that, as far as possible, the pupils should be
present at the opening of the term.
Having very spacious and pleasant accommoda-
tions, Mrs. Porter will receive a few young ladies
into her family, and bestow upon them every at-
tention that a parent can desire.
The following are the course of studies, and
terms per quarter:
vIaST DIVISiON.
Arithmetic, Geography, and History, Orthography,
Reading, and Writing, $5 00
SECOND DIVISION.


The above branches continued, with Grammar, Na-
tural Philosophy, Astronomy, Botany, Goodrich's
Ecclesiastical History, &c. $8 00
THIRD DIVISION.
Algebra, Geometry, Chemistry, Rhetoric, Moral
and Intellectual Philosophy, Burriti's Geography
of the Heavens, Furgus's Natural Theology,
&c. $10 00
French, by a highly approved native teacher, 6 00
Latin, 5 00
Drawing and Painting, 6 00
Music on the Piano, 18 00
Use of Plane, 2 00
All the pupils are required to attend to a weekly
exercise in composition, and also a given Wloon
frnm the Bible.


/T RAVELS IN SOUTHEASTERN ASIA-
1. embracing Hindostan, Malaya, Siam, and
China, with Notices of numerous Missionary Sta-
tions, and a full account of the Burman Empire,
with Dissertations, Tables, etc. by Howard Mal-
colm, in 2 vols.; third edition. Passages in Foretgn
Travel, by Isaac Appleton Jewett, in 2 vols. Also,
Rambles in Europe, or a Tour through France,
Italy, Switzerland, Great Britain, and Ireland, in
1836, by Fanny W. Hall, :n 2 vols. are for sale by
WM. M. MORRISON, 4 dooius west of Brown's
hotel. June 27

OFFICE OF CoailissARV GENERAL OF St'nsISTiENCE
Washington, July Lt, 1840.
SEPARATE proposals will be received at this
office un:il ihe first day of October next, for the
delivery of provisions in bulk for ihe uze of the
troops of the United States, upon inspection, as fol-
lows:
AT NEW ORLEANS.
100 barrels of Pork
200 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
90 bushels of new a white field Beans
1,500 pound of good hard Soap
40 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT THE PUBLICtU LANDING, SIX MILES FROM FORT
TOI SON, MOUTH OF THE CHIEMICHI.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh supeifine Flour
360 bushels of new whitv Seld Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
April, 1841, and to leave Natchitoches by 20th
February, 1841.
AT PORT SMITH, ARKANSAS.
1,000 barrels of Pork
2,000 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
900 bushels of new white field Beans
15,000 pounds of good hard Soap
400 bushels of good clear dry Salt
The whole to be delivered in all the month of
May, 1841.
AT ST. LOUIS, OR JEFFERSONBARRACKS, MISSOURI.
500 barrels of Pork
1,000 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
450 bushels of new white field Beans
7,500 pounds of good hard Soap
200 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT FORT CRAWFORD, PRAIRIE DU CHIiEN, MISSIS-
SIPPI RIVER.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field Beans
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
2,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
80 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the 1st of June,
1841.
AT FORT SELLING, ST. PETERS.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360' bushels ofnew white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
4,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the 15th June,
1841.
AT FORT WINNEBAGO, ON THE FOX RIVER, AT
THE PORTAGE OF FOX AND WISKONSIN RIVERS.
300 barrels of Pork
600 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
270 bushels of new white field Beans
4,500 pounds of good hard Soap
3,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
120 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the first of June,
1841.
AT FORT HOWARD, GREEN BAY.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field Beans
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
2,000 pounds of good hard tdllow Candles
80 bushels good clean iry Salt
The whole to 'be deivoc.'ed ;' the first of June,
1841.
AT FORT BRADY, SAULT DE STE. MIARIE.
100 barrels of Pork
200 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
90 bushels of new white field Beans
1,500 pounds of good hard Soap
1,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
40 bushels of good clean dry Salt
The whole to be delivered by the first of June,
1841.
AT HANCOCK BARRACKS, HOLTON, MAINE.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
4,000 pounds of good hard tallow Candles
160 bushels of good clean dry salt
The whole to be delivered in December, 1840,
and January and February, 1841.
AT NEW YORK.
400 barrels of Pork
800 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
360 bushels of new white field Beans
6,000 pounds of good hard Soap
160 bushels of good clean dry Salt
AT BALTIMORE.
200 barrels of Pork
400 barrels of fresh superfine Flour
180 bushels of new white field Beans
3,000 pounds of good hard Soap
80 bushels of good clean dry salt.
NOTE.-All bidders are requested to extend the
amount of their bids for each article, and exhibit
the total amount of each bid.
The periods and quantities of each delivery at
those posts where they are not specified, will be one-
fourth 1st June, lIt September, 1st December, 1841,
and 1st March, 1842.
The hogs of which the pork is packed to be
fattened on corn, and each hog to weigh not less
than two hundred pounds, and consist of one hog
to each barrel, excluding the feet, legs, ears, and
snout. Side pieces may be substituted for the
hams. The Pork is to be first salted with Turks
Island salt, and then carefully packed with the
same article, In pieces not exceeding ten ponds
each. When the packing has been completed, the
contractor must furnish to this office a certificate
from the packer, that the Pork has been so salted
and packed. The Pork to be contained in sea-
soned heart of white oak or white ash barrels, full
hooped; the Beans in water tight barrels, and
the Soap and Candles in strong boxes of conveni-
ent size for transportation. Salt will only be re-
ceived by measurement of thirty-two quarts to the
bushel. The Candles to have cotton wicks. The
provisions for Prairie du Chien and St. Peters,
must pass St. Louis for their ultimate destination,
by the 15th April, 1841. A failure in this parti-
cular will be considered a breach of contract, and
the Department will be authorized to purchase to
supply these posts.
The provisions will be inspected at the time and
place of delivery, and all expenses to be paid by
contractors until they are deposited at such store
houses as may be designated by the agents of the
Department.
The Commissary General reserves the privilege
of increasing or diminishing the quantities, or of
dispensing with one or more articles, at any time
before entering into contract, and also of increas-
ing'or reducing the quantities of each delivery one-
third, subsequent to contract, on giving sixty days'
previous notice.
Bidders, not heretofore contractors, are required
to accompany their proposals with evidence of their
ability, together with the names of their sureties,
whose responsibility must be certified by the Dis-
trict Attorney, or by some person well known to
the Government, otherwise their proposals will not
be acted on.
Advances cannot be made in any case; and evi-


dence of inspection and full delivery will be re-
quired at this office before requisition will be made
upon the Treasury for payment, which will be ef-
fected in such public money as may be convenient
to the points of delivery, the places of purchase, or
the residence of the contractors.
No drafts on this office will be accepted or paid
under any circumstances.
Each proposal will be sealed in a separate en-
velope, and marked "Proposals for furnishing
Army Subsistence." GEO. GIBSON, C. G. S.
fTiHE STUDENT'S MANUAL, designed, by
.. specific directions, to aid in forming and
strengthening the intellectual and moral character
and habits of the student, by Rev. John Todd;
ninth edition, is for sale by
W.M, MORRISON,


HARLOTTE HALL SCHOOL.-The an-
nual exhibition and examination of the
pupils of this school, held on the 29th, 30th,
and 31st ultimo, the Trustees are happy to
say, have been such as fully to sustain the
high character which this Academy has so
long and deservedly enjoyed. They have only to
regret that parents and guardians, who patronize
this institution, and the public, who feel interested
in the cause of education, did not more numerously
avail themselves of the opportunity to witness the
proficiency of the students in their respective classes.
The duties of this institution will recommence on
the last Monday of August, under the direction of
Dr. Charles Kraitsir, with the co-operation of two
efficient assistants, namely, Mr. Charles A. F.
Shaw, in the Mathematical, Mr. Wm. C. Barnes,
in the Classical department. Dr. Kraitsir is a gen-
.eman of high literary attainments, and of whom
it is deemed unnecessary to say more than to refer
to the publication respecting this school in the
Globe and National Intelligencer of June last, and
to express our hearty concurrence in the high testi-
timony, therein borne, to his scholarship and capa
city as a Principal of an Academy.
Thecourse of instruction in this school is thorough,
and not merely theoretical, but practical also, by
blending intellectual, moral and physical education.
To the branches heretofore taught will be added, at
ihe cpiion of parents or guardians, the French lan-
guage, Drawing, and Fencing. An opportunity of
learning other modern languages will also be
offered.
Terms of tuition-in Greek, Latin, and French,
$7; in English branches $4 50, per quarter.
Boarding at the Steward's house, or with fami-
lies in the neighborhood, with washing and bed-
ding, $25, without bedding $23 75 per quarter.
Students wishing to avail themselves of the op-
portanity of learning Latin, French, or some other
language by conversation, may be accommodated
with boarding at the principal's house.
The situation of Charlotte Hall is surpassed by
that of no other place in this country, as regards
salubrity and absence of allurements hostile to edu-
cation and to proficiency in knowledge.
JOSEPH F. SHAW.
By order of the board of Trustees.
C OLUMBIAN COLLEGE, DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA-The Lectures in the Medical
Department of this Institution will commence on
the first Monday in November, annually, and con-
tinue until the first of March.
During this period, full courses will be delivered
on the various branches of Medicine by
THOMAS SEWALL, M. D. Piofessor of Pa-
thology and the Practice of Medicine.
THOMAS P. JONES, M. D. Professor of Che-
mistry and Pharmacy.
HARVEY LINDSLY, M. D. Professor of Ob-
stetrics, and the Diseases of Women and Children.
THOMAS MILLER, M. D. Professor of Ana-
tomy and Physiology.
JOHN M. THOMAS, M. D. Professor of Ma-
teria Medica and Therapeutics.
J. FREDERICK MAY, M. D. Professor of
Surgery; late Professor of Surgery in the Univer-
sity of Maryland.
SAMUEL C. SMOOT, M. D. Demonstrator
of Anatomy.
The Medical College is situated at the corner of
10th and E streets, equi-distant from the Capitol
and the President's House.
In the arrangements of this building, and the
organization of the school, particular reference has
been had to the study ot Practical Anatomy, a
branch which the student will enjoy peculiar facili-
ties for cultivating.
The Professor of Surgery will show all the ope-
rations upon the recent subject, and afford the stu-
dent an opportunity of repeating the more impor-
tant ones with his own hand.
The Professor of Chemistry has a complete
Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus.
The Professor of Obstetrics will illustrate his
lectures by obstetrical apparatus, and an ample
collection of preparations and drawings.
As there are many young men of talent and
worth in different parts of our country who, from
restricted circumstances, are unable to' avail them-
selves of the benefit of public lectures, the Profes-
sors have resolved to admit, gratuitously, two such
students from each of the States, and one from
each of the Territories. In order, however, to
guard against individuals whose education and cha-
racter do not qualify them to become useful mem-
bers of the profession, the selection is placed in the
hands of the Senators and Delegates of Congress,
each of whom has the right to select one student
from his respective State or Territory, and whose
certificate of selection will be a passport to all the
lectures, by paying only, on entering the school,
the usual matriculating fee of five dollars.
The entire expense, for a Course of Lectures by
all the Professors, is $70. Dissecting Ticket $10;
optional with the student.
The requisites for graduation are, that the can-
didate shall have attended the lectures of each Pro-
fessor two full courses, or one full course in this
school, and one in some other respectable institu-
tion. He shall have entered his name with the
Dean of the Faculty as a candidate for graduation,
and delivered to him an inaugural dissertation on
some medical subject, thirty days before the
close of the session, and pass a satisfactory exami-
nation.
All persons who have attended two full courses
of lectures in this school, are entitled to attend suc-
ceeding courses free of expense.
The degrees are conferred by the authority of
the Columbian College, incorporated by an act of
Congress of the United States.
Good board can be procured at from three to
four dollars per week.
J. M. THOMAS, M. D.
Dean of the Faculty.
City of Washington, June 2, 1840-2awtlN

HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, that the sub-
scribers have obtained from the Orphans'
Court of Washington county, in the District of
Columbia, letters of administration on the personal
estate of James L. Anthony, late of Washington
county, deceased. All persons having claims
against the deceased, are hereby warned to exhibit
the same, with the vouchers thereof, to the sub-
scribers on or before the 14th day of July next;
they may otherwise, by law, be excluded frocs all
benefit of said estate. All persons indebted to said
estate are requested to make payment to Avis Bin-
ney Anthony, 12th street, 3d door above E.
Give under our hands this 14th day of July,
1840. A. BINNEY ANTHONY,
Administratrix,
THEODORE FOWLER, M. D.
July 25-w3w5 Administlrators

N EW MUSIC.-Just received the following
pieces of new Music, at the old established
store two doors east of the City Post Office:
The Lament of the Irish Emigrant, a ballad,
with beautiful vignette.
0 swift we go, a sleighing song,
Land of the Siuth; words by A. B. Meek, esq.
The Tippecanoe Club Qluick Step.
Hall's Qtuick Step, as played by the Boston
Baud, with beautiful vignette.
The Eglantine Waltz.
The Bella do
The Adelia do
The Queen's Country Dances.
Aug 11 W. FISCHER.

N EW GOODS.-W. FISCHER, importer and
dealer in fancy and staple stationery, draw-
ing materials, Terry's prepared parchment, Rod-
gers's best cutlery, perfumery, and fancy articles,


takes pleasure in announcing the arrival (at New
York) of a part of his fall supply of goods from
England by the ship Westminster. A description
of th'm will be given in a future advertisement.

R. VAN BUREN'S LETTER.-Copies
of the "Workingman's Advocate," extra,
which contains Mr. Van Buren's excellent letter to
certain citizens of Elizat-eih City co. Virginia, can
be procured by appitcaton to HOBART BER-
RIAN, at the office of the Army and Navy Chro-
nicle, opposite the Navy Department. Price 25
cents per dozen, $1 for fifty, and #1 50 per hun-
dred. Aug 19-3t


C CENTRAL CLASSICAL SCHOOL, ELE-
VENTH STREET.-The exercises of the
subscriber's school will be resumed on Tuesday,
the 1st of September.
A quantity of second hand school furniture to be
disposed of on moderate terms.
Aug24- It S. G. BULFINCH.


MRS. PORTER'S SEMINARY FOR YOUNG
LADIES will reopen on Tuesday, the first
of September, instead of the first Monday, as at
first advertised.- Aug. 24


EXCELLENT HOUSEHOLD FURNI-
TURE, BRANDIES, GIN, AND WINES.
-I have on hand, at private sale, an excellent lot
of household furniture nearly all new-such as
Mahogany hair-seat Sofas and parlor Chars, Cen-
tre Tables
do. Dining and Card Tables, Workstands,
Wardrobes, and Bureaus
do. Sideboards, recumbent Chairs, hand-
Pier Table and Cabinet
do. Peir and Centre Tables, marble tops,
and two Piano Fortes
Very handsome Turkey Carpets and Persian
Rugs, Loo Table, Large gilt Mirrors, French
Plate, Toilet Tables and Stands, a variety cfcane,
rush, and wood seat Chairs, draw Toilet Glasses,
a variety of high and low post and other Bedsteads,
shuck Mattresses, with many other articles in the
line not necessary to be enumerated.
I have also on hand at private sale, upon time
to suit purchasers, Champagne and Cognac Bran-
dies, in half pipes, Holland Gin, 15 barrels supe-
rior old Monongahela Whiskey, quarters and
eighths casks Sherry and Madeira Wine, Cham-
pagne, Madeira Port, brown and pale Sherry, Ita-
lian Wines in bottles, boxes, and baskets, of one
dozen each, all of which will be sold low, and can
be recommended. EDWARD DYER,
Aug 24 Auctioneer and Corn. Merchant.
AGENCY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK.
-EDWIN C. ESTES, at No. 167 Pearl
street, offers his services to merchants, planters,
and others, in the purchase of every description of
foreign and domestic merchandise, as well as in
the sale of cotton.
He promises fidelity and promptness in filling
any order sent to him, and making returns for any
property entrusted to him for sale, and refers.to
Houn. R. Chapman, M. C. City of Washington.
Jos. Brewster, NwYork.
Lester, Holmes and Co. New or
P. Fanning, Norwich, Connecticut.
George and A. B. Hager, Boston.
Fuerson, Dale and Co. New Orleans.
Keyes and Roberts, New Orleans.
Gen. J. W. Garth, Decatur, Ala.
John J. Massey, Pickensville, Ala.
Hon. David C. Neal, Wetumka, Ala.
Bull and Files, Mobile, Ala.
I. D. Fuller,I } Moble Aa
Hon. J. L. Martin, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
C. C. Norvell, Nashville, Tenn.
D. A. Smith, esq. Jacksonville, Ill.
Jas. Brown, Oxford, Miss.
R. M. Williamson, Jackson, Miss.
Win. T. Lewis, Woodville, Miss.
Aug 13-2aw6m*
E CAREFUL OF YOUR COLDS.-Many
B people are very apt to consider a cold but a
trifling matter, and to think that "it will go away
of itself in a day or two," and they give themselves
no trouble about it. But to such we would say, "be
careful of your colds"-do not tamper with your
constitutions. If you desire to live to "a good old
age," be careful to take such remedies as will
effect an easy and a speedy cure. Da.
SWAYNE'S COMPOUND SYRUP OF PRUNUS
VIRGINIANA, or WILD CHERRY, has cured
more colds than any other medicine offered for
sale in this country. The certificates of cures
effected by this invaluable medicine, which the
proprietor is daily receiving, are or the most grati-
fying character, and tend to show its sanative pro-
perties, and the high rank it holds in public estima-
tion.-Medical Definer.
For sale at the book store of R. FARNHAM,
between 9th and 10th streets, sole agent for the city
of Washington.
PATENT OFiCE, August 7, 1840.
N the petition of William Beach, of the city
of Philadelphia, praying for an extension of
the patent granted to said William Beach for an
improved Plough, for seven years from the expira-
tion of said patent, which takes place on the 27th
of June, 1841,
It is ordered that said petition be heard at the
Patent Office, on the first Monday in January,
1841, next, at 12 o'clock, m. and all persons are
notified to appear and show cause, if any they
have, why said petition ought not to be granted.
Ordered, also, that this notice be published in the
Globe, printed at Washington city; the Pennsylva-
nian, published at Philadelphia, Pa; and the Bos.
ton Morning Post, printed at Boston, Mass. once a
week for four weeks, previous to the said first
Monday in January, 1841.
H. L. ELLSWORTH,
Commissioner of Patents.
N. B. The above papers will publish the above
notice and send the account to the Patent Office.
August 8-law4w H. L. E.
ERY LARGE AND DESIRABLE RESI-
DENCE FOR RENT.-Will be rented, and
possession given immediately, that very large and
desirable three story brick house, lately occupied
by Aaron Vail, esq. north of the President's
House, and fronting the public square. It is a
very large airy building, with extensive back build-
ings, carriage houses and stables, all substantially
enclosed and in good order for the reception of a
tenant. Any gentleman wishing to view the pre-
mises, can do so on application to Mr. Baty, who
is in charge of the same, and occupies the back
buildings. To a good tenant, the rent will be
made to suit. Application to be made to me, at
my auction store on Pennsylvania avenue.
Aug 24W EDWARD DYER.
IANOS.-Mr. WAGLER has just selected
three Vienna Piano Fortes, which he hopes
will suit all lovers of music. He believes this to
be the "appointed time" for purchase or exchange,
to smooth away the dulness of the season, (politics
always excepted.) And although a piano may be
found at every spring or watering place, he thinks
a home piano will answer in the end full as well.
Please call at the Piano-room on H street.
E DUCATION.-The subscriber respectfully
informs his friends and the public generally,
that his school (which has been closed for a short
time) will be re-opened on Monday, the 17th inst.
in that commodious room over the Western mar-
ket, for the instruction of youth in the following
branches of an English education, viz: Orthogra-
phy, Reading, Writing, Grammar, Arithmetic, Ge-
ography, and History. The Latin language will be
taught if required.
For terms of tuition apply at the school room,
where the most satisfactory testimonials of charac-
ter and qualifications for the performance of the
above duties will be exhibited.
Aug 12-3t JOHN M. ALLISON
1,200 CARDS PERRYIAN PENS.
W FISCHER has just opened twelve hun-
dredcards of patent Metallic Pens, which
he has recently imported direct from the patentees,
Messrs. James Perry and Co. of London, embrac-
ing every description of pens made by these unri-
valled manufacturers. Among them are two kinds
entirely new, called the Varnished and Black Ra-
ven Pens. All of which are offered at wholesale
and retail, on the mest reasonable terms, at Sta-
tioner's Hall. August 29
T OOTH ACHE! TOOTHACHE!! TOOTH
ACHEO!!-WM. BROWN, Chemist, 481
Washington street, Boston, Mass. has invented an
article that will remove this tormenting pain-re-
move all soreness of teeth, and fit them to be filled;
and will remove all unpleasant smell ofthe breath
when occasioned by defective teeth. It is consi-
dered by the inhabitants of Boston a great and
valuable discovery; thousands have already availed
themselves of this never failing remedy. For the
genuine article, call for "Win. Brown's Extract of


Gall and Kreosote," and observe my signature
For sale at TODD'8 Drug Store.


(
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I
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Chansey John S.
Day Mrs. Cecilia
Downes Con. John
Day Geo. S.
Day Agnes
Drake John
Diggs Mrs. Norah
Diggs Rachael
Dove A.
DeKrafftI J. W. 2
Douglass Dr. Chas.

Evans Benj.
Evans Miss Caroline B
Eustis Alexander B.
English Mrs. Julia

Flynn Simon
Fleet Julia
Fouke Jos.
Fleet James H.
France Miss Elizabeth
Fagans Geo. W. 2
Forrest Miss Eliza

Gantt Mrs. Rosa
Geages George
Gates Mary Ann
Gray Miss Sarah
Goddard Thomas
Griffith Richard W.
Griffin William

Haugh Andrew
Hurst Lewis
Hughes Mrs. Anna M.
Hill Mrs. Catharine 2
Hodges G. Washington
Hume Mrs. B. E.
Hill Mrs. Mary B.
Hughes Dr. Ellis, U. S.
N. 2
Hall William H.
Hebb George V.
Hately James
Hubbert Joseph P.
Henry William
Hormeg Mathias
Hillery Walter

Johnson Dearborn
Jones Miss Rebecca M.
Jones Win. W.

