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The globe
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073656/00002
 Material Information
Title: The globe
Uniform Title: Globe (Washington, D.C. Daily)
Physical Description: v. : ; 56-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: F.P. Blair
Place of Publication: City of Washington D.C
Creation Date: July 22, 1837
Publication Date: 1831-1843
Frequency: daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular
Edition: Daily ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 13, 1831)-v. 13, no. 170 (Dec. 30, 1843).
General Note: Publisher: Blair & Rives, <oct. 10, 1835>-
General Note: "The world is governed too much."
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 08786354
lccn - sn 82014043
System ID: UF00073656:00002
 Related Items
Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Semiweekly)
Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Weekly)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1832)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1834)
Related Items: Weekly globe (Washington, D.C. : 1841)
Succeeded by: Daily globe (Washington, D.C. : 1844)

Full Text



EDITED BY FRANCIS P. BAR.

FRANCIS P. BLAIR & JOHN C. RIVES,
PROPRIETORS AND PUBLISHERS.

TERMS.
Dily paper, per an'mn, t0 00 ] Aeirni.weekly ter an'm, 5 00
FOR LESS THAN A YEAR.
Daily, per month, 81 00 i Semi weekly, per month. 0 S
Subscriptions to the Daily for less than two, or to the Stecmni-
weekly for less than four, m months, will not be received.
subscribers may discontinue their paper at any time by pay-
ng for the time they have received them; butt not without.
Those who subscribe for a year, and do not at the time of
subscribing order a discontinuance at the end of it, will be
considered subscribers until they order the paper to be stopped,
and pay arrearages.
PRICE FOR ADVERTISINSa.
Twelve lines, or less, three insertions, $1 (
Every additional insertion 0 5
Longer advertisements charged in proportion.
A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the year.
All payments to be made in advance. Those who have not
an opportunity of paying otherwise, may remit by mail, at our
risk, postage paid. The Postmaster's certificate of such re-
mittance, shall be a sufficient receipt therefore. The notes of
any specie-paying bank will be received.
No attention will be given to any order, unless the money,
or a Postmaster's certificate that it has been remitted, aecom-
panies it.
p 3-' Letters to the Proprietors, charged with postage
i will not be taken out of the Post Officee.

(Co NTISNED TROM SUPFLEMENT.)
Leave Woodville every Monday and Thursday
at 3 p m, arrive at Larkinsville same days by 7 pm.
Leave Larkinsville every Monclay and Thursday
at 10 a m, arrive at Woodville same days by 2 p m.
3612. From Claysville to Warrenton, 6, miles
and back once a week.
Leave Claysville every Saturday at 8 a m, arrive
at Warrenton same day by 10 a m.
Leave Warrnton every Saturday at 11 a m,
arrive at Claysville same day by 1 p m.
3613. From Somerville by Rock Hill to Decatur,
16 miles and back three times a week in stages.
Leave Somerville every Tuesday Thurssday,
and Saturday at 6 a mr arrive at Decatur same dys
by, 11 am in.
Leave Decatur every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at I p m, arrive at Soinerville same days
by 6 p Tm.
3614. From Somerville by Cedar Plains, Hlous-
ton's Store, Oakvil'e, Moulton, Mount Hope, and
Newburgh to Russellville, 64 miles and back once
a week.
Leave Somerville every Tuesday at 9 a min, ar-
rive at Russellville next day by 1 p m.
Leave Russellville every Wednesday at 3 p nm,
arrive at Somerville next day by 8 p m.
3615. From Decatur by Courtland and Leigh-
ton to Tuscumbia, 41 miles and back six times a
week in rail-road cars.
Leave Decatur every day, except Sunday, at 12
noon, arrive at Tuscumbi'a same d-y by 5 p m.
Leave Tuscumbia every day, except Sundiy, at
5 a w, arrive at Decalur same day by 12 noon.
3616. From Athens by Fulton anid Mooresville
to Triana, 26 miles and back once a week.
Leave Athens en ery Friday at 8 a m, arrive at
Triana same day by 6 p m.
Leave Triana every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Athens same day by 4 p m.
3617. From Athens by Gilbertsboro' to Elkton,
Tenn., 26 mils and back once a week.
Le-ve Athens every Friday at 8 a mi, arrive at
ElktOn sante day by 6 p m.
LFave Elkton every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Athens same day by 4 p mIn.
3618. From Athens by Brown's Ferry to Court-
and, 22 miles and back once a week.
Leave Athens every Wednesday at 1 p m, arrive
at Courtland same day by 9 p m.
Leave Courtland every Wednesday at 4 a m,
arrive at Athens same day by 12 noon.
3619. From Athens to Decatur, 20 miles and
back once a week.
Leave Athens every Friday at 4 a m, arrive at
D#catur same day by 12 noon.
Leave Decatur ever Friday at 1 p. m, arrive at
Athens same day by 9 p m.
3620 From Courtland, by Moulton, New Lo.
don, Thorn Hill, Eldridge, New Lexington, and
Northport, to Tuscaloosa, 126 miles and back three
times a week in fmr-horse post coaches.
Leave Courtland every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Tuscaloosa every
Tuesday, Thursday, and Sunday by 6 p m.
Leave Tuscaloosa every Mondiy, Wi-dnesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Courtland every
Tuesday, Thursday, and Sundy by 6 p m.
3621. From Florence, by South Florence, Tus.
cumbia, Russellville, Pikeville, Border Spring,
Mi., and Delphi, to Columbus, 125 miles and back
three times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Florence every Sunday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 5 p m, arrive at Columbus every rues-
day, Friday, and Sunday by 7 p m.
Leave Columbus every Monday, Wednesday
and Saturday at 4 a m, arrive at Florence next days
by 6 p m.
O-^Proposals f>r carrying the mail daily will
also be considered.
3622. From Florence, by Masonville, Lexing-
ton, and Sugar Creek, Te., to Pulaski, 52 miles
and back oiice a week.
Leave Florence every Thursday at 1 p m, arrive
at Pulaski next day by 5 p m.
Leave Pulaski every Wednesday at 6 a m, ar-


rive at Florence next day by 10 a m.
3623. From Florence, by Barton's, to Waterloo,
26 miles and back once a week.
Leave Florence every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Waterloo same day by 4 p m.
Leave Waterloo every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Florence same day by 4 p m.
3624. From Leighton to La Grange, 5 miles and
back twice a week.
Leave Leighton every Wednesday and Saturday
at 8 a m, arrive at La Grange same days by 10
nm.
Leave La Grange every Wednesday and Satur-
day at 5 a m, arrive at Leighton same days by 7
a m.
3625. From Pikeville, by Fayette C. H., to
New Lexington, 42 miles and back twice a week.
Leave Pikeville every Monday and Friday at 5
a m, arrive at New Lexington same days by 8
p m.
Leave New Lexington every Tuesday and Sat-
urday at 5 a mn, arrive at Pikeville same days by
8pro.
3626. From New Lexington, by Clear Creek,
to Walker C. H., 40 miles and back once a week.
Leave New Lexington every Tuesday at 5 a m,
arrive at Walker C. H. same day by 8 p m.
Leave Walker C. H. every Monday at 5 a m,
arrive at New Lexington same day by 8 p m.
3627. From Tuscaloosa, by Normentsville, Lub-
bub, and Carrollton, to Pickensville, 51 miles and
back three times a week in four-horse post
coaches.
Leave Tuscaloosa every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 7 a m, arrive at Pickensville next
days by 11 a inm.
Leave Pickensville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 1 p m, arrive at Tuscaloosa next
days by 6 p m.
3628. From Tuscaloosa, by Bucksville and
Jonesboro', to Elyton, 54 miles and back three
times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Tuscaloosa every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 2 a m, arrive at Eiyton same days by
7prm.
Leave Elyton every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 5 a m, arrive at Tuscaloosa same days
by 7 p m. ..I


- '.-~. '-' t


4


(7
C""""


BY BLAIR & RIVES. "THE WORLD IS GOVERNED TOO MUCH." VOL. VI'...No. 34.


CITY OF WASHINGTON. IL SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 22, 18,.
Ill 1 I [ IIII I III I I I I I "w .... .. ... II ',,--"-, .. ......IIINEWi


Saturday at 6 a rn, arrive at Pickensville same days
by 12 noon.
3634. From Pickensville by Hope, Vienna,
Pleasant Ridge, Clinton, Springfield, Mesopotamia,
and Erie to Greensboro', 50 miles and ba' k, three
times a week in four-horse post coaches;
Leave Pickensville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 1 p m, arrive at Greensboro' next
days by 1 p m.
Leave Greensboro' every Sunday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 11 a m, arrive at Pickensville next
days by j pm.
3635. From Knoxville by Clinton and Gaines.
ville to Narkeeta, Mi., 60 miles and back; twice a
week between Knoxville and Gainesville, and once
a week the residue of the route.
Leave Knoxville every Tuesday and Friday at
6 a m, arrive at Gainesv'lle s-ame days by 5 p m.
Leave Gainesville every Monday and Thursday
at 6 a m, arrive at Knoxville same days by 5 p m.
Leave Gainesville every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Narkeeta same day by 5 p m.
Leave Narkeela every Sunday at 6 a m, arrive
at Gainesvillle same diy by 5 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3636. From Clinton by Hebron, Jamestown,
and Fairfield to Pickensville, 45 miles and back,
once a week.
Leave Clinton every Tuesday at 6 a m, arrive
at Pickensville next day by 11 am.
Leave Pickensville every Wednesday at 2 p m,
arrive at Clinton next days by 5 p m.
3637. From Livingston by Jones's Bluff and
Daniel's Prairie to Springfield, 36 miles and back,
twice a week.
Leave Livingston every Monday and Thursday
at 5 a m, arrive at Springfield same days by 6 p m.
Leave SFringfiell every Tuesday and Friday at
5 a m, arrive at Livingston same days by 6 p m.
3638. ,From Livingston by Sumterville, Gaines-
ville, and Smith's Ferry to Jamestown, 30 miles
and back, twice a week.
Leave Livingston every Monday and Thursday
>t 6 a m, arrive at Jamestown same da* by 4 p m.
Leave Jamestown every Tuesday and Friday at
6 a m, arrive at Livingston same days by 4 p m.
3639. From Livingston by Belmont and Bluff
Port to Demopolis, 26 miles and back, three times
a week in four-ho -se post coaches.
Leave Livings*on every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday At 7 a m, arrive at Demopolis same
days by 3 p m.
Leave Demopolis every Sunday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 7 a m, airive at Livingston same
days by 3 p m.
3640. From Livingston by Looksookalo and
Narkeeta, Mi., to De Kalb, 29 miles and back, twice
a week.
Leave Livingston every Monday and Thursday
at 6 a m, arrive at De Kalb same day by 4 p m.
Leave De Kalb every Tuesday and Friday at 6
a m, arrive at Livingston same days by 4 p m.
3641. From livingston by Perryman's Store
to Linden, 36 miles and back, once a week.
Leave Living-ton every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Linden same day by 6 pm.
Leave Linden every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
lLivingston same day by 6 p m.
3642. From Livingston by Paynesville and
Mingo Hoomit to Daleville, Mi., 35 miles and back,
twice a ,eek.
Leave Livingston every Wednesday and Satur-
day at 5 a m, arrive at Daleville same days by 6
pm.
Leave Daleville every Sunday and Wednesday
at 5 a m, arrive at Livingston same days by 6 p m.
Dt Proposals to carry the mail three times a
week, in four bore post coaches, with greater
speed will also be considered.
3643. From Livingston by Horner's Old Store,
Mount Sterling, and McCarty's to Washington C.
H., 80 miles and back, once a week.
Leave Livingston every Thursday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Washington C. H. next day by 6 p m.
Leave Washington C. H. every Saturday at 5 a
m, arrive at Livingston next day by 6 p m.
3644. From Greensboro' by Perry C. H. and
Hamburg to Selma, 42 miles and back, three times
a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Greensbero' every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 2 p m, arrive at Selma next days
by 9 a m.
Leave Selma every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 4 p m, arrive at Greensboro next days
by 11 am.
3645. From Greensboro' by Macon, Demopolit?--
Spring Hill, Linden, Beaver Creek, Pineville, and
Wood's Bluff to Coffeeville, 90 stiles and back,
three times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Greensboro' every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 2 p m, arrive at Coffeeville every
Thursday, Saturday, and Monday by 11 a m.
Leave Coffeeville every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 1 p m, arrive at Greensboro' every
Wednesday, Friday. and Sunday by 11 a m.
3646, From Greensboro' by Picken's Mills,
Uniontown, and South Canebrake to Daletown,
50 miles and back, once a week.
Leave Greensboro' every Thursday at 2 p m,
arrive at Daletown next day by 6 p m.
Leave Daletown every Wednesday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Greensboro' next day by 11 a m.
3647. From Greensboro' by Candy's Landing
and Arcola to D+ mopolis, 24 miles and back, once
a week.


Leave Greenboro' every Thursday at 2 p m,
arrive at Demopolis next day by 10 a m.
Leave Demopolis every Friday at 11 a m, arrive
at Greensboro' same day by 8 p m.
3648. From Linden by Shiloah and Mott's, to
Grove Hill, 47 miles and back once a week.
Leave Linden every Wednesday at 2 p m, ar-
rive at Grove Hill next day by 6 p m.
Leave Grove Hill every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Linden next day by 11 a m.
3649. From Linden by Antioch and Longwood,
to Daletown, 31 miles and back once a week.
Let-ave Linden every Fri'ay at 6 a m, arrive at
Daletown same dlay by 5 p m.
Leave Daletown every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Linden same clay by 5 p m.
3650. From Linden by Boston and Uniontown,
to Cahaba, 55 miles and back once a week.
Leave Linden every Wednesday at 2 p m, ar-
rive at Cahaba next day by 6 p m.
Leave Cahaba' every Tuesday at 6 a m, arrive
at Linden next day by 11 a m.
3651. From Uniontown by Antrim, Liberty Hill,
and Cambridge, to Portland, 35 miles and back
once a week.
Leave Uniontown every Thurssday at 5 a m,
arrive at Portland same dlay by 6 pm.
Leav- Portland every Wednesday at 5 a m ar-
rive at Uniontown same day by 6 p m.
Service t is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3652. From Perry C. H. by Jericho, to Centre-


Leave Shelbyville every Friday at 4 a m, arrive
at Ashville next dlay by 8 a m,
Leave Ashville every Sunday at 4 a mi, arrive at
Shelbyville next day by 9 a nm.
3658. From Bennettsville by Willstown, Will's
Valley, and Lookout Valley, to Dallas, Te., 100
miles and back once a week.
Leave Bennettsville every Sunday at 6 a mn, ar-
rive at Dallas every Tuesday by 6 p m.
Leave Dallas every Wednesday at 6 a m, arrive
at Bennettsville every Friday by 6 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 183 .
3659. From Bennettsville by Rosenant, Ash-
ville, Broken Arrow, Diana, and Rotherwood, to
Harpersville, 56 miles and back once a week.
Leave Bennettsville every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Harpersville next dlay by 4 p m.
Leave Harpersville every Friday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Bennettsville next day by 4 p m.
3660. From Jacksonville by Ladiga and Vann's
Valley, Ga., to Rome, 60 miles and back twice a
week in stages.
Leave Jacksonville every Monday and Friday
at6 a mn, arrive at Rome next days by 4 p m.
Leave Rome every Wednesday and Saturday at
6a m, arrive at Jacksonville next days by 4 p m.
0:' Propcoals to carry the mail in four-horse
post coaches with greater speed will also be con-
sidered.
3661, From Jacksonvi'le by Rawden's Store,
Adams, Smith's Ferry, Gaylesville, Dougherty's
Mills, Price s, Henryls, Walker C. H., Ga., Tay-
lor's, McDaniel's, and Walker's Place, to Calhoun,
Te., 160 miles and back once a week.
Leave Jacksonville every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Calhoun every Sunday by 5 p m.
Leave Calhouni every Wednesday at 6 am, ar-
rive at Jacksonville every Sunday by 5 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3662. From Jacksonville by White Plains and
Oaktfuskee to Wedowee, 40 miles and back twice
a week,
Leave Jacksonville every Monday and Friday
at 5 a m, arrive at Wedcwee same days by 7 p m.
Leave Wedowee every Sunday and Thursday
at 5 a m, arrive at Jacksonville same days by 7
p m.
Y*Proposals to carry the mail in stages will
also be considered,
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3663. From Jacksonville by Alexandria and
Fife to Talladega, 38 miles and back twice a week
In stages.
Leave Jacksonville every Wednesday and Fri-
day at 6 a m, arrive at Talladega same days by 5
pm.
Leave Talladega every Monday and Thursday
at 6 a m, arrive at Jacksonville sAme days by 5
pm.
Q:YProposals to carry the mall in four-horse
post coaches will also be considered.
3664. From Talladega by Kelley's Springs,
Hickory Level, Oakfuskee, and Laurel Hill, Ga.,
to Rotherwood, 74 miles and back once a week.
Leave Talladega every Monday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Rotherwood next day by 6 p m.
Leave Ro'herwood every Wednesday at 5 a m,
arrive at Talladega next day by 6 p m.
3665. From Talladega by Wedowee and Dick-
son's Mills to La Grange, Ga., 90 miles and back
once a week
Leave Talladega every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at LA Grange every Monday by 5 p m.
Leave La Grange every Tuesday at 6 a mn, ar-
rive at Talladega every Thursday by 5 p m.
3666. From Talladega to Chambers C. H., 69
miles and back once week.
Leave Talladega every Thursday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Chambers C. H. next day by 5 p m.
Leave Chambers C. H. every Satuiday at 6 a
m, arrive at Talladega next dlay by 5 l) m.
3667. From Wedowee by Chambers C H.,
Cassitah and Gerard to Columbus, Ga., 90 miles
and back twice a week.
Leave Wedowee every Tuesday and Saturday
at 4 a m. arrive at Columbus every Thursday and
Monday by 12 noon.
Leave Columbus every Monday and Thursday
at 1 p m, arrive at Wedowee every Wednesday
and Saturday by 8 p m.
(CZ'Proposals to carrythe mail in stages will also
be considered.
3668. From Chambers C. H. to West Point,
Ga., 15 miles and back once a week.
Leave Ghamber-aC. H. every Monday at 6 a m,
arrive at West Point same day by 11 a m.
Leave West Point every Monday at 12 noon,
arrive at Chambers C. H. same day by 5 p m.
3669. From Columbus by Shady Grove, Society
Hill, Tuskegee, cross Keys Caba Hatchie, and
Mount Meigs to Montgomery, 81 miles and
back daily in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Columbus daily at 10 p m, arrive at
Montgomery next day by 7 p m.
Leave Montgomery daily at 9 a m, arrive at
Columbus next day by 6 am.
3670. From Columbus, Ga., by Fort Mitchell,
Ala., Roanoke, Ga.. Irwiaton, Ala., and Franklin to
Fort Gaines, Ga., 75 miles and back twice a week.
Leave Columbus every Tuesday and Friday at
5 a m, arrive at Fort Gaines next days by 6 p m.
Leave Fort Gaines every Thursday and Sunday
at 5 a m, arrive at Columbus next days by 6 p m.
UT7 Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse post
coaches will also be considered.