King Enos
Koontz H.M.
Key P. Barton


D.
Dowling Dan. J.
DunlapGen. R.G. 2
Dixon James
DeKrafft Mrs. Ann Alex.
Dupre Edmond
Dawson Capt. Jas. L.
Diggs Miss Mary Jane
Dennison Mrs. Jennette
Dobbyn Mrs. Matilda

E.
Eberhard Maitin
Edelin Capt. J.
Eaton Robert A.

F.
Freeman Wilkerson
Fauntleroy D. U. S. N.
Fenwick James
Fenwick Gen. John R.
Fryer Mrs. Violetta Ann
Fletcher William
Ferguson Henry
G.
Getting Benj. E. 2
Gregory John 2
Gibbons Miss Martha
Gartrell Aaron M.
Graham Mrs. James D.
Graham Win. M.
Gibbons Miss Eliza
H. ,
Hipkins Robert S.
Herring Maj. E.
Hammond Mrs. Sarah 2
Harry Francis A.
SHuffman Leonard
Holman Miss M. E.
Henry Miss Elizabeth K.
" Hamilton Josiah
Hutchinson Mrs. John
Henderson Win. H. S.
Heidepohl Ernest
Horden James
Harrison Robert M.
Harris Mrs. Rhoda C.
Harris Mrs. Jane
Harbough John R.
J.
Ichheltmer A.
" Johnson Z. F.

K.
King Patr;ck
Kuhn J. M.


L.
Leach Mrs. Eliza Lindsay Dr. J. J. M.
Lloyd Thomas Lamar G. B.
Lee Capt. R. E. Laupns Philip
Leach Miss Elizabeth R. Lediugham Mr.
Lee Chas. Carter Leslie Henry P.
LycnHervy Leiber Sebastian
Linton Miss A. E. Lewis S.
M.
Milney Andrew Milledge Jghn
Munn Lt. Samuel 2 Maxwell Alexander
Moore Rev. Win. Matthews Nathaniel
Murphy Win. Martin Dr. Joseph
Martin Susan Mickum Theodore
Milliard Mrs. Louisa Mitchell Miss
Martin Thomas L. Manning Mrs. Martha 2
Matney Leonard Morris R. M.
Miller George Mirowski Edmond
Malloy Winm. or James Mitahell Win. S.
Boys Martin Edwin
Manning Miss Caroline Mattingly George
Morrison Geo. F. Marcy Labun
Mason Miss Catharine Murphy Patrick
Me.
McLain Capt. G. McKim Silas D.
McAllister Archibald McGinnis Col. John
.c.arrl.Joh


McCarrol John
Nye Marquis
Nixon R.
Ogden Francis B.
O'Donald Mrs. E.
Pratt Miss Mary E.
Plumb, jr. John
Page Dr. F. B.
Porter Win.
Philleo Dr. A. 2
Parkhurst J.

Reed David
Rose Hugh
Rains Capt. G. J.
Robinson George
Robertson James
Ridgway Johnson W.
Robins Thomas
Raggel Gotlib


N.
Nolan Cornelius
Newel B. A.
0.
Oliver Miss Margaret
O'Driacoll George
P.
Peosey Massey
Killings Mivs Mary
Perkins Capt. David 2
Posey John W. M.
Porter Win. L.

R.
Robert Jean
Rowan Lt. J. C.
Russell John H.
Rogers Capt. John
RoWk rell S.
Riagold Win. H.
Reynolds E. L.


S.
Swarm Edward Sutton Michael
Shiles John W. Shepherd T. J. 32
Scott David Seawell Capt. W.
Smith Mrs. Matilda R. Snyder J.
Stork Thomas Shepherd Jeremiah
Shaw John Shallink Sergeant A.
Smith William A. Saltmarsh D. A.
Smith Geo. B. Sewill Mrs. Maria
Smith George Serrin Daniel
Smith Mrs. Mary Simson Mr. (Gunsmith)
Sloan James Sanders James H.
Smith Win. of Culpeper Stoddart Dr. Charles B.
Staines Julia Simpson W. D.
Simpson Ann S. Stewart W. W.
T.
Tack St. John W. Thomas Mrs. Margaret
Thruston Col. C. M. Tyler Henry
Taylor R. D. Tabbet T. J.
Tripplitt Mrs. H. H. Taylor Alfred
U.
Ungerer Mrs. M. Upperman Chau. E. 2
V.
Vose Lt. Col. S. H. Van Throop John V. N.
Vernon Henry Vankleek Lawrence L.
Van Home Lt. J.
W.
Wells Thomas C. Warrington Corn. Lewis
White Nathaniel Williams Edward A.
Ward William H. Woodward William
Ward Francis Watmough E. E. C.
Wright Mrs. T. Weber Joseph
Wood Miss Sarah Williams James
Wright Richard Whimnev Mr,. Mary
Wood Henry Warren Miss L. A. B.
Wade John K. Wilkinson Capt. Jesse
Willigman Miss H. Williamson Mrs. Harriet
Wallace Thomas Walker L. P.
Williams Miss Julia M, WVeldin Miss Ann
Wilaon James M. Wilson J. M.
Watson James A. Winner H. W.
INITIALS.
B. B. X. X.
P.W. X.Y.Z.
P :'The inland postage on all letters intended to
to by ship must be paid, otherwise ihev remain itt
this office, J1, S. GUNNELL, p, Mt.,
*- *' 5


- I ;


- 1


F LETTERS
lemalning in the Post Office, Wasbingtoa city,
September 1, 1840.
j ` Persons inqutring for letters in the follow,
ng list, wLl please say they are advertised.
A.
LImy Sylvesiler Ambrose James
Lddison John Andison Mr.
Lddison Miss Miry E. Archer William
Lndrews Peter Anderson Miss Mary
LAshton Mrs. Mary Abomrn Lowry W. 3
B.
Belt Thomas J. Broadrup George
Burch Thomas Beron Miss Mary Anm
Brush S. 2 Bayly James K.
Brown Mrs. Louisa S. Bacon William P.
Beall Mrs. Mary Ann 2 Baker J. and G. W.
Brooks James Bacon Miss Mary
Brent Thos. L. L. Balmain Andrew 2
Boyd Mrs. Charlotte E. Bryan Samuel
Brown J. R. Barry Miss Emily
Browne William Bowen Leonidas H.
Balche Thomas Buckner S.
Blount Thomas M. Barney Charles R.
Burke James 2 Bensina A.
Bush Mrs. Mary Bearen W.
Barnes Mrs. Sarah Briscoe Winm.
Briggs Samuel S. Bradbury Geo.
Bean Hezekiah Batterworth Samuel F.
Boss Wmin. Bernard Mrs. Matilda
Brown Absolem Bailey Dr. J. H.
Browning R. L. U. S. N.
Q.
Carnes Peter A. Campbell Mrs. 2
Carl William Cowan John Epes 2
Clinch Gen. D. L. Collingwood Andraw
Mark Maj. Isaac Carter B. F.
Clarke Mrs. Maria Ciger Alfred
Clark John H. Clary Winm.
Contee John Custis Mrs Sophia Cha.
Chapin Alpheus Colahan Thomas
Campbell James W. Collins William
Crawford R. L. Collins Frederick
Crocken James H. Cramer Mrs. Eliza
Called Miss Ann Campbell Major





-^ ..I


~' q~ji1~


POLITICAL.
From ihe Ballimore Republican
GENERAL HARRISON'S POSITION.
We would Invie for the aldiess from General
3. C. Howard, which wepublish this morning, the
particular aitenlon of our readers. It shows by a
reference to the ci.ur-e which has been taken by
those who were instrumental in procuring the.no-
niination of General Harrii.'n, and the language
which was empl,.yrd by them in reference to it,
the motives which actuated them in placing his
name before the country as a candidate for the
Presidency. It is seen that their object was to se-
cure the election of a candidate opposed to Mr.
Van Buren by means of Abolition voles, and the
votes of the Antimasons; and it remains to be seen
whether the people of the Sou h, and those who
are opposed to the proscriptive course which would
deny to a man the enjoymeni of asocial intercourse
in his own way, while he does not interfere with
the rights or feelings of others, can give their sup-
port to a candidate who is brought forward on
such grounds. The fact that General Harrison is
supported on such grounds, serves to explain
clearly why it is that the State of Vermont, which
is steeped in Antimasonry and Abolitionism, has
gone in favor of the Whigs by an increased ma-
jority. He is understood, in that State, to be de-
voted to the interests of the fanatics who abound so
largely there.

To THE EDITOR OF THE REPUBLICAN ;
I have been requested to communicate to you
for publication, the substance of some of the re-
marks which I made to the people at the Rising
Sun, in Anne Arundel county, on the 29th Au-
gust, and at Fell's Point on September 4th. They
relate to a topic of paramount importance to all the
Southern States, and particularly Maryland and
Virginia. Being placed upon the electoral ticket,
and thus brought before the people of this State as
a candidate for their suffrages at the Presidential
election, in November, I feel it to be a duty to lay
before those whose votes I am soliciting, all such
opinions, and reasons for entertaining them,as may
conduce to a thorough understanding of the merits
of the candidates for the Presidency of the United
States.
It appears to me to be a clear case that General
Harrison was brought out by the Harrisburg Con-
vention, for the purpose of securing the votes of the
Abolitionists and Antimasons, whose co-operation
with the Whig party proper was supposed to be
sufficiently powerful to carry his election. Let
those who doubt this refer to the evidence which
follows, and explain it away if they can.
On Wednesday, the 4th day of September, 1839,
a convention assembled at Harri-burg, in Pennsyl-
vania, in conformity with a resolution which had
been adopted, on the 22d June preceding, by the
"Democratic anti-Van Buren" members of the Le-
gislature of that State. The object of the Conven-
tion, as set forth in the resolution, was to adopt
measures "to unite the Anti-Van Buron party, and
secure Its success in their own State and in the
next Presi.denial Election." The preference of the
phrase "Anti.Van Buren" to that of the "Whig"
party, was full of meaning, as will at once be un-
derstood by all those who remember the impression
made upon the Abolitionists by Mr. Van Buien's
declaration that he would veto any bill for the abo.
lition of slavery in the District of Columbia, if any
such should pass the two Houses of Congress dur-
ing his Presidency. The Antimasons had twice
before nominated Harrison as their candidate, and
hence the cognomen of "Anti-Van Buren" party
was extensive enough to include both these
- classes.
With the characters of the individual members
of the Convention, I am not acquainted, and can
therefore only speak of its proceedings as a
body.
The President, John Parker, Esq. of Chester, up
on taking his seat, said, amongst other thing, "Thi:
is emphatically an assemblage of patriotic freemen
representing the various parties of our great Corn-
monwealth, and composed of all the elements of oppo-
sition to the miserable and destructive Administra-
tion that is now sapping the foundations of our
happiness and prosperity;" and again "on this oc-
casion I find myself surrounded by Whigs, anti-
masons and Conservatives."
On motion of C. B. Penro3e, esq. a committee of
twenty was appointed to prepare an address to the
people, and clothed with "power to adopt and ex-
ecute such measures as may be calculated to pro.
mote and carry into effect the views of this conven-
tion, and UNITE THE ANTI-VAN BUaEN PARTY in the
approaching Presidential election."
The resolutions adopted by the convention speak
of Mr. Clay as follows:
-"His devotion to the public good, in which he
has encountered these prejudices, has commended
him to the support of ardent admirers among the
most enlightened portion of his countrymen, who
cherish the hope that THE PERIOD WILL YET ARRIVE
when the vast patronage and power of the Genera
Government will be no longer in the hands of those
who artfully, use it to deceive the people in regard
to his public conduct; and when these prejudices
will have passed away, THE COUNTRY WILL CON'ER
UPON HIM THE HIGHEST EVIDENCE OF ITS AFFECTION
AND GtATITUDE.
"They confide in the sincerity of the noble senti
meant which he has expressed, that if his name cre
ated any obstacle to cordial union and harmony, i
should be withdrawn, and that we should concerni
rate upon some individual MORE ACCEPTABLE T(
ALL BRANCHES OF THE OPPOSITION.' The evidence
of popular opinion as emphatically designates the
name of that individual who is 'ACCEPTABLE TOALL
BRANCHES OP THE OPPOSITION,' and the resolutions
then proceed to recommend General Harrison.
The committee of twenty, appointed to prepare
an address, were allowed time to perform this duty
and it was not issued until the 17th of October
1839. The proceedings of the convention to which
I have referred, are found in Niles's Register, Vol
57, page 46, under date September 14th, 1839. The
address of which I shall now speak will be found a
page 190 of the same volume, under date of No.
vember 16, 1839.
The cautious generalities of the resolutions oe
the convention are departed from in the address
It was necessary to explain more fully who an
what these "branches of the Opposition" were
which it was expedient to conciliate by the nominal
tion of Harrison, and they are set forth with a mi
nuteness well calculated to serve the purpose il
Pennsylvania, but also to attract the anxious attend
tion of the Southern people. The address says:
"It is wise, as well as honest, to admit this truth
and we may say it is equally true that there at
like branches in the Van Buren party, the difference
between the two parties being, that in the latte
these branches mere readily submit to the control
the parent stem than they do in the former."
"Without noticing minor d fferences of opinion
we may refer to the known fact that there are i]
these branches ABOLITIONISTS, ANTIMA
SONS, Democrats and Whigs, and that amor
these there are very many who were prompted bh
the glowing feeling of gratitude for arduous mill
tary services, which fthe history of mankind, in a:
ages, proves to have been common to all nation
to support General Jackson for the Presidency."
"We do not pretend to say that Mr. Van Bure
and his friends have been without the support (
many Abolitionists and Antimasons in some of th
different parts of oar country where they exist."
"But candor requires us to admit that among
those who entertain peculiar views on the subject
slavery, although they are many who lend then
selves directly or indirectly to the re-election
Martin Van Buren, there are a VAST NUMBE
who are decidedly opposed to his mal-administre
tion of the Government, and who are willing to a:


their WHt BRETHREN in all parts of the country
rescue it from misrule. It cannot be concealed
however, that the position taken by Mr. Clay, on
recent occasion, has created in this BRANCH 0
THE WHIG PARTY a prejudice which cann
be overcome."
"The corresponding branch in the Van Bur
party are more readily moulded to party support
"A similar difficulty exists with the Antimason
This portion of the Whiig party, particularly in Pen
sylvania, although unwilling to support Mr. Cla
have nevertheless discovered a decided willingne
to make concessions to theirWhig biethren,by evin
ing a determination to support another distinguish
ed Whig, General Harrison, and have not insist
on a candidate who had adopted their peculiar viev
on the subject of masonry."
When the convention remembered that the
BRANCHES OF THE OPPOSITION PARTY, formed
large a portion of the voters in VERMONT, RHO
ISLAND, CONNECTICTT, NEW YORE, NEW JERSI
PENNSYLVAmIA, OHIO and INDIANA, not to ape
of other States or other questions, it was pl1
to them, that if they regarded the welfare of t
country as identified with a change of rulers, it wei
not do to choose for a candidate, any one, howev
eminent, who was not acceptable to THE!
BRANCHES, well knowing that a union of toe
position pat wOW essential to success."


"To GENERAL HARRISON NO SUC'TIEjCTIONs
EXIST." -
The above extracts appear to state the case as
plainly as language can do it. The Abolitionists (or
as they are tenderly called, those who entertain pe-
culiar views on the subject of slavery) and Antima-
sons are so intractable that they will not c'ncur with
their Whig brethren in supporting Mr. Clay, and as
an union is indispensable, therefore, the Whig
brethren must unite with the Abolitionists and
Antimasdns in sustaining General Harrison.
If it be said that this is only the address of a State
Convention, for which t is unjustifiable to hold the
Harrisburg general convention responsible, let us
push the inquiry a little further.
The same volume of Niles's Register, page 250,
contains the letter of Mr. Clay to the Kentucky dele-
gation in the Harrisburg Convention, which was
published amongst their proceedings. In. that letter
he refers to the Pennsylvania convention, and says:
If it be right in supposing that the distinguished
citizen whom it prefers would be more likely to be
successful than any other, HE OUOHT TO BE NOMINA-
TED; and undoubtedly, for that reason, will be nomi-
nated by the Harrisburg convention should it enter-
tain the same opinion."
In all the above extracts, I have put in italics
and capitals the passages which appear most im-
portant. In the original, they are, of course, not
thus marked.
It must be remembered that C. B. Penrose, esq.
the chairman of the committee of twenty, and, pro-
bably, the writer of the address, was the first
named secretary of the great Harrisburg conven-
tion, and of course upon terms of familiar inter-
course with all its members, upon whom he had an
ample opportunity to impress the necessity of the
policy set forth in the address.
The letter of Mr. Clay does not appear to have
been publicly read in the convention until after the
nomination of General Harrison had been made,
but it was received some days before, and its con-
tents probably known. It contains an uncondi-
tional ratification of the policy proposed by the
Pennsylvania State Convention, by recommending
the nomination of Harrison "in case he should be
more likely to be successful than any other." Why
more likely? The address fully explains the cause.
He could receive, whilst Mr. Clay could not, the
votes of that "branch of the Opposition party"
who had "peculiar views on the subject of sla-
very," and who abounded in VERMONT, RHBDE
ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY,
PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO and INDIANA. The coars-
and indelicate intimation contained in the address
that the period might yet arrive, when the vast
power and patronage of the Government would be
in other hands, and the country confer upon Mr.
Clay the HIGHEST EVIDENCE OF ITS AFFECTION AND
GRATITUDE, was probably unheeded by his friends;
but a serious question remains to be decided by
the Southern States; and that is whether the dele-
Sgates from the South, in giving in their adhesion to
Sthe policy proposed in the address, did not yield up
too much to the uncompromising spirit of the Abo-
lition branch of the "anti-Van Buren party."
e The reluctance with which they acquiesced, is
Sufficiently manifest from the notorious fact, that
Son the first ballot, General Harrison did not re-
Sceive the vote of a single Southern State, and yet he
is now strenuously advocated in them all. The
question which the people of Maryland have to set-
Stie, is, whether their hostility to Mr. Van Buren is
so great as to reconcile them to an union with those
Swho entertain peculiar views on the subject of
Slaveryy" and who evidently forced the nomination
Sof Harrison upon their Whig brethren. No one
y can tell how far the Whig party in the non-slave-
e holding States will go hereafter to conciliate the Abo-
litionists, and preserve their support. It is a mat-
s ter of conjecture. But we know that they have
Already gone to a fearful length in the State of New
a York, by putting that powerful State in the attitude
of an open contemner of the laws of the Union.
SWhether or not there will be a resistance and re-
is bellion, can only be seen when a case shall arise
which is subject to the conflicting legislation of the
SUnited States on the one hand and the State of New
SYork on the other.
In the year 1793, chap. 152, in figures, or VII
r or letters, Congress passed an act, prescribing the
mode of recovering fugitive slaves. It directs that
the runaway shall be carried by his master before a
judge, either of the Federal or State Court, whose
f decision shall be final. Last winter, the Legslatmre
e of New York saw fit to pass a law, enacting that the
question of ownership should be tried by a jury, and
that if, after a decision by ajury in favor ofthe negro,
his claimant interfered with him further, such claim-
s ant should be sent to the State prison for ten years.
A provision exempting Southern claimants of their
k runaway slaves from this penalty, was refused to be
inserted, on the final vote min the popular branch of
e the Legislature, by a strict party vote, with the ex-
d ception of one man; the friends of Mr. Van Buren
e except that one, voting for the exemption, and the
o Anti-Van Buren party in a mass, against it. As the
law now stands, if a Marylander were to attempt to
.1 reclaim his fugitive slave in the mode pointed out
e by Congress, and take him before a Judge of the
d Federal court, a conflict of authority would imme-
s diately ensue. The State law would interpose it-
R self and demand a trial by jury. In fact, the act ot
N Congress stands completely nullified by the law of
New York. Would the Judge of the United States
i- court submit to this prostration of his authority?
e- Would he not rather command the marshal to sus-
it tain him in the exercise of his constitutional pow-
I- ers, and enforce obedience to a judicial sentence?
o If he did not, he would prove himself unworthy of
e his high office. What then? Should the marshal
e be resisted by the officers of the State, stimulated
L as they would be by the entire influence of the Abo.
s litiobists, the ultimate power of the President of the
United States must be resorted to, by virtue of the
e authority vested in him, to compel submission to
Sthe laws. What a spectable is this? When may it
happen? The answer is, next month-next week
h -to-morrow. And for what end is the country
1. placed in such peril, and the very Union endan.
e gered? Because the Whig party in New York
It have gone to this dreadful extremity in order to con.
ciliate the Abolitionists of New York, and receive
their further co-operation.
f There is a part of the Pennsylvania address which
i. excites great surprise. It is that which says thai
d the Antimasons "have not insisted on a candidate
e who had adopted their peculiar views on the sub
a- ject of masonry."
i- Political antimasonry has not yet found its way
n into Maryland. From some cause or other, it ha.
t- never been able to cross Mason and Dixon's line
We have heard its noise as that of a wave beating
t, against a rocky barrier without being able to de-
re stroy or surmount it, although occasionally i'
ae splashes over. But if I am able to form a correct
er opinion of political Antimasonry, General Harri.
of son has not only given in his adhesion to thi,
"Branch," but has done so in a manner highly dis.
5, reputable to his character, and has twice been no
n minated as the Antimasonic candidate for the Pr.
L- sidency, once at a former election, and again a
ig this. Autimasonry rests upon two bases-an al
3y leged fact, and a political principle. The former
i- is untrue, and the latter unsound. The fact al.
.11 leged, is, that masons assume the performance ol
s, duties to each other, which are paramount to, anc
inconsistent with, their duties to society; and the
en principle is, that the remedy is their exclusion frou
of all offices, either of election by the people, or ap
he pointment by the Executive. The evidence o
men who differ from each other in religion, politics
ig taste, temper, and associations, but concur in as
of sorting that the doctrines of masonry are sount
n- and wholesome, ought to be satisfactory as to thi
of charge brought against it as well as other similar
iR associations; but if all the allegations were true