3671. From Tuskegee by Union Spring and
Missouri to Monticello, 50 miles anil back once
a week.
Leave Tuskegee every Wednesday at 9 a m,
arrive at Monticello next day by 6 p m.
Leave Monticello every Friday at 6 a m, arrive
at Tuskegee next day by 3 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3672. From Tuskegee by Tuckabatchee and
Talassee to Wetumpka, 40 miles and back once
a week.
Leave Tuskegee every Wednesday at 5 a im,
arrive at Wetumpka same day by 8 p m.
Leave Wetumpka every Thursday at 5 a m,
arrive at Tuskegue same day by 8 p m.
3673. From Talassee by Cassita and Oak Bowery
to West Point, Ga., 56 miles and back unce a week.
Leave Talassee every Friday at 7 a m, arrive at
West Point next day by 4 p m.
Leave West Point every Sunday at 7 a m, ar-
rive at Talassee next day by 4 p m
Proposals to carry this mail three times a week
in coaches, and to commence at Wetumka, will
be considered.
Service is to commence on the 1st July 1838.
3674. From Cross Keys by Line Creek to C bin
Grove, i5 miles and back once a week.
Leave Cross Keys every Thursday at 10 a m,
arrive at China Grove same day by 5 p m. ,
Leave China Grove every Friday at 6 a m, arrive
at Cross Keys same day by 2 p m.


and Kingston, to Maplesville, 58 miles and back
three times a week in four-horse post coaches;
two trips via Coosada and Kingston, and one trip
via Little York and Chesnut Creek.
Leave Montgomery every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Maplesville same
days by 9 p m.
Leave Maplesville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 4 a mn, arrive at Montgomery same
days by 9 p m.
3680. From Montgomery by Wetumpka, Nix-
burg, Rockford, Sylacauga and Mardisville, to
Talladega, 87 miles and back three times a week
in four-horse post coaches.,
Leave Mon'gomery every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 7 a m, arrive at Talladega n,-xt
days by 4 p m,
Leave Talladega every Ttesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 7 a m, arrive at Montgomery next
days by 4 p m.
3681. From Montgomery by Carter's Hill and
Chi, a Grove, to Monticell-, 56 miles and back
once a week.
Leave Montgomery every Wednesday at 7 a m,
arrive at Monticello next day by 5 p m.
Leave Monticello every Friday at 7 a m, arrive
at Montgomery next day by 5 p m.
3682 From Montgomery to Millville, 60 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Montgomery every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Millville next day by 5 p m.
Leave Miliville every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Montgomery next day by 5 p m.
Service is to commence onr the 1st July, 1838.
3683. From Wetumpka by Montreal, Dadeville,
Pittsboro', Chambers C. II., 'redonia and Vernon,
Ga., to La Grange, 95 miles and back once a
week.
Leave Wetumpka every friday at 10 a m, ar-
rive at La Grange every Sunday by 8 p m.
Leave La Grange every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Wetumpka every Wednesday uy 5 p m.
3684. From Chesnut Creek by Waxahatchee to
Columbiani, 32 miles and back once a week.
Leave Chesnut Creek every Thursday at 7 a m,
arrive at Columbiana same day by 6 p nm.
Leave Columbi mna every Friday at 7 a m, ar-
rive at Chesnut Creek same day by 6 pm.
3685. From Chesnut Creek by Rockford to
Montreal, 50 miles and back once a week.
Leave Chesnut Creek every Tuesday at 1 p m,
arrive at Montreal next day by 6 p m.
Leave Montreal every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Chesnut Creek next day by 12 noon.-
3686. From Washington by Graves' Landing,
Lowndesboro', Haynesville, Prairie Hill and Fort
Dale, to Greenville, 50 miles and back three times
a week.
Leave Washington every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 10 a m, arrive at Greenville next
days by 2 pm.
Leave Greenville every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 10 a m, arrive at Washington next
days by 2 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3687. From Washington by Kingston, Inde-
pendence, Hamilton, Oakridge and Valley Creek,
to Perry C. H., 75 mils and back once a week.
Leave Washington every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Perry C. H. next day by 7 p m.
Leave Perry C. H every Friday at 6 a m, arrive
at Washington next day by 7 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3688. From Vernon by Benton, to Pleasant Hill,
29 miles and back once a week.
Leave Vernon every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Pleasant Hill same day by 4 p m.
Leave Pleasant Hill every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Vernon same day by 4 p m.
3689. From Benton by Maule's Store, to Mount
Willing, 20 miles ahd back once a week.
Leave Benton every Frid.iy al 1 p m, arrive at
Mount Willing same day by 8 p m.
Leave Mount Willing every Friday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Benton same day by 12 noon.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3690. From Selma by Woodlawn and Corinth,
to Maplesville, 32 miles and back three times a
week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Selma every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 10 a m, arrive at Arkplesviile irame days
by 8 p m.
Leave Maplesville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 5 a in, arrive at Selma same days
by 3 p m.
3691. From Selma by Cahaba, Cambridge,
Daletown, Canton, Black's Bluff, and Bell's Land-
ing to Claiborne, 86 miles and back three times
a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Selma every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 10 a m, arrive at Claiborne next days by
6pm.
Leave Claiborne every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Selma next days by
3pm.
3692. From Selma by Cahaba, King's Landing,
Pleasant Hill, Farmersville, Bragg's, and Man-
ningham to Greenville, 42 miles and back three
times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Selma every Monday, Wednesday, and
Fridt.y at 10 a m, arrive at Greenville same days
by 0lp m.
Leave Greenville every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Selma same days by


6pm.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1833.
3693. From Cahaba by Johnson's Mills, Port-
land, Carlowsville, Womack's, Mount Moriah, and
Ridgeville to Manningham, 51 miles and back
once a week.
Leave Cahaba every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Manningham next day by II a m.
Leave Manningham every Friday at 1 p mn, ar-
rive at Cahaba next day by 6 p m.
3694. From Cahaba to Perry C. H., 26 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Cahaba every Tuesday at 7 a m, arrive at
Perry C. H. same day by 4 pm.
Leave Perry C. H. every Wednesday at 7 a m,
arrive at Cahaba same day bt 4 p m.
3695. From Haynesville by Lowndesboro' to
Vernon, 17 miles and back once a week.
Leave Haynesville every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Vernon same day by 12 noon.
Leave Vernon every Wednesday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Haynesville same day by 7 p m.
3696. From Haynesville by Church Hill to Ben-
ton, 18 miles and back oncea week.
Leave Haynesville every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Bt nton same day by 12 noon.
Leave Benton every Wednesday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Haynesville same day by 7 p m.
3697. From Haynesville to Carter's Hill, 35
miles and back once a week.
Leave Haynesville every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Carter's Hill same day by 6 p m.


Leave Franklin every Wednesday at 6 a m, ar.
rive at Monticello next day by 4 p m.
3704. From Monticello by Union Hill and
Gaines's Store to Montezuma, 70 miles and back
once a week.
Leave Monticello every Friday at 5 a m, arrive
at Montezuma next day by 7 p m.
Leave Montezuma ,very Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Munticello next day by 7 pinm.
3705. From Monticello to Dale C. H., 45 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Monticello every Friday at 4 a m, arrive
at Dale C. H. same day by 10 p nm.
Leave Dale C. H. every Thursday at 4 a m, ar-
rive at Monticello same day by 10 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3706 From Franklin by Leaman's Store, to Co-
lumnibia, 24 milTes and back once a week.
Leave Franklin every Monday at 3 a m, arrive
at Columbia same day by 12 noon.
Leave Columbia every Monday at i p M, arrive
at Franklin same day by 10 p m.
3707. From Dale C. H. by Block Hlous, Mc-
Clindon's, and Abb,.ville, to Franklin, 52 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Dale C. H. every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Franklin next day by 12 noon.
Leave Franklin every Sunday at 1 p m, arrive
at Dale C. H. next day by 6 p m.
3708 From Dale C. H. to Montezuma, 53 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Dale C. H. every Tuesday at 8 a m, ,ar-
rive at Montezuma next day by 4 p inm.
ILeave Montezuma every Thursday at 8 a m, ar-
rive at Dale C. H. next day by 4 pm.
3709. From Dale C. H. to Valambrosa, lFo. T.
60 miles and back once a week.
Leave Dale C. H. every Saturday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Valambrosa next day by 5 p m.
Leave Valambrosa every Monday at 6 a m, ar-
tive at DalG C. H. netted y by 5pm.
3710. From Montezuma by Brooklyn, Sparta,
and Belleville,'to Burnt Corn, 51 miles and back
twice a week.
Leave Montezuma every Tuesday and Friday at
1 p m, arrive at Burnt Corn next days by 6 p m.
Leave Burnt Corn every Monday anl Thursday
at 6 a i, arrive at Montezuma next days by 11
a m.
0J" Proposals to carry the mail in stages will
also be considered.
3711. From Sparta by Robb's Store,Tto Green-
ville, 50 miles and back once a week.
Leave Sparta every Tuesday at 1 p m, arrive at
Greenville next diy by 5 p inm.
Leave Greenville every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Sparta next day by 11 a inm.
3712. From Sparta to Pensacola, Flo. T., 80
miles and back once a week.
Leave Sparta every Wednesday at 5 a m, arrive
at Pensacola next day by 8 p m.
Leave Pensacola every Friday at 5 a m, arrive
at Sparta next day by 8 p m.
3713. From Burnt Corn by Godbolt's Store, to
Allenton, 33 miles and back once a week.
Leave Burnt Corn every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Allenton same day by 6 p m.
Leave Allenton every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at LRurnt Corn same d.&y by 6 p inm.
3714. From Claiborne by Gosport, Suggsville,
Jackson, and St Stephen's, to Washington C. H.
60 miles and back twice a week.
Leave Claiborne every Tuesday and Saturday
at 1 p m, arrive at Washington C. H. next days by
6 p in.
Leave Washington C, H. every Monday and
Friday at 6 a m, arrive at Claiborne next days by
12 noon.
3715. From Claiborne by Gosport, '"and Supgs-
ville, to Grove Hill, 24 miles and back once a
week.
Leave Claiborne every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Grove Hill same day by 3 p m,
Leave Grove Hill every Tuesday at 8 a m, ar-
rive at Claiborne same day by 5 p m.
3716. From Coffeeville by St. Stephen's,
New Wakefield, and Mount Vernon, to Mobile,
82 miles and back three times a week in four-
horse post coaches.
Leave Coffeeville every Monday Thursday, and
Satu-day at 12 noon, arrive at Mobile next days
by 10 p inm,
Leave Mobile every Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday at 4 a m, arrive at Coffeeville next days
by 12 noon,
3717. From Coffeeyille by Warrior Bridge, to
Washington 0. H. 15 miles and back once a
week.
Leave Coffeeville every Saturday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Washington C. H. same day by 6 p m.
Leave Washington C. H. every Saturday at 6
a ro, arrive at Coffeeville same day by 11 a m.

MISSISSIPPI.
3801. From Jackson by Richland, Madisonville,
Harmony, Williamstown, Haysville, Harpersville,
Louisville, Deposit, Choctaw Agency, and West-
port to Columbus, 145 miles and back, three times
a week in four horse post couches.
Leave Jackson every Sunday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 10 p m, arrive at Columbus every Wed.
nesday, Saturday, and Monday by 3 a m.
Leave Columbus every Sunday, Tuesday, and


Friday at 8 p m, arrive at Jackson every Tuesday,
Thursday, and Sunday by 10 p m.
6- Proposals to carry the mail daily will also
be considered.
3802. From Jackson by Clinton, Raymond,
Auburn, CAyuiga, Rocky Spring, Willow Spring,
Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Fayette,Selserstown, and
Washington to Natchez, 109 miles and back, three
times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Jackson every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Natcliez next days by
10 p m.
Leave Natchez every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Jackson next days by
9pm
0:Y Proposals to carry the mail daily will also be
considered.
3803. From Jackson by Newtown and Line
Store to Gallatin, 33 miles and back, three times
a week in sulheys.
Leave Jackson every Monday, Wednesday, and
Saturday at 1 a m, arrive at Gallatin same days by
11 am.
Leave Gallatin every Sunday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 12 m, arrive at Jackson same days by 9
p m.
(0j Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse
post coaches will also be considered.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3804. From Jackson by Brandon, Scott C. H.,
and Union to Daleville, 110 miles and back, twice
a week.
Leave Jackson every Sunday and Thursday at


Leave Jackson every Tuesday and Saturday at
5 a m, arrive at Williamsburgh next lays by 7 p m.
Leave Williamsburgh every Sunday and Thurs-
day at 5 a m, arrive at Jackson next days by 7 p m.
1:j Proposals to carry the mail in stages will
also be considered.
38 i9. From Madisonville by Canton, Warsaw,
and Beatti's Bluff to Vernon, 30 miles and back,
three times a we Leave Madisoiville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Vernon same days
by 5 p m.
Leave Vernon every Monday, Wednesday, and
Fr iday at 6 a m, arrive at Madisonville same days
by 5 p m.
0}'J Proposals to carry the mail in agess will
also be considered.
3810. From Livingston by rCanton, Valena,
Georgesville, and Franklin to Lexington, 60 Miles
and back, once a week.
Leave Livingston every Tuesday at 12 mrn arrive
at Lexington next day by 10 p m.
Leave Lexngton every Thursday at 3 a m, ar-
rive at L ,ingston next day by 12 m.
3811. From Fleetwood by Spring Branch and
Summerville to Satartia, 25 miles and back, twice
a wPek.
Leave Fleetwood every Tuesday at'd Saturday
at 11 a m, arrive at Satartia same days by S p M't.
Leave S.tartia every Monday and Friday at 4 a
m, arrive at Fleetwood same days by 1 p m.
3812. From Vicksburg by Milldale, Claiborne-
viile, Satartia, LUverpool, and Benton to Lexing-
ton, 100 miles and back, three times a week ,in
four-h.orse post coaches. Manchester to be sup-
plied three times a week in stages.
Leave Vicksburg every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Satur lay at 4 a m, arrive at Lexington every Wed-
nesday, Friday, and Monday by 10 p in.
Leave Lexington every Tuesday, Thwrsday, and
Saturday, at 4 a m, arrive at Vicksburg every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 10 p m,
3813. From Vicksburg by Warrenton and
Mount Vernon to Rocky Spring, 26 miles and back,
three times a week. -
Leave Vicksburg every Monday, Wednesday,
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Rocky Spring
same days by 4 p m.
Leave Rocky Spring every Sunday, Tiaesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at Vicksburg same
days by 2 pm.
SPropos ls to carry the mail in stages will
also be considered.
3814 From Benton by Kendallville and Rome,
to Tchula, 28 miles and back once a week.
Leave Benton every Tharsday at 6 a m, arrive
at Tchula same day by 4 p m.
Leave Tchula every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Bent-n same day by 4 p m.
3815. From Lexington by Black Hawk, Car-
rollton, Hope Valley, and Grenada, to Coffeeville,
70 miles ani back three times a week in four-
horse post coaches.
Leave Lexington every Tuesdlay, Thursday,
and Saturday at 7 a m, arrive at Colfeeville every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 4 p m.
Leave Coffeeviile every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 7 a m, arrive at Lexington every
WeJnesday, Friday, and Monday by 4 p m.
Proposals for running with greater expedition
are invited.
3816 From Lexingtonr by Smithfield, to Tchu-
la, 15 miles and back three times a week.
Leave Lexington every TuesdAy, Thursday,
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Tehula same days
by 12 noon.
Leave Tchula every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 12 noon, arrive at Lexington same days
by 6 pm.
3817. From Carrollton by Leflore, Point Veto,
Choechumna, and Tuscahoma, to Grenada, 43 miles
and back twice a week.
Leave Carrollton every Monday and Friday at
6 a m, arrive at Grena la next days by 11 a m.
Leave Grenada every Tuesday and Saturday at
1 p m, arrive at Carnollton next days by 6 p m.
3818. From Carrollton by Smith's Mills, Choc-
chusa, Tuscahoma, and iillatoba, to Panola, 8)
miles and back once a week.
Leave Carrollton every"Monday at 5 a m, ar.
rive at Panola next day by 7 p nm.
Leive Panola every Wednesday at 5,a m, arrive
at Carrollton next day by 7 p m.
3819. From Carrol ton by Shougola, to Greens-
boro', 40 miles and back once a week.
Leave Carrollton every Thurslay at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Greensboro' next day by 12 noon.
Leave Greensboro' every Friday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Carrollton next day by 12 noon.
3820. From Coffeeville by'Oxford, Wyatt, Wa-
tertord, Holly Springs, and Hudsonvil!e, to La
Grange, Te., 100 miles and back three times a
weel in four.horse post coaches.
Leave Coffeeville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 3 a m, arrive at La Gringe every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 9 p m.
Leave La Grange every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 3 a m, arrive at CoftTeville every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 9 p m.
3821. From Coffeeviile by Pontitoc and Buz-
zard ttoost,-Ala., to Truscumbia, 160 miles and
back three times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Coffeeville every Tuesday. Thursday,
and Saturday at 6 a m, arrive at Tuscumbia every