'a- the proposed mode of removing the evil would no
id be less dangerous or unconstitutional. The reme
to dy does not reach the case, either; because, whet
Ed, the entire legislative power was placed in the hand
a a of the Antimasons, as it was in Vermont, and per
>F haps in Pennsylvania, it was soon discovered tha
tot no law could be passed punishing men for thei
opinions. If it was right to appeal to the ballc
en box as a cure for masonry, then the power which
t." emanated from the ballot box, of course, ought t
as. have been effectual. But no attempt was made t
in- send a man to the penitentiary in Vermont (if the
ay, have one) for being a mason; and the result prove
ess that it was a mistaken course to ask for legisli
Sc- live power to cure an evil, which that power, whe
sh- obtained, was utterly insufficient to reach. So also
trd the exclusion from office is not the remedy; be
,ws cause that permits what is alleged to be a grievot
evil to remain undisturbed, provided the sinne
ese are more attached to the sin than they are
s office. But the creed of political Antimasoni
S is, that all masons are culpable because they con
; sider their obligations to each other as paramount
,ak the laws of the1 land, and that they ought to be pw
la nished by exclusion from office. Let us see wh
the General Harrison has said on these points.
muid In Niles's Register, vol. 49, page 177, and
ver date of November 14, 1835, may be found
;SE letter from him to the chairman and Secretary
op. State Committee of the Antimasonic party in Pen
sylvania, which is creditable to his judgment at
feelings, Hie says;


"You will readally conclude, gentlemen, from
this statement that I haveiever been partial to the
masonic order. But I should feel that I had been W.
deficient in candor and disappoint your expect. i
tions of the 'explicit reply' wh ch you request,if I
I were not to add, that, should it ever be my for-
tune to be elevated to that high office to which I
have been designated by the partiality of some of
my fellow-citizens, I could, on no account, suffer A,
my opinions of masonry to influence my con-
duct to the prejudice of ihose who differ, and, ye
vsr
amongst whom, hower they may err in relation to H
masonry are to be found a full proportion of the eli
talent and the public and private virtues of the tie
nation." m,
"If masonry is an evil, it must be corrected by To
public opinion, by the people themselves, and not m
by their agents, and LEAST OF ALL BY THOSE WHO a
ADMINISTER THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED ta
STATES. By them no qualifications of a citizen T
could be admitted which is not declared by the fa
Constitution itself, no participation withheld in them
advantages which it is its great object equally to at
secure to every description of citizens." w.
These sentiments, correct and honorable as they at
are, did not suit the taste of the Antimasonic par- at
ty; and the most objectionable act of General Har-
rison's life is the precipitancy which he reverses his
opinion, when informed by Mr. William Ayres tri
that "it was believed he had been misunderstood." T
Mr. Ayres says also: A
"'It is not expected or desired by the Antimasons, UI
in this section of the country, that the powers of A
the General Government or any of its departments, B
should be exercised to suppress masonry. The ap- ht
pointing powteer is the only one in the hands of the U
Executive for the correction of evils ehich attach 1
themselves to the qualifications of applicants for G
office. I should be happy to receive your views in re
relation to the foregoing."-[Niles, same vol. page we
244. M
It is impossible to read General Harrison's an-
swer without lamenting the infirmity of human
nature. Wholly regardless of his former opinion, le
he rushes headlong into the arms of the party whose pr
leading maxim he had not only condemned, but o0
shown to be inconsistent with the spirit of our Con- fe
stitution, in the succinct paragraph just quoted. A st
few days afterwards, on the 20th November, he re- r
plies thus: th
"Lest I should be misunderstood also in another tih
particular, I must take leave to say, that whilst I di
deny the right of the General Government or any SO
of its Departments, to interfere wilh the con- f
cerns of the people, in relation to their party th
principles or party movements, in all cases ef
where the laws of the Union are not violated, S
I cannot be supposed to mean that it is not n,
the duty of the appointing power STRICTLY &
TO INQUIRE INTO THE PRINCIPLES el
OF THOSE WHO ARE CANDIDATES FOR
OFFICE. FOR MY OWN PART, I HESITATE NOT TO r
SAY THAT I WOULD AS SOON THINK OF APPOINTING TO ce
AN OFFICE UNDER THIS REPUBLIC, ONE OF THE Ie
SPRIGS OF ENGLISH NOBILITY, A SCION FROM THE I)
PURE TORY STOCK OF THE HOUSE OF ELDON OR h
LOWTHER OR JENKINSON OR WELLESLEY, AS AN fa
AMERICAN CITIZEN WHO WOULD ASSERT HIS RIGHT ci
TO ENTER INTO ANY ENGAGEMENT OR COM- th
BINATION, WHICH WOULD RELr.ASE HIM PFROM w
HIS PARAMOUNT OBLIGATIONS OF DUTY TO THE CON- o
STITUTION AND LAWS OF HIS COUNTRY." S
[Niles, same vcol. p. 245. tl
Now as no American citizen has in fact ever a
been such a fool or madman as to assert his right it
to do this, but as the Antimasons charge the whole c
body of masons with the crime, they construed the j
letter in the only way in which it can be inter-
preted-as an admission of the fact and principle
upon which the party stands. The results shown
in Niles, page 265. o
"The Chronicle of yesterday morning learns
from Harrisburg that the ANTIMASONIC CONVEN- .
TION, on Wednesday evening, with great unanimi- f
ty, nominated General Harrison as a candidate d
for President. It was confidently expected that
the WHIG CONVENTION would unanimously concur t
in the nomination."
The Antimasonic Convention, therefore, in De- e
member, 1835, led the way in the nomination of n
Harrison, and the Whig party followed them as
they have done since. t
These documents have been referred to as prov-
ing the fact, that the nomination of Harrison at e
Harrisburg was intended to secure the ABOLITION
and ANTIMASONIC votes. It remains to be ieen e
whether the people of the Southern States will
ratify the measure by adopting it. The Southern
delegates in the convention fought against it, as it I
is understood, to the last; for, according to report,
the nomination of Harrison was made by the fol- t
lowing vote: S
S Maine 10
New Hampshire 7 f
Massachusetts 14
Vermont 7
New York 42
Pennsylvania 30
Ohio - 21
Indiana 9
Illinois 5
S Michigan- 3

148 ,
Not a single Southern State amongst them all.'
? There is something extraordinary in the perse-
verance and unanimity with which they opposed
Harrison. Perhaps the Southern delegates had,
Spread the Pennsylvania address, above quoted, and t
f did not relish an association with what are therein
styled BRANCHES OF THE WHIG PARTY, viz: ABOLI-
TIONISTS and ArNTIMASONS.
BENJ. C. HOWARD.
BRITISH ALLIANCE WITH THE OPPOSITION.
S Read the subjoined extract from the London
t Morning Post of June 3d, the organ of the high
r Tory party in England, and then inquire who
Those men are who stoop fr6m a palace to a logic
hut, and what are their objects. Read it with at-
tention, and see if this "Whig log cabin cry" is not
a British trap to deceive and enslave the American
Democracy:
"We learn by the arrival of the Stephen Whit- I
ney, from New York, that the resignation of Mr.
t Amos Kendall, and other ministerial functionaries,
e was talked of. Should these changes take place,
the success of the Whigs, or "log cabin" party, in
the approaching Presidential election, will be se-
cured. By the election of General Harrison, the
Whig candidate, and the rejection of Mr. Van Bu-
ren, the return of the Government to a sound and
rational system of banking will follow as a matter
g of course; and possibly the United States Bank
may once more find itself under the protection of a
t proper charter. The rejection of Mr. Van Buren
t will be decisive of the late of the Sub-Treasury
" scheme. That insane piece of legislation will be
s most assuredly knocked on the head, and we shall
" no longer hear of pet banks, and the thousand
" other absurdities with which it is associated. We
" rejoice in the downfall of the visionary undertak-
iags of the radical spirits and political economical
coxcombs, whether they be of the old world or the
. new, and may, accordingly, congratulate the Ame-
ricans on the prospects they have of getting rid of
f such quacks as VAN BUREN, 'VAN' JACK-
d SON, and Mr. AMOS KENDALL.
e "Whether the resignation takes place or not,
n there seems to be no doubt that the whole crew of
" the Democratic party will, in the month of Novem-
ber at the latest, be relieved from the cares of office."
' Yet "the Whigs, or the 'log cabin' party," as the
Tory Morning Post terns the Opposition, have
made it a part of their deceptive game to descend
e from their higir position in society, and shake the
r "huge paws" of the farmer, mechanic, and laborer!
How plain is the cheat-so palpable that it cannot
but react with fearful force upon the heads of those


who use it.
s THE PROGRESS OP THE HARD CIDER DEMORALI-
r- ZATION.-The drunkenness, violence, and intem-
Vt perance of all kinds, that has spread through the
ir land like a moral pestilence, through the de-
It grading "log cabin and "coon skin" parades and
h debauches, have, naturally, alarmed the moral and
o truly religious portion of the community; and re-
o newed exertions are making, we discover, to coun-
Y teract their influence, by law. So outrageous and
d beastly have these hard cider topers become, that
a, religious meetings are no longer free from their
n uproar and violence. "Old Tip" songs, and "give
0, us more hard cider," in imitation of Gen. Harri-
e- son himself in his speech at Fort Meigs, are doing
1us their work.
ri We discover that a petition is circulating among
to the religious societies, to be presented to the next
ry Legislature, for redress of grievances, from which
n- we extract the following:
t0 1 "The undersigned, citizens of ths State of Ohio,
1- respectfully represent, that they have witnessed,
at with extreme pain, the demoralizing influences
growing out of the practices of certain huxters and
er pedlers, for their own personal interest, vending at
a camp and other religious meetings, throughout
o this State, ardent spirits, beer, CIDER, cakes, &e.
n- to the great annoyance of the public worship of
nd God, and to the extensive injury of the peace and
good order of the community,'--[OAio Stat4esman,.


"Wm the-(N. Y.) Pruning IHook. til
WAR REMINISCENCES. ac
tAR FEDERALISM AND HARRISON FEDERALISM taK
IDENTICAL THE WAR DEMOCRACY AND VAN tiC
BUREN DEMOCRACY "UNCHANGED." pr
--1812.-
At the spring election of 1812, the Federalists or
exceeded in carrying a majority in the House of Ta
assembly. War was declared in June of that m
ar. At the meeting of the Legislature in No-U
ember, for the choice of Presidential electors, the at
house not only nominated) on its part a ticket of
actors, distinct from either of the Democratic el
;kets; but the Federal majority resorted to every g(
means to harass the administrations of Governor be
ompkins and of Mr. Madison. Their firstcc
ovementwas to avow their hostility to the war of
id the measures of the Democratic Admtinistra- j
ins, in their answer to the Governor's speech.
he answer was drawn up Josiah Ogden Hoffman, be
their of Ogden Hoffman, the Federal Harrison V
ember of Congress from the City of New York# th
id was reported by the committee, a majority of ty
which consisted of Mr. Hoffman, Daniel Cady, '
>d Eiisha Williams. It was most exceptionable -
id unpatriotic throughout.
The Senate was Democratic. The efforts of that 4
ody, with Mr. Van Buren at its head, were as pa- Si
iotic and as zealous in the support of Governor C
ompkins, the war, and the State and National tt
administrations, as the House ot Assembly was N
friendly and embarrassing in all its movements. t
Though this was the first appearance of Mr. Van t
oren in any legislative body, he being, with per- 01
tps a single exception, the youngest man that had,
p to that time, been elected to the Senate, he was
aced on the committee to draft the answer to
governor Tompkins's speech, and wrote it. It was
'ported on the same day on which the electors td
ere chosen. c<
R. VAN BUREN'S ANSWER TO GOVERNOR TOMPKINS'S it
SPEECH.
"Sir, the Senate fully concur with your Excel- p
ncy, in the senliment that, at a period like the p:
resent, when our country is engaged in war with B
me of the most powerful nations of Europe, dif- it
rence of opinion on abstract points should not be %
offered to impede or prevent a united and vigo- d
ous support of the constituted authority of A
he nation; and duly impressed with a convic- v
on that in the breast of a real patriot all in-
ividual considerations and feelings should be ab- a
irbed in a paramount regard for his country's wel- il
ire, the Senate will cheerfully and firmly unite
teir exertions with those of tie other departments e;
f the Government to apply the energies of the a
late to a vigorous prosecution of the war, until the ("
ecessity of its further continuance shall be super- rn
eded by an honorable peace, the only legitimate s,
object of war. F
"The different subjects submitted to the conside- I
nation of the Senate by your Excellency, shall re- tl
eive their early and prompt attention; and be- tl
eying, as they do, that respect for the memory ot d
he soldier whose life is sacrificed in the service of E
is country, and to make provision for his destitute
family, is the duty of all Governments, and espe- s'
ally of a Government like ours, in which more ih
ian any other the character of the patriot is united t,
'ith that of the soldier; the situation of the families
f the officers and soldiers of the militia of this e
tate, who have fallen or been disabled in the bat- n
le of Queenstown, shall receive the seasonable ti
attention of the Senate, and be disposed of by them b
n such manner as shall, in their judgment, best I
omport with the honor and justice of the State." c
OSIAH OGDEN HOFFMAN'S ANSWER TO GOVERNOR E
TOMPKINS'S SPEECH. 8
"The sudden and unexpected declaration of war u
by the United States against the United Kingdom V
of Great Britain and Ireland and its dependencies,
and the peculiar circumstances of our country at c
he period of that declaration, could not fail to af- d
ect the people (f this State with emotions of the d
deepest interest and concern." I
[Allusions to the unprepared state of the country, p
he condition of our frontier, the incursions of the f
enemy, his supremacy on the lakes, and our own t
'reverses," as proofs of the incapacity of the Ge. -
ineral Government, were followed by the usual in- c
ridious encomiums upon the navy, and imputa- s
ions against the Democratic administration for not
giving it an exclusive preference, and by flings at (
he army.] .
"In the bravery ef our armies we have the high- I
est confidence; but it is with mingled emotions of I
shame, sorrow, and indignation, that we perceive t
hat valor misemployed and unprofitably directed; I
nor can we imagineF the adequate reason of the sud-
len emergency which commanded the undisciplined
bravery of new troops to waste itself in hopeless i
struggles; which prodigally poured out the blood
and treasure of the nation before its resources were
ully developed, and a due portion of military skill
imparted to its armies."
And again, the old Federal doctrine, that sought
to repress the ardor of the militia, and to resist any
order that called them beyond the defensive opera-
tions:
"To subserve the 'national will,' expressed ac-
cording to the Constitution, must always be consi-.
lered by us a duty of the highest obligation; and we i
confidently expect that in facilitating the operations I
)f the General Government, ) our Excellency has
been animated with a due regard to the provisions
of the sacred law. We cannot here refrain from
observing that neither in its spirit or in its letter areI
we able to discover any authority to order the mili-
tia of this or any other State upon enterprises of
conquest or attack, out of the limits of the Union."
Mr. Van Buren and his Democratic friends in
the Senate rejected by a party vote, (20 to 7,) the
substitute offered by Judge Plait, a leading Fede-
ralist then and untilhis death, in which he "so-
lemly deplored the unwise and improvident exer-
cise of power which has thus, without prepara-
tion, and without necessity, plunged our country
into a war with one of the most powerful nations
of the world;" and that the unqualified claim upon
the State Legislature, and upon our citizens, to
subservee the national will," by voluntary exer-
tions and supplies, whether that will be wisely or
unwisely directed, is a claim of questionable right,
and equivocal import."
The Federal House REJECTED, by strict party
votes, the amendments te the answer of that body,
proposed by the Democratic friends of Mr. Van
Bursn, and particularly the following: "But while
the prosecution of the war be necessary, we shall
always be ready to concur with the General Go-
vernment and the other States, in the most decisive
and energetic measures, as the best calculated to
secure a permanent and honorable peace."
The Democratic majority of the Senate adopted
Mr. Van Buren's answer, by a party vote, 20 to 7.
The Federal majority of the House adopted Mr.
Hoffman's answer, by a party vote, 53 to 45. One
seconded the noble efforts of the patriot Tompitins
in support of the war, and in vindication of the
national rights and honor, and promised all co-ope-
ration and aid. The other sought to repress the
ardor and thwart the efforts of the patriot Governor,
to increase his difficulties, to disparage the efforts
of the brave defenders of the country, to deny the
necessity and justice of the contest, and to refuse
the required aid and co-operation. With few ex-
ceptions, the Federalist of that day who are alive,
and who voted for the Federal answer, who united
in the Federal legislative movements to paralyze
the efforts of Gov. Tompkins, and who assailed and
opposed Mr. Van Buren, are now his opponents
and assailants, and the supporters of General Har-
rison.
Mr. Van Buren and Mr. Wendall were appoint-
ed to wait on Governor Tompkins, to know when
he would receive the Senate with their answer to


his speech. He appointed the following day, at 11
a. m. when they proceeded in a body to wait upon
the Governor; and he replied in the following, brief
but emphatic terms:
- "GENTLEMEN: The sentiments expressed by you
in this address, receive my hearty concurrence; and
it will give me infinite satisfaction to unite my ex-
ertions with those of the other departments of the
Government in giving full effect to all measures
dictated by the spirit of patriotism which animates
the Senate."
Mr. Moore and Mr. McNier were appointed by
the assembly to wait upon the Executive with a
similar message; and Gov. Tompkins having ap.
pointed the following day at 12, the Assembly
waited upon him, and received his reply. It was
occupied in repelling the imputations of the Fede-
ral answer, in which he had been accused of call-
ing to the defence of the city and harbor of New
York, militia (from the Hudson and its vicinity)
that ought, as the address said, to have been re-
served for the frontier, and, impliedly, of making
an unanthorizid call upon the militia for service
out of the Union. It was emphatic, also, in vindi.
eating the General Government from the allega-
tion that it made no provision for the families of
the militia that might be disabled or might fall in
its service. Gov. TJ thus replied to the effusion of
Federal spleen in relation to the "national will"
and the constitutional power to command the ser-
vices of the militia beyond the lines:
"I am free to say that my opinion of the con-
stitutional extent to which the services of the jill-


Smay be required, is embraced in the terms of theI
ct of Congress passed ia 1795. That act con-
ins the cotemporameous construction of ihe na-
inal constitution upon that point, sanctioned and T
actised during the administration of the illustrious
Washington; and I do not recollect to have received
seen, nor am I conscious of having myself issued
ay orders incompatible with that construction
he importance of the topic relative to the employ.
ent of the militia, contained in your address, and
y loss for the application of the allusion to un-
ithorized orders upon that subject, required this
:position: and having performed that duty, I con-
ude with an humble supplication, that He who
overns the destinies of the world, will extend his ti
eneficent hand to the protection of our beloved 'u
>untry, and safely conduct us through the perils v
fa war forced upon us by the aggressions and in- di
stice of other nations." li
And yet it is with these facts of historical record b
*fore ihem-with the undeniable fact that Mr. is
an Buren led the Democracy in the support of t(
his war, in maintaining its high justice and necessi- v
y, and in sustaining Gov. Tompkins and the pa- is
iot band of that day in their efforts to carry for- tt
ard the greatest conet-i-lha' all this was done m
against the utmost partisan labors of the Federalists u
-and that it was done at the identical extra ses. tl
on when Presidential electors friendly to Mr. ti
linton were chosen-it is, we repeat, with all n
tese undeniable historical facts before them, that tn
Ir. Van Buren is accused, by the Federalists in ri
he present day, of leaguing with the Federalists in f]
ieir hostility to the war, and to the administrations L
F Governor Tompkins and Mr. Madison. y
From the Louisville Public Advertiser. v
CHARGE UPON THEM!
This should be the policy of the Democracy pE
throughout the Union. They should keep up a t
constant charge upon the vite assailants of the free 8
institutions of the country. it
Charge them with wilfully lying about the ex-
enditures of the General Government-with com- a
lining of expenditures for which they voted, at-a
iost unanimously-with proposing expenditures, tl
tending to complain of them when made-and t
with indirectly giving aid and comfort to the In- 8
ians in Florida, for the purpose of harassing the
Administration, and increasing the expenses of the
war. t
Charge them with piratical conduct, in fighting,9
without daring to raise a common flag, or to avow I
ihe principles and policy they wish to establish.
Charge them with base lying in relation to the
xpenditures for furnishing the President's House,8
nd suppressing the speech of Governor Lincoln, a
Whig evidence,) which shows that Congress di-r
rcted the appropriations complained of, without
olicitation or recommendation on the part of the
'resident. The conclusive speech of Governor
.incoln has only appeared in one Federal paper inr
ihe United States-the National Intelligencer-and
hat print would have gladly been excused from
isseminating such a triumphant vindication of the
President.
Charge them with bank subserviency-show that
ubserviency, by showing that wherever banks are
large lenders to the people, and the people slaves
o the banks, Federalism bears sway.
Charge them with striving to substitute the pow-
r of incorporations for that of the people, and de-
nonstrate by the present influence of ths banks,
hat, unless the people arouse themselves, their li-
berties may be overthrown by bank conspirators, i
f, when suspended, bankrupt and disgraced, banks
an hold hundreds of thousands in bondage, what
night they not do, if sound, and conducted by
able financiers. They are now in the hands of
unscrupulous partisans, and no change for the
woise can take place on that score.
Charge them with base lying about the increase
of Executive patronage. This is a complaint Fe.
leralists never make in sincerity. If the Piesi-
lent were guilty all they charge upon him, on this i
point, and more, they would rally around him, and
proclaim him one of themselves. It is farcical in a
iree country to hear monarenists complaining of
he increase of Executive patronage-to hear the
advocates of exclusive priviliges-thechampions
if incorporated credit-hypocritically defending
simple government and equal rights.
Charge them with vile lying about the character
of the Intependent Treasury bill, and prove the
charge by referring to the fact that, since the bill
camee a law, the Federal papers dare not lay it
before their readers, nor can Federal orators ven-
ure to read it, in any of the innumerable lying
speeches they are delivering.
Charge them with scandalous lying about the
effects the Independent Treasury law would have--
such as reducing prices to the rates now paid in
Europe, and utterly prostrating every branch of bu-
siness. Prices are improving and business looking
up, and exhibiting to the public gaze the Federal
leaders, as a dirty set of lick-spittle liars.
Charge them with corrupt lying about Mr. Van
Buren's advocacy of negro suffrage, and his oppo-
sition to white suffrage. He advocated the right
of every man, paying a poll tax, working on a
highway, or being a householder, if a citizen and
of lawful sge, to vote at all elections, except free
negroes, who were required to have a freehold qua-
lification of the value of $250.
Charge them with lying about Mr. Van Buren's
opposition to the late war. He was, throughout, a
supporter of the late war with England, and every
reading Federalist knowingly lies, when he makes
an assertion to the contrary.
Charge them with filthy lying about the Hooe
case-the negro testimony, &c. Enough of lat-
nose or snotty-nose lying has been done in behalf
of the petty tyrant, Hooe, to sink a thousand souls
into everlasting torment. Well, Hooe and his
friends may get their deserts, certainly in the next
world, and probably in this.
Charge them with lying about defaulters-run-
ning through twenty years to rake up a list of six-
ty or seventy, and then reading the list, as if all
the defalcations occurred under the administration
of Mr. Van Buren. Such conduct is too base for
a blackleg to descend to.
Charge them with lying for years about the war
of the Administration on the credit and commerce
of the country. No war of the sort was ever com-
menced. If, however, the Administration could
have made a successful war on credit, it would
have done great service to the country. We
should have had fewer gentlemen of capital on
other people's means.
Charge them with lying about the currency. If
the banks had not suspended to save their pets, we
should have had a sound currency. Who wants a
better currency than specie? And can there be any
lack of specie whilst the banks redeem their issues
in good faith? The truth is, the Federalists are the
bankers; they supply the paper currency, and cor-
rupt and depreciate it. They alone are responsi-
ble for the present derangement of the currency.
Charge them with trying to )ie Harrison into a De-
mocrat and an unequalled hero. Harrison was ac-
cused of cowardice in the Late war, as the dates of
hundreds of his certificates of courage will show,
and the charge came from those who were then
fighting shoulder (o shoulder with Daniel Webster
and the Hartford Conventionists. The Federalists
are the men who charged Iheir prrseni candidate
for President with cowardice. They forgive his
omissions of duty to his own country, because he
never harmed England intentionally, and now sup-
port him because they think they can use him.
Charge Ihem with lying about the humbug of a
standing army of two hundred thousand sen, to an
extent sufficient to demoralize a million of souls
here, and damn them hereafter. On this subject,
more reckless villany has been displayed than was
ever exhibited in any political contest since the for-
malion of the Federal Government. No Federal-
ist has spoken upon it without uttering wilful


falsehoods without stint.
Charge them with warring upon the purity of
the press, the purity of elections, and the rights and
liberties of the people. Without any thing like a
common or national flag, they are, like pirates, as-
sailing the dearest rights of the people, and rely for
success-not altogether on hard cider, but hard ly-
ing, bribery, intimidation, and corruption. It is
the last desperate effort of the most profligate set of
men that ever took the position of office hunters in
this or any other civilized country. Americans, if
you respect yourselves or value your liberties, tram-
ple the varlets in the dust. Show them that you
cannot be deceived by such mercenary, corrupt,
brazen-faced liars.

CRoaHAN's LETTERS.-We have never witness-
ed any thing equal to the demand for Croghan's
letters. Old and young, men, women and children,
seem anxious to read them. We have received
about a thousand subscribers in the last week
since their publication, and mostly calling for Cro'
ghan's letters. We put our form to press the se'
cond time, and scarcely a copy left.
[Oeio Statesman.
F OR RENT-and possession given the 1st day
S of October next, that large boarding house
over the scores of Messrs. Semmep and Phillips, cor-
ner of 7Ih street west, and north of Market Space.
For terms apply to ANN R. DERMOTT,


THE RESULTS OF BANKING.
From the Metropolitan Magazine, London, July, 1840.
'ho Currency capable of Regulation-An Investi-
gation of the Theory of Currency, with Stric-
tures on the Projected Regulation of Bank Issues:
To which is added a Project of a Paper Circula-
tion which would not fluctuate, and which, be-
sides keeping Prices steady, and regulating the
Exchange, would save at least two millions a
year in Taxes.-By CHARLES SCOTT, kate Manae-
ger of the Bank of'British J'or-tA Jmeriea, Mon-
treal:
The question of the currency, and the considera-
on of the various and vital interests that depend
pon it, remain as mysterious as if thousands of
olumes had not been written upon it, and hun-
reds of speculators had not offered their infal-
ible panacea for placing it in a state of nnaisaila-
le perfection. The approaching the subject at all,
s like coming to a large city from different quar-
ters by many individuals; each lakes a different
iew of it and as far as he sees, every one
s right. iWe hardly ever read a pamphlet on
he subject that was not plausible, and on
whieh we were not disposed to place a Ittle credit,
atil we had read the succeeding one. The only
thing that we have yet ascertained to our entire sa-
isfacrion is this-that the PRODUCERS of our im-
mense wealth, agricultural, as well as manufac-
ired, the instructors of those who produce it, their
ulers, their defenders, the proprietors of the soil
rom which much of its is produced, ALL GET TOO
LITTLE OF IT; and your STOCKJOBBER, YO0rlrBROKER,
our COMMIssION AGENT-men, whose, industry ne-
er caused a grain of corn to grow, or benefited
heir fellow creatures to the value of mendingla
air of old shoes for one of them, GET THE GREAT-
STS SHARE OF IT, by some hocius pocus, that they
themselves do not understand, or anybody else. Men
hall begin with no other capital that a desk, an
nkstand, and a high s'ool; and in a few years thou-
ands shall be laboring for them in their different
avocations, in order that the winds of heaven
hall not visit them too roughly. We think
hat to this, some portion of the national dis-
ress may be traced. We think that the producers
should take more care of their property, and at-
empt to depend less upon the professional finan.
cier, call him by what name you will. Mr. Scott,
he author of the pamphlet before us, promises
great things, and depreciates the great things others
have promised, equal largely.
We have no'space to go through all the details
by which the author attempts to prove all others not
o wise as himself; but we cannot help mentioning
in incident that goes partly to establish a general
oguery in your dealers in money, if that roguery
an be practised according to law. Speaking of
currency, he says: "On the other hand, there may
be coins that are a legal tender which are not cur-
ent. I adduce, as an instance, the French half
crowns of Lower Canada. They are a legal ten-
der in the Province, but, being overvalued about
nine per cent. almost the whole of them are HOARD-
ED BY THE BANKS, for the purpose of fighting off
parties demanding specie."
This is banking honesty-that honesty would
terseif call robbery. I give the banker 1001 to
take care of for me; and when I ask for it he offers
me 911, for presuming to demand it. Yet Mr. Scott
has not one word in condemnation of this SWIN-
DLING ACCORDING TO*ILAW Now for the author's
fiscal remedy, that is to make and preserve the
health of our vast circulation. He would make
sovereigns a legal tender only to the amount of 201;
and not demandab'e on payments for more than
ive. Beyond these Ilimits, and the present limits
as to silver, he.would make gold and silver mere
commodities, leaving every man to give or get as
much for them as he could. The rest of the cur-
rency to be made up of Government bank paper,
he Government to be the only issue; the parlia-
ment to decide every year -he amount to be issued.
In our humble opinion this wouldbe nothingbut
a bank restriction act, under a new name, and
with a slightly altered form. During the period that
the bank was authorized to refuse payment in spe-
cie, you might have then circulated coin,
if yon could get it. So, under Mr. Scott's
plan, above five pounds, you may value
your sovereigns at what you will, and pay as few
of them away for as many notes as you could.
This you could not legally do before, yet we all
know that it was generally done in spite of the act
of Parliament that declared a one-pound note, that
would only purchase fourteeni or fifien shillings
worth of gold, equal in value to one pound sterling.
We think, but with much doubting, that were our
author's method adopted, there would be two cur-
rencies-the nominal and the real, and the nominal
being the legal one, ROGUES WOULD PROSPER.

From the Ohio Statennman.
THE BLACK COCKADE CANDIDATE.
The question at first asked by many, what is
there in Gen. Harrison that his nomination should
bring every old Hartford Convention Federalist to
his feet and opened mouth in the political arena?
THEY KNOW THEIR MAN! Gen. Harrison wore the
black cockade, and was always a Federalist.
Every vote he ever gave was a Federal vote-vo-
lumes of proof are flowing in daily of this. Mr.
Tazewell, so well known among Virginia Republi-
cans, says, in a letter just published, that he and
Harrison were always opposed to each other in
every measure of politics. This is conclusive.
But see the following from the Ohio Sun:
STILL MORE TESTIMONY.-Senator Allen, in his
speech at Batavia, on Thursday, said that at Car-
thage, on Wednesday, four gentlemen stood up
and testified that they saw Gen. Harrison with the
Federal black cockade upon his hat; and out of
the ten thousand there assembled, no one came for-
ward to contradict the witnesses.

HOW IT RUNS IN THE BLOOD!
At the great Federal hard cider humbug held in
this city on the 4th of June last, young Mr. Web-
ster, son of Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts,
was present, and made a speech. A Federal cor-
respondent, writing to a Federal paper (the Atlas,)
in Boston, says that the "convention gave three
cheers to young Webster, and then three cheers
FOR THE BLOOD !"
The "blood" thus cheered by the members of the
Federal hard cider convention is, of course, thai
which runs in the veins of Daniel Webster, oi
Massachusetts. What did this "blood" do during
the last war, when a saneuinary foe was marching
through the country, carrying fire and sword it
every direction, even to the heart of the Capito
of the United States? How did Daniel Webster
vote, we ask, during that war, in the hottest par
of which General Harrison resigned. "
On the 7th January, 1814, Mr. Webster, it
Congress, voted against an appropriation to defra}
the expenses of the navy !
On the 10th of the same month, he voted against
a proposition to detect and punish traitors.
On the 14th, against making provision to fill tht
ranks of the army.
On the 23d, against raising troops for five
years.
On the 28th, against a non-importation law.
On the 5th February, against raising five regi.
ments of riflemen.
On the S9th, against a bill to execute the lawi
and repel invasion.
On the 21 December, against a bill to raise I
revenue for the Government, and maintain the
public credit.
On the 10th, against a bill for an appropriation
to rebuild the Capitol, after it had been burned bj
the enemy !!!


The same Daniel Webster is now the right hand
man of Harrison-the guardian of his military
fame-and is to be his Secretary of State, and ac
tual President, should Harrison be elected; o
which, by the way, there is not much prospect.
This is the same Daniel Webster whose "blood'
was cheered by the blind and besotted Federalistt
of Illinois, at their great log cabin and hard cideri
festival of June last.-Sate Register.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the
subscriber has obtained from the Orphans
Court of Charles. county, letters testamentary 01
the personal estate of Susanna Reeder, late of sail
county, deceased. All persons having claim:
against said deceased, are hereby warned to exhibi
the same, with the vouchers thereof, to the subseri
her, on or before the first day of January next
They may otherwise, by law, be excluded from al
benefit of said estate. All persons indebted to said
-estate are requested to make their payments. Given
under my hand this 25 h day of Autust, 1840.
CHAS. J. LOCKE, Executor.
Aug 27-law4t


36".C[ REWARD.-Lost, on Thu-rsday
$3 I night, about 8 o'clock, near the City
Post office, a small Morocco Pocket Book, contain-
ing a few papers and $35 in money. The finder
will be rewarded by leaving it at the Globe of-
fice, or at Mrs. Taylor's, on the avenue, near Gads-
by's. T. J. PEW.
Sept. 4-3t


NEW WORKI.-Letters and Speeches on va-
,-ioes subjects, by Henry Lord Brougham,
F. R.S. and member of the National Institute of
France, in 2 volumes, al-o, Jack Ashore, by the
author of Ratlin the Reefer, &c. in 2 volumes-are
this day published, and for sale by
W. M. MORRISpN,
Four doors west of Biown' Hiotel.
Sept 8
L ORD BROUGHAM'S LETTERS AND
SPEECHES, on various subject; 2 10ls.
A6o, Jack Ashorc, by the author of Railin the
Reefer, &c. Just published, and for sale by
Sept 8 F. TAYLOR.
CoORPORATION STOCK FOR SALE.-
J Washington Cily five and six per cent. stock
for sale, in lots to suit purchasers.
Sept 8-3t CORCORAN & RIGGS.


N EW CASH STORE.-The subscriber would
inform the citizens of Washington and vici-
nity that he has taken a store on Pennsylvania
avenue, directly opposite Brown's Hotel, where he
is prepared to serve all who may please to favor
him with acall. He manufaciu'es ladies' and gen-
tlemen's boots and shoes of every description,
which will le sold at such prices as cannot fail to
please. He is aware of the great competition
which prevail-, and is determined to Fell a little
che.iper than the cheapest. Bargains may be exe
peeted. Terms cash.
Sept 9-tf JOSEPH COGSWELL.

W ASHINGTON MUSEUM, corner of 41
and D street.-The public are respectful-
ly informed that the Museum re-opens for the sea-
son this day,
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7,
Having .undeigone a :horough change, and receiv-
ed many new and rare articles, among wh;ch are
some splendid BIRDS from New South Wales.
The public are invited to call and see for them.
selves.
N. B.-Those persons having curiosities to dis-
pose of, are requested to inform the p. oprietor.
JOHN VARDEN.
Open from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m.
Admittance to the Museum 25 cents, children
and servants half-price. Sept. 7
SRICKS.-800,000 Bricks, of a superior quali-
ty, for sale, at the cheapest rates, by SMITH
and PROUD, of the Patent Brick Press, Washing-
ton. The present kilns are believed to be equal, if
not superior, to any bricks ever made at this esta-
blishment, and will compare favorably with those
of any other, while they are sold at much lower
prices. The facility of the manufacture enables
the proprietors to fulfil with punctuality contracts
to any amount, and to attend to orders from a dis-
tance. The attention of builders, &c. in Norfolk,
and other Southern cities, is especially invited, as
shipments may be made to those place at moderate
freight.
N. B. All persons indebted to S. and P. are re-
quested to make a settlement with a member of the
firm, to be constantly found at the Press; there be-
ing no agent at present authorized.
Sept 4-eod3t
OFFICE OF T U COMM]ssioNaR or PTH Petic BUILDINOa,
City of Washington, August, 1840.
pROPOSALS will be received at this offtie'Un-
-- til the first of October next, to deliver at the
new General Post Office building in this city, thir-
teen thousand superficial feet of best quality
finished marble flagging suitable for paving, of
sizes not less than a foot square, alternately white
and black or of a dark color; the thickness not less
than one inch-the time of delivery to be in all
the month of May, 1841. The proposals to state
the price per superficial foot, delivered, and the
quarry or place from whence the marble would
come.
Aug 27-dtOcti fNat. Intel ]
The Citizen, Frederick city; Republican, Balti-
more; Pennsylvanian, Philadelphia; Evening Poet,
New York, will publish the above once a week till
the 1st of October.
ENTUCKY MILITARY LANDS.-James
L. Dallain, residing in Satem, Livingston
county, Kentucky, will attend to the payment of
taxes, adjusting disputed titles, reclaim lands sold
for tax, leas-s, buy and sell land held and owned'
by non-residents in the State of Kentucky, and
particularly in the Green river, or lower section of
the State, upon reasonable terms. With several
years' experience as an agent, and a general
quaintance throughout the State, he hopes, by strict
attention to business, to give satisfaction. He has
for sale improved and unimproved lands on the
rivers Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee.
REFERENCEi,
THOS. S. PAGE, Second Auditor for Kentucky.
JNO. M. FOSTER, Register of Land Office.
COL. JAMaB DAVIDSON, Treasurer.
JACOB SiviuENT, Clerk of Court of Appeals.
HoN. J. J. CRITTrNDEs, United States Senator.
F. P. BLAIR, Washington city.
JAs. M. HARRaaIS, Virginia.
HIRAM HARMRS, Richmond.
FRANCIS J. DALLAM, Baltimore.
A. H. WALLACE, New Orleans.
WILLS COOPER, late of Norfolk.
August 28-dIm
M MEMOIRS OF EMINENT PIOUS WO-
M MEN, by Rev. Samuel Burder, D. D.
author of Original Customs; a new edition, revised
and enlarged, is for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,
'D DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Washington
J.N county, Orphans' Court, August 28,1840.-
In the ease of John D. Clarke, administrator of
John Pierce, deceased. The administrator, with
the approbation of the Orphans' Court, has ap-
pointed the second day of October next for the set-
tlement of said estate, and for paying and distri-
buting, under the court's direction and control, the
assets in the administrator's hands to the creditors
of said deceased, at which time and place the said
creditors are requested to attend. This notice to
be published once a week for three weeks previous
to said day.
Test; ED. N. ROACH,
Regiiter of Wills.
t lO Those persons who placed papers in the
hands of John Pierce are particularly requested to
call for the same, as I have several judments in
their favor. JOHN D. CLARK.
Sep 1-law3w

THE STATE OF MARYLAND, S0.
At an Orphans' Court for Saint Mary's County,
held at the Court-house in Leonardtowa on the
llih day of August. in the year of our Lord 1840,
present, Chapman Billingsley and John M. Thomp-
son, esq'rs, Justices, G. W. Morgan, esq. Sheriff,
and Geo. Combs, Register, among other proceedings
were the following, viz:
O N application of Rev. Thomas Mulleday by
S George D. Coad, esq. his attorney-It is or-
dered by the Orphans' Court of Saint Mary's
county, this lhth day of August, 1840, that admi-
nistration on the personal estate of William H.
J. Dorsey, late of Saint Mary's county, deceased,
will be granted at the discretion of the Court or or
after the second Tuesday in October next, unless
cause be shown to the contrary, provided a copy of
this order is published in the Globe newspaper, in
the City of Washington, once a week until the said
second Tuesday in October next.
In testimony that the aforegoing is a true copy,
taken from one of the records of proceedings of
the Orphans' Court of Saint Mary's county, I
have hereunto subscribed my name, and set my
seal of office, this llth day of August, in the
year of our Lord 1840.
G. COMBS, Register.
Leonardtown, Aug 31, 1840-lawt2O

I MPORTA NT TO THE DEAF.-Doctor Price,
of Richmond, Kentucky, cures by his mode of
operating on the ear, about four cases out of five
of deafness. He has restored to hearing a number
of individuals after its loss, to a great extent, frpm
ten to twenty years, and in one instance for near
forty years; and this individual now hears well.
The length of time deafness has existed is not con-
clusive evidences that h .r g cannot be re-
stored.
From the fact that a great 'majority of the large
number deprived of the inestimable faculty of


hearing, can be restored by his mode of operating
Sand treatment, in some instances by a single opera-
tion, and at farthest in a few weeks or months,
he invites all those who are deaf to come and be
restored. Cases from a distance will not be re
quired to remain longer than a few days.

SEALING WAX, WAFERS, AND OQUILLS.
SW. FISCHER has just opened very large quan-
Stity of extra superfine Red, Black, and fancy colored
Wax, Wafers, and 20,000 superior Quills, which
he has recently imported direct from the mianufac-
turer, and which will be sold wholesale and retail,
on the most reasonable terms, at Stalionert' Hall,
Sept4


,,S,











THE GLOBE.

CITY OF WASHINGTON.

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPT. 9, 1840.

PREPARATiON FOR FRAUD ON TIHE BALLOT BOX,
BY TIlE FEDERAL PARTY IN OHIO.
A detected secret circular of the Central Com-
mittee of the Federal party at Columbus, just pub.
listed in the Ohio Statesman, shows that pre-
viously the spring elections, they had conceal ted to
get the judges ofjhe election appointed altogether
from the ranks of Federalism, upon the ground that
"IT 1 INCUMBENT ON US (thr Feds) TO PUT HBi.
POWER OF JUDOoINO 1N SUCH HANDS, AS WILL INSURE
ITS HONEST EXERCIS !" Every man must be sensi-
ble that to insure a fair election, the presiding offi-
cers at the polls ought to be selected from each
party. Theo is always done where fairness
is meant. In Pennsylvania the law has been
iecentily altered by the Democratic majority,
so as to secure the right of each party to
have a functionary at tha polls to guard against
frauds; and yet we find the instruments of the
same party, in Ohio, which committed the late out-
rages on the right of suffrage in Pennsylvania and
New Jersey, through their election officers, sus-
tained by their Governors, RITsER and PENNINGTON,
secretly conspiring to get complete command of the
polls, to "PREVENT (says the secret circular of the
Federal Central Commitlee of Ohio) THE REPETI-
TION OF SERET FRALDS, A; WE HAVE TOO MUCH
REASON TO BELIEVE TIIEV HAVE HERETOFORE BEEN
PERPETRATED BYT OUR POLITICAL OPPOYENTa." The
attempt to get all the judges, by the party convicted
by Congressof the grossest frauds, during the last
year'$ elections, and which had almost produced
civil war, is proof, that they meditate carrying the
Presidency itself by fraud on the ballot boxes, and
that they were resolved that no Democrat should
be present as an officer to watch them, and give the
alarm to the people. To cover their design, they
begin by accusing their opponents of fraud!