Friday, Sunday, and Wednesday by 5 p inm.
Leave Tuscuminbia every Sunday, Tuesday, ani
Thursday at 6 a m, arrive at Coffeeville every
Wednssday, Friday, and Monday by 5 p m.
Proposa's for running with greater expedition
are invited.
3822. From Coffeeville by Panola (C. H..) Bel-
mont, and Jefferson, to Memphis, Te, 75 miles
and back twice a week.
Leave Coffeeville every Tuesday and Saturday
at 5 a m, arrive at Memphis next days by 8 p m.
Leave Memphis every Tuesday and Saturday at
5 a m, arrive at Coffeeville next days by 8 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
3823. From Panola to Tunica C. H., 40 miles
and back once a week.
Leave Panola every Wednesday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Tunica C. H. same day by 8 p m.
Leave Tunica C. H. every Tuesday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Panola sime day by 8 p m.
3824. From Holly Springs, by Ochacopassa, Mi.,
to Memphis, Te., 44 miles and back three times
a week.
Leave Holly Springs every Monday, Wednes-
day, and Friday at 4 p m, arrive at Memphis next
days by 6 p m.
Leave Memphis every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 6 a m, arrive at Holly Springs next
diys by 9 a inm.
OC Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse
post coaches will also be considered.
3825. From Holly Springs to Pontitoc,50 miles


Leave Lexington every Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7 a mn, arrive at Williamstown next days by
11 am
3847. From Williamitown, by Offahoma, to
Kosciusko, 36 miles and back once a week
Leave Williamstown every Wednesday at 6 am
arrive at Kosciusko same day by 6 p m
Leave Kosciusko every Tue.day at 6 a m, arrive
at Williamstown same d.ty by 6 p m
3848. From Scott C. H., by Kelling's, Moze-
lusha, Oldtown, and Yanwaky, to De Kalb, 75
miles and back once a week
Leave Scott C. H. every Monday at 5 a m, arrive
at De Kalb next day by 6 p min
Leave De Kalb every Wed-iesday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Scott C. H. next day by 6 p m
3849. From Union, by Decatu and Garlands-
ville, to Pauld;ng, 40 miles and back twice a week
Leave Union every Sunday and Wednesday at
4 a m, arrive at Paulding same days by 8 o m
Leave Paulding every Monday and Friday at 4
a ifi, arrive at Union same days by 8 p mn
Service is to commence on the 1lt July, 1838
3850. From Union to De Kalb, 45 mikls and
back once a week
Leave Union every Thursday' at 1 p m, arrive
at De Kalb next day by 5 p m
Leave Da Kalb every Wednesday at 6 a mn, ar-
rive at Union next day by 11 a m
, 3851. From Union, by Smiti C. H. and Oco-.
ha Bridge, to Williamsburg, 60 miles and back-
once a week
Leave Union every Wednesday at 6 a m, arrive
at Williamsburg next day by 5 p m
Leave Williamsburg every Friday at 6 a mn, ar-
rive at Union next day by 5 p m
3852. From Da'eville, by Magnolia, Quiji'min,.
and Chickasawhay, to Winchester, 70 miles and.
back twice a week
Leave D)aleville every Sunday and Thurs.lav at-
Sa m, arrive at Winchester next daXs by 6 p m
Leave Winchester every Monday and Frid i at
5 a mn, arrive at Daleville next days by 6 p ri
(C7Proposals to carry the mail in slages, or in,
four-horse post coaches, with greater speed, will
also be considered
3853. From Winchester to Paulding, 43 mi'es
and back twice a week


3830. From Pontitoe by rishenigoi C Hi. to,
Purdy, Te., 100 miles and back onrre a week
Leave Pontitoe eve-y Monday at 6 'a min arrive
at Purdy every Wednesday by 6 p mn
Leave Pardy every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
,at Pontitoe every Saturday by 6,p m
Service is to commence on Jh 1t July, 1838
3B31. From Pontitoe to Rtawaminba C. H., 45
miles and back once a week
Leave kostitoc every Thursd ly at 5 a m, arrive
at Itawamba CH. one.t day by 11 a m
Leave ltaWarfbs C. H, every Friday at 1 p m,
arrive at Pontitoc nest day by 6 p m
- 3832. From Athens by Quincy and Wall's Tan
Yard to Cotton Gin Port, 23 mnils and back
onceY a week
Leate Athens every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Cotton Gin P'ort same day by 2 p m
Leave Cotton Gia port every Saturday at 6
a m, arrive at Athens same day by 2 p m
3833. From Athens by Aberdeen, Hamilton,
and Calelonia, to Columbus, 43 miles aid back
once.a week
Leave Athens every Thursday at 4 a m, arrive
at Columbus same day by 9 p m
Leave Columbus every Wednesday at 4 a m
arrive at Athens same clay by 9 p m
3834. From Columbus by PlyNmou'h, Mayhew
and Starksville, to Greensboro', 70 miles and back
Once a week
Leave Columbus every Wednesday at 1. p m,
arrive at Greensboro' every Frday by 12 noon
Leave Greensboro' every Friday at I p m, ar-
rive at Columbus every Sunday by 12 noon
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838
3835. From Columbus by Colbin tb Houston,
60 miles and back once a week
Leave Columbus evely Wednesday at 6 am,
arrive At Houston next day by 6 p m
Leave Houston every Friday at 6 am, arrive
at Columbus next day by 6 p m
S3836. From Columbus 'by Loundsville, Cedar
Creek, Macon, Meander, and De Kalb, to Dale-
ville, 60 miles and back twice a week
Leave Columbus every Tuesday and Friday at
6 a mw, arrive at Daleville next days by 6 p m
Leave Daleville every Sunday and Wednesday
at a a mn, arrive at' Columbus next r'avs by 6 p m
(0'Proposals to carry the mail in stages, or in
four-horse post coaches, with grea'c r speed, will
also be considered.
3837. From Greensboro' to Choechuma, 50
miles and back once a week
Leave Greensboro' every Friday at 1 p Im, at'r-
rive at Choochumna next day by 7 p tn
Leave Chocchumna every Thirsdyv t 5 a m, ar-
rive at Greensbord' itxt daly by 12 npo,n
3838. PFomi Greensboro' to lcu;v'til, 40
miles arid back once a week "
Leave Greenatioro"every Friday It 1 p m, ar-
rive at Louisville next day by 4 in
Leave Louisville every Thuirsday at 11 a m, ar-
rive at Greensboro' next day by 12 noon
3839. From Louisvile by Fearn's Swing to
De Kalb, 40 miles and back twiceia a Wetk
Leave Louisville every Monday and Thursday
at 4 a m, arrive at De Kaib same days by 8 p m
Leave Do Kalb every Tuesday an4"'lFridayat
4 a m, arrive at Louisville sam- days by 8 p m
3840. From Louisville by Macon to Pickens-
ville, Ala, 60 miles and back bncea week
Leave Louisville every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Pickensville next day by 6 p m
Leave Pickensville every Thursday at 6 a mn,
arrive at Louisville next day by 6 p m
3841. From Louisville by Kosciusko to Lexing-
ton, 75 miles and back once a week
Leave Louisville every Tuesday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Lexington next day by 7 p mn
Leave Lexington every Thursday at 5 a m, ar-
rive at Louisville next day by 7 p m,
Service is to commence on the 1st ,jlv, 1833
3842. From Louisville to Union, 55 mies* and
back twice a week
Leave Louisville every Monday and Friday at
5am, arrive at Union next days by 12 -,ooa
Leave Union every Tuesdty an i Sqtrd.k at I
p m, arrive at Louisville next daya by 7 p M'
Service is to commence on the 1st Jtly, 1v 38
3843. From Carthag, by Wl ch lock ani Brook-
lyn, to Fairfield, Ala., 90 mites and back once a.
week.
Leave Carthage every Mo'd y at 6 a m, arrive
at Fairfield every We'ln's.l.tv by 6 p ',,
Leave Fairfield evi ry Thursday a. 6 a m, ars
rive at Carthage every Sattirday by 6 p m
3844. From Haysville, by Carthage, t< Uniof
45 miles and back once a week
Leave Haysville every Friday at 7 a m, arrive.
at Union next diy by 11 a m
Leave Union every Saturday at 1 p m, arrive at
Haysville next day by 5 p m
3845. Fr m Haysville, by Cartha -e, to Scott
C. H., 40 miles and back once a we, k
Leave Haysville every Tuesday at 4 a m, arrive
at Scott C. H. same day by 8 p m
Leave Scott C. H. every W, dnesday at 4 a m
arrive at Haysville same day l'y 8 p m
3846. From Williamsvown, by Camden, Vilena.
Georgesville, and Franklin, to Lexington, 4^
miles and back twice a week
Leave Williamstown every Sunday and Thurs.
day at 2 p m, arrive at Lexington iext days by 6
pm







VPOLX OICALZ NTZIGINXL KO31
From the Cincinuati Advertiser.
THE PENNSYLVANIA BANK OF THE UNITED
STATES.
The Baltimore American contradicts the report
I-that the Bank of the United States intends to re-
sume specie payments in advance of the other
Philadelphia banks, and gives the following fiat-
'tering account of the existing condition of our
great State institution:
"For every dollar of its notes in circulation i
has an equal amount of specie in its vaults, tha
is, four or five millions. Were the bank to re
same 'payment before the measure is generally
adopted, it would be drawn upon by every money
ed institution and individual holding its notes, an(
the inevitable consequence would. be that in
few days it would have neither circulation no
specie. Whereas, by retaining its five millions o
coin, it possesses a basis on which to issue tweot
millions with safety, whenever specie payment
become general. We further learn that effectua
measures have been adopted to prevent a contain
agency occurring which would 'enable the executive,
or legislative authority o Pennsylvania to annu
its charter."
The above we have extracted from one of th,
organs of the monster bank in Philadelphia, ani
we do think that it exceeds any other of the fulmi
nations that we have ever seen to emanate front
that polluted source, for downright impudence
reckless of all pretensions to honesty, or integrity'
of character. What, an open avowal of possess
ing a dollar in specie for every dollar of its note
in circulation, and at the same time declare th
intention to refuse payment of its notes! Why
this is beyond swindling-ay, far beyond it-thu
to boast of having the means of paying debts, an(
at the same time set its creditors at defiance! Wh'
could be prepared for such an infamous declare
tion? It is certainly beyond any thing that it
greatest enemies could have expected. Its cha
racter is now so well known to the people that fev
could have been so sanguine as to expect a speed
Resort to specie payment; but we will venture t
say that none could have expected that an ope
avowal would be made that the means of paynme
were in its vaults, but that' those means should
not and would not be applied to any such purpose
and the reason, given, is fully as extraordinary an
as arrogant-that by retaining its five millions
coin, it "possesses a basis on which to issue twer
ty millions with safety." Not content with th
nine or ten millions of the miserable rags already
in circulation, being at a discount of ten or twelv
per cent. twenty millions more must be put fort.
to rob the people of their hard earnings.
S But we would ask how the statement mad
above accords with' the statement made two month
ago? Then it was acknowledged that the circular
tion and deposits were at least eleven million
and a half, and to pay that there was not two mi
lions of specie. Now, if there be at present fiv
millions of specie, that must have been procure
by the sale of the notes of the old bank, and of tr
swindling notes at twelve months after date; an
therefore the increase of circulation must at lea
equal the increase of specie, which will rather prt
tract than hasten a recurrence to specie payment
But the paragraph above openly avows that there
is no intention of resuming specie payment-bt
that the specie will be retainer. s a basis for tr(
bling the paper circulation. Surely Congress wi
not silently submit to such a system of open an
avowed plunder; surely 'Congress will not continue
to suffer the illegal re;ssae of the notes of the ol
bank, for which notes the Government is response
ble, at least so fa-r as the- seven millions of stock
goes, none of w'nich is yet paid, nor does it appeal
there is any intention of paying.
There ca n be on doubt but that if the fitst insta
ment of the Government stock, due 1st Septemb,
next, sb.all not have been paid, that an injunctic
will b'e served upon the bank, and its operations I
put ; nto the hands of trustees to wind up its affair
payr the Government stock, and the notes yet i
circulation.
The subterfuge no doubt resorted to in the above
paragraph, means that the five millions of circus
tion is merely the notes of the new bank, and th,
there is 'no intention of ever paying the notes of t1
old bank, without Government should interfere. I
deed., it is doubtful that there is ts much as fi<
millions of the new notes in circulation; for the in
nvense sums of old notes re-issued after redemption
and with which the west and southwest have bee
inundated for the purchase of specie, is tolerab]
evidence that the circulation of the new notes is 1
mited, and that the inheritance boasted of by Biddli
is the notes of the old bank, never to be redeeme
by the new bank.
But what, we would ask, is the nature of the "e
fectual means which have been adopted to prevent
a contingency occurring which would enable th
executive or legislative authority of Pennsylvani
to annul the charter?"
Has the Governor of Pennsylvania been co.
rupied. Has he made his bargain that he would
veto any bill annulling the charter? l-as the Si
- preme Court been bought up, that these men ta]
so confidently that effectual measures nAVE bee
adopted to prevent the charter being annulled? Ti
Legislature yet to act upon the matter has yet
be elected. Measures cannot have been taken wil


it. When, then, are those measures, if they hav
not been the corruption of the Executive or the Ji
dietary?
It is certainly a bold assertion to make at tb
present moment, and given with so much coni
dence as to imply that the deed has been don(
But vie would also inquire how a specie basis c
five millions could justify the issue of twenty mi
1ioss more than already in circulation?
S When the specie basis was near two million:
and the circulation but about ten millions, the ban
closed its doors. How, then, could an issue
twenty millions, in addition to the ten, be sal
upon a specie basis of five millions? When th
bankruptcy was declared, it was said the bank ha
4e dollar in specie for five in circulation. Nov
witn thirty millions in circulation, for five million
of specie, there would be but one dollar in speci
for six in circ'alation. Where then is safety in an
thing else th,an in a point blank refusal to pay an
specie at -all? r

From the Dayton (0.) Democratic Herald.
It is an indisputable fact, that the great effort a
the democratic party, as a party, has been to intro
dace into daily ci'culation GOLD AND SILVER SufM
cient for the ordinary and common purposes o
life, leaving paper to be employed in the dealing
of an extensive commerce only. Now we asse
nothing without proof, and only ask every citize
to compare for himself the amount of gold and si
ver now in the country with the quantity in it onl
three years ago. There is at this moment MOB
0eLD AND SILVER 'IN THE COUNTRY THAN THERE WA
SPECIE AND BANK NOTES TOGETHER IN 1834. Th
amount then estimated to be in the country, wa
about eighty-eight millions-it is estimated tha
the specie now in the country amounts to about
,ninety millions. It must be recollected, however
that the banks lave about one-half of this in the
vaults, inaccessible to the reach of the vulge
hands of the people, and only to be gazed on an
used by the moneyed aristocracy" of the lan(
Who does not know that for the introduction
unch a large amount of specie in the country, an


1?~ttLDetrvit ifornintg PaM.
S The General Assembly of Virginia voted a
farewell address to Jefferson, upon his retiring
from the Presidential chair. The following is an
extract:
S "We have to thank you for the model of an ad-
ministration conducted on the PtrSIT PRINCIPLES
OF REPUBLICANISM, for POMP and STATE laid aside;
PATRONAGE DISCARDED; internal taxes abolished; a,
Shot of superfluous officers disbanded; the mo-!,
narchic maximn that "a national debt is a national"
t blessing," renounced, and more than thirty-three
t millions of our debt discharged; 'thbe'stive right to
nearly one hundred nilliohis 'C acres, or our na-
y tional domain extinguisheed, and, without the guilt
or calamities of ddfaest, a vast and fertile region
d added to our o'utntry, far more extensive than her
a original 'Pt'sessions, bringing along with it the
r Mississippi and the port of Orleans, the trade of
f te West to the Pacific Ocean, and in the intrinsic
Value of the land itself, a source of permanent andi
s almost inexhaustible revenue. These are points.
Sin your administration which the. historian wi'l not'
Sfail to seize, to expand, and teach posterity to
e dwell upon with delight. Nor 'will he forget our
I peace with the civilized world, preserved through
a season of uncommon difficulty and trial 'the
e good will cultivated with the unfortunate aborigi-,
Snes of our oounlry, and the civilization humanely
extended among them; the lesson taught the Iinha-
Sbitants of the coast of Barbary, that we have the.
means of chastising their piratical encroachmi'hts,
Solid awing them into justice;, aid that theme, on
Which, above all others, 'the historic genius will
I hang with rapture, the ierly of speech, and of the
e press, preserved inviolate, without which genius and
e science are given to man in vain."
is Writing to Martin Van Buren in 1824-yves 6t
i that tyrant, MARTIN VAN BUREN-he speailes thUs
oef the federalists:
The federalists, pretending (to be the exclusive
Friends of General Washigton, have ever done
S*hhat they could to 'ihA his character, by hanging
Theirs on it, and by representing as the enemy of
w republicans 'him, who, of all men, is best entitled
Y to the appellation of the Father of that Republic
woich they were endeavoring to subvert anA re-
n publicans to maintain. They caftt 'deny, be-j
Id cause the elections proclaimed the truth, that flhe'
Great body of the nation approved the RE'fT.BI.dCN
j MEASURES."