WHERE DOES THE MONEY COME FROM
The New York American, (the organ of the
British capitalists on both sides of the Atlantic,) in-
stead of answering this natural inquiry of every
man who sees the unbounded use of money ia all
quarters of the Union by the Federal party, calls
on the Democrats to prove that the English owners
of the Bank and States stocks have contri-
buted to this illimitable electioneering fund.
The Journal of Commerce stated but the
other day that the Bank of the United States
was mostly owned in England, Two-thirds
of its capital belongs to foreigners; and its
thirty-five millions, every body knows, is swol-
len, "in fair business transactions" of one sort
or another, to at least seventy millions, under the
operation of its currency-making and mercantile
privileges. Has this foreign institution brought no
pecuniary means to bear on the present contest?
Its directory have their grasp upon debts to the
amount of seventy millions. Do they not work
this long lever to press those in their power to the
polls "tv SUtPFEtNas7' It was openly avowed by
the National Gazette, its organ, that this was the only
way to bring the country right in its politics? The
Bank has long since refused to redeem its notes,
while it causes every refrantory debtor to redeem
his promises to them. Under these circumstances,
it can not only draw in those who owe it, but it can
pour out as much as it chooses for others, to ac-
complish its objects in the pending election?
Does any one doubt that the same Bank which
poured out millions to members of Congress-thou-
sands for publications, and feed lawyers, and emis-
varies, in all quarters,in the contest with the late Pre-
sident, as appeared from its own books when publicly
examined, (and this at a time when it paid gold and
silver for its notes,) hesitates to do the same thing
now, when, if the money it throws out fails in its
object, it has only to continue its present course
and throw the whole loss of its fraudulent issues on
the community'? If, then, it is fair to argue that the
foreign Bank does now, as it has done in every
contest in which the country has been involved since
the Bank war commenced, surely the inference may
be justly drawn, that a portion of the miraculous
fund which astonishes the country, in its extraor
dinary electioneering exhibitions at this moment
comes from British capitalists.
But the British fundholders have more than ont
hundred millions invested in State debts, which cost
them probably half the sum in British goods
British commodities, in the rounds of credit and
traffic, make the channel through which tht
State bonds are ultimately absorbed. To ta:
the nation for these bonds, certainly and per
petually, and thus double their value, the gram
scheme of assumption has been put forth b:
the holders, Does any man suppose that it is ex
pected to accomplish this through any other mean
than the success of Federalism in the election o
HauMsoN ? Nobody dreams of such a measure bu
through the management of WEBsERa, the feedcoun
sel of the BArINOS, and his political allies. Well
if the BARINGS were willing to give this lawyer
a thousand pounds sterling, nearly, in our money
five thousand dollars, for an opinion a
to the competency of the States to contra,
the debts, would they not give something t
make those debts worth fifty millions more tha
they are at present? As it is certain they hay
paid money on this score-that the Bank of th
United States (a British interest) has lard out hut
dreds of thousands on our elections heretofore-
and that the vast amounts .now employed in th
present political canvass, cannot possibly b
supplied by that party, who pretend t
wage the war, because, as they say, the
are already impoverished. The conclusion
fair, that they receive supplies from those whose
interests they give their untiring exertion to ai
vance-who have the greatest means to apply ti
their purposes, and the greatest stake in the on
troversy.
The following remarks of the New York Eve
ning Post to the call made by the New York Am<
rican on an individual on this subject, bring som


striking facts to light:
"The American does not give the substance o
Mr. Wood's words quite correctly. Instead of en
pressing his convictionn of the influence of Britis
gold in promulgating British principles through ou
elections,' he declared himself convinced that
British gold had been used in this country for th
purpose tf carrying the next election in favor
Harrison. It is one thing to say that the people
have been influenced by such an attempt, an
another to say that he attempt has been madi
Mr. Wood's conviciions are the same which mus
occur to any ingenuous man who has observed th
close connection between the Whig party in thh
city and the stockjobbers in England, who consider
the vast sums already squandered by the Whig i
eleciioneering, who reflects that Mr. Webster, th
head of the Whig party in the Norther
States, is the legal counsel of the owner
of American stocks in Great Britain, wh
knows that th Whig party have urge
the assumption of the State debts by the Genera
Government, who knows that Governor Sewar
offered the place of Comptroller af the State to it
agent of the Bank of England iu this city, wh
knows that the agents of British houses in this eil
subscribe liberally to the election expenses of Ih
Whig party, and who knows finally that money
men, whether in England or here, are always wi
ling to contribute to the expenses of elections whc
effect their interests, and that the leaders of it


Whig party are not too virtuous to accept the funds W
for defraying what they would call the necessary at
election expenses, without inquiring too minutely
whether the money be raised in England or Ame-
rica. m
-The American swaggers a good deal about the B
stigma which Mr. Wood casts upon his fellow
countrymen, in coming to such a conclusion. But st
no stigma is cast upon our countrymen if this pro-
ligate attempt should not succeed, as we solemnly al
believe it will not. The stigma, the disgrace, in sit
that case, must rest upon those who attempt to cor- M
rupt the people; and their defeat will redound to the co
honor of our country. B
"Meantime, we would inform the American that th
there is a paper in that clever print, the Rough- gt
Hewer, published at Albany, in which the reasons rilt
for believing that the British stockjobbers have con- fa
tribnted to the Whig fund, are given at length. Let
the American first try its teeth on that nut, and th
then it may with a better grace show them to Mr. stI
Wood." w
w
THE CALL OF MR. DAWSON ON GENE- at
RAL HARRISON. at
The last number of the Cincinnati Advertiser th
makes this call on General HARRISON: th
"THE CROGHAN CORRESPONDENCE.-We do hereby tht
once more emphatically call upont General Harrisoncc
to either publish his letters to Colonel Croghan, or call D
upon the Globe to publish them, in order that we
may have a correct view of the matter in contrc- cw
very. We have been charged by a friend of the
Colonel with suppressing material facts in our life
of General Harrison, in relation to the subject of
that correspondence. We imply from one of Cro-
ghan's letters, that the General had promised that N
justice should be done to him in a supplement to D
that work. Of this supplement we never had any p
knowledge, nor intention of publishing, prior t: S
the letters published in the Globe. We therefore S
are personally interested in the matter, and haveS
a strong desire to see both sides of the controver-
sy; and if General Harrison will neither publish g
nor ask for the publication of his letters within
one week, we request of the Editor of the GlobeW
to publish them in his paper immediately after the tl
expiration of that week. This is no electioneer-
ing affair-our veracity has been questioned, and
we demand justice at the hands of General Harri-
son, in order to clear ourselves of the vile asper- t
sion." n
REMARKs.-Mr. DAWSON, as the public is aware, r
wrote the biography of General HARRISON, from t
the documents and oral information furnished by B
the latter. After the-work was completed, it was
revised by HARatSON. The letters of Colonel
CROGHAN show that immediately after the pub-
lication of the biography, which repeated the
false statements which HARRISON had before intro.
duced in McAPEE's History of the War in the West,
the fulfilment of HARRISON'S promise to correct
them was again demanded by the injured party.
HARRISON then solemnly pledged himself to Co-
lonel CROGHAN that he would do him full jus-
tice in a supplement to the biography, and tells him
expressly, in writing, that Mr. DAWSON anid himself
had agreed upon the publication of a supplement-
that he had actually begun to prepare what lie pro-
posed in relation to CaRoGsAN-and afterwards,
when again pressed by Col. CROGHAN upon the
subject, he states that "DAwsoN has postponed his
supplement for the present, on accout of the stale of his
funds."C
That all this was done to deceive Colonel GRo-
OHAN, and gain time, to wear off the impression of the
renewed wrong done him, and the history of the
country, in the false statements of the biography, is
manifest,from the fact which now appears on the face
of Mr. DAWSON'S call, addressed to Gen. HARRISON.
Mr. DAWSON says, that prior to the recent publica-
tioa of Col. CRooHAN's letters in the Globe, he never
heard of this supplement! We repeat his words:
"We imply from one of CRGoHAN'S letters that the
General had promised that justice should be done
to. him in a supplement to that work-(DAwsoN'S
Biography.) OF THIS SUPPLEMENT WE NEVER HAD
ANY KNOWLEDGE, NOR INTENTION OF PUBLISHING,
PRIOR TO THE LETTERS PUBLISHED IN THE GLOBE."
S What a comment is this single fact on the vera-
city of General HARRISON, and the sincerity of his
promises to Colonel CROOHAN! Now that Mr.
9 DAWSON has the cue to the denouement of the San-
s dusky plot of HARRISON to falsify the history of
L the country; and as he was unconsciously, on
a his part, made the agent in effecting it
e permanently, we trust he will undertake
Sthe publication of the supplement to which
e he was pledged by HARRIsoN, without his
y knowledge, and which he was represented to have
s suspendedfor the want offunds. Asan honest man,
Mr. DAWSON is bound to correct the misrepresen-
tations which, by the artifice and imposition of
HARRISON, his good name is made to sauc-
e tion; and he has a right to call on
t Colonel CROOHAN for full information, and all
Sthe materials in his power, to make the correction.
d Under the the aspect which the new developments
e have given to HaaRIsoN's conduct, it is imppssib!e
that Col. CROOHAN can hesitate a moment Io put
Mr. DAWSON in possession of his entire corresdpond-
d ence with Gen. HARRISON, with an explanation of
y every thing connected with it.
[. To-morrow we will furnish Mr. DAWSON with
s another leaf for his supplement. He will find it
f necessary to correct General HARRISON'S misrepre-
t sentations in regard to the battle of the Thames,
and do justice to Col. JOHNSON-a portion of whose
glory HAaRRSON cunningly filched from him, by a
r false report.

5 THE TRAVELLING BEAR.
ct Certificates were sent to us from a number of
Q the most respectable men in Ohio, stating numerous
n cases of swindling on the part of BEAR, one of the
ie travelling orators of Whigery. DOFF GREEN put
ie forth a paper, obtained in a different neighborhood,
n- certifying that no knowledge of the facts charged
against BEAR existed on the part of the signers;
e and this NEGATIVE testimony, borne by Whigs in a
e different quarter of the State from that in which the
o offences were committed, was published to excul-
y pate BEAR. This matter has been inquired into by
s the Editor of the Pottsville Emporium, and the fol-
i lowing letter is published to put the people of Penn-
l. sylvania on their guard against him:
o The Federal presses of this county issued hand-
a- bills for a meeting to be held in this place in court
week, printed in large characters, and circulated
e- them throughout the whole county, accompanied
with about 1,000 names, the greater part of whom
e- we presume were copied from the tax list, and the
e remainder made up of beardless boys, and nnna-
turalized foreigners; from which we observe that


f the famous "Buckeye Blacksmith," and the nolo-
_ rious Thaddeus Stevens, one of the heroes of the
3h buckshot war, and a number ot other distinguished
r Federal bank orators will be heie. We presume
at our readers have already heard enough of the cha-
n racter and standing of Mr. Stevens betterr known
of as the "Cloven foot") to know in what estimation
le he is held by the poodle of the Keystone State. As
d to the character of Mr. BEAR, we have no more
e to say than what the following letter from a distin-
st guished gentleman of Zanesville, Ohio, his native
e State, will display, which is headed with the re-
is marks of the Pottsville Emporium:
s BAER-THE TRAVELLING HUMBUG,
in "BLACKSMITH."
e We have nothing to say for or against the pri-
In vate character of the Western Bear, who has been
Is lecturing in this county on the subject of politics,
Further than to publish the following extract from
d a letter from the postmaster at Zanesville, Ohio, to
al a New Jersey committee of Democrats. It will
rd be seen that he resided in Salt creek, the ministr-
Sing stream which empties into a river by the same
to name, and where the Federal party will go en
ty masst after the election.
he ZANESVIiLLE, Ohio, July 30, 1840.
'd DEAR Sia: Yonr letter addressed to G. A. Hill,
1. James Hamp-on, Robert Mitchell, and George W.
;h Manypenny, r(q.esting a certificate of the post-
be master of ibthis place, or a certificate in some other


ay, has been handed to ime by those gentlemen to
riswer.
In your letter you say that it is asserted in the I
bhig paper. of your State that ther- never was, a a
an lived in our county by the namo of John W 0:
ear. : b
In answer to this, I have only to say that their h,
atements are false, pi
I am personally acquainted with John W. Bear it
ins the Buckeye Blacksmith, I have known him at
nee 1835: aLd in 1836, whilst I was sheriff in bi
d[uskingum county, I had in custody on a writ of
pias ad respendendum for keeping a GAMING TA- b
LE! and his recognizances are nowin the hands of tt
e clerk of the court of common pleas of Muskin- p
im county, which I took from him and his seen- A
ties at that time, and which stands as a recorded tl
ct. it
He formerly resided in Salt Creek township, in t(
is county, (Muskingum,) and was elected con- C
able, as stated by Solomon Groves, and others,. u
hose certificate I have seen in the papers, and o
hose characters were certified to by the above 1(
named gentlemen, Hall and others, to whom you o
dressed your letter. F
I am personally acquainted with the signers of d
at certificate, and can say that no man who knows p
he signers of that paper in this county would doubt tl
heir veracity and truth. You must be aware that s,
he Democracy of Muskinguml would not repose v
confidence in these men, in appointing them the p
democraticc Corresponding Committee of this c
county, if they were not men of standing; and you h
'ill find that two of these men, to wit: George W. t]
Ianypenny and G. A. Hall, are a part of that a
ammittee. Captain James Hampson is an old u
nd respectable citizen of our town, and has been p
pwards of thirty-five years; and as for Dr. Robert k
litchell, I have only to refer you to Philemon r
tickerson, Samuel Fowler, Th,mas Lee, James a
'arker, Ferdinand S. Schwenk, and William N. e
hinn, who were members of Congress from your f1
tate during the panic session of 1833 and 1834, c
'ith Dr. R. Mitchell, who was a member of Con- h
ress from this district at that time. p
It is unnecessary for me to multiply words in
writing further, as no honest Whig in this county it
would stake his reputation in denying the fact, hi
that he is the same John W. Bear set forth in that hI
certificate. s
About the first appearance of Bear on the politi-
al stage was at Columbus, last February, when s
he Whigs held their convention at that place; and i
my nephew, who is a Whig, and who is now She! I
iff of this county, informed me on his return from t
hat convention, that he was the same John WV. I
Bear that lived in this county, and the same John
W. Bear that I arrested as above stated. So you
can see there is no doubt about his identity.
Respectfully, yours,
A. R. CASSIDY, P. M.
S.UB-TREASURY IN NEW YORK CITY.
The correspondent of the National Intelligencer
s grievously troubled because the Sub-Treasury is
rept in a room and vaults in New York, hired of a
bank; as if, till the vaults are completed in the
new custom-house, which we learn are rapidly in
progress, it was not proper to hire vaults else-
where. Would the Opposition have the money
thrown into the streets,or kept in an insecure place?
And how could sufficient vaults be hired, unless of
some bank or individual, who happened to own a
good one? What miserable croaking!
From the Lowell Courier.
THE POISONING CASE.
The public mind has become so much excited
on this subject, that we suppose any acts in regard
to Mrs. Kenney, or Mr. Freeman, will be read with
inter est.
Mrs. Kenney's maiden name was Hannah Han-
son. She was first married to a Mr. Witham,
from whom, after giving birth to four children, she
was divorced. She is said to have been assisted
in obtaining her divorce by Mr. George F. Kenney,
with whom she continued to be intimate, and to
whom she was said to be engaged. She was after-
wards married to her cousin, Rev. Enoch W.
Freeman, of this city. There was much objection,
among the members of Mr. Freeman's society, to
marrying her, on account of her reputation, but it
was as ineffectual as opposition to a person's will,
in such matters, generally is. It is said that after
Mr. Freeman was married, Mr. Kenney was in
the habit of visiting at the house. We are in-
formed that he was in Lowell on the morning of
the day that Mr. Freeman was taken sick.
Mr. Freeman was taken ill, between meetings,
on Sunday, Sept. 20, 1835, and vomited several
times. He went into his pulpit, however, in the
afternoon, and commenced the services, but was
unable to proceed with them, and returned to his
house. He continued to grow worse, and suffer.
ed exceedingly, with unequivocal symptoms of
inflammation of the stomach, until about five
o'clock on Tuesday morning, when he expired,
one year and one day from the time he was mar-
ried.
Mrs. Freeman appeared to be much affected by
his death. A post mortem examination was made,
and the stomach was found to have been highly in-
flamed; but as no suspicions of poison were then
entertained by his physician, no chemical analysis
of its contents was had.
We have already remarked that his marriage oc-
casioned some division in the church. Just as he
closed his eyes in death, he was asked if he had
any advice to leave for his people? He replied:
"Tell them to be humble, faithful, zealous, united
in love." His dying counsel has since been placed
over the pulpit in the meeting house where he
preached.
Mrs. Freeman afterwards kept a milliner's shop
on Merrimack street, in this city. She is said to
be good looking, and exceedingly fascinating in her
manners, or rather, as an acquaintance of hers
said to us this morning, "in her eyes."
Although it has long been the opinion of many
who knew her, that she was the cause of her hus-
band's death, she has been accustomed to speak of
him with much apparent feeling, and would some-
times weep when conversing about him.
Mrs. Freeman is said to have lived with Mr.
Kinney, some time, in Boston, before she married
him.
The account of his sudden death, and the fact
that arsenic was found in his stomach, are already
well known.
A handsome marble monument, with a granite
base, has been erected over Mr. Freeman's graVe,
and by its side is a weeping willow, which Was
sent by his widow, after her removal to Boston, to
be placed there. The following is the inscription
upon his monument:
"Rev. Enoch W. Freeman, Pastor of the First
Baptist Church and Society in Lowell. Died Sept.
22, 1835, aged 37 years."
We saw Mr. Freeman's remains after they were
exhumed, on Monday evening, August 17th.
They were in a remarkable state of preservation.
They had turned black and shrunk somewhat; but
one of the physicians who was present, said that
he had seen a subject used for illustrating lectures
on anatomy, which was farther advanced in putre-
faction.
We have heard a report, which, if true, furnishes
another curious link in the chain of circumstances
which-are now becoming developed. It is said
that, after Mr. Freeman's marriage, his father, who
resided in Maine, died very suddenly, while Mr.
F. and his wife were making him a visit.


BoSINESS. The past week has shown, conclu-
sively, the lack of any foundation for the reports
put in circulation by the Whig press relative to
the prostration of trade in our Atlantic cities,
caused, as they have asserted, by the Sub-Treasu-
ry bill. The general business of our city has been
good, and is gradually advancing, while the arri-
vals from foreign ports, including a number of our
fine packet ships with European merchandise,have
been unusually large. The demand for domestics
for export and country supplies has been quite ac-
tive, and the largest sale of hardware ever made
in this city took place during the week, at which
one thousand and sixty lots were offered by James
M. Miller and Co. auctioneers, and sold at fair
prices. Upwards of 15,000 bushels of Ohio wheat
have been purchased during the week for export,
at $1 10 a $1 11, and 'here has been a moderate
demand for flour for export and home uwe.
By a reference to the review of the Baltimore
market, which will be found in another column, it
will be perceived that the business of that city, in
all the departments of trade, is exceedingly good,
while their wharves are crowded with an unusual
ly large number of shipping, discharging and re-
ceiving freight.
Let us hear no more of this Whig croaking
about the destruction of business.
[JNew York Standard.

S RS. R. HOWARD, opposite Mr. Fuller's
City Hotel, can accommodate two or three
gentlemen with board. Sept. 7.-3t.


[coATMSMCATrrD.]
Ma. EDITOR: The time is rapidly approaching
then we shall be called upon to choose our rulers;
nd it will be well for every man who has h-e love
f his country at heart, to act with caution, and not
s led off by the UNFOUNDED excitements which
aVe been got up by designing men to deceive the
people of this country. We ought to ace as ra-
onal men, and not do in an unguarded moment
n act that will not only be a curse to ourselves,
at to our posterity, forever.
The Federal party who congregated at Harris-
urg to make their nomination, were well aware
iat to nominate a man who would have the inde-
endence to come out and make known to the
.merican people the PRINCIPLES which the party
rough him would carry out, could never receive
ihe suffrage of a majority of the people of the Uni-
ted States; and the consequence was, that Henry
Clay, WHO is THE IDOL OF THE PARTY, and who, it
ras supposed, would be the Federal candidate,
would not receive a majority ofthe votes of the de-
egates. After discussing the merits and demerits
f persons proposed by that convention, Win. H.
larnrison was thought to be the most available Fe-
eral candidate that could be presented to the peo-
le of this country for their support, from the fact
that he was the only man who would suffer him-
elf to be under the control of a committee, and
rho would not make any disclosures of the princi-
lea to be carried out by the party, should they suc-
eed in getting the reins of Government in their
hands. In accordance with that vote, the name of
heir candidate was made known, followed with an
address to the people of the United Siait-., urging
pon the people of this nation the propriety of sup-
orting the Federal candidate, without making
known to them what principles he entertained in
elation to the great questions which then, as well
as now, agitate the public mind. He is represent-
d to he a MILITARY CHIEFTAIN, who had done more
or his country in the late war than any other offi-
er attached to the American army, which entitles
im to the highest office in the gift of the American
people.
It is well known that General Harrison has been
a but few battles; and in no instance did he ever
esad on an attack, but, on the contrary, suffered
his men to be surprised by the ENEMY; and the con-
equence of that surprise was, that many of his
nost valuable men became victims to the SAVAGE
CALPING KNIFE AND TOMAHAWK; and for his success
n battle, we are called upon to make General Har-
ison President of the United States, in preference
o our worthy Chief Magistrate. Why did Gene-
ral Harrison, (who is represented to be so much of
a patriot,) at the most critical and trying time of
the war, and when his services were most wanted,
resign his command in the army, and retire to pri-
vate life, and leave the battles of his country to be
fought by others, while he sat by his fireside in
safety, enjoying all the good things of this world?
Do such acts of General Harrison prove him to
be what he is represented by his party, or do they
prove clearly to the American people that they have
upon that, as well as upon other subjects, been de-
ceived by the Federal party? The result, however,
of General Harrison's resignation was, that the
command devolved upon General Andrew Jack-
son, who,through his skill andbravery at .New Orleans,
ended the war in a blaze of glory.
Among the claims of General Harrison which
have been presented to the honest, working portion
of the community, we find him represented to be
the inmate of a log cabin, decorated with coon
skins, old saddles, rattle snake tails, etc. and that
he drinks hard cider out of a gourd; one of the
greatest insults ever offered to an intelligent people
by any party, and ought to be regarded and treated
as such by the workingmen at their respective polls,
at the ensuing Presidential election, and by that
means teach the Whigs that the workingmen of this
country are not to be gulled by such clap-trap ar-
guments, but that they are capable of judging what
will conduce to their welfare, and that they will not
sacrifice the liberty they now enjoy under the pre-.
sent Administration, to place in the Presidential
chair a man without principles, (or who is at least
afraid to make them known,) merely because he
lives in a log cabin, and drinks hard cider. It is well
known that General Harrison's house is no log ca-
bin, but, on the contrary, is a fine frame building,
of large dimensions; is well finished and furnished.
and is surrounded by the most fertile land in all thai
section of country, and is one of the most delight
ful situations on the banks of the Ohio, and west
of the Al'eghany Mountains; and with these facts
before us, we are told he is the log cabin candi-
date, the poor man's friend, and ought to receive
the support of the working-, men of this country
By what class of men was Win. H. Harrisor
brought out? Was it by the working men? Cast
your eye over the list of delegates who composed
the convention, and you will find that it was com-
posed exclusively of bank officers, bank stockhold-
ers, speculators, Abolitionists, &c. We are told
that those are the men who study the interests o
the laboring class, and they go for the good of the
country, and are actuated by principle, and not by
personal motives.
The Whig party is using all manner of scheme
to gull and deceive the people, and nothing is lef
undone that money cando to carry their ends. Thel
are making desperate efforts throughout the coun
try; and are determined, if they cannot defeat the
Democratic party, by threats of violence, they wil
use all the unfair means that can be brought t
bear, to deceive the people between this and th
election. The Federal prices throughout the coun
try go so far as to pronounce Mr. Van Buren
despot, and that the liberties of the people are for
ever gone, if the Democratic party should re.elec
him to the honorable station he now holds. Wel
let us see how far his despotism does extend. Whet
Mr. Van Buren was a candidate for the Presidency
and his opinions was asked in respect to the great
questions which then agitated the country, did h
hesitate giving his opinionupon subjects of so muc
importance to the people ef the United States? 0
did he, without delay,make known to Sherrod Wi
liams his views, that they might, through him, bi
laid before the people, ftom Maine to Louisiana
that they, the people, might have time to considi
whether his views upon those subjects, would,
carried out, prove beneficial to the country or noted
The great questions which then, as well as at th
present time, agitated the country, were the abrlitie
of slavery in the District of Columbia, the recharter
the United States Bank-a high protective tariff, an
internal improvements by the Gemeral Goveramen
Upon these, Mr. Van Buren's opinion was askei
and, without the least hesitation, was given, i
terms plain and decisive.
The great mass of the people of the United Stati
approved of Mr. Van Buren's views uoon tho:
subjects, and sanctioned them by electing him Pr
sident of the United States by a very large majority
over the Opposition candidate. The course pu
sued by the President from the commencement
his administration to the present lime, has been a
honorable and straight forward one, and in every it
stance has he acted in accordance with the pledg
made by him to the American people, previous
his election in 1836.
The separation of the Government from tl
banks, is an aet of the Administration that ought
be regarded, by every lover of his country, as
second declaration of independence. So great w.
the banking influence, that it was easier to thro
off the British yoke, than for the Government
obtain a law by which she would be enabled
keep safe and disburse the public revenue, in ob
dienne to the letter, and spirit of the Constitutio
Should the Bank of the United States, though i
trigue, and by the aid of Blitish gold, succeed
electing Win. H. Harrison President, we mu
view with sorrow the downfall of this Governmer


and her institutions, and never again expect to r
gain our liberties, except by revolution and blood
shed.
When we look at the intelligence of this gre
nation, and their love of liberty, we have not tl
slightest doubt of their willingness and ability
put down, at the coming election, the trio of Fed
ral Bank Abolitionists,and do honor to themselv
and honor to their country, by re electing Mart
Van Buren, the supporter and defender of the Co
stitution and laws, President of the United State
and Richard M. Johnson, who carries upon h
person, not certificates received from the officers
the army, of his bravery, but the wounds he r
ceived in the service of his country, and who
the hero of the Thames, Vice President. I mus
before laying my pen aside, appeal to the working
men, (to which class I am proud to say I belong
and warn you, as you value your ihermte-, to b
ware of these men, who profess to be so deeply i
terested in your welfare, and whose only aim is
deceive you, by impressing upon you the beli
that the election of Harrison to the Presidency w
prove advantageous ito your interests; depend up(
it, that this soulless set of beings, who profess to I
the workingman's friend, feel no more interest
your welfare than they do for the re-election
Martin Van Buren and R. M. Johnson; and just
the same proportion that they oppose their election
are they opposed to the welfare of the country ar
to the workingman's interests. Were those pe
sons, who profess to be your friends, able to ele


their candidate without your Votes, such appeals
wou!d not be made to you, requesting you to go to
the polls, and vote away your liberties, under the
pretence that it will prove an advantage to you
and your posterity; but, on the contrary, you would
find them going silently to ihe polls, and by their
acts deprive you of your liberties, and place in the
hands of the few the wealth and power of the
country, to the exclusion of the many.
Workingmen! you who can and who will main-
tain your rights, be not careless; but, as you value
the laws of equality, be vigilant to your rights and
your interests, and go the polls in such numbers,
that the result of the election of November, 1840,
may prove a death blow to the' Federal party,
whose only aim is to make the rich richer and the
poor poorer.
A WORKINGMAN.

OFFICIAL.
PorST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
September 5th, 1840.
4bstracfrom the Journal for the week ending this day.
POST OFFICES DISCONTINUED.
Greenfield, Poinsett co. Ark.
Corbett's, Armstrong co. Pa.
POST OFFICES ESTABLISHED AND POSTMASTERS AP-
POINTED.
James' Creek, Huntingdon co. Pa. John B. Gi-
ven.
Second creek, Greenbrier co. Va. John Burdett.
South Washington, Orange co. Vt. Ora K. Good-
ale.
Raymondville, St. Lawrence co. N. Y. John
Woodard.
Wesley, Venaugo co. Pa. Robert C. Calvin.
Portsmouth, Carteret co. N. C. John Rumley.
Lights Corners, Waldo co. Me. B. C. Mathews.
Union Grove, Newton co. Me. H. C. Armstrong.
Mine Le Motte, Madison co. Mo. George Pettit.
Sweet Home, Washington co. Ark. J. C. Pitt-
man.
Big Prairie, Lowndes Co. Miss. E. Brothers.
East Washington, Sullivan co. N. H. Simon W.
Jones.
Little York, Hunterdon co. N. J. Geo. V. Al-
paugh.
POSTMASTERS APPOINTED.
Moses Herrington, Factory Point, Bennington
co. Vermont.
A. Kibbe, North Somers, Tolland co. Ct.
Win. K. Hall, Evansville, Preston co. Vs.
Andrew Leik, New Madison, Darke co. 0.
John Frances, Haddington, Philadelphia co. Pa.
A. Graham, Lexington, Rockbridge co. Va.
Robert Russell, Graves Landing, Lowndes co.
Alabama.
John P. Caldwell, New Athens, Harrison co. 0.
David Erskine, Perryopolis, Monroe co. 0.
H. Chadbourne, Maluncas, Aroostook co. Me.
H. F. French, Chester, Rockingham co. N. H.
C. Hornbeck, Wawarsing, Ulster co. N. Y.
George Ray, Lenox, Ashtabula co. 0.
Eli Egnor, Otivesburg, Richland co. 0.
C. M. Smith, Houston, Heard co. Ga.
John Justice, Littleton, Halifax co. N. C.
Sanm'l S. Earle, Elyton, Jefferson co. Al.
Oren Branch, Chester, Meigs co. 0.
David T. Bonnell, Jerseyville, Jersey co. Ill.
Henry Owens, Owensville, Clay co. Mo.
James H. Graves, Woodville, Mvacon co. Mo.
Win. L. Voorhee;, Bordeaux, Avoyeltes parish
Louisiana.
F. Starnes, St. Helena, St. Helena parish, La.
A. J. Leggett, Williamsburg, Covington co. Mi
Sterling Withers, Oak Ridge, Marshall co. Mi
C. W. Haskins, West Port, Lowndes co. Mi.
Daniel Hess, Lyons, Clinton co. Iowa.
Benj. F. Cooledge, Leyden, Franklin co. Mass
Levi French, Northwest Bridgewater, Plymoutl
Sco. Mass.
S Lewis Phelps, River Road Forks, Livingston co
SNew York.
t Joseph Warren, Stockholm, Morris co. N. J.
John Ong, Fulton, Westmoreland co. Pa.
Geo. W. Allen, Greenfield, Green co. Ill.
t John G. Lewis, Lewis Grove, Shelby co. Mo.
CHANGE OF NAME AND SiTE.
River Road Forks, Livingston co. N. Y. to Si
Helena.
Countsville, Lexington District, S. C. to Pama
rtie.
t Fishersville, Bucks co. Pa. to Plumstead.
New Greenfield, Green co. Ill. to Greenfield.
t Dutton's Grove, Shelby co. Mo. to Lewis' Grove
S
INSPECTION OFFICE.
e Fines imposed on contractors, for the week ending
S 5th September, 1840, viz:
a Fines _.. $8
E jfINGLISH BOOKS.-Just received for sal
.l2A by P. TAYLOR.
S(iulliver's Travels, 1 octavo vol. embellishe
d with more than 400 beautiful engraved illustra
Stions from designs by Granville.
Charles Lamb's Works, complete in 1 vol. 8v(
e Illustrated edition of La Martine', Travels i
Y the Holy Land, many engravings.
The complete Works of La Martine, in Frencu
Small in one large 8vo vol. Brusselis edition.
Miscellanies and Literature, by D'Israeli, 1 vo
8vo.
e Hook's History of Rome, 3 vols. 8vo.
S Oxford Bibles, with very beautiful steel ei
0 gravings, numerous.
oe The Complete Works of Beaumont and Fletche
Sin 2 vols. 8vo.
S The Dramat;c Works of Massinger and Fort
a complete in one 870vo vol.
et All the Dramatic Works of Ben Johnson, con
plete in 1 vol. 8vo.
m The Ladies' Flower Garden, by Mrs. Landor
S1 vol. 4ro, filled with splendidly colored groups
Y Flowers.
S And many others, of which the list will be cot
Stinued in a subsequent advertisement. Sept 7
,h
)r ] EW MUSIC.-Just received, the followir
I- N [ New Music, at the old established Slore, tw
)e doors east of the city Post Office.
a, W. FISCHER.
er Evening Melodies, No. 1 to 9.
if When twilight is stealing; Duet.
? The music of thy song.
ie When voices breathe a music sweet.
'a Ask not from me; a Duet.
of Smile on.
d The voice of the past.
t. 0, touch the harp.
id The hours to-night.
*f The bird of spring.
Metacom's Grand March, G. 0. J. Shaw.
es Recollections of Buffalo. QOuick step; by Johi
se son.
e- Grand Promenade March; by Detsch.
y American quick step.
r- Bonaparte crossing the Alps.
f Leander crossing the Hellespont.
La Sept 9
5-
es TALUABLE IMPROVED AND UNII
to W PROVED PROPERTY AT PUBL]
SALE.-On Thursday, the 10th inst. I shall se
ie by order of Executor, to close an estate, the folio
to ing valuable property in the city of Washingto
a viz: Lot No. 20, in square No. 374, corner of S
as and I streets, fronting 62 feet 101 inches on S
w street, and containing 5,916 square feet. This
to is in one of the most rapidly improving portions
to the Northern Liberties, and very desirable for p.
e- vate residences.
n. East half of Lot No. 9, in square No. 142, frot
n- ing south 35 feet 9 inches on North F street,
in 128 feet 81 inches deep, containing 4,601 squs


ay feet. This lot is also a very desirable one for p
nt, vate residence, being on a ridge overlooking t
re. Potomac, &c. and nearly opposite the residence
d- Mrs. Meade.
Part of Lot 24, in square No. 288, fronting
S12th street North 20 feet, between G and H, up
which there is a very comfortable two story bri
he House, now occupied by Capt. Warder.
to The sale will take place at half-past five o'cloc
es p. m. in front of the house on 12ih street, last me
tioned, and occupied by Capt. Warder.
n Terms-one-third cash, balance in notes, at
n.
Sand twelve months, with interest, satisfactorily
us cured. EDWARD DYER, Auct'r.
nr Sept 5


D OG LOS .-On Saturday evening last, a
young Newfoundland dog left his owner in
this city. His body is black, but his neck and feet
are white. A liberal reward will be made to any
person who will leave him at Mr. Coburn's Groce-
ry Store, near the War Department. Sep. 7-3t
PERFORATED CARDS AND BRISTOIL
S BOARDS.-W. FISCHER has for sale Per.
forated Cards and Bristol Boards, assorted colors,
for fancy work, which he has recently imported
from London.
BORDER BEAGLES, A TALE OF MISSIS-
I SIPPI, By the author of "Richard Hurdis,"
in 2 vols. Woman's Love and the World's Fa-
vour, or the Fergusons, by the Hon. Edmund
Phipps, in 2 vols. Also, No. 8 Humphry's Clock
-are this day published and for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,


INDbIAN MURDER.
From the Savannah Oeorgian of August 31.
S ST. MARY'S (Ga.) August 24, 1840.
I am very sorry to inform you that the savage In-
dians are againrmin our county. Last week on the
Suwannee river, the killed eleven individuals and
burned the same number of settlements. I derived
my information from Mr. James Howell, formerly
of Camden county, and one of the unfortunate suf-
ferers, having had his wife and one child butchered.
I proceed to give you all the information obtained
from him relative to the murders, depredations, &c.
committed on the Suwannee and St. Mary's rivers
during the last two weeks.
About ten days since, or possibly two weeks,
they made an attack upon the family of Mr. Cour-
cy, (who was himself absent from home at the
time, having left his wife and six children in the
morning of the day, enjoying health and every
comfort,) but what must have been his feelings on
his return that evening, to find his dwelling and
every house on the place, a mass of smoking ru-
ins, and his wife, with six small children, lying
about his feld, shot down in attempting to escape,
and their bodies horribly mutilated. He lived on
Brandy Branch, (I think,) one of the head branches
of St. Mary's river, in Florida.
The wretches then struck across for a large set-
tlement df farmers on the Suwannee, in search of
other victims in that neighborhood, as this settle-
ment had never been the scene of their butcheries.
A Mr. Daniel Green, who had removed from
Camden the last year, and Mr. Howell, lived very
near each o.her, their farms adjoining. These
persons, with several others, had concluded to
erect a school house in the centre of the settlement
for the education of their children, and had left
their homes in the morning to continue their work.
Mr. Howell states that between ten an eleven
o'clock he heard the crack of several rifles, accom-
panied with the yells of the Indians, immediately
in the direction of his house. He instantly mount
ed his horse and dashed for his home; halted about
one hundred yards from his house, and discovered
Indians in his yard, who fired at him, as did seve-
ral others in the field apparently searching for his
children, who had escaped, and secreted themselves
in a cane patch. In casting his eyes about, he
discovered three of them jumping over the fence
some hundred or two hundred yards distant from
him. He immediately run and seized them up on
his horse and made his escape, the Indians yell-
ing and pursuing like devils after. His poor wife
and one child (she being in a state of pregnancy,)
were overtaken and slaughtered. Casting his eyes
towards Mr. Green's place, he perceived every
building on fire: the scene rendered more terrific by
the yells of the savages rejoicing over their butcher-
ed victims and their destruction of property. He
learnt, on reaching a place of security not far off,
that Mrs. Green and one of her children had been
killed, which information he derived from a settler
approaching with Miss Chanty Green on horse-
back (whom he had rescued) she having been very
severely wounded by a rifle ball through her shoul-
der, and covered with blood, and in a few mo-
ments would have been overtaken by the Indians,
as'she was completely exhausted from the loss ol
blood.
This news was soon spread in every direction
the next day, and the families living on St. Mary's
river collected at Fort Moniac (a post on the ri-
ver recently occupied by United States troops, but
which had been abandoned some months) to de-
fend themselves. They occupied the soldiers
quarters around the stockade.
i. On the evening of the 19th, the Indians ap
proached very near, without the knowledge of any
one; and whilst Mrs. Patrick was preparing a bed
Sfor her little children, she was fired at from thi
h window, and fell dead on the bed in front of her
father. An attack was then made simultaneously
on all the houses by the infernal devils. Mr.Tho
mas Davis, of our county, and two of his children
were killed, and their bodies consumed in the build
ing, which was set on fire-as was the case witl
every other, except the picket, whither they al
rushed for the preservation of their lives. Mr
Patrick, who was the bearer of the express, amn
t. with whom I conversed, informed me, as he rushed
for the picket, bearing the dead body of hi
t- daughter, he was fired at four or five times, bu
luckily escape]. The Indians were then driven
off by the men in the fort. Mr. A. Jernakil
killed one, as he was seen to fall and borne offl
a. They continued to fire at the fort, and kept up at
incessant yelling during the night. A party was
however, sent off very soon to the plantation of Mr
g Hogan, about half a mile distant, and in a short
time every building on the place was wrapt it
2 flame and completely destroyed.
The next day the Indians crossed into Camde
e county, burnt the place of the unfortunate Davis,
Mr. Mincey's, and several others.
d You can form no idea of the panic and distress
&- which now prevails in our county. Every man i
the upper part of the county has left his home, o
in are collecting at points to defend themselves an
n families, leaving their crops and every thing the
possess, exposed to the ravages of the enemy.
h General Floyd, upon hearing of the outrage o
the Suwannee, with his know promptitude, ordered
Captain Tracy to collect a company of fifty men
and afford protection to our frontier settlement,
That company has been raised, and this morning
a- left Centreville for the scene of outrage. As soo
as he learns of the other murders and depredation
r, committed in Camden, I doubt not he will order
out a larger force.
,' The families who had collected at "Moniac
abandoned the place shortly after the attack of th
n- Indians, and assembled at Mr. Jernakin's, consider
ing it a better place of security, and two evening
n since the stockade was burnt by the enemy. Tw
Stravellers informed me that they passed within fiv
miles of it, and discovered an immense fire in thi
direction.
Lieutenant May of the 2d Dragoons, with
ig detachment of men, is at this time in pursuit, and
,o hope either himself or the volunteers under Cap
Tracy may fall in with them.

JACKSONVILLE, August 25.
[From our correspondent.]
NEWNANSVILLE, August 13.-Again it become
my painful duty to inform you of the murder
another of our citizens. I will give you the part
culars as I heard them from a young man who a
rived here last night from the scene of action. M
Samuel Smart, and Mr. James Lanier, both your
men, were in their field at Fort Tarver guardir
their negroes, uho were gathering fodder. Th
was in the afternoon of Wednesday, the 12th in;
A little before sunset, the young men strolled t
- wards the hammock, which entirely surrounded tl
field, where there were some water-melons, ai
while in the act of eating one, were fired on fro
the hammock, by Indians, one ball passing throul
the body of Mr. Smart, and killed him almost i
stantly. Mr. Lanier was severely wounded, b
- succeeded in making his escape. The lndia:
Ml- took from Mr. Smart a fine rifle, a powder hor
IC and some silver change. The death of Mr. Smi
II, is very much lamented by all who knew him. F
W- was about twenty-three years of age, a native
in, the State of Mississippi, and for the last eig
ith years a resident of this county.
ith In addition to the above, we learn from the Net
lot nansville Mail Carrier, that on the evening of tl
of 13th, two dragoons with their horses were kill
ri- near Mclntosh's Plantation, about ten miles east
Micanopy. On the morning of the 13th India
it- were seen from the top of a house at Fort Cran
by in a field near that post. They numbered abo
.re sixty, and were apparently celebrating their victor
ri- They held up and danced around a rifle or go
he which was recognized to be that taken from Sma
of These no doubt, were the same that killed the dr


goons.
on Since $e above was in type, we had seen a ge
on tleman from NewnaRsville, who was one of t]
ck party that wvnt after the body of Smart. He al
saw the trail of the Indians that killed the dragoot
;k, He states it to be his belief that the party that mu
an- dered Smart was entirely distinct from that whi,
murdered the dragoons. He thinks there we
six about a hundred in each party. He is a gentlemt
se- of some experience in those matters, whose jud
meant may be relied on.


ICHARD SON'S NEW DICTIONARY OF
ENGLISH LANGUAGE, handsomely
bound, in two volumes, is for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,

W ILLIAM LANPHIER, Surgeon Dentist,
continues the exercise of his profession in
Alexandria. The citizens and visitors of Wash-
ington can consult him every Wednesday, at his
father's, north side of Pennsylvania avenue, above
and a few doors from the corner of 12th street.
The mechanical branches, in which he has had
long experience, and being wholly executed by
himself, will enable him to insert artificial teeth,
either single or in sets, more durable, so very like
nature, as not to be detected by the nicest scrutiny,
and much cheaper than can be afforded elsewhere
in this District. Aug. l2-3aw4w


Piom the Sendnel of he Vaiiey.
The following extract of a letter received by
the firm of E. Almond and Co. of Lurav, Poge
City, Virginia, has been handed us by that firm
forpubliaction. It contains a corroboration of the
statement of General Hale respecting General Har-
rison's profanation, and of the statements of the
Democratic papers concerning his (General Har-
rison's) intellectual unfitness for the Presidency.
It also furnishes some idea of General Hairrton's
popularity in Ohio. The writer is a very respecta-
ble man-a brother of the Rev. Wesley Amiss,
a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal
Church in eastern Virginia. Let it be read, espe-
cially by the Whigs.
Extract from a letter, dated
CINCINNATI, Omo, August 13, 1840.
"You have written to me something about
the standing of General Charles Hale, and the
outrage General Harrison committed on him in
the street. That is all true. I imagine that the
statement you have seen in the newspapers is true.
As for General Hale, he is a very respectable
man. Any thing that he may have said can be
relied upon; and not only that, I can myself
get one hundred respectable men to testify to the
truth of what I say This is net the first time
,hat the Old General (Harrison) has been guilty of
such outrages; if it was, we might look over it.
"You wish me to let you know how the old
General is likely to run in our State. The general
opinion of many of the people is, that he will not
run as well as he did before. Neither will he run
as well as he would have done, some four or five
months ago. I have seen and conversed with him,
and I do not think him qualified to fill so impor-
tant an office. He is the clerk of our county court,
and has to get some body to attend to that, being
too infirm himself." Yours, &c.
ROB'T B. AMISS.