S The Germantown Telegrah, after stating that
e the importation of fdreigIft grain during the past
te year, amounted to five millions of bushels, for
e which the county had to pay seven and a half mil-
Slions of dollars, adds:
I "This business, however, is about drawing to
a clo-s--our present crops will yield, it is mnoe
s than probable, enough for us all and to Vpare 'and
we trust the day will be a very distanao'6ne, when
There shall again be a necessity for a cargo of fo-
reign grain to enter our sports."
il- Not so fast, M-. Teegraph. The day for the
ve necessity of new importations may not be so dis-
e tant as y u imagine. The cause was not in short
b ciops, but in the monopoly of crops by speculators,
t aided by bank credits, and the forcing of every
thing to artificial prices by paper money. As you
Write for the Pennsylvania farmers, and, as we in-
,r fer from this paragraph, are anxius for their pross-
r perity, examine this subject philosophically., and
without reference to parties, and fav'o your ag-
ricultural readers with the result 'ol your discove-
id ries.-Philade!phia Ledger.
]e CREIT.--O0re would suppose, from reading the
)ld
s- whig heW*papers, that there was a disposition on the
,k partof the administration party to destroy the present
a. system of credits altogether. But this is entirely
false. No party of intelligent men is so infatuated
l_ as to suppose that commerce can be carried on
er without credit. Yet it is the object of Government
to reform that species of currency Which leads to
Abuses of the system of credit. They would destroy
s, all the abuse of credit which has an inevitable ten-
in dency to bring about a general bankruptcy every
four or five years. They would prune off all the
re superAfluns and noxious branches of the present
a- system. They hope to accomplish this object, not
Sby destroying banks or a paper currency, but by
e establishing it on a specie basis. They would not
Shave it so easy that every speculating knave may
be enabled by it to enrich himself upon the fruits
of other men's labors.-Boston Post.
n In a pamphlet recently published by Mr. Gouge,
le has proposed a system of Sub-Treasuries as a
i- means of collecting the revenue, and thereby en-
e, tirely entirely separating the fiscal concerns of the
Government from banking institutions. To such a
separation of bank and State there can be no possi-
f ble objection.--.M Y. Times.

e When the democratic party went out of power
a at the last election for Governor, the aggregate
banking capital of this State did not amount to
r- $20,000,000. This capital was created during
Id rome forty or fifty years. But what did the aston-
u. ished people of Pennsylvania behold in less than
11 six months after Ritner's election? Why, they saw
,n Governor Ritner and his whig friends increase the
hp banking capital of this State $40,000,000 in one


to single session !!! This astounding increase justly
th alarmed the democracy of the country for the
ve safety of our free institutions, and the present shin
u. plasters is the offspring of this sudden and impru-
dent augmentation of fictitious capital.
he [Union (Pa.) Times.

e. BEAUTIES OP THE SHIN PLASTER SYSTEM.-The
," papers are already beginning to publish lists of
counterfeits of the corporation shin plasters of
Philadelphia. Those of that city are drawn so
s, ear an imitation of the United States Bank notes,
k that the most unblushing frauds are frequently
r1 committed by the cunning and crafty sharpers.
fe A few days since a farmer went into the city to
he sell a horse, and disposed of him, as he supposed,
ad for two fifty dollar bil!s, but when he arrived at
W) home, he found they were "shin plasters" for fifty
1s cents each, with the words fifty printed in large
I2 letters, which induced him to take them for fifty
y dollar bills. The papers are full of accounts of
Y frauds of the same kind.-Erie Observer.

AN xssuE.-The Atlas says that Mr. Webster
holds the same opinions now, that he always has
held. Mr. Webster says, "I have often been
of wrong in my judgment on political questions."
SNow either the Atlas or Mr. Webster don't tell the
Truth in this matter, or if Mr. Webster holds the
f same opinions now he always has done, his opi-
Snions, by his own confession, are wrong. How
rt will you chop this logic, Master Atlas?
en [Boston J$dvocate.
n____ I_ II_____1 __11__ I
1 We notice an article going the rounds headed
y "A Day's Sport with Daniel Webster"--we've
had ten years' sport with him, and expect to have
AS about five more.-Boston Post.
he
as
at LAND OFFICES.-We have made inquiries at the
ut proper places, and have had the gratification to
r hear that the land office receipts in this State con-
ir tinue pretty nearly what they were before the
ar stoppage of the banks. It is believed there is
id gold and silver enough now in those offices, to
A. meet all the heavy disbursements of the Govern-
of ment in this quarter of the Union, thanks to the.
d Treasury order-and the opinion is universal that,


MISaELLAmEOUS ITEIIX.
From the Boston .Atlas.
GEN. RICHARD MONTGOMERY.
Richard Montgomery was bon iii Ireland, in the
year 1737, and'was a'meIs b, of a most respecta-
ble family in the north part of that country. They
are nodt of the titled nobility, but are of such a stanQ-
irig:a respects property and character, that they
associate with the highest in the land. This was
the standing of the family when Richard was born,
and such it continues to be to the present day.
In 1775, when troops were raised for the Coiti-
nental service in these (then) Coltonies, Mr. M-t it
gomery was found residing phn the banks of 'the
North river, in the State fi 'New York., He. had
previously beenin theM ritish service, and beeti on.,
duty with his 'regiment in this country, and 'had, ift
soldiers" 9has'e, "seen 'a great, del 'of serVice."
His career from 'the first'(and ihehetd a commission
at the age of eighteen.) was 8tarked with intrepidity
and remarkable courage; so much so, that he was
a universal faVorite with his fellow-soldiers, from
the highest to the lowest. Notwithstanding which',
he resigned his commission when he reriittcd with
his regiment to England. .
Soon after thi eveil, ivhich was probably only
preparatory 'to -the next step, he returned to this
country, and, being a soldier by profession, deter-
'ined, if he followed his profession, that his talents
should be used in the cause of liberty rather than
that of tyranny. .
1775 it has been stated ifatritim residing in the
State of New York, atldi the same year found him
in possessioo'ofta commission of Brigadier Gene-
ral iin the Colonial army. The post assigned him
ws tinder General Schuyler, who then had chief
Command of the northern army, so called, and
whose position was on or near the Canadian lines,.
He was not long idle after joinitig the army, and
his numerous engagements with the eflemYr.iwere
only a series of stories, "until he'finally'capt'uied
and took p session of the inrdirtaiAt F'ort of St.
Jothn *tad city of MontrealI
Whilet the a rihrW ere going on, Washing-
ton 'was 'dica*bhiped with the main army in this
Vidiciniity in Cambridge, and then and there pro-
''tfic.ed the expedition which set out under command
of Colonel Arnold, and crossed the wilderness from
the Kenebec river to the Canada lines. The in-
tention of General Washington was, that this de-
detachment should join and co-operate with the
northern army under Schuyler, and that whe uiini-
ted they would attack and capftte the fortress of
Qucbecb Anter Arnojdl had een some weeks on
his mach, a'd Wh'e&n he was in the depths of the
wiMealde'ss 'neiws came to Washington that Schuy-
t 1 '16was sick, and was utterly unable to lead the
army to the intended attack on Quebec. This was
sad news to Washington, for two reasons; first, he
was losing the services of an officer in whom he
had great confidence; and next, the gentleman
whom he believed to be second in command, and
who would of course take Schuyler's place, was
one in whom he had little confidence for the exe-
cution of such an enterprise as was then in hand.
He believed the command 'developed on General
Wooster, and under this impression wrote to
Schuyler (who was then sick) as follows: "Gene-
ral Wooster, I am informed, is not of such activity
as to press through difficulties with which that ser-
vice is environed, I am therefore much alarmed foi
Arnold, whose expedition was built upon yours,
and who will inevitably perish if the invasion and
entry into Canada are abandoned by your succes-
sor."
These fears, however, were not needed, the fact
being, though then unknown to Washington, thai
Montgomery stood one degree higher than Woos-
ter, consequently, he took the command, and
Wooster, under him, took a portion of the army.
After this, when Washington was informed thai
Montgomery was entitled to and had assumed the
command, his joy was unbounded. He knew
Montgomery's character for enterprise, perseve-
rance and bravery, and consequently felt once more
full confidence in the success of the expedition. Ir
writing again to Schuyler, he requested him "to con-
vey his best wishes and regards to General Mont.
gomery."
The result of this bold attempt on a fortress,
which is one of the two strongest in the world, i,
known to every reader of American history. Mont.
gomery fell in the actual possession of victory, bu
his fall created such a panic and consternatior
amongst his followers, that defeat followed almost
instantly.
To show the political sagacity, as well as th(
bravery of Montgomery, one fact may be noticed
Whilst he was pushing his conquest along the Can.
ada lines, Congress saw the advantage that woulc
be gained if the Canadians could be brought ovei
to take part with these Colonies, and appointed i
committee to proceed to the Northern Army, anc
there confer with and assist General Schuyler. Ir
the instructions to this committee are these words:
Congress desires you to exert your utmost endea-
vors to induce the Canadians to accede to a unior
with these Colonies, and that they form from theii
several parishes a provincial convention, and senc
delegates to this Congress." This was done in th(
wisdom of Congress, and all the formality of ,
travelling committee had to be used to lay the in-
vitations before the Canadians. But, what wa,


Montgomery doing all this time? He had done
single handed, apd by the volition of his own
will, the very thing which Congress had voted tc
do. When he took possession of Montreal on the
12th of November, he issued a proclamation o
address to the Canadians, in which he gives the
same invitation that the Congress committee was
instructed to give, and the language of the twc
documents is so similar, that it would almost ap-
pear as if they had been written by the same hand
so much for the sagacity and zeal with which he
devoted himself to the service of his adopted
country.
Montgomery's sense of honor was very acute
He was one of the most high-minded of men. An
instance in proof will be given. When the For
of St. John capitulated to him, his own soldiers
were not in the most comfortable situation as res-
pected their clothing. The British soldiers were
well provided. The circumstance was rather
tempting to the victorious army, particularly or
the approach and within the reach of a Canadiar
winter. They thought then, as some politicians
are said to have thought since, "that the spoils be-
long to the victors." But Montgomery said: "No
private property shall be respected. These men
are our prisoners, but we will not strip' them.'
He describes the circumstance himself, as follows
in a letter addressed to General Schuyler at th(
lines-and any other language than his own woulc
do him injustice, when that can be had access to.
The officers of the first regiment of Yorker:
and artillery company were very near a inutin3
the other day, because I would not stop the cloth-
ing of the garrison of St. Johns. I would not have
sullied my own reputation, nor disgraced the con-
tinental army, with such a breach of capitulation
for the world. There was no driving it into thei:
heads that the clothing was really the property o
the soldier. That he had paid for it, and tha
every regiment in this country especially, saved
year's clothing to have decent clothes to wear or
particular occasions."
To such noble conduct did his sense of hono;
prompt him.
In those days it was no drawback to a bi ave mar
and a soldier, that he was an Irishman. Wash.


i ertst 671and Ch del fig
H -indostan.
S.MTING IN INDIA.
Hawking ian\ndia, to those who are not bent
upon the exterrmination of beasts of prey, is one of
the most exhilarating things in the world, and the
sport is peculiarly Suited to feminine participation.
To ladies, hog hunting is of course quite out of the
question; and there are few whose nerves could
stand against the terror and carnage of an expedi-
tion against tigers, to say nothing of the fatigue to
be encountered in a chase wh'Ih Ireqjuently lasts for
hours under a buirtiing sun. Hawking, wh'eie there'
is s'es excie'ement, may be relinquishedd at pleasure,
and the pffrsuit of game leads the party into wilder-
nesses far iremnioved from the dwellings of man-
The sylvan denizens of the soil are seen in their'
native haunts. The majestic nylghau, roused at
the approach of intruders, scours across the plain,
or crashes through the boughs of a neighboring
thicket; herds of antelopes are seen gra'aing, and at
every step the. .elephant puts up some beautiful
bird, or some strange and interesting animal; wolves
and bears may be detected stealing off to a more
secluded covert, whilst the porcupine utters its
shrill cry of alarm, and the monkey gibbers at the
passing pageant. .
Wild geese afford the best sport, theysoar t x-'
ceedingly high, and frequently bid 'det'ance to the

falcon's adventurous win's. Smaller birds, par-
tridge espe'cipy.P, have no chance of escape; and
'. when appearing on the edge of those basin-like val-
leys, which so frequently diversify the plains of
India, their capture is seen to great advantage from
the back of an elephant, as the spectator can look
down upon the whole scene; and following the flight
of the hawk along the steep, where the ftightoned'
partridge hurries for shelter, ,0b1erve 'the fatal pre-
cisioti of his aim, a'ud see him pounce directly on
'the. Victi-i, which e bears to the falconer in his
claw.. Ih some parts of the country, the largest de-
scription of the hawk is trained to the chase; and
its murderous talons are directed against antelopes
and the smaller kinds of deer. It darts at the head
of the quarry, blinds and confuses it with its flap-
ping wings, tears it with its beak and claws, and
finally succeeds in depriving it of life. This is not,
however, a common exhibition, and is seldom wit-
nessed, except at the courts of native princes.
Hunting with cheetahs leopardss) is movie com-
monly practised; but though the manceuvres of the
cat-like pursuer are exceedingly curious and inte-
resting, as 'they develop the nature and habits of
the animal, there is nothing noble, generous, or ex-
citing in the sport. The cheetahs, hooded like
hawks, are secured by a slight harness to a platform
fastened on a bullock cart: their keeper holds the
beast in his hand, and those who wish to obtain a
good view of the chase, take a seat beside the
driver.
Antelopes, accustomed to the sight of bullocks,
will permit them to make a much nearer approach
than any less familiar animal. When the carts
have arrived at a prudent distance from the herd,
the driver halts, the cheetahs are unloosed, and
espying the herd, they drop silently off the vehicle,
taking care to choose the contrary side from that
on which the deer are feeding. They steal, crouch-
ing along the ground, screening themselves behind
every bush, hillock, or tuft of grass which may oc-
cur in their way, pausing occasionally, when there
seems to be any danger of a premature alarm.
SEach has singled out his victim; and measuring the
distance with an experienced eye, they dart forward
with a sudden bound. Two or three springs en-
sure success or disappointment: the victor alights
upon his prey. But if a threatened antelope should
t have the good fortune to escape the first attempt, no
t second attempt is made: the cheetah returns growl-
ing and in ill humor, to his keeper: he has lost his
t advantage, and sullenly relinquishes a field which
must be won fairly by strength and speed.
t The poorer class of natives, who take up the
occupation of hunters for their own subsistence, or
Specuniary emoluments, sometimes avail themselves
of the services of a bullock in approaching within
shot of a herd of antelopes. Theirs is a matter of
Business, not of excitement, and they have no idea
of allowing a chance to the objects of their pursuit.
SA bullock is carefully trained for the purpose, and
when his education is completed, he makes a quiet
s entrance into the jungles, followed closely by his
s master, who contrives to screen himself completely
behind the animal. The bullock grazes carelessly
t as he advances, making circuitous and apparently
a unpremeditated movements; at last he arrives at a
t convenient distance without having disturbed the
unconscious herd ; he then stands still, the shikaree,
e or hunter fixes his clumsy matchlock along the
back of the animal, and still unseen, takes unerring
aim; down drops the devoted antelope, and away
1 fly the rest of the herd, dispersed and out of sight
r in an instant. Europeans rarely witness this kind
of sport, if such it may be called; but it sometimes
I falls to the lot of a solitary traveller, who from
a some elevation obtains an extensive view over a
: wide plain, to have ag opportunity of watching the
singular manouvres employed by the hunter and
a the uncouth agent.
r Where the weapons at hand are inefficient for
I open warfare, stratagems must supply the place of
e more generous hostility; and even Anglo Indians


Share sometimes compelled to adopt native arts, and
when the assistance of elephants cannot be pro-
s cured, they will condescend to lay a bait fora tiger,
and sit patiently in a tree until the fierce animal
Shall repair to his evening repast, and then they can
shoot him while, in fancied security, he is indulg-
Sing his appetite. Others, disdaining such unwarlike
defences, will encounter a tiger singly on horse-
back. This is of course a very difficult and dan-
s gerous enterprise; few steeds, however noble, can
Sbe brought to face an enemy of which they enter-
tain an instinctive dread The vicinity of a tiger
; is often discovered by the distress and terror ex-
Shibited by horses, which even in their stables have
I been known to fall into fits of trembling and per-
spiration, occasioned by their secret conviction that
their foe is at hand; and when a horse is found
Sufficiently courageous to encounter so terrible a
t savage, the most extraordinary activity, coolness,
s presence of mind, accuracy of eye and strength of
- arm, are necessary to ensure the victory. The
e hunter, after putting up the tiger, wheels round him
r in a circle at full speed, never permitting, in the
a rapidity of his movements, a single moment for the
a fatal spring; and when the tiger, bewildered and
s dazzled, offers an unguarded front, pins him to the
- earth with the thrust of a spear. Such enterprises
: must be of rare occuieence, and can only be con-
a templated by adventurous spirits delighting in the
Excitement produced by the wild and dangerous
, sports of India, and anxiously bent upon braving the
e most fearful terrors of the field.
I
AMIABLE RESIGNATION.-In Sir Walter Scott's
s diary of a voyage to the Shetland and Orkneys, it
r is related that the inhabitants of those islands be-
trayed much chagrin at the erection of light houses.
e Mr. Stevenson," said Sir Walter, "happened to
Observe that the boat of a Sanda farmer had bad
a sails. If it had been His (i. e. God's) will that ye
r had nae built sae money light houses hereabout,' an-
f swered the Arcadian, with great composure, 'I
t should have had new mils last winter.' The light
I houses cut off a principal means of their living by
Preventing wrecks. The spirit of these people is
r by no means singular or peculiar to themselves, be-
ing that of thousands who object to enterprises or
changes of great public utility and importance, on
Account of their interfejnce with the profits which


LAUNCH OP THE NEL$O0.
On Monday, the 10th of July, the Nelson, the
largest line of battle ship ever built in England,
was launched at the King's Yard, Woolwich.
Within the Dock Yard every regulation was
adopted to render the ceremony as gratifying to
public curiosity as possible. The Royal Marines
were drawn up in the street, in front of the. en-
trance gate, the Royal Artillery ivere infringed in
E extended files in every direction, within the Dock
Yaird, for the purpose 6f preserving orler, and the
Formanag militia were stationed around. Stages
for the accommodation of the spectators were erected,
contiguous to the vessel'ready to be launched, and
those common tding the best prospects of ceremony!
were covered with white canvass,, and appropria-
ted to select company. They were lined inside
with the colors of the shipping, which had a grand
and striking effect. One on the larboard side,
with the royal standard, was appropriated for the
Lords of the Admiralty, and another on the oppo-'
site side, to correspond, to the Commissioners. The,
The different vessels on the river were crowded
with spectators. The hulks; pleasure beats, tops
of houses, and the banks 'on the opposite side, were
alp filled 'with a multitude.
The Nelson lay in the slips decked in all the
pride of naval magnificence. The St. George's
red and blue ensigns were displayed at the fore,
main, and mizen masts. A red ensign was also
hanging over her stern, and the union jack for-.
ward. She appeared a beautiful ship,,and is the
finest of the class ever built iin British docks, con-
structed purposely 'to commemorate the numerous
and, glorious victories achieved by the immortal
hero from whom she derives her name, and as a
tribute of national gratitude to the memory of de
parted bravery and merit.
The following are her dimensions:
Feet. Inches.


Length on the range of the lower gun
deck, from the rabbit of the stem to
the rabbit of the stern post
Length from the aft part of the fife-rail
to the fore part of the figure-head -
Length of the keel fi r tonnage
Breadth ihoulded -
Breadth extreme -
Breadth to the outside of the main


walls'
Depth in the hold
Perpendicular height from
side of the false keel to
part of the figure-head
Perpendicular height from
side of the false keel to
part of the taffrail
Length of the foremast
Diameter -
Length of the mainmast
Diameter -
Length of the maintop
Length of the main yard
Diameter -
Draft of water 'Afore
lAbalt
Burthen in tons
Establishment of men
Gun deck 32 32 prs.
Middle do. 34 24
Upper do. 34 18
Quarter do. 6 12
Forecastle 2 12


205

2~44
170
52
52


- 54


Af')f


the under-
the upper
the under-
the Upper


2617
875


4-94


55 2


65
118
3
127
3
77
109
2
24
25


10 car. 32 prs.
2 32


MUNGO PARK'S SON.-It was at Accra that Mr.
Thomas Park, son of the celebrated traveller, was
landed as a midshipman from the Sybille, with three
years' leave of of absence, to travel into the inte-
rior, and search for his father. He was a fine tall
Scotch lad, only nineteen years of age, and without
any knowledge of the world. His death has been
commonly ascribed to poison, administered to him
in vengeance for having imprudently ascended a
fetiphe or sacred tree; but the real cause was his
obstinacy in rejecting the advice of the resident
merchants of Accra. He lived there for three
months in the town, and though he had frequent
invitations to take up his quarters with the Euro-
peans, he preferred remaining in a hut with the
designing natives, who plundered him. There he
indulged in drinking sprits-married an Accra
wife by way of learning the language-though the
dialect at Accra is totally different from those in
the interior; and took long walks in the heat of
the day, with a view of hardening himself. The
consequence of these imprudences were, that when
he set out to cross the Volta his constitution was
completely broken; he was thin and weak; he
caught a fever after a few marches, and fell
another victim to African discovery.
[Capt. Jlexander's Voyage of Observation.
THE CROPS IN ALABAMA.-It gives us pleasure to
be able to state, says the Mobile Shipping List, of
the 14th instant, that from the best information we
can obtain, the present year's crop will prove unu-.
sually productive. Cotton is smaller than usual,
owing to the drought, and a rather backward spring,
but the weed looks healthy and vigorous, and full
of squares. On the black lands, which are pecu-
liarly adapted to dry seasons, the prospect is most
cheering. Corn looks uncommonly well, and we
are gratified to learn, that planters generally have
devoted a much greater portion.,of their industry
to this article the present season, and that the crop
promises to be an abundant one.

KINGCRAFT.-By an apparently trifling act of
policy, Louis Philippe is said to have secured the
favor of the populace during the three days. He
caused to be placed in a conspicuous situation in
the Palais Royal an attractive print, in which he
was represented as a schoolmaster busily occupied
with his scholars; the bait was swallowed. "Voila,"
said the gaping crowd, "here is the very man we
want; here is one of ourselves, a man of the people,
not ashamed to acknowledge that he made his
bread by honest industry, in place of living on our
pockets. This is the man we will have to reign
over us! vive Louis Philippe!"

THE FRENCH POST OFFICE.--From an official
document lately published at Paris, it appears that
there has been made within a few years in France
a great improvement in the despatch of the mails.
From a tabular statement of the length of time oc-
cupied in despatching the fifteen mails from Patis,
in the different dirdetions to the frontiers of the
kingdom, it appears that the aggregate length of
time, occupied in traversing all the lines, making
772 posts, was, in 1814, 910 hours, in 1829, 626
hours, and in 1836 only 501 hours-making a re-
duction in time since 1814, of 409 hours, or nearly
one-half, and an increase of speed, from a league
and two-thirds an hour, to three leagues and an
eighth. For example, the time occupied between
Paris and Havre is reduced from 38 hours to 14
hours; from Paris to Bordeaux is reduced from 86
to 44 hours; from Paris to Calais, from 38 to 18
hours. The greatest reform was introduced in
1818, by the adoption of the English form of stage
coaches, with four wheels, feur horses, and four
inside passengers, but great improvements have
been introduced since.
The fifteen mails leave Paris nearly at the same
moment, every evening, at 6 o'clock, carrying on
an average eighteen hundred packages. These
packages contain a daily average of 270,000 let-
ters, and 157,000 journals and printed documents.
The three estafette mails for Havre, Calais, a9d
Va leninnes-n xvhir,,h nesrvw no nflaosori r dnrt nfr


AVOWZON SALBS.
(CARRIAGES, HORSES, BAROUCHES.
) On Tuesday next, 25th inst. at 4 o'clock, p.
m. I shall sell at public auction, in front of my
store, for cash, to close a concern-six excellent
hack or work horses-i Barouche, nearly new-
2 Carriages, ahd 1 Chaise, all with harness com-
plete, together with Buckets, Blankets, Qurrying
Combs', Shovel aInd Fork, Wheelbarrow, and part
of a sack of Salt, &c. Persons wishing to supply
themselves with Hacks and Horses for the ap-
proaching session of Congress, have now a good op-
portunity of doing so. EDW. DYER,
July 21 Auctioneer.
SAll persons having claims against the late
firm of Messrs. Upton and Loomis, are requested
to present them to the subscriber for settlement.
EDW. DYER,
July 21 Auctioneer.


SALE OF LANDS IN ILLINOIS.-Under a
deep of trust executed by the late Edward W.
Duvall, on the 7th May, 1825, the subscriber will
offer for sale at public auction, at the Auction rooms
of Mr. Edward Dyer, in this city, on Saturday, the
9th of September next, at 4 o'clock, p. m. all the
right, title, and interest of the said Edward WV.
Duvall of, in, and to an undivided moiety of 115
quarter sections of land in Illinois, bought by him
in connection with Mr, John Karrich, of Baltimore,
and atro alt Mr. Duvall's right to several quarter
'sections of land in the said State of Illinois, stand-
ing in his own name.
The sale will be for cash, and the subscriber
will convey to the purchaser all the title given in
the aforesaid deed.
RD. SMITH, Trustee.
EDW. DYER, Auctioneer.
July 20-3tawtS&dts

A TWO STORY BRICK HOUSE ON i4th
STREET, AND LOTS.-,-Oni Wednesday;
26th instant, at 5 o'clock, p. m. t shall sell at pub-
lic auction, in front of the premises, one of the
two story brick dwellings in the row on 14th street,
between F and G streets, occupied by Mr. D.
McCurdy; a very comfortable dwelling for a small
family. An excellent opportunity for any person
wishing to make a moderate investment that will
yield a good interest.
After the above, lot No. 14, in square 216, front-
ing on Vermont avenue, northeast of St. Jphn's
church, adjoining the property orf C6ol'oiel Born-
ford; a beautiful site for a dwelling house. Lot
No. in square 555, adjoining Mr. John Hoover's,
contains 18,8471 feet. Terms at sale.
EDWARD DYER,
July 1-eo&ds u Auctioneer.
NTIQUARIAN DRAWING PAPER.-
WWhatman's English is just received for sale
by F. TAYLOR. Also, French vegetable tracing
Paper, of a large size; English letter and note Pa-
per; patent India Rubber, London pressed; Brook-
man and Langdon's London drawing Pencils, gra-
duated to every degree of hardness and shade' Eng-
lish Pounce, &c.
F. Taylor keeps a constant supply of every
article of Stationery, both European and Ameri-
can, in the selection of which the greatest care and
attention is bestowed; -for sale at the most reasona-
ble prices. July 21


G EORGETOWN COLLEGE, D. C.-The
annual commencement of Georgetow-i Col
lege will be held in the College Hall, oa Tuesday,
25th inst. at 9 o'clock, a. m.
The public are respectfully invited to attend.
July 15-dt


LAW PARTNERSHIP IN ILLINOIS.-The
undersigned, residing in Vandalia, Illinoi*
(the place at which are held the Supreme Court of
the State, the District and Circuit Courts of the
United States, and a State Circuit Court, have en-
tered into partnership with the view of entering
largely into the collection of debts. They promise
prompt attention to all business confided to them.
W. L. D. EWING.
LEVI DAVIS.
FERRIS FORMAN.
REFERENCES.
NEW YORK CITY-Gen. S. Swartwout, Col. Jas.
L. Curtis, Hon. C. C. Cambreleng, Dr. T. Barlow,
HIon. Mr. Hoffman, Willis Hall, esq. James Au-
chincloss, Charles Butler, esq. Richard Oakley, esq.
and Casey and Hubbard.
PHILADELPHIA-Capt. T. H. Stevens and Dr.
Granville S. Pattison.
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y.-Hon. N. P. Tallmadge
NEW YORK-Hon. S. Wright.
CONNECTICUT-Hon. Mr. Niles.
MAINE-Hon. J. Dana and Hon. Mr. Ruggles
LANCASTER, PA.-Hon. James Buchanan.
ILLINOIs-Hon. Jno. M. Robinson, Hon. Richd
M. Young, and Hon. Zadok Casey.
CHICAGO, ILL.-H. G. Hubbard and Co. and
Kinzie, Hunter and Co.
LOUISIANA-Hon Mr. Nicholas.
NEw ORLEANS-Col. Jas. W. Breedlove.
BALTIMORE-Hon. Mr. Howard.
MISSOURI--Hon. L. F. Linn and Hon. Thomai
H. Benton. July 18--ly
N 'OTICE.-The subscriber respectfully requests
all who are indebted to the lale firm of C
E. WASHINGTON and Co. to call and settle
their accounts. All accounts which remain unset-
tled on the 1st of August next, will be placed it
the hands of an officer for collection.
R. C. WASHINGTON,
Office on 9th st. adjoining Dr. Gunton's store,
July 8-dtAugl


FOR NORFOLK.
The steamer COLUMBIA,Capt.
SJames Mitchell, will leave
Washington for Norfolk, eve-
ry Monday and Friday, at 11
o'clock, a. m. and arrive at Nofolk ori the folibw-.
ing mornings, (Tiesdayrs arid Saturdaysj in tim e
for the Cars of the Portsmoiuth and Roirioke rili-
road, and the steamboats for Richmord. ,
Returning, she will leave Norfolk eyery Wednes1
day and Sunday, immediately after the arrival ft
the railroad cars, and the steamboats from Rich-
mond.. ,
The Columbia will land at Piney Point; and
take off passengers going and returning. ,
Passage and fare, $6. Going and returning Id;
July 13


t PLEASURE EXCURSION,
K for Piney Point, Old Point, .Norb-
Tuesdyo o forldik, and Cape Henry.-Steamer
shew 'lrtunt Columbia will leave Foulk r..
wharf on Mionday, 4th instant, at 11 o'clock, oW,
pleasure excursion for the above-named place
touching at Piney Point on her way down, and the
proceed direct to Norfolk. Leaving Norfolk o..
Tuesday forenoon for Old Point and Cape Henry,
she will return to Norfolk in the evening, where
she will remain until Wednesday, one o'clock,
which will enable passengers to visit the dry dock
and shipping. Passage and fare on this occasion
to Piney Point and returning, four dollars. Passage
and fare for the whole trip $8. There will be no
gambling allowed on board.
The MARINE BAND will be engaged on this
occasion. July 20
A LBANY ALE.-The subscriber has received
a large supply of the very celebrated Albany
Ale, the superiority of which he invites his chni
towers and the public, to test, at, the Unioin Hotel;
on F Street, between 13th and 14th streets. .
July 20-3t A. BUTLER.
SPLENDID LOTTERY OF BOOKS, &c. tb
" be drawn August 1st, 1837.
Scheme of valuable Real and Personal Estate.
To be disposed of by Lottery, under the superin-
tendence of Trustees appointed by the Legisla-
ture of Maryland.
Prize No. 1.-A tract of land called
"Morven," in Bedford county, Petin-
sylvania, containing as per survey;
424 acres, $2,544 00
Prize No. 2.-A tract of land called
Condy," in the same county, con-
tainingas per sLkvey, 401 acres 2,406 00
Prize No. 3.-A tract of land in Hun-
tington county, Pennsylvania, con-
taining as per survey, 291*: acres 1,747 00
Prize No. 4.-A tract of land, in same
county, containing as per survey, 411
acres 1644 590
Prize No. 5.-A magnificeiit, iritg in a
superb case, presented to the deceas-
ed by the EmperorAlexander of Rus-
sia, containing 175 diamonds, of va-
rious sizes, and a rich central orien-
tal topaz 1,000 00
Prize No. 6.-Three shares of Balti-
more and Ohio Railroad stock 225 00
Prize No. 7.-Three do do 225 00
Prize No. 8.-Portrait of Washington,
by the elder Peale 100 00
Prize No. 9.-A folio volume of splen-
did engravings, from the paintings ii
the Gall'ry of the Marquis of Staf-
ford, with descriptions i00 0O
Prizes No.. 10 to 304.-Containing
rich and valuable collection of books,
many of which are splendidly bound,
in every department of science, lite;-
Srature, the find arts, &c. more than
1200 volumes, of vacous prices,
from $75 the set to $2; all of which
are catalogued, numbered, carefully
S packed up, and insured .08s 50


FOR RENT, the dwelling house and grounds
of the late Lewis G. Davidson, Esq. situated
on the extreme right of the heights of Georgetown,
D. C. and comprising every advantage most desi-
rable in a private residence. The house is substan-
tially built of brick, and is of two stories, and spa-
cious, neatly furnished with garrets, having four
large rooms on each floor, with wing for kitchen,
servants' rooms, pantry, &c. Stables, carriage
house, cow house, and gardener's house, and other
offices, all of brick, are attached. The lot covers
an extent of twenty acres and more, which is now
under fine cultivation as garden, orchard, grass
lots, woodland, &c. The prospect from this resi-
dence south is perhaps more extensive than that of
any other part of the heights, while it embraces a
very beautiful northern view, of which all the others
are deprived.
For terms, apply to R. R. CRAWFORD, on
the premises. June 13-dtf
TREASURY DRAFTS OR WARRANTS.
T'%HE subscriber respectfully informs all persons
who have money to receive from the Govern
ment, that he is authorized to purchase Treasury
drafts or warrants, and that he will give the highest
premium therefore.
He will be found for the present at Fuller's
Hotel, from nine until three o'clock, where persons
are invited to call prior to drawing their warrants.
July 12-dtf CHARLES J. NOURSE.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
July 17, 1837.
P ROPOSALS will be received by the sub-
Sscriber until the 18th of August, for the
delivery at this Department of one hundred and
twenty cords of good Oak Wood, and thirty cords
of good Hickory Wood, tofle corded and measured


3,000 Tickets at $5 each, $15,000 00
N. B. The taxes are paid on all the tracts.
Plats of the real estate are deposited with the
trustees, to either of whom the friends of the esti.
mable and philanthropic deceased, and others; itia
clinked to promote the object, will please to address
themselves.
Ticketsimay be had of the various lottery offices
in Baltimore.
Orders from the country may be addressed to
COALE & CO.
Booksellers and Stationers, No. 6, N. Charles St.
This lottery will positively be dratn 6n the 19it,
2d, and 3d days of August.
The undersigned are fully sensible of the patient
indulgence accorded by the public to the long de-
layed drawing of this lottery, occasioned by the pe-
culiar difficulties of the times, and the desire of re-
alizing, as far as possible, the contemplated adyan-t-
tages of the privilege granted by the Stat'. Th'
privilege as to time does not expire until 'tih 17ft
of September; but, under existing circumstances,
the time is now owvclusively fixed on as above.
Tickets may be had of most of the Lottery Brokers
in the city, as also of Coale and Co. North Charles
street.
As many have declined to adventure in this lot-
tery because no day was fixed for its drawing, it is
now confidently hoped the tickets will be rapidly
disposed of, as there will be no further poto6ne:.
ment for a single day.