[PROPOSALS for carrying the mails of the
United States on the following routes will be
ceived at the Contract Office of the Post Office
epattment, in the city of Washington, until the
lth day of October next, at 3 o'clock, p m. to be
decided by the 15th day of said October.
NEW JERSEY.
No. 1319. From Morristown, by Mendon, Ches-
r, Washington, German Valley, Schooley's
mountain, Pleasant Grove, Anderson, Mansfield
id New Village, to Easton, Pa. 43 miles and back,
x times a week in four horse post coaches, with
tri-weekly branch from Mansfield by Oxford
urnace to Belvidere, 9 miles and back in stages,
o be run in due connection.
Leave Morristown every day except Sunday at
1i m, arrive at Easton same days by 9 p m.
Leave Easton every day except Sunday at 3 a
i, arrive at Morristown same days by 12 m.
Proposals to carry but three times a week are
iso invited.
The service is to commence on the first day of
November, 1840, and continue to the 30th June,
844, inclusive.
PENNSYLVANIA.
1610. From Bedford to Rainsburg, 10 miles and
ack, once a week.
Leave Bedford every Tuesday at 7 a m, arrive
t Rainsburg same day by 10 a m.
Leave Rainsburg same day at 12 m, arrive at
Bedford same day by3 p m.
The term of service to be as aforesaid.
INDIANA.
2591. From Terre Haute, by Otter Creek, Clin's
on, Montezuma, Highland, Newport, Eugene,
Perryville, Cov'ngton, Portland, Rob Roy, Attica,
ihawnee Prairie and West Point, to Lafayette, 86
niles and back, three times a week in four horse
post coaches.
Leave Terre Haute every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Lafayette the next
lays by 12 m.
Leave Lafayette every Tuesday, Thursday, anti
Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Terra Haute next days
by 12 m.
Proposals to carry in stages will also be consi-
lered.
The service is to commence on the first day of
November, 1840, and continue to the 30th June,
1842, inclusive.
On the following routes, the proposals for carry-
ing the mails will be received as aforesaid until the
14th day of November, 1840, and decided by the
18th day of said November.
INDIANA.
2555. From Louisville, Ky. by Jefferson-
ville, Ia. Hamburg, New Providence, Pekin,Salem,
Claysville, and Lost river, to Orleans, 54 miles and
back, 3 times a week in stages.
Proposals to carry in 4 horse post coaches will
be considered.
Also, from Salem by Walnut Ridge, Hillport,Va-
onia, Browstown, Rockford, Reddington, and
Azalia, to Columbus, 42 miles and back, 3 times a
week, on horseback. Proposals to carry in stages
will be considered.
Leave Louisville every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, at 8 a m, arrive at Orleans same day
by 8 p m.
Leave Orleans every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, at 10 a m, arrive at Louisville same
days by 10 pm.
Leave Salem every Tuesday, Thursday, and Sa-
turday, at 5 a m, arrive at Columbus same days by
5 p M.
Leave Columbus every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, at 5 a m, arrive at Salem same days
by 5 p m.
The service is to commence on the Ilt January,
1841, and continue to the 30 June, 1842, inclusive.
ALABAMA.
3719. From Rome, Georgia, by Missionary
Station, Ball Play, Ala. Gatesville, Van Buren,
Marshall, Warrenton, Oleander, Somerville, and
Rock Hill, to Decutur, 141 miles and back, three
times a week ia 4 horse post coaches.
Leave Rome every Thursday, Saturday, and
Monday at 4 a m, arrive at Decatur every Satur-
day, Monday, and Wednesday by 11 a m.
Leave Decatur every Thursday, Saturday, and
Monday at 1 p mi, arrive at Rome every Saturday
Monday, and Wednesday by 8 p m.
The service is to commence on the first day 'of
January, 1841, and continue tothe30th June, 1842.
MISSISSIPPI.
3898. From Tuscumbia, Alabama by Buzzard,
Roost, Cartersville, Mi. Jacinto, Rienzi, Ripley,
and Salem, to Holly Springs, 112 miles and back 3
times a week in 4 horse post coaches.
Leave Tuscumbia every Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday at 5 a m; arrive at Holly Springs next
days by 8 p m.
Leave Holly Springs every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 5 a m, arrive at Tuscumbia next
days by 8 p m.
The term of service to be as on No. 3,719.
ARKANSAS.,
4002. From Little Rock, Arkansas, by Searcy
C. H. to Batesville, 100 miles and back twice a
week.
Leave Little Roc'c every Sunday and Wednes-
day at 8 a. m. and arrive at Batesville every Tues-
day and Friday by 6 p. m.
Leave Batesville every Wednesday and Satur-
day at 6 a. m. and arrive at little Rock every Fri-
day and Monday by 4 p. m.
Proposals to run twice a week in stages six
months in the year will be considered. Also, a
longer time if practicable, the period to be spe-
cified.
The time (f service to be the same as in Nose
3719 and 3838.
TO BIDDERS.
Place but one route in a proposal, and state dis-
tinctly the annual sum, the mode of service, and
your residence. See the act of Congress of 1836
against promises, offers, or combinations to prevent
competition. Bids resulting from them are void.
Send with the bid a guarantee in the following
form:
"The undersigned guaranty that
if his (or their) bid for carrying the
mail from to be accepted
by the Postmaster General, shall enterinto au obli-
gation prior to the first day of next, with
good and sufficient sureties to perform the service
proposed. Dated 1840."
*Fill this blank as to 1319, 1610, and 2591, with
"November;" and as to the other routes with
"January."
Have the guarantors duly certified to be men of
property, and able to make good their guarantee, by
a postmaster, or the fact otherwise satisfactorily
shown to the Department.
Address the letter enclosing the bid to the First
Assistant Postmaster General, and mark the letter
with the term "mail proposals," end the number of
the route.
You are to satisfy yourselves as to the distances,
and take the stock of the present contractor, when
you underbid him on a stage or coach route, and
have not stoek yourself, and be subject to fines and
forfeitures for failures of performance, as specified
in the regulations published in the advertisement
for the annual lettings.
JOHN M. NILES,
Postmaster General,
POST OrFtcE DEPARTMENT,
WauiilngtQn, August 15,18B40,








BY THE PRE61DENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
B EN, President of th. United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that a
public sale will be held a the lind office at Ionia,
in the State of Michigan, coromeriCing on Monday
the twelfth day of Ocit..br n xi, for the disposal of
the public land, within the limits ofthe under
mentioned t .iwnshipa, to wit:
North of the bate line, and west of'he meridim.
Townships tenriy-one, twenty-iwo, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twent)-five, twenty-aix, twenty-
seven, twenty,eiglt, Ltwenty-nine, and thirty, of
range eight.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, and
twenty-seven, and fractional townships twenty-
eight, twenly-nine, an.] iLir'y, bordering on Grand
Traverse Bay, of range rue.
Townships twenty-cune, twenty-two, twenty-three,
twenty-lfour, and twenty-five, of range ten.
At the same place in continuation, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-etxh day of October next,
for the dispo-al of ihe public lands within the
limits of the undermetioned townships, and frac-
tional townships, to wit:
,A'rth of the base line and ie/t of the meridian.
Township twerny-iix, iaetional township twen-
ry -even, twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
bordering on Grand Traver-e Bay, of range ten.
Townships twemy-one,weniyv-two, twenty-three,
twenty-lour, twenl)-rive, and twenty-six, and frac-
tional townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twen-
ty-nine, and thirty, bordering on Grand Traverse
Bay, of range eleven.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three,
t'enty-fc-ur, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven,
tweniy-eigh,. and fractional townships twenty-
nine and ihirty, bordering on Lake Michigan, of
range twelve.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be ex-
ciuded from sale.
The rale; will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the
expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-fourth day of April, anno Domini,
1840. M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any of the lands designated in the above procla-
mation, is requested to prove the same to thesa-
tisfactiod of the Register and Receiver of ihe Land
Office, aid make payment therefore as soon as prac-
ticable after seeing this notice, in order that the claim
may be adjudicated by those officers agreeably to
law, in due time, prior to the twenty-second day of
June next, when the pre-emption law of 1838 will ex-
pire by limitation: and all claims not duly made
known and paid for prior to that date, are declared
by law to be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
April 25-lawt260
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President ol the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that
public s-ales will be held at the undermentioned
lanrd otlices in the State of Michigan, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Ionia, commencing on Mon-
day, the twenty-third day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range three.
Townships twenty-e:ght, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range four.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range five.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range six.
Townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-
nine, and thirty, of range seven.
At the land office at Genesee, commencing on
Monday, the twenty-third day of November next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
Sof range one.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine, and thirty,
of range two.
,Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
lJm tidpid.no private entries of land, in the town-
shipso offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
:;. Chten nndr d my hand, at the City of Washing-
ton, this ihird'day of August, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
-By it.l Pre.imdni:
'J'3t WHIoTCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption to
]and in any of the'townhips designated in this pro-
clamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act of
2-d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the ait.ici,.rn L.i the Register and Receiver of the
proper land office and make payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and before
the day appointed for ithe commencement of the
public sale of the land as above designated; other-
wise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner o athe General Land Office.
Aug 4-lawt23N
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNt.TED STATES
I"N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that a
public sale will be held at the land office at Bur-
lington, in the Territory of Iowa, commencing on
*Monday, the twelfth day of October next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, and fractional
townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships
seventy and seventy-six, of range five.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships
seventy, seventy-four, seventy-five, and seventy-
six, of range six.
Townships seventy-one and seventy-four, of
range seven.
Township sixty-eight, of range ten.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sale will be kept open for 'two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer, and on private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the
expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-fifth day of May, anno Dami-
ni, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.


By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any of the lands designated in the above procla-
mation, is requested to prove the same to the sa-
tisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the Land
Office, and make~payment therefore, as soon as prac-
ticable after seeing this notice, in order that the claim
may be adjudicated by those officers agreeably to
law, in due time, prior to the.twenty-second dayel of
June next, when' the pre-emption law of 1838 will
expire by limitation; and all claims not duly made
known and paid forprior to that date, are declared
by law to be forfeited.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Comminionerof the General Land Office.
May 26-wts


F LORA'S LEXICON.-An Interpretation of
the Language and Sentiment of Flowers,
with an outline of Botany, and a Poetical Intro.
duction, by Catharine H. Waterman; Floral Bi-
ography or Chapters.of Flowers, by Charlotte Eli-
zabeth; The Sentiment of Flowers or Language of
Flora, with colored plates. Also, the Language of
Flowers, with illustrative poetry, to which is now
t added the Calendar of Flowers, &c. are for
e by W. M:MORRISON,
ay 21 fa doers west of B;rwn's Hotel.


BY THE PRESIDENT OF TaxE NrrmTE) STtEs-
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices, in the State of Illinois, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Danville, commencing on
Monday, the fourteenth day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships and fractional
townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the second
principal meridian.
Townships twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty,
of range fourteen.
.North of the base line, and east of the third princi-
pal merdian.
Townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-
nine and thirty, of range nine.
Townships twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-
nine and thirty, of range ten.
Fractional townships twenty-seven, twenty-
eight, twenty-nine and thirty, of range eleven.
At the land office at Chicago, commencing on
Monday, the twenty-eighth day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
JNorth of the base line, and east of the third principal
meridian.
Townships forty-two, forty-three and forty-five,
of range eight.
Townships forty-three, forty-four and forty-five,
of range nine.
The northeast quarter of section eight, in town-
ship thirty-three, of range seven.
The northeast quarter of section twenty four, in
township thirty-six, of range eleven.
At the land office atQuincy, commencing on the
twelfth day of October next, for the disposal of the
following detached tracts, not heretofore offered at
public sale, to wit:
forthh of the base line, and east ofthe fourth principal
meridian.
The west half of the southwest quarter of sec-
tion twenty-three, in township four, of range one.
The west half of the southeast quarter of section
two, in township ten, of range two.
The east half of the northeast quarter of section
twenty-six, in township four, of range three.
.North of the base line, and west of the fourth principal
meridian.
The east half of the southeast quarter of section
twenty-six, in township four, and the west half of
the southwest quarter of section nineteen, in town-
ship twelve, of range three.
The west half of the northeast quarter of sec-
tion five, in township two, and the east half of the
southwest quarter of section six, in township ten,
of range four.
The east half of the southeast quarter of section
twenty.six, and the east half of the northeast quar-
ter of section thirty-five, in township one, and the
east half of the northwest quarter of section two,
in township four, of range five.
The east half of the northeast quarter of section
seven, and the west half of the northwest quarter
of section thirty, in township five, of range six.,
The west half of the southwest quarter of sec-
tion fourteen, in township four, of range nine.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, tlis eighth day of Jtne, anno Domini,
eighteen hundred and forty.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOM ,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the
act of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified
by the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions
of the latter act, granting certain privileges to an-
other class of settlers, is requested to prove the
same to the satisfaction of the Register and
Receiver of the land office, and make pay-
ment therefore, as soon as practicable after seeing
this notice, and before the day appointed for the
commencement of the public sale of the land as
above designated; otherwise such claims will be
forfeited. JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BIT.
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices, in the State of Arkansas, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Batesville, commencing on
Monday, the seventh day of September next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships eight, nine, and ten, of range fif-
teen.
Townships eight, nine. and ten, of range six-
teen.
Townships eight and ten, of range seventeen.
At the land office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday, the fourteenth day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships and fractional
townships, to wit:
.North ojf'the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships eighteen and twenty-one, of range
twenty-nine.
Township eighteen, of range thirty-one.
Fractional township twelve, bordering on the
Cherokee boundary, of range thirty-three.
At the land office at Littli Rock, commencing on
Monday, the twenty-first day of September next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
nmeridian.
That part of township seven, lying north of the
old Cherokee boundary, of range sixteen.
South of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Townships two, three, and four, of range seven.
Township four, of range eight.
Township four, of range nine.
Townships six, seven, and eight, of range ten.
At the land office at Johnson Court House, com-
mencing on Monday, the twenty-eighth day of Sep-
tember next, for the disposal of the public lands
within the limits of the undermentioned townships
and fractional township, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township two, of range eighteen.
Township ten, of range thirty.
Fractional township eleven, bordering on the
Cherokee boundary, of range thirty-three.
At the land office at Washington, commencing
on monday, the twelfth day of October next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of the
undermentioned townships, to wit:
9outh of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township twelve, of range thirty.
'township twelve, of range thirty-one.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sal,-


The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the
townships so offered, will be admitted until after
the expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the City of Washing-
ton, this fourth day of May, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
T., -... V-T .........


JAMIEUS W HITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any of the lands designated in the above procla-
mation, is requested to prove the same, to the satis-
faction of the Register and Receiver of the proper
land office, and make payment therefore as soon as
praclita) ,.ftei seeing this notice, in order that the
claim may be adjudicated by those officers, agree-
ably to law, in due lime, prior to the 22d day of June
next, when the pre-emption law of 1838 will expire by
limitation; and all claims not duly made known and
paid for prior to that date, are declared by law to be
forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK, Nos. 5
and 6, are this day published and for sale
W. M. MORUISON,


BY THE PRESIDENT OF TIlE UNITED aTATES..
I N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BT-
R, REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that
public sales will be held at the undermentioned
land offices in the Slate of Arkansas, at the peri-
ods hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Batesville, commencing on
Monday, the fifth day of October next, for the dis-
posal of public lands within the limits of the un-.
dermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Fractional township nineteen, on thepouth side
of White river, of range fifteen.
Township eighteen, of range sixteen.
Township nine, of range seventeen.
At the Land Office at Little Rock, commencing
on Monday, the twelfth day of October next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and west of the principal meri-.
dian.
Townships three and four, of range six.
At the Land Office at Johnson Court-House,
commencing on Monday, the nineteenth day of Oc-
tober next, for the disposal of the public lands with-
in the limits of the undermentioned townships, to
wit:
.North of the bate line, and west of the'fifth principal
meridian.
Township three, of range eighteen.
Fractional township six, on the north side of
Arkansas river, of range twenty.
Township ten, of range twenty-four.
At the Land Office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-sixth day of October next,
for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships and frac-
tional townships, to wit:
North of the base line, and west of the fifth principal
meridian.
Township fourteen, of range thirty.
Fractional townships eighteen, nineteen, and
twenty, bordering on the Cherokee boundary line,
of range thirty-tour.
Lands appropriated by law for the use ofschools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept oper for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the city of Washington
this twentieth day of June, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BURDEN.
By the President,
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the register and receiver of the
proper land office, and make payment therefore,
as soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
tle public sale of the land as above designated;
otherwise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General.Land Office.
June 26-lawt260

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
N pursuance tt law, I, MARTIN VAN Bt-
AgN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that
a public sale will be held at the Land Office at
Mineral Point, in the Territory of Wiskonsin,
commencing on Monday, the fifth day of October
next, for the disposal of the public lands hereinaf-
ter described, to wit:
Jorth of the base line and east of the fourth principal
meridian.
Sections one, eleven, twelve, thirteen, and four-
teen, in township twenty-two, of range five.
Sections one to ten, inclusive, section fifteen,
sections seventeen to twenty-one, inclusive, and
section twenty.nine, in township twenty-two; sec-
tions thirteen and fourteen, sections twenty-one to
twenty-nine, inclusive, and sections thirty-one to
thirty-six, inclusive, in township twenty-three; sec-
tions one, two, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and thirty-
six, in township twenty-six; and sections thirteen,
twenty-four, twenty-five, thirty-five, and thirty-six,
in township twenty-seven, of range six.
Sections two to six, inclusive, in township twen-
ty-two; sections one, two, and three, and sections
nine to thirty-six, inclusive, except section sixteen,
in township twenty-three; sections one to five, in-
clusive, sections eight to fifteen, inclusive, sections
twenty-one to twenty-seven, inclusive, and sections
thirty-four, thirty-five, and thirty-six, in township
twenty-four; sections one to fifteen, inclusive, sec-
tion seventeen, sections twenty to twenty-nine,
inclusive, and sections thirty-two to thirty-six, in-
clusive,i n township twenty-five; sections three to
ten, inclusive, section fifteen, sections seventeen to
twenty-two, inclusive, and sections twenty.six to
thirty-five, inclusive, in township twenty-six; sec-
tions one to twelve, inclusive, sections fourteen and
fifteen, sections seventeen to twenty-three, inclu-
sive, and sections twenty-six to thirty-four, inclu-
sive, in township twenty-seven; sections one, two,
three, and four, sections nine to fifteen, inclusive,
sections twenty-one to twenty-nine, inclusive, and
sections thirty-two to thirty-six, inclausiv.e, in town-
ship twenty-eight; and sections twenty-five, twenty-
six, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, thirty-three, thirty-
four, thirty-five, and thirty-six, in township twenty-
ty-nine, of range seven.
Sections three to eleven, inclusive, sections four-
teen and fifteen, sections seventeen to twenty-three,
inclusive, and sections twenty-six to thirty-four, in-
clusive, in township twenty-three; sections six, se-
ven, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, and
twenty-one, and sections twenty-eight to thirtn-
four, inclusive, in township twenty-four; sections
six, seven, eighteen nineteen, thirty, and thirty-
one, in township twenty-five; section six in township
twenty-seven, and sections six, seven, eighteen,
nineteen, thirty, and thirty-one, in township twenty-
eight, of range eight.
Lands appropriated by law, for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be exclu-
ded from sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks, (un-
less the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no long-
er; and no private entries of lands in the townships
so offered, will be admitted until after the expira-
tion of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twentieth day of June, anno Domini
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMBS WHiTCrOMn,
Comnmissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of
the latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
land office, and make payment therefore as soon as
practicable after seeing this notice, and before the
day appointed for the commencement of the pub.


lie sale of the land as above designated; otherwise
such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

TO THE PUBLIC.
The lands here proclaimed are situated in the
valley and on both sides of the Wiskonsin river.
They were ceded to the United States by the Meno-
monie Indians on the 30th September, 1836, and
are described in the treaty as follows: "Beginning
at a point upon the Wiskonsin river, two miles
above the grant or privilege heretofore granted by
the said nation and the United States to Amable
Grignon, thence running up and along said river
forty-eight miles in a direct line, and being three
miles in width on each side of said river," and are
represented to be of great value on account of the
pine timber abounding thereon.
JAMES WHIYCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 30-lawt5Oct

A SYSTEM OF PRACTICAL MEDICINE,
comprised in a series of original disserta-
tio arranged and edited by Alexander Tweedie,
M. D., F. R. S. Fevers and Diseases of the Skin,
is this day published and for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,
Aug 4 Four doos west of Brown's I-otel,


PARTIAL POSTPONEMENT OP PUBLIC'
LAND SALES ordered to te held at Du
Buque, in the Territo.ry of Iowa; at Chicago and
Galena, in the State of Illinois; and at Detroit, in
the Stale of Michigan.
Notice is given that the postponement is hereby
declared of the public sales of certain townships of
land heretofore ordered to be held at Du Buque, in
the Territory of Iowa, and at Chicago and Galena,
in the State of Illinois, and at Detroit, in the State
of Michigan, as follows:
The public sale of townships numbered eighty,
eighty-one, and eighty-ieven, of range one; of
township numbered seventy-nine and eighty of
range two; of townships seventy-nine and eighty of
range three; of fractional township seventy-eight
and townships eighty, eighty-one, and eighty-five of
range four; of fractional township eighty and town-
ships eighty-one, eighty-two, and eighty-six of range
five; of township eighty-two of range six; and of
fractional township eighty-two of range seven; all
north of the base line and east of the 5th principal
meridian, advertised on the 22d of January last to
be held at the land office at Du Buque, on the
fourth day of May next, is postponed until, and
will commence on, Monday, the sixth day of July
next.
The public sale of townships numbered eighty
and eighty-one of range one; of township eighty-
eight of range tw -; of townships eighty-three,
eighty-eight, and nine,y-one of range three; of town-
ship eighty-eight of range four; of townships se-
venty-nine, eighty-four, and eighty-five of range
five; and of township seventy-nine (with the excep-
tion of sections two, three, four, nine, ten, eleven,
fourteen, and fifteen, as heretofore designated,) of
range six, all north of the base line and west of the
5th principal meridian, advertised on the 22d of
January last to be held at the land office at Du
Buque on the eighteenth of May next, is postponed
until, and will commence on, Monday, the third
day of August next.
The public sale of townships numbered forty four
and forty-six of range eight, and townships num-
bered forty-two and forty-six of range nine, all
north of the base line and east of the third principal
meridian, advertised on the 22d day of January
last to be held at the land office at Chicago, in the
State of Illinois, on the fourth day of May next, is
postponed until, and will commence on, Monday,
the seventh day of September next.
The public sale of fractional township numbered
twenty-three (with the exception of the.north halves
of sections one and two, as heretofore designated,)
of range three, and fractional township numbered
twenty-three (with the exception of the north halves
of sections one to six, inclusive, as heretofore de-
signated,) of range four, all north of the base line
and east of the fourth principal meridian, advertised
on the 22d day of January last to be held at the
land office at Galena, in the State of Illinois, on
the eighteenth day of May next, is postponed until,
and will commence on, Monday, the fifth day of
October next.
Notice is also hereby given that the public sale
advertised on the sixth of February last, to be held
at Detroit, in the State of Michigan, on the
eleventh of May next, for the disposal of the pub-
lic lands within the limits of the west half of town-
ship six north, of range thirteen, east of the princi-
pal meridian, is postponed until, and will com-
mence on, Monday, the sixth day of July next.
Of course the residue of the lands, the sale of
which is not hereby postponed, will be sold at the
times and places, as heretofore advertised.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this third day of April, anno Domini, 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WtITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to any land the public sale of which is hereby post-
poned, is requested to prove the same to the satis-
faction of the Register and Receiver of the proper
land office, prior to the 22d day of June next,
otherwise the claim to such pre-emption will be for-
feited by law.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
April 6-wt50