July ~--t


DAVID HOFFMAN,
JOHN G. PROUD,
Trustees for tary Ann Coal.


PROPOSALS FOR INDIAN RIFLES.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE INDIAN AFFAIRS, July 21,1887M S
S EALED PROPOSALS will be received at this
Office until the 12 o'clock, m. on the firs 'da,
of September next, for furnishing', fol the use of
emigrant Indians,
4,500 RIFLES.
The proposals must be endorsed Proposals for
furnishing Indian Rifles," and must be accompa-
nied by a pattern gan of each kind proposed to be
furnished.
The rifles wanted are such as have heretofore
been furnished to emigrating Indians. They may
be described, in general terms, as carrying balls of
which a pound of lead will make not less than forty.
five, nor more than one hundred, and must be of .
lenrgth and weight corresponding properly With thi
size of the ball. Each gun is to be acoiipanied by
moulds, wiper, and such other implements as are
necessary to make a complete equipment.
Each rifle to be enclosed in a first rate woollen
cover, setlurely packed in strong boxes, with not
1ess than twenty, nor more than twenty-five in each
box.
One third to be delivered in six, one third in
nine, and the remaining third in twelve months
from the day of closing the contract They fiuA
be delivered in New York, Philadelphia, or Balti-
more, or at such othet city or town as may
be determined on by this office; not to be, how-
ever at a greater or more expensive distance from
the contractor than the most distant of the above
named cities. All expenses of boxing, drayage,
storage, &c. until delivered as above to an autho-
rized agent of the Government at such point in the
designated city or town as may be hereafter deter-
mined on by this office, and all expenses of inspec-
tion, proof, &c. to be borne by'the contractor.
Seventy-five nor .ent oF tha e ... A... ---


S


s
1






r1
S.


I








THE GLOBE.
'SUPREMACY OF THE LAWS AND THE CONSTITUTION."

CITY dF WASHINGTON.
SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 22, i837;

Etrfat frorm the Londoin tankers' Circular of Jan. 27.
," FROM ITS NATURE, THE INFLUENCE OF A BANK
MUST BE ALLIED TO THE ARISTOCRACY OF WEALTH,
ANb NOT TO THE DEMOCRACY OF NUMBERS; AND
THIS IS MORE ESPECIArLL THE CASE WITH GREAT
CHARTERED BANKS HAVING IMMENSE POWER. THE
LATE BANK OF THE UNITED STATES WAS ONE OF THIS
DESCRIPTION, AND ITS POLITICAL INFLUENCE WAS PRO-
DIGIOUS."
/ APPOINTMENT BY.THE PRESIDENT.
I BNNYAIrN RusiHr, to be Secretary of the Legation
the United States, near His Britanni6 Majesty.

S GLANCES AT THE TIMES.
Miss Martineau, in her recently published work
on this country, remarks, that the mobs in the
United States are generally composed of gentlemen,
and that gentlemen are the encouragers and sup-
porters of mob law. She refers to a case in point;
a case of riot and outrage at the East. The news-
papers teemed with accounts of the disturbance;
but the lady tourist was anxious to learn more, and
she addressed inquiries to all who she supposed
might be informed upon the subject. The answer
invariably was, ", There was no riot) for the parties
Engaged in the affair were gentlemen." If she per-
sisted in her inquiries, and asked whether the
newspaper accounts were or were not exaggerated,
she uniformly received a similar reply-" It was a
small matter;" there was not much harm done;
bof course there could not be, because the parties
Engaged in the affair were gentlemen, men of the
highest respectability." Her mouth was closed.
he was" either compelled to disbelieve ier gentle-
manly and respectable informants, or else she was
bound to come to the conclusion that mobs in the
United States are generally composed of gentlemen.
She has taken her informants at their words, and
has come to the latter conclusion. They should be
* the last persons in the world, to question the correct-
ness of her decision, for if it is impugned, it must
be at the expense of their veracity.
It needed nilot; however the testimony of Miss
MrtiiheaU, to show that mobs, and incitements to
Smobs, are by no means confined to the ignorant
and the worthless. Some slight spark of mob spi-
rit was struck out not very many weeks ago in New
York, when the honeyed expressions of tyrant, dic-
tator, &c. were made use of in speaking of the
President; and there was a slight approximation
to mob rule in the recommendation that a snug
ititle committee of tern thousand should be de-
p'atchetd io Washington, for the purpose of forcing
the Executive to pursue a course which a few gen-
tlemien had determined was well enough for the
country at large, and the very best thing in the
-world for their own private interests. All this,
however, was gentlemanly in the highest degree.
To be sure, the language was a little rough; there
-*ere sihndry dark givijigs but about personal vio-
ence; it was openly asserted by the most gentle-
manly of men, that if the President were in the
city his life would not be in safety. But after all,
what was it but a slighlit exuberance of feeling on
'the part of certain gentlemen? No harm came of
it' no harm could come of it, and there was
nothing improper about it; for, like the mob re-
ferred to by Miss Martineau, the parties concerned
were all perfect gentlemen.
When, shortly after this grand demonstration,
there was a show of resistance to the laws in a
"sister city, and threats were muttered about "Bos-
ton tea parties," the persons who displayed the
most valor were of the same class as that referred
to by Miss Martineau. They would not engage in
a riot or a mob for the world; for mobs and riots are
got up by the low and the vile. True it is, they
ktlreatkeied the Government fior refusing to violate
the laws; they threatened public officers for persist-
ing in administering the laws which they were
sworn to maintain; and their whole course was
marked by bullying and bravado. They were de-
termined to browbeat the Government into a viola-


tion of the law, to suit their personal convenience.
,'hey did hot quite come to overt acts, albeit they
threatened most lustily, and swore more terribly
than did the famous army in Flanders. Had the
worst come to the worst-had they carried their
threats into execution, torn down the Post Office,
and committed other acts of outrage-would they
have acknowledged that they had been engaged in
a riot or a mob? Oh no! It would have been neither
A ribot nbt h mob, fot the parties engaged iii it would
have been the most gentlemanly and respectable of
men.
We marvel that Miss Martineau, while upon the
subject of gentlemanly mobs, did not observe that
these are no more loud mouthed sticklers for the
Constitution and the laws, than those self-same
persons who form their judgment of mobs and
riots, not by the acts of outrage committed, but by
the character of the persons engaged in the distur-
bance,. it would seem a strange anomaly, that
these same instigators and' abettors of mobs, as
Miss Martineau describes them, should claim to be
the special friends and conservators of order, and
the special supporters of the Constitution and the
laws. They have worked themselves into an agony
of grief, and wept bitter tears over the ruins of the
Constitution and tht violated laws, but their sorrow
hS scarce had a resting spell, before they have
broken forth into a whirlwind of passion, and
vented threats and imprecations almost too terrible
to be repeated, on the heads of the President and
his advisers, because they persisted in turning a
deaf ear to the very reasonable request that the
laws of the land should be trodden under foot, for
no other purpose then that of making certain
persons easy in the way of small change. The
request was almost as comprehensive, and quite as
reasonable, as the traver of the lover, that time


BANK8I
We find it impossible, in the management of a
newspaper devoted to the general interests of the
people, to suit the taste of the various branches of
the whig party. When the banks throughout the
country committed a manifest arid flagrant outrage
upon the rights and interests of the industrious and
producing classes of the community, by at voluntary
breach of the plainest moral duty-the redemption
of ihe currency which they had issued for their own
profit-we expressed ourselves in strong terms of
reprobation of their violation of good faith, and
suggested the necessity of providing against the in-
jurious consequences to the public service and upon
the national faith, by the future recurrence of such
a state of things, by effecting a total separation
of the fiscal affairs of the Government from all
dependence upon ,the success of the private specu-
lations of individuals. In reply to the statements
of the oppositionl, that the doctrines of the late
head of the Executive Government, with regard to
the superior security and utility of a specie cur-
rency, had EXPLODED," we asserted that it was
the paper system that had exploded, by being in-
flated through the gambling speculations of its
managers, and that the only safe and prudent
course was to adhere, in the transactions of the
Government, to the only currency recognized in the
Constitution which established it.
This view of the question, which arose upon
the fancied verification of the prediction of Mr.
Webster, that the banks Wotuld "shut up the Trea-
sury," and in the midst of the universal triumph of
the whig newspapers at the bankruptcy of the
Treasury," through the stoppage of the banks and the
merchants, every day's experience serves to corrobo-
rate as proper and wise, in order effectually to defeat
the success of such predicted calamities. We are con-
vinced that reflection and investigation will satisfy
every citizen, who has no sinister interest in the use
bf ihe public tri0oiey for promoting his private ad-
vantage, that the separation of the fls al affairs of
the public Treasury from the individual transac-
tions of private corporations, is indispensable to the
public welfare and security.
We are not aware that this proposition involves
the destruction of these corporations. They are
neither assailed nor injured by it. Under proper
restrictions and limitations, they are doubtless use-
ful to the merchants, arid sometimes to the States.
We have no wish, and have never expressed a desire,
to raise a crusade against them. If they will dis-
charge their duties faithfully to those who have re-
lied upon their good faith, they will probably be
both useful and profitable to the States and to the
citizens, who have created them for their own be-
nefit.
We have been charged in various whig organs
with advbocating inconsistent doctrines on this sub-
jeit. The IntelligenIer of this morning states that
we have made an "explicit recantation of all the
menaces which have been thrown out Agaiti tihe
banks, and an admission of all that we (the editors
of the Intelligencer) and others have ever main-
tained on the subject." As to menaces, the readers
of the Globe will judge whether any have been
made in the course of the remarks upon the con-
duct of the banks which our duty to the public


called for.
the-Biddle


As to an admission of the d66 tnrs of
school, if they are to be found in the


expression of our views on this subject, we have
greatly misunderstood the language employed.

SPECIE AND THE TREASURY.
The friends of the United States Bank of Penn-
sylvania do not deny the fact that it issues the bills
of the old bank; but say that the Government or
the Treasury is equally culpable in demanding spe-
cie of their debtors, and riot paying its creditors in
the same. They forget that the banks have cheated
both the Government and people by locking up
their vaults.-Evening Post.
NOTE BY THE GLOBE.-They forget likewise that
the Treasury, in fact, pays specie in a great many
cases and we are told, that since the suspension of
specie payments, it has Paid outing mniy thousands
dollars in specie more than it has since collected,
having fortunately been able to resort to the mint
for a part of what was wisely and safely on depo-
site there.

PERU-BOLIVIAN CONFEDERATION.
The subjoined documents relating to the recogni-
tion of JAMES B. THORNTON, our Charge d'Affaires
near the Government of Peru, are taken from the
Lima Eco del Norte of the 19th April, 1837:
General Secretaryship of his Excellency, the Supreme
Protector:
To the honorable Secretary General of the Supreme
Protector, charged with the direction of the Fo-
reign Relations of the Peru-Bolivian Confedera-
tion :
SIR: Having been appointed by the President of
the United States Chare d'Affaires near the Go-
vernment of the Republic of Peru, and having ar-
rived at Lima with the object of entering upon the
duties of that office; being informed by the resi-
dent authorities, and by my predecessor, Mr. LAR-
NED, that my credentials are to be sent to this De-
partment, I take the liberty of inclosing them, ho-
ping that measures may be taken to accredit me
as Charge d'Affaires from the United States near this
Government, or that I miiay be informed of any
other step necessary to be taken, and that the time,
manner, and place may be indicated to me, that
I may be permitted to produce other credentials in
my possession, if necessary.
I have the honor to be, sir, with sentiments of
high consideration and esteem, your obedient ser-
vant, JAMES B. THORNTON.
LIMA, Feb. 7, 1837.

To the Minister of Poreign Relations of the Republic
of Peru.
SIR: The President of the United States, having
thought fit to appoint JAMES B. THORNTON Charge
d'Affaires near the Government of the Republic of
Peru, I have the honor to announce this appoint-
ment to your Excellency, asking that full credit may
be given to his representations. You are aware of
the interest taken by our Republic in the well being
and success of the Republic of Peru, our strong
desire to cultivate and deserve its friendship, by
all the good offices that may add to its pros-
perity, and my zeal in promoting these objects in
any thing that relates to my situation. I doubt not


the eetretary oft Foreign Relations of the United
States.
SThe undersigned has the honor of presenting to
the Charge d'Affaires the expression of his most
distinguished consideration.
In the absence of the Secretary General:
JOSE MANUEL LOZA.
To the C'ARG'E .P'AFFAtRES
of the United States of .'mnerica.

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN RELATiONS;'
Protectoral Palace, March 16, 1837.
The undersigned, Secretary General of his excel-
lency, the President of Bolivia, Supreme Protector
of the States of North and South Peru, charged
with the direction of the foreign relations of the
three States forming the Peru-Bolivian. Confedera-
tiopa, has had the honor of receiving the attentive
communication of the Minister of Foreitn Rela-
tions of the Republic of the United States, under
date of the 21st of July, in which he is pleased to
communicate that the President of said Republic
has appointed Mr. James B. Thornton Charge
d'Affaires near the Government of the Republic of
Peru; at the same time giving him necessary cre-
dentials for the exercise of the functions belong-
ing to his office; and adding the expression of the
sincere interest entertained by the Republic of the
United States towards that of Peru, and the desire
of cultivating her friendship, and of deserving it
by all the good offices that may advance her inte-
rests.
The Minister of State must be aware of the al-
terations which the ancient Republic of Peru has
undergone, now divided by the unanimous consent
of its people and by the solemn vote of its legisla-
tive assemblies, into two States, which form a con-
federated nation with the Republic of Bolivia. As
a consequence of this change, the President of Bo-
livia, charged with the executive power over the
States into which Peru was divided, having ap-
pointed .proper persons for the exercise of adminis-
trative functions during his absence, has reserved
to himself the direction of the foreign relations of
the three States which recognize hiffi as Chief; and,
being now absent from Peru, has ordered the Pre-
sident of the Council of the Government of Lima
(in which capital Mr. Thornton was presented) to
receive him in his official character, at the same
time issuing a decree in which he is recognized as
Charge d'Affaires from the United States of Ame-
rica near the States which compose the Peru-
Bolivian, Confederation, securing to him all the
prerogai.ves 6h eh belong to his official character.
His Excellency has; a aiMe game, time, directed
the undersigned te express to his ]xcellency the
President of the United States, his gratification for
the lively interest taken by him in the fortunes of
this country, whose good and friendly relations
with the illustrious people of North America he
has endeavored, and will endeavor, to cultivate,
as has been recently shown by the treaty concluded
between the two Governments on the invitation of
the, accfedited agent of the United States.
His EIcelleriic. pays a sacred debt, in acknow-
ledging, in an authentic fortr;, tf iht< Government of
the United States, that Samuel Lamrned, the last
Charge d'Affaires near the Government of Peru,
has fulfilled, with the most laudable ability, the
functions with which he has been invested; and that
he carries with him, on his return to the country of
his birth, the strongest esteem and the most sincere
affection of the Government, and of the inhabitants
of the Confederation.
The undersigned hopes that the minister ad-
dressed w:ll make known to the President of the
United States thigh testimonial of the friendship and
gratitude which Mr. Larned has secured to him-
self iti the disCharge of his duties.
The undersigned has the honor to salute the Mi-
nister of Foreign Relations with the highest consi-
derations of his esteem.
In the absence of the Secretary General:
JOSE MANUEL LOZA.

PALACE OF THE GOVERNMENT,
March 16, 1837.
Jamet B: Thornton, having been presented to
the Minister Of For'ein Rfelations, and accredited
as Charge d'Aftaires from hi Go0vernment near the
Republic of Peru, and since his appoirtmteat the
form of government of this State having been
altered, the foreign relations of which, as well as
those of the Republic of Bolivia and of the State of
South Peru, are under the direction of his Excel-
lency the President of Bolivia; Supreme Protector
of the States of North and South Peru, his Excel-
lency has resolved that the above named Jaimies B.
Thornton be received and recognized as Charge
d'Affaires of the Government of the United States
near the States which compose the Peru-Bolivian
Confederacy, and that a*t such, all the prerogatives
that appertain to his situation be conceded and se-
cured to him.
In the absence of the Secretary General:
JOSE MANUEL LOZA.

PRAOTECTORAL PALACE OP AYACUCHO,
March 26, 1837.
His Excellency the Supreme PrOtector of the
States of North and South Peru, charged With the di-
rection of the foreign relations of the Confederation
of the Peru-Bolivian States, has resolved, that the


term of eight months granted to vessels coming from
the ports of the United States as a protection from
being considered contraband to such of them as
within the said period may present themselves at
the ports of the 6tbtffederation, after having touched
at th6se of Chili, be extended to ten months, has
been extended te vessels from the piotrn of Asia,
Africa and Europe, during the present war.
In the absence of the Secretary General:
JOSE MANUEL LOZA.

DISTRESSING NEWS FROM CENTRAL AMERICA.-A
letter received by a merchant in this city from his
correspondent at St. Juan, Central America, of the
23d ultimo, contains distressing intelligence from
that country. The cholera was raging to a fright-
ful extent on the west coast. Six hundred had died
of that dreadful disease between the 4th and 30th
of May.-Balt. Gas.

HORRIBLE DEATH OF A STATE CRIMINAL AT AL-
GIERS.-At the outside of that dreadful gate, as
late as 1813, a friend of mine, too authentic an in-
formant, saw a State criminal chained to a post to
be starved alive. The sufferer was a florid, stout
man, on the first day of his punishment, and he
bore the pangs of famine for several days with
heroic fortitude; but on the ninth day he was
screaming for water to quench his thirst, and died
with his bones coming through his skin.
[Campbell's Letters from the South.

METALLIC BASIS.-Mr. Biddle, on board the
steamboat the other day, gave as a toast-" Rail-
roads, the best metallic basis of circulation." It is
well enough, perhaps, for him to hold out this idea
when he has but little metallic basis for his circula-
tion; but we strongly suspect that the farmers, me-
chanics, and laboring men, much as they may be
in favor of railroads, will prefer gold and silver for
a metallic basis for circulation.-Balt. Republican.

ABOLITION INSOLENCE.-We find in the Boston
Transcript an account of a most disgraceful pro-
ceeding on the part of those unprincipled agitators,
whT nr ia.A nmctsint~iv endavrimmnnc to\ excite. thenpno .~^\


.OO... iA.02._J.. ._.iIi-.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GLOBE.
MR. EDITOR: I have just seen your comment ou
my last letter, and have otily time to say a word in
explanation before the mail closes, Your observa-
tion about strong personal denunciations rtlust, I
suppose, allude to my remarks upon the case of the
bank in Massachusetts. I have but to say, then,
that the accusation, a part of which I copied, is ex-
tracted from Mr. Gue's" b6ok 6n b anking, which
has been published some years, an( ,f which' you
yourself announced a new edition, the other da~y,
with unqualified praise. My edition is actually
stereotyped, and I think you will therefore agree
with me1 that if men will permit such grave charges
against the&, -Tot only to be printed for years with-
out contradiction, but to be' even stereotyped, they
must not complain. If you think ih'af my attack
on the president of the Bank of the United Slate-
has been 0too violent, I will merely observe that
your paper of the same day contains an extract
from the Providence Journal, I think, a hundred
times moree offensive, not to speak of other frequent
denunciations'. Now I make it a point to avoid
personalities. I write not against Mti Biddle, but
against the president of the United State"., ahnk.
I have nothing to do with Mr. Biddle's private cha-
racter, which, as far as I caa learn, is one of un-
questioned and unquestionable honor and probity.
But shall this man be permitted to assume a ha-
bitual tone of contempt towards the Government
of the people; shall he be allowed to talk of it pub-
licly as a vulgar tyranny or despotism; shall he be
suffered, in an oration delivered before persons of
every political 6pini6n, and on' a gaole6iii occasion,
to stigmatise the democratic representatives as ft-
gitivys fro6m the penitentiary," and must I not have
the poor privilel ti' oken my mouth by way of re-
tort, in terms much mre6. zilda and. courteous?
With regard to the views, which you admit to' halve
great truth and power, but "the main drift of
which" you deprecate, "under the circumstances of
the times," I have but to say that they are the re-
sult of much thought and observation, and held
with the ptofotmdest conviction. So solemnly am
I impressed with their truths and their inexpressible
moment, that I would, at afny time, readily lay
down my life rather than renounce them; dy, atrtd
go to the sacrifice, too, as a bridegroom to the altar.
Whatever may be my opinion, however, about the
nature and immunity of charters, I agree with you
that no injustice;, especially of a sudden character)
should be done to existing institutions. I like the
English cttstom, if that respect, which always
spares existing incimmbents, I concur with you,
also, that this subject must b left to the gradual
reform of the States.
Whether, then, to come to a close, I am sup-
ported by others, or left alone in these opinions, it
concerns me little. My highest pride, were, in the
noble language of Milton, "through the chance of
good or of evil report, to be the SOLE ADVO-
CATE OF A DISCOUNTENANCED TRUTH."
A YEOMAN.


DEPARTMENT of" S'ATE,
Washington, July 21, 1837.
The following is a translation of a new decree
for export duty which will be levied on all vessels
entering the ports of Venezuela from and after the
1st of July, 1837, dated the 13th of May last, and
transmitted to the Department of State by the United
States Consul at La Guayra:
.Vew Tariff of Duties, which, from and after the 1st
of July next, must be paid in all the ports of Vene-
zuela, according to tariff of 16th of May, 1836, and
the new decree of 13th of May, 1837, for a subsi-
diary contribution, to wit:
Tariff. Subsidiary. Total.
Cotton will pay, per quintal, 0 60 cts. 60 cts.
Ihdigo per lb. 1 4 5
Asses per head, 150 0 150
Horses 300 500 800
Cocoa per quintal, 70 5 75
Coffee 30 30 60
Raw hides each 18 7 25
All other skins, (raw,) each, 1 A 1i
Horned caule,(cows, oxen, &c.)
each 75 150 225
Copper ore, per quintal 25 15 40
Mules, per head, 400 200 600
Gold, in any and every form,
2 per cent.
"Dye'woods, per ton 50 0 50
Silver in every form, 2 per ct.


Bark, per lb. 0 4
Tobacco, in leaf, (best,)per b. 1 0 1
All other kinds of tobacco, A 0 1
Mares, each 300 500 800
Sarsaparilla, per quintal 25 25 50
The above duties are payable in cash, (export
duty of 1834,) allowance for tare is 12 per cent. on
indigo packed in skins, and 2 lbs. per bag of either
coffee or cocoa.
By a decee bearing date of 5th May, 1837, all
vessels in ballast entering the Orinoco for the pur-
pose of exporting oxen, &c. are released from the
necessity of proceeding up to Angostura for a
clearance.

"T NATIONAL TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY.
STo Journeymen Printers throughout the
United States. Notice is hereby given, that the
Delegates composing the above institution, will
hold their first meeting in the city of New York, on
the first Monday of September next, (1837.)
From information already received from various
parts of the country, the undersigned cannot but ex-
press his great gratification at the cheering pros-
pect afforded, of the Profession being generally re-
presented. Our brethren are alive to the subject
in New Orleans, Mobile, Natchez, Nashville, Lex-
ington, Ky. Jackson, Mississippi, Washington, D.
C. Harrisburg, Penn. Cincinnati, Ohio, Richmond,
Va. Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York, from
all of which places delegates will be present, and
no doubt from many others, of which, as yet, no
advices have come to hand.
It is earnestly hoped that a matter of so much
importance to the Craft, will not be neglected in
any city, town, or village of the land, but that the
east, the west, the north and the south will cordi-
ally join the praisworthy effort to bind together the
interests and feelings, and elevate the character and
standing of the Profession.
CHARLES A. DAVIS, Cor. Sec.
?^ The members of the Columbia Typogra-
phical Society will bear in mind that delegates to
the National Typographical Convention, to be held
in New York, will be elected at the meeting to take
place on the first Saturday in August.
T-11- 00 T A 19'TFFrtTf-lrVm 0-i.


BT TEB EXPRESS MCArli
The New Orleans Bee of July 14th says: "For
the information of our absent fellow-citizens,
we state that notwithstanding the oppressive
heat, the city is healthy, but all kinds of
business completely at a stand. Within a few
days past, the Mississippi has taken a sudden and
rapid rise. The scarcity of money has had no
effect in lowering the price Of provisions and the
other necessaries of life, which continue higl, and
with no prospect of falling."

Fioni the Charleston Patriot of July 19.
J.9ORIDA.
The Tallahassee J/aidian 6d the 8th instant,
has the following:
An express from San Pedro arrived last eken.-,
ing with despatches to the Governor, from Captaini
R. D. Bradley, commanding the Madison county
troops giving an account of a spirited scout made
b a ptrty under his command, from the 29th ult.
to the 8d instr.in pursuit of a band of Indians which
had crossed the iartee, and been plundering the
plantations and stock 4of the settlers in Madison.
The Indians were closely trailed ace'oss the Stiwan-
nee several miles, and three different patfies at-
tacked. In every instance the Floridians whipped
them, and forced them to fly to the hammocks.
Captain B. recovered considerable of the plundered
property, retook several cattle, mules, &c. and cap-
tured several ponies and packs. Two Indians were
killed arid scalped, andit is known several others
were severely Woti;ied. The notorious and cruel
chief John Hicks, the min6dier'6f &rq. Wallace
and her family, it is thought, has ehi'sj'ustf fate.
Several of the party fired upon and badly w#Uide'd
an Indian greatly resembling him, but he escaped
into a hammock, and could not be found. Fortu-
nately, none of Capt. B's command received inju-
ry from the Indian rifle, although Mr. A. Goodwin
had his horse shot from under him, and was hurt
by his fall. Capt. B. and his officers and men are
ciritlied tp great credit for their gallantry, intrepi-
dity, an activity.
Capt. Bradley wtite- that there appears tf o b,
"considerable signs of Iditang' 6n th-e Suwannee,
and trails where they have bte6i driving cattle
rieently towards the upper part of the Su4 anriee
i-Tarnm6ock and Deadman's Bay." The express
states that alt the powder horns taken from the In-
dians, and they wei6 several, were full of the finest
glazed fresh powder. None 6T' the new levies have
got into the field as yet, although paft of them are
on their march; and the whole force now on the
frontier this side of the Suwannee, is but eigh'tyI
men. The settlers anticipate constant attacks all
this summer and fall from predatory bands; but as
they are now prepared, they are not alarmed."

PENSACOLA, July 11.
The United States revenue ctfter Jefferson, W.
Foster, Esq. Commander, arrived hete oft Stnday
last, in ten days from Rio Del Norte and Bras6s,
St. Jago (Mexico.) The Government brig, Gen.
Urrea, was formally restored, and delivered by
Capt. Crabb of the Vandalia, to an agent, (Captain
of the port,) appointed by Gen. Filosola, on the
29th ult. and salutes exchanged; immediately after
*ihichi the Vandalia, and revenue cutter Dexter.
sailed to the southward for Tampico and Vera
Cruz, and thie Jefferson cutter for this port, with
despatches from Mr. Greenhow for our Govern
ment. The Commodore had left Brasses for those
ports about the 18th.
Lieutenant Taylor, late midshipman in the United
States navy, and Lieutenant in the Independence,
remained a prisoner on parole at Matamoras.
Two schooners from New Orleans were dis-
charging their cargoes outside at Rio Del Norte,
net having water to eater, and several vessels de-
tained inside for the same cause.
Lieutenant J. W. Moore and Assistant Surgeon
Haslet of the United States navy, came passengers
in the Jefferson.
Two other Mexican brigs of war, of sixteen and
fourteen guns, were cruizing off the coast, and in
sight of our vessels for two days, but no communi-
cation was had with them. It was said they were
from Vera Cruz, with $150,000 for the troops
of Gen. Filosola, at Metamoras.
The country was said to be in a very unsettled
state, and murder and robberies frequent on the
road to Metamoras.

NAVY SLOP CLOTHING FOR THE YEAR 1838.

NAVY COMMISSIONERS' OFFICE,
July 22, 1837. 5
k1 EALED PROPOSALS, endorsed "Proposals
Li for Slop Clothing," will be received at this
office until three o'clock, p. m. of the 1st Septem-
ber next, for furnishing and delivering at each of
the nevy yards at Charlestown, Massachusetts,
Brooklyn, New York, and Gosport, Virginia, the
following articles, viz:
600 pea jackets, 1,600 blue cloth jackets, 2,000
pairs blue cloth trowsers, 2,000 duck frocks, 1,600
duck trowsers, 2,000 white flannel shirts, 2,000
white flannel long drawers, 2,500 black silk neck
handkerchiefs, 2,000 pairs sewed leather shoes.


1,600 pairs of woollen stockings, 2,000 pairs of
woollen socks.
All the articles are to be fully equal in quality
and workmanship to the samples which are depos-
ited at all the different navy yards, and at Balti-
more. Schedules showing the sizes of the pea and
other jackets, trowsers, drawers, frocks and shirts,
and the numbers which will be required of each
size, are also deposited at each of the said navy
yards, and at Baltimore, for the information of per-
sons who may wish to make proposals.
All the said articles of Slop Clothing must be
subjected to such inspection and survey as the
Commissioners of the Navy shall direct, by instruc-
tions to the commanding officers of the respective
navy yards of delivery, and no portion of the
said Slop Clothing will be received that is not fully
equal to the standard samples or patterns, and does
not conform in all other respects to the stipulations
and provisions of the contracts to be made.
The prices to be asked for the several denomina-
tions of articles enumerated, must be mean or
average prices, without regard to the sizes, and
must be calculated to cover every expense attend-
ing the fulfilment of the contracts until the articles
have passed inspection, been approved, and re-
ceived, including the necessary metal naval but-
tons.
Bonds in one-third the amount of the respective
contracts will be required, and ten per centum in
addition will be withheld from the amount of each
payment to be made, as collateral security for the
due and faithful performance of the respective
contracts, which will, on no account, be paid until
the contracts are complied with in all respects; and
is to be forfeited to the use and benefit of the
United States, in the event of failures to complete
the deliveries within the prescribed periods. After
deducting ten per centum, payment will be made by
the United States within thirty days after the said
slop clothing shall have been inspected and re-
ceived, and bills for the same, approved by the
commandants of the respective navy yards, accord-
ing to the terms of the contracts.
The silk handkerchiefs must be fully equal to
the samples, in size, quality, and weight. The
stockings. socks and shoes must be of assorted


LIVE OAK TIMBER.

NAVY COMMISSIONERS' OFFmCE,
July 22, 1837.
EALED PROPOSALS will be received at this
Office until 3 o'clock, p. m. of the 2d Septem-
ber next, for the supply of Live Oak Timber as
follows:
CLASS No. 1.-For the frame timber, beam, and
keelson pieces, and for the promiscuous timber
which may be directed, for one ship of the line,
one frigate, first class, and one sloop of war, large
class; to be delivered at the navy yard near Ports-
mouth, N. H.
CLASS No. 2.-For the frame timber, beam, and
keelson pieces, and for the promiscous timber
which may be directed, for one sloop of war, small
class, and one smaller vessel; to be delivered at the
navy yard near Portsmouth, N. H. I
CLAss No. 3.-For the frame timber, beam, and
keelson pieces, and aor the promiscuous timber,
which may be directed, for one ship of the line,
one frigate, first eflass, and one steamer, to be de-
livered at the navy yard. Charlestown, Massachu-
setts.
CLASS No. 4.-For the frame timber, beam, and
keelson pieces, and for the promiscuous timber,
which may be directed for two steamers, two sloops
of war, small class, and one smaller vessel to be de-
livered, at the navy yard, Philadelphia.
CLASS No. 5.-For the frame timber, beam, and
keelson pieces, and for the promiscuous timber,
which may be directed, for one sloop of war,
small class, and for the lefidenr timber for a frame
of one sloop of war, large class, about 5,000 feet, to
be delivered at the navy yard, Washington, Dis-
trict of Columbia.
The quantities and dimensions of the promiscu-
ous timber for each vessel, of each class, is as fol-
rI'ows:
Foft th'e ship of the line, 6,000 cubic feet, which
must be sided 15 inches, and be from 12 to 20 feet
in length; six of the longest pieces to side 22 inches.
For each frigate 3,000 ctbic feet, which must be
sided fifteen inches, and be from twelve to twenty
feet long; six of the longest pieces to i nineteen
inches.
For each sloop of war 1500 cubic feet, which
mntt be sided twelve inches, and be from twelve to
eighteent feet long; six of the longest pieces to side
sixteen inches.
i For each steamer 1500 cubic feet, which must
be sided fifteen inches,and be from twelve to eighteen
feet ioitgf s6i of the longest pieces to side sixteen
inches.
For each small vessel 800 cubic feet, which must
be sided eight inches, and be from ten to sixteen
feet long; six of the longest piecs to side twelv
ard a half inches.
A pitrp of the promiscuous timber may be got to
larger dinzi'skms, provided the pieces will answer
for replacing defective hawse pieces, transoms,
breast hooks, or otfiheY valuable pieces.
Separate offers must te made for each of the
preceding numbers, and each offer must embrace
all the timber that is called for, by dhe number to
which it refers; the prices asked per cubic foot
must be stated separately for each and every class
of vessels ermbiaeed in the offer, and for the pro-
miscuous timber of eaeb class separately from the
other; all of which other i considered moulded
timber.
Of classes numbers one and three, at least one-
fourth of the whole quantity of timber, comprising
a fair proportion of the most valuable pieces, must
be delivered on or before the last day of March,
1839; one-half of the remainder on or before the
last day of March, 1840; and the whole on or be-
fore the last day of March, 1841. And of classes
number two, number four, and number five, one-
half must be delivered on or before the last day
of March, 1838, and the whole on or before the last
day of March, 1839. And if the above proportions
shall not be delivered at the respective times above
specified, the Commissioners of the Navy reserve to
themselves the right of cancelling any contract, in
the execution of which such failure may occur, and
of entering into new contracts, holding the ori-
ginal contractors and their sureties liable for any
excess of cost, and other damages which may be
incurred.
The said Live Oak Timber must have grown
within twenty-five miles of the seaboard, (which
must be proven to the satisfaction of the respective
commandants,) must be got out by the moulds and
written directions, and specifications of dimensions,
&c. which will be furnished to the contractors for
their government, and must be free from all injuries
and defects, which may impair the good quality
of the said timber, for the purposes for which it
is required by contract, and be in all respects sa-
tisfactory to the commandants of the respective
navy yards where it is delivered.
Bonds, with two good and responsible sureties,
in the amount of one-third of the estimated value
of the timber to be furnished under therespeetive
contracts, will be required; and as collateral secu-
rity for the faithful compliance with the terms,
stipulations, and conditions of the said contracts,
ten per centum will be reserved from the actual
amount of each payment which may be made from
time to time, within thirty days after bills shall be


duly approved and presented to the navy agent, un-
til the said contracts are completed and closed;
which reservations, respectively, will be forfeited
to the use and benefit of the United States in the
event of failures to deliver the timber within the
respective periods prescribed.
The moulds will be furnished to the contractors
at one of the navy yards, Brooklyn, Gosport, or
Philadelphia.
To be published twice a week in the Globe,
National Intelligencer, Army and Navy Chronicle,
Eastern Argus, New Hampshire Gazette, Boston
Morning Post, and Commercial Gazette, New
York Times, New York Evening Post, Trenton
Emporium, Pennsylvanian, American Sentinel,
Richmond Enquirer, Norfolk Herald, Raleigh
Star, Charleston Patriot, Georgian, Pensacola
Gazette, Louisiana Advertiser, and Mobile Re-
gister. July 22