BY TIHE PRESIDENT OF UHE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known, that
a public sale will be held at the land office at
Opelousas, in the State of Louisiana, commencing
on Monday, the fourteenth day of September next,
for the disposal of the unappropriated, vacant,
public lands to which no "private claims" are al-
leged under existing laws, within the limits of the
undermentioned townships, to wit:
.North of the 31st degree of latitude, and west of the
meridian.
Township three, and the fractional township four,
situated on the south side of Red River, of range
one.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks, (un-
less the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer, and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at tie city of Washing-
ton, this eighth day of June, anno Domini,
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President,
JAMES WHITCOMS,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the
act of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of
the latter act, grantingcertain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the register and receiver of the
land office, and make payment therefore as soon as
practicable after seeing this notice, and before the
day appointed for the commencement of the public
sale of the land as above designated; otherwise,
such claims will be forfeited.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 10-wtl4Sept.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF TIIE UNITED STATES.
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU.
REN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and make known, that a pub-
lic sale will be held at the Land Office at Genessee,
in the State of Michigan, commencing on Monday,
the ninth day of November next, for the disposal
of the public lands within the limits of the under-
mentioned townships and fractional townships, to
wit:
.North of the base line and east of the meridian.
Townships twenty-one and twenty-two, of range
three.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, and twenty-five, of range four.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of
range five.
Townships twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of
range six.
Fractional townships twenty-one and twenty-
two, bordering on Lake Huron, townships twenty-
three, twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, of


range seven.
Fractional township twenty-two, bordering on
Lake Huron, townships twenty-three, twenty-tour,
twenty-five, and twenty-six, of range eight.
Fractional townships twenty-two, twenty-three,
twenty-four, twenty-five, and twenty-six, bordering
on Lake Huron, of range nine.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of
schools, military, or other purposes, will be ex-
cluded from sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks (unless
the lands are sooner disposed of) and no longer;
and no private entries of land, in the townships so
offered, will be admitted until after the expiration
of two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-eighth day of July, anno
Domini 1840.
SM. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of 1st June, 1840; or of the provisions of
the latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the Eame to


BY THE PRESIDENT O1 TEE UNTED STATES
IN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and make known that
Sublic sales will be held at the undermentioned
and offices, in the State of Alabama, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Mardisville, commencing
on Monday, the ninth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands hereinafter de-
signated, bordering on the line dividing the States
of Georgia and Alabama, viz:
South of the base line and east of the meridian.
Fractional sections three, ten, fifteen, twenty-two,
twenty-seven, thirty four, and thirty-five, in town-
ship fourteen, fractional sections two, eleven, four-
teen, twenty-three, twenty-six, thirty-five and thirty-
six, in township fifteen, and fractional sections one,
twelve, thirteen, twenty-four, twenty-five, and
thirty-six, in township sixteen, of range twelve.
SFractional section thirty-one, in township six-
teen, fractional sections six, seven, eighteen, nine-
teen, twenty-nine, thirty, and thirty-two, and sec-
tion thirty-one, in township seventeen, fractional
sections live, eight, seventeen, twenty, twenty-one,
twenty-eight, and thirty-three, and sections twenty-
nine and thirty-two, in towriship eighteen, fractional
sections four, nine, fifteen, twenty-two, twenty,
seven, and thirty-four, and sections twenty-ona-
twenty-eight, and thirty-three, in township nine-
teen, fractional sections three, ten, eleven, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-sir, and thirty-five, and sec-
tions fifteen, twenty-two, twenty-seven, and thirty-
four, in township twenty, and fractional sections
two, twelve, thirteen, twenty-four, twenty-five, and
thirty-six, and sections eleven, fourteen, twenty-
three, twenty six, and thirty-five, in township twen-
ty-one, of range thirteen.
Fractional section thirty-one, in township twenty-
one, and fractional sections six, seven, and eighteen,
in township twenty-two, of range fourteen.
At the land office at Montgomery, commencing
on Monday, the ninth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands hereinafter desig-
nated, bordering on the line dividing the States of
Georgia and Alabama, viz:
.North of the base line fend east of the meridian.
Fractional sections one, twelve, thirteen, twenty-
four, and twenty-five, in township twenty-two,
fractional sections two, three, eleven, fourteen,
twenty-three, twenty-six, and thirty-five, in town-
ship twenty-three, and fractional sections three,
four, ten, fifteen, twenty-two, twenty-seven, and
thirty-four, in township twenty-four, orange twenty-
eight.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land, in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washington,
this twenty-third day of July, anno Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by the
act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions of the lat-
ter act granting certain privileges to another class
of settlers, is requested to prove the same to the
satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
proper land office, and make payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
the public sale of the land as above designated,
otherwise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
lN pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
REN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare and make known that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices in the State of Illinois, at the periods here-
inafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Chicago, commencing on
Monday, the ninth day of November next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned townships and fractional town-
ships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the third principal
meridian.
Townships forty-two, forty-three, and forty-four,
of range ten.
Townships forty-two and forty-three, of range
eleven.
Fractional townships forty, north of the old In-
dian boundary line, except sections one to six in-
clusive, townships forty-two, and fractional town-
ship forty-three, except the northeast quarter of
section ten, of range twelve.
Fractional townships forty and forty-one, lying
north of the old Indian boundary, and fractional
townships forty-two and ferty-three, bordering on
Lake Michigan, of range thirteen.
Fractional township forty-one, north of the old
Indian boundary line, and bordering on Lake Mich-
igan, of range fourteen.
At the land office at Palestine, commencing on
Monday, the sixteenth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township five, north of the base line, of range four-
teen, west of the second principal meridian.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer; and no private entries of land in the town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the City of Washington,
this twenty-third day of July, anno Domin
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the act
of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified by
the act of lt June, 1840, or of the provisions of the
latter act granting certain privileges to another
class of settlers, is requested to prove the same to
the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of the
proper land office, and make payment therefore as
soon as practicable after seeing this notice, and before
the day appointed for the commencement or the
publicsale of the land a, above designated; other-
wise such claims will be forfeited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Lsnd Office.
N OTICE OF THE DISCONTINUANCE OF
THE PUBLIC LAND OFFICES AT
MARIETTA, STEUBENVILLE, ZANES-.
VILLE, CINCINNATI, AND WOOSTER, IN
THE STATE OF OHIO.-Under the provisions
of the second section of an act of Congress, ap-
proved on the 12th of June, 1840, which declares,
'that whenever the quantity of public land re-
maining unsold in any land district shall be re-
duced to a number of acres less than one hundred
thousand, it shall be the duty of the Secretary of
the Treasury to discontinue the land office of such
district; and if any land in any such district shall
remain unsold at the time of the discontinuance ot


a land office, the same shall be subject to sale at
some one of the existing land offices most conve-
nient to the district in which the land office shall
haire been discontinued, of which the Secretary of
the Treasury shall give notice."
Notice is accordingly hereby given, that in the
prosecution of his duty under the above section,
the Secretary of the Treasumy has advised this
office that the land, offices at Marietta, Steuben-
ville, Zanesville, and Cincinnati, in the State of
Ohio, are to be discontinued by law; and the lands
in said districts, respectively, remaining unsold at
the time of the discontinuance, are to be thereafter
subject to sale at the land office at Chillicothe; alse,
that the land office at Wooster, in the same State,
is to be discontinued, and the lands in that distret
remaining unsold at the time of the discontinuance,
are to be thereafter subject to sale at the land office
at Bucyrus.
Laids remaining unsold, and unappropriated by
law, and subject to private entry within the limits
of the districts of Marietta, Steubenville, Zanes-
ville, Cincinnati, and Wooster, will cease to be
subject to entry as heretofore at those offices, from
the date of the receipt of this notice at each ol
them respectively; and the land officers at Chilli-
cothe and Bucyrus will give further no:.ice of the
day on which they will be prepared to receive ap-
plications for entries, of any such.lands.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner.
GENERAL. LAND OFFrE, July 28, 1840-w4l


the satisfaction of the Register and Receiver of
the proper land office, and make payment therefore
as soon s practieable after sees this notice, and be-
fore the day appointed for the commencement of
the public sale of the land as designated; otherwise
such claims will be forfeited.
JAS,. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of She General Land Office.
July 29-wt9thNov
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
I N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BU-
SREN, President of the United States of Ame-
rica, do hereby declare andmake known, that pub-
lic sales will be held at the undermentioned land
offices in the State of Arkansas, at the periods
hereinafter designated, to wit:
At the land office at Johnson Court-house, com-
mencing on Monday, the twenty-third day of No-
vember next, for the disposal of the public lands
within the limits of the undermentioned townships,
to wit:
North of the base line and west of the meridian.
Towniship two, of range twenty-one.
Township five, of range twenty-two.
Township two, of range twenty-three.
Townships three and seven, of range twenty-
four.
Township five, of range twenty-five.
At the land office at Washington, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-third day of November
next, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships. to wit:
South of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Township twelve, of range twenty-eight.
Fractional township fourteen, north of Red river,
of range twenty-nine.
Fractional townships thirteen and fourteen, north
of Red river, of range thirty.
Fractional township fourteen, north of Red river,
of range thirty-one.
At the land office at Little Rock, commencing
on Monday, the twenty-third day of November
next, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Township one, of range eight.
Township one, of range nine.
Township fifteen, of range seventeen.
At the land office at Helena, commencing on
Monday, the thirtieth day of November next, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
the undermentioned fractional townships, to wit:
South of the base line, and east of the meridian.
Fractional township nine, north of Arkansas
river, of range one.
Fractional township four, except the north half
of section two, and sections three, four, five, six,
nine, and ten, of range three.
South of the base line, and west of the meridian.
Fractional township nine, north of Arkansas and
south of White river, except sections two, three,
and twelve, of range one.
At the land office at Fayetteville, commencing
on Monday the thirtieth of November next, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township sixteen, north of the base line, of range
eighteen, west of the meridian.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks,
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no
longer, and no private entries of land, in thft town-
ships so offered, will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the City of Washing-
ton, this -seventh day of August, anno Domini,
1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption
to land in any of the townships designated in this
proclamation, in virtue of the provisions of the
act of 22d June, 1838, as extended and modified
by the act of 1st June, 1840, or of the provisions
of the latter act, granting certain privileges to
another class of settlers, is requested to prove the
same to the satisfaction of tha Register and Re-
ceiver of the proper land office, and make payment
therefore as soon as practicable after seeing this no-
tice, and before the day appointed for the com-
mencement of the public sale of the land as above
designated, otherwise such claims will be for-
feited.
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
Aug 10-liw30N

PARTIAL POSTPONEMENT OF LAND SALE.
OTICE is hereby given, that so much of the
N public sale of land, advertised to take place
at lonia, in the State of Michigan, on Monday, the
26th day of October next, by proclamation of the
President bearing date the 24th of April last, as is
embraced by the fractional townships twenty-eight,
twenty-nine, and thirty, north of range ten west of
the principal meridian, is indefinitely postponed,
the same having been located for the reservation of
twenty thousand acres on said bay, under the 2d
article of the treaty concluded with the Ottawa and
Chippewa nation of Indians on the 28th of March,
1836, which was ratified on the 27th of May fol-
lowing:
Given under my hand at the city of Washing-
ton this 4th day of August, aano Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
Aug 7-law3w

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
NOTICE is hereby given that the public sale of
lands ordered to be held at the land office at
Natchitoches, in the State of Louisiana, on Mon-
day, the tenth day of August next, by proclama-
tion issued on the fourth day of April last, is post-
poned until, and will commence on, Monday, the
twenty-third day of November next.
The lands to be then offered, are described as
Township numbered twenty, of range nine.
That part of township seventeen situated north
of Red river, of range thirteen.
Fractional sections three, nine, ten, eleven, four-
teen, fifteen, and twenty-one, section twenty-two,
and fractional sections twenty-three, twenty-six,
thirty-five, and thirty-six, all situated south of Red
river, in township tr enty, of range fourteen.
Given under my hand at the city of Washing-
ton this fourth day of August, anno Domini 1840.
M. VAN BUREN. -
By the President:
JAs. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
August 7-lawiN23

NEW MUSIC.-Just received, the following
New Music, at the old established store, two
doors east of the City Post Office.
W. FISCHER.
Grief was sent thee for thy good; by T. H. Bailey,
esq.
Spring is coming; Barcarolla, by Bassini
T'is the last rose of summer, Iot two performers
Grey Eagle Cotillions; by W. C. Peters
The Bloomingdale Hop Waltz; by Willis
The Arab Gallopade, as played by the Prague
Company
The Virginia do do do do
The Canton Grand March; by Lehmann
Capt. Lilly's Qtuick Step; by Lucchesi
The Whigs Grand March, dedicated to General
Harrison


The Hard Cider Quickstep
Bridall Bells; arranged for the Guitar
Fanny Elssler's dances
Souvernir de Sylphide.
July 29

RS. GARDINER'S INDIAN BALSAM
OF LIVERWORT.-For the cure of
Coughs, Colds, Whooping Cough, Phthisic, Sore
Stomach, pain in the side, and all diseases of the
Lungs. For the above complaints, this medicine
stands unrivalled for its efficacy-it is prepared
wholly from vegetables. Also, its efficacy for the
cure of the Liver Complaint, is full established. I
mention the names of but a few of thousands who
have been cured by this invaluable medicine-for
places of residence, see inside directions. Price 50
cents.
C. Ellis, M. D. ElishaHorton, D. F. Woodbury,
Thos. Haskins, jr. B. F. Brown, Horace Gall,
Miss L. Howard, and E. Williams.
For sale at
Jan 29 TODD'S Drug Store.

G REENBRIER WHITE SULPHUR WA-
TER.-Another supply of this justly cele-
brated mineral water, put up the present month at
the spring., this day received and for sale by
J. L. PEABODY,
Centre Market Space,
June 22 Agent for the District of Cowmniaia.


B BROTHER JONATHAN, the arrest and
most beautiful newspaper In the world-
larger, by fifty square inches, than any other news-
paper in the United States-published Saturdays,
at 162 Nassau street, New York. Price three dol-
lars a year. Two copies for five dollars.
The proprietors of this mammoth sheet-Lthe
"Great Western" among the newspapers-have
the pleasure of spreading before the reading public
a weekly periodical, containing a greater amouniat
and variety of useful and entertaining miscellany,
than is to be found in any similar publication in
the world.
Fach number of the paper contains as large an
amount of reading matter as is found in volume s of
ordinary duodecimo, which co't $2, and more than
is contained in a volume of Irving's Columbus, or
Bancroft's History of America, which cost t3 a
volume; and all for three dollars a year. For 15
two copies will be forwarded one year, or one copy
two years.
Since the publication of our original prospectus,
the Brother Jonathan has been enlarged, and its
size, ample before, has been so much increased,
that much more than the former quantity of the
most interesting literature of the day is embraced
in its immense capacity. Selections from all the
most prominent and celebrated writers of the day
assist in swelling its ceatents; and whatever is new,
rich, or rare, is immediately transferred to its
columns. All the contributions to periodicals of
American writers of repute appear in iis pages; and
the issues of the foreign press are laid under con-
tributions, as soon as received in this country. To
the Miscellaneous and Literary Department, the
closest attention is paid; and in all the .!elections
and original contributions, strict care is devoted to
avoid all that may touch upoa the opinions of any
party in religion or politics.
Experience having taught us that we had marked
out a path for ourselves, in which all sorts of peo-
ple delight to follow, the Brother Jonathan shall
continue, as it began, to be a bold, gentle, weighti,
light, grave, merry, serious, Uwity, smooth, dash-
ing, interesting, inspired, and incomparable news-
paper. It shall be a stupendous mirror wherein all
the world will stand reflected. It shall contain the
most beautiful of Novels, Romances, and Stories
for both sexes-Fairy Tales for lovers of the mar-
vellous-Legends for antiquarians--Pasquinades
for wit mongers-Nuts and Raisins for short-winded
readers-Serenades for musical lovers-Sonnets
for ladies-Sentiment for old bachelors-Statistics
for politicians-and Lectures, Sermons, Criticism,
Epigrams, c &c. de. &c. for all the world.
# Letters should be addressed to
WILSON & COMPANY,
Publishers of the "Brother Jonathan,"
March 13-tawtf New York.
A COLLECTION of Political Writings of
William Leggett, selected and arranged,
with a preface, by Theodore Sedgwick, in two
volumes, is for sale by
W. M. MORRISON,
April 14 Four doors west of Brown's Hotel.
AWS OF ETIQUETTE, or Short Rules
and Reflections for Conduct In Society: by
a gentleman. 1 .pocket volume, price 50 cents.
Also, The Canons of Good Breeding, for gentle-
men: by the author of Laws of Etiquette. 1 small
volume, price 50 cents. Giving hints on personal
appearance and apparel, on manner, on conversa-
lion, behavior on particular occasions, on good
breeding, on morning calls, evening visits, on re-
ceiving company, &c. &ec. &c. For sale by
June 2F F. TAYLOR.
ILLER'S PATENT AIR-HEIATING
STOVE-For producing an equal distribu
lion of heat in Rooms, Halls, Academies, Churches,
Steamboats, Railroad Cars, &c. Also, for warm-
ing several apartments by one stove.-CombiinbW
all the advantages of the Stove and Furnace.
A lot of the above invaluable Stoves has been
received, and for sale at Francis Naylor's Tin
and Sheet Iron Factory, Pennsylvania avenue,
south side, near Third street, west. Comfort,
economy, and neatness, combined; all who have
an eye to those three essentials, would do well to
call and examine before purchasing other Stoves.
ADVANTAGES.
I. Durability.-The case can never burn mout.
The interior Stove is rendered stronger and more
durable by the patent flange conductors.
2. Comfort.-It distributes a mild, summer-like
temperature equally in every part, so that it is not
uncomfortable near the Stove, from the heat, nor
uncomfortable at a distance, from the cold.
3. Economuy.-A considerable amount 6f fuel a
saved by securing the radiated heat usually lost.
4. Security.-No injury is done to furniture or
goods by radiation.
5. Conveniecnce.-Several apartments may be
heated agreeably by one Stove. Though intended
for the Parlor and Hall, it may, if preferred, be
used to heat them from below, in the manner of a
furnace.
6. Cleanness.-No dust from the coal is thrown
out, nor does the exterior of the Stove lose its color
rom heat.
7. Ease of management.-The management is
simple and similar to that of a common Stove.
8. Ventilation.-I has an arrangement for ad-
mitting the air to be heated, in any way desired.
TESTIMONIALS.
From J. B. Burleigh, esq. No. 29, Fayette street,
Baltimore.
"Mr. Miller put up his Patent Air-heating Stove
in my office about two months ago. It keeps up a
lively circulation of heated air, and has decided
advantages over any that I have ever seen in use
in regard to health, comfort, and economy.-March
1839.
From Rev. E. Hutchinson, Principal of A.adesmy,
Fayette street, Baltimore.
"I have used Mr. Miller's newly invented Air
heating Stove for several months, and am con-
vinced that it is much superior to every other Stove
that I have seen. It is so constructed that it may
be made to heat several rooms with very little extra
expense. I cordially recommend it to the public."
From Mr. D. Barnum, Proprietor of the City Hotel,
Baltimore.
"I put up two of Mr. Miller's Air-heating
Stoves in my City Hotel, and have found them
admirably adapted both to large and small rooms,
in preserving an equallity of temperature, and in my
opinion more conducive to health and comfort than.
the ordinary Stoves. I think them also mhck more
economical in respect to saving of fuel."
From .Messrs. .McLauglin and Stonnerd.
"We have used Mr. Miller's Air-heating Stoves,
and our opinion coincides with that expressed
about e by Mr. Barnum.-Baltimore, Feb. 1839.
Extracts from Public .Notices.
"The invention of Mr. James Miller of this
city strikes us as being unsurpassed by any of the
modern apparatus for warming apartments. It
diffuses a mild and uniform heat throughout the room,
and is so constructed that two apartment may be
heated with it at about the same expense of fuel as
is required in ordinary Stoves for one."
Baltimore Transcript and Corn. Gasette
"We attended the examination of an Air.heat-
ing Stove placed in the Reading room of Mr. Bar-
num's City Hotel. It has a decided superiority
over every other Stove which we have seen.
[February, 1839.-Balt. Repsbtials.
From Rev. .A. C. Thomas, Philadelphia.
"I have had opportunities of witnessing the ope-
ratien of Mr. Miller's Air-Heating Stove, and have
no hesitation in recommending it for several desira-
ble qualities: 1st, The inconvenience and disoom-


fort of radiation is nearly avoided, thus adapting
the stove to school rooms and meetings for public
worship, and 2d, the fuel consumed is considerably
less than was required to produce an equal degree
of heat, by the Stove removed to make room fur
Mr. Miller's improvement.--March, 1839.
Extract from a letter of Rev. S. W. Fuller, Phila.-
delphia.
"DEAR Sin: The model of Air-Heating Stove,'
submitted to my examination last winter, led me
to believe that in several essential provisions It
was decidedly superior to any Stove I had ever
seen, and I am happy to add, that my belief in its
superior properties was soon afier fully confirmed
by seeing one of the Stoves in operation. Your ef-
forts and success in providing a Stove so well cal-
culated to promote the comfort ol your fellow-citi-
zeus, deserve, and I doubt not will receive the pa-
tronage of a discerning public."- May, 1839.
From the Proprietors of the Globe.
We are now using Miller's Stoves in our office,
and consider them superior to any we have ever
seen.
For sale at F. NAYLOR'S,
Nov 8--ly Pennsylvania avenue.
D R. JEBB'S RHEUMATIC LINIMENT.-
Its operation is often immediate. The Li-
niment has frequently cured rheumatic afibetions,
of years standing, in four-and-twenty hours, and is
recommended with confidence as one of the beet ap-
plications known for chilblains, stilffness of the
joints, numnriness, sprains, and bruises. Price, 50
cents per bolile. For sale at
Apnl 10-3m TITODD'S Drug Store,


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