NOTICE.-By virtue of a writ of ft. fa. issued
by C. T. Ceote, Esq. one of the Justices of
the Peace for Washington county, D. C. and to
me directed, I shall expose to public sale, to the
highest bidder, for cash, the following property, to
wit: One Mantel Clock, four Kegs and contents,
five Barrels and contents, eleven Decanters, eight
Tumblers, one Tin Drainer, one Pitcher, eight
Benches, one pair Brass Andirons, one Mahogany
Breakfast Table, one Looking Glass, four old
Brass Candlesticks, three old Waiters, half barrel
of Herrings, one barrel of salt Fish, one old Table,
one Stove and Pipe, one Pot and Hooks, one Tea
Kettle, one Skillet, one Water Bucket, one Piggin,
two Wood Bowls, one pair Iron Dogs, two Grid-
irons, one Knife-box, one long-handle Shovel, one
Coffee Mill, one Brass Lamp, three Stools, one
Peck Measure, two Tin Reflectors, three Prints.
Seized and taken as the property of Lewen Ver-
million, and will be sold to satisfy a judgment due
Lucy A. Laskey.
Sale to take place on Saturday, 29th July inst.
at 81 o'clock, a. m. opposite the Centre Market
Space, in the city of Washington.
July 22-eo3t* L. S. BECK, Constable.

pLAYING CARDS.-Upwards of two hun-


F AUQUIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS
in Virginia.-This watering place, fifty miles
from Alexandria and thirty-seven from Fredericks'
burg, is now ready for the reception of visitors.,
ft has been much improved since the last season,
'and for'extent and elegance of accommodation is
certainly notsurpassed by any in our country.
The Water resembles in nearly every respect that
of the celebrated White Sulphur in Greenbrier.
Its unquestionable medicinal virtues-its fortunate
location, in a remarkably healthy country, within
fifteen miles of the. Blue Ridge of mountains, (in
full view,) and yet within seven or eight miles
drive of the tide water-the facility, ease, and ex-
pedition, in the conveyance from all the ;Btlantic
cities-are advantages which have been duly appre-,
ciated by large crowds since the improvements were
commenced.
Visiters from the North to the other Virginia,
Springs may take this route, in the public or their
own private conveyances, without losing a day.
No expense has been spared in procuring every
thing conducive to the comfort and accommodation
of the guests. A first rate band -of music, and
various other sources of rational amusement, have
been provided.
The subscriber, who has taken the entire control
and management, pledges himself that his table,
attendance, &c. shall correspond with the rest of
the establishment; and though fully aware of the
magnitude of the pledge, he trusts, from his expe-
rience and the satisfaction heretofore given, he will
be able to redeem it. WM. BARBER.
June 30-3taw4w

f ED SULPHUR SPRINGS, MONROE COUN-
S TY, VIRGINIA.-The above watering place
is now open, and prepared for the comfortable ac-
commodation of 300 visitors, with their servants
and equipages. The celebrity acquired by the
water in reducing arterial action, allaying nervous
irritability, and arresting subacute inflammation,
renders it unnecessary to dilate upon its virtues;
and, indeed, the undersigned shrinks from the im-
putation of any disposition to impose upon the cre-
dulity of the public, by puffing it into notice. The
best evidence of its powVers. js a trial of forty-eve
years; during which time, notithstanding te.
wretchedness of the improvements, an'd acconmmo-
dations 3ntil it came into the possession of the un-
dersigned, it has gained additional reputation every
year, until it has excited such a degree of confi-
dence, especially inconsumptive patients, that many
of them imagine it capable of restoring them in the
last stage of the disease. The subscriber is far
from encouraging such delusive expectations; but
he conscientiously believes it will, in most cases,
arrest the disease at its commencement. Nor is its
power confined to pulmonary consumption alone,
but extends to all scrofulous affections in their pri-
mary stages. It will be needless to enumerate the
various diseases in which it may be used with suc-
cess; its remarkable property of equalizing the
circulation, combined with its alterative, sedative,
diuretic, and diaphoretic qualities, will sufficiently
point the attention of every skilful physician to the
cases in which its application might be proper.
The present improvements are such as will ren-
der this a delightful retreat, not only to the invalid,
but to the man of taste and the lover of nature; and
the arrangements of the establishment are such as
it is hoped will not o9ly insure comfort, but amuse
and interest the gay and fashionable.
The table will be plentifully provided with all
the luxuries of the mountains; and as no expense
has been spared to make every provision deemed
essential, it is hoped the result will be general satis.
faction. WM. BURKE, Proprietor.
Dr3Exaggerated reports of a recent flood at this
place having obtained circulation, it may be proper
to state that the injury sustained was trifling, and
is now entirely repaired. W. B.
RED SULPHUR, May 27; 1837.
June 3-2aw8w
PATENT COTTON GINS.-I beg leave to
call the attention of the planters to an.
important improvement on the Cotton Gin, now
manufacturing in Philadelphia by WILLIAM IDLER,
in Willow street, near Sixth street.
This improvement is made by Jacob Idler, by
professional engineer, who had for many years
establishments in the Southern States, in ginning
and packing of cotton, using Mr. E. Whitney's,
gin, and others most approved in the Sotthern_
States, and by experience up to this time, it proved.
that they last but a short time to gin to advantage.
By many trials and experiments made, it proved.
that the cylinder on which the saws are fastened,
and fixture of the gin ribs, is the most essential part
of the gin. The saws have heretofore" been fastened
in wood in different ways, and the gin frames were
also of wood, but the shrinking o''the wood in'
dry weather, and swelling in damp, causes the saws
to deviate more or less so that a great part of them
do not pass in the centre of the small space be--
tween between the gin ribs. The lea: t variation
by the shrinking or swelling of the wood, the saws
will vary and pass too near one cr the other side of
the gin ribs, which cuts the cotton in passing, and
forces it into the teeth of the saws, which causes
the many little knots in the cotton, and diminished


its value materially, and ruins the gin in a short
time and cleans and produces less good cotton.
This difficulty of injuring the cotton and the gin
is now perfectly overcome by this new improve-
ment, by which the cast steel saws are all set inr
brass or other metals; the whole cylinder is iron,
and metal, no wood whatever on it; the saws can--
not deviate the least, and must pass directly in the-
centre in the opening of the gin ribs, and cannot.
cut the cotton, nor jam it into the teeth by passing.
It delivers it clear of knots and gins more, as every
baw must do its duty.
The most essential part of this improvement is:
the saws are numbered to their places; the whole
construction of this gin is so simple and plain that
any one acquainted with a gin can open the metal
cylinder, take out the saws with great facility, shar-
pen them and put them to their former places; the
regulator bring them to their former focus. They
will again answer the same as new saws: this can
be repeated in the same machine till the saws are
worn down; in that case new ones can be put ia
their places, and the same with the gin ribs and
brushes.
Another advantage of this machine is, the brush
is made to traverse a little to the right and left, in.
order not to strike the saws always on one fixed
point like the common gin. It will last three times
longer than the old mode, and will take off the cot-
ton better from the teeth. It can be drove in two,
ways, by a middling and faster motion; each tooth
receives sufficient number of strokes.
The saws are of the best polished cast steel, fine'
teeth and polished, gin ribs case hardened. The:
gin frames are made of iron, lined with wood, wilt
last as long as iron will in a dry place, and are
strong and compact. The shafts are proportiona-
bly strong, with regulators to set them in or out,,
up or down, and moveable breast.
The frames and cylinder being metal, no' part
can give, and when once set and regulated all must
work the same true line; and when the saws, ribs,.
and brushes are worn out, new ones can be applied
in the same frame, instead of getting an entire new
gin; the whole can be easily taken apart. All
those acquainted with the ginning of cotton find
the fixture of the metal saw cylinders to be one of
the best improvements, sime the invention of Mr.
E. Whitney's gin. The inventor has been induced





.6 ow*


^
s'
f


Leave Port Gibson every Monday, Wednesday,
and Saturday, at 1 p m, arrive at Rodney same
days by 7 p m
Leave Rodney every Monday, Wednesday, and
Saturday, at 5 a m, arrive at Port Gibson same
days by 11 am
3873. From Rtodney by Paine's Store to Selser-
towo, 18 miles and back once a week
Leaye Rodney every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Selsettown same day by 12 noon
Leave Sels-rtown every Thursday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Rodney same day by 7 p min
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838
3874. Fr)nm Washington by Portersyille, Mead
ville, and McCalI's Creek, to Brookhaven, 56
miles and back once a week.
Leave Washington every Friday at 10 a m,
arrive at Brookhav.n next day by 5 p m
Leave Brookhaven every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Washington next day by 3 p m
3875. From Natchez by Prospect Hill, King-
ston, and Lebanon, to Liberty, 49 miles and back
twice a week
Leave Natchez every Wednesday and Sunday
at 7 a m, arrive at Liberty next days by 11 a m
Leave Liberty every Thursday and Monday at
2 p mn, arriveat Natchez next day by 7 p m
3876. From Natchez by Cold Spring, Wood-
yille, and Laurel Hill, La., to St. Francisville, 62
miles and back three times a week in stages
Leave Natchez every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday, at 6 a m, arrive at St. Francisville next
days by 12 noon
Leave St. Francisville every Monday, Wednes-
'day, and Friday, at 1 p m, arrive at Natchez next
days by 7 p m
3877. From Meadville by Fairfield to Holmes-
ville, 42 mites and back once a week
Leave Meadville every Saturday at 4 a m, ar-
rive at Holmesville same days by 8 p m
Leave Holmesville every Sunday at 4 a m, ar-
rive at Meadville next day by 8 p m
3878. From Monticello by Fair River to Brook-
haven, 22 miles and back three times a week
Leave Monticello every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, at 12 noon, arrive at Brookhaven
same days by 8 p m
Leave Brookhaven every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday, at 12 noon, arrive at Monticello


at 6 a m, arrive at Batesville next days by 6 p m.
4017. From Desare to Frankfort, county seat of
White County, 30 miles and back once a week.
Leave Desarc every Wednesday at 6 am, arrive
at Frankfort same day by 5 p m.
Leave Frankfort every Tuesday at 5 a m, arrive
at Desarc same day by 4 p m.
4018. From Lewisburg to Clinton, 45 miles and
back once a week.
Leave Lewisburg every Wednesday at 1 p m,
arrive at Clinton next day by 5 p m.
Leave Clinton every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Lewisburg next day by 10 a m.
4019. From Clinton by Kinderhook, to Bates-
ville, 65 miles and back once a week.
Leave Clinton every Friday at 6 a m, arrive at
Batesville next day by 6 p m.
Leave Batesville every Wednesday at 6 am, ar-
rive at Clinton next day by 6 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
4020. From Clinton by Richwoods, to Izard C.
H., 50 miles and back once a week.
Leave Clinton every Friday at 7 a m, arrive at
Izard C. H. next day by 4 pm.
Leave Izard'C. H. every Wednesday at 7 a m,
arrive at Clinton next day by 4 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
4021. From Clinton to Dwight, 60 miles and
back once a week.
Leave Clinton every Friday at 6 a mn, arrive at
Dwight next day by 5 p m.
Leave Dwight every Wednesday at 6 a m, arrive
at Clinton next day by 5 p m.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838.
4022. From Izard C. H. by Johnstone, Yell-
ville, Blythe and Crooked Creek, to Carrollton, 66
miles and back twice a week.
SLeave Izard C. H. every Monday and Thursday
at 6 a m, arrive at Carrollton next days by 6 p m.
Leave Carrollton every Sunday and Thursday
at 6 a m, arrive at Izard C. H. next days by 6 p m.
4023. From Carrollton by King's River, War
Eagle and Richland Creek, to Fayetteville, 67
miles and back twice a week.
Leave Carrollton every Sunday and Wednesday
at 5 a m, arrive at Fayetteville next days by 6 p m.
Leave Fayetteville every Friday and Tuesday
at 5 a m, arrive at Carrollton next days by 6 p m
4024. From Dwight by Scotia, Spadric Bluff,
Morrison's Bluff and Short Mountain, to Craw-
ford C. H., 64 miles and back three times a week


[Contintued from first page.]
Leave Mobile every Monday and Thursday at
6 a m, ar yive at Lt .akilecve_(_.jr snd
"Saur'rf}"b ni? on
oProposals to carry the mall in stages will
a'so be considered
3858. From Leaksville, by Leaf River and Al-
gusta, to Monroe, 62 miles and back once a week
Leave Leaksville every Wednesday at 1 p m,
arrive at Monroe next day by 8 p m
Leave Monroe every Tuesday at 4 a m, arrive at
Leaksville next day by I 1 a m
3859 From Auigusta to Bay of Biloxi, 70 miles
and back once a week
Leave Augusta every Friday at 5 a m, arrive at
Bay of Bilxi next day by 6 p m
Leave Bay of Biloxi every Wednesday at 5a m,
arrive at Augusta next day by 6 p in
3R60. Fr mn Monroe to Eliisville, 22 miles and
back once a week
Lave Monroe every Thursday at 1 p m, arrive
at Ellisvile same day by 7 p m
Leave Ellisville every Thursday at 5 a m arrive
at Monroe same day by 11 a m
3861. From Columbia, by Orangeburg,; to Wil.
liamsburg, 40 miles and hack once a week
Leave Columbia ev,!ry Thursday at 4 a m, ar-
rive at Williamsburg same clay by 8 p m
Leave Williamsburg every Friday at 4 a m, ar
rive at Columbia same day by 8 p m
386?. From Columbia, by Spring Cottage. Ha
bolochelto, And Pearlington, to Shieldsboro', 99
miles and back once a week
Leave Columbia every Saturday at 6 a m,arrive
at hieklshoro' every Monday by 4 p m
Leave Shieldsboro' every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar
rive at Columbia every Thursday by 4 p m
3863. From Columbia, by Montictllo and Co.
piah Cretk, to Gailatin, 59 miles and back once a
week
Leave Columbia every Saturday at 6 a m, arrive
at Gailatin next day by 4 p in
Leave Gallatin ev-ry Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at Columbia next day by 4 p m
3864. From Columbia, by Fordsville, and Jack-
sonville Springs, La., to Covimgton, 59 miles and
back once a week
Leave Columbia every Saturday at 6 a m, arrive
at Oovington next day by 4 p m
Leave Covington every Thursday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Columbia next day by 4 p mn
3865. From Westvfle, by Georgetown an.l
Copiah Creek, to Gallatin, 35 miles and back twice
a week
Leave Westville every Monday and Friday at 5
a m, arrive at Gallatin same days by 6 p m
Leave Gallatin every Tuesday and Saturday at
5 a m, arrive at Westville same days by 6 p m
3866. From Wes'ville, by Fayette Hill anwl
Smith C. H., to Paulding, 75 miles and back twice
a week
Leave Westville eyery Sunday and Wednesday
at 5 a m, arrive at Paulrding next days by 6 p m
Leave Pauding every Tuesday and Friday at 5
a m, arrive at Westville next day by 6 p m
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838
3867. From Gallatinm, by Brookhaven, Holmes.
ville, Silver Creek, and Oak Grove, La., to Cov-
ington, 105 miles and back three times a week in
sulkeys
Leave Gallatin'very Monday, Wednesday, and
Saturday at 12 noon, ,rrivec at Covington every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday at 5 p m
Leave Covington every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 6p m, arrive at Gallatin every Wed-
nesday, Friday, and Sunday by 11 a m
:3 Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse
post coaches will also be considered
Service is to commence on the ist July, 1838
3868. From Gallatin, by Mount Washington,
Pine Bluff, and Burtonton, to Port Gibson, 51
miies and bhck once a week
Leuve Gallatinm evry Wedrlneqday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Port Gibson next day by 7 p m
Leave Port Gihson every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar-
rive at Gal at'n next day by 12 noon
3869. From Gallatirf by Garnersyille' andl
McCall's Creek to Liberty, 50 miles and back
once a week
Leave Gdilatini every Wednesday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Liberty next day by 6 p m
Leave Liberty Tevey Tuesday at 5 a m, arrive
at Gtilatin next d'y by 12 noon
C t'roposals to carry the< mail in four-horse
po.t coaches will also he considered
3870. From Gallatin by Holden's Store, Hugh's
Store, and Malcotm, to Fayette, 50 miles and back
one a week
* Leave Galltin (very Wednesday at 6 a m, ar-
v ri'- at Fayette i.ext day by 11 a m
Leave F ayett- every Thursday at 1 p tn, ar-
rive at Gamlatinl next day by 5 p m
387t. From Port Gibson hy Darwin, Shelby,
Lloyd's Mills, and Casey's Store, to Raymond, 50
m les and back once a week
Leave Port Gibson every Wednesday at 6 a m,
arrive at Raymond next day by 11 a m
Leave Ra mond every Thursday at 1 p m, ar-
rive at Port Gibson next day by 6 p m
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1838
3872. From Port G'b~on by Bruensburgh and
Oakland College, to Rodney, 20 miles and back
three times a week


Leave New Orleans every Monday,Wednesday
and Friday at 7 a m, arrive atCovingtonsame days
by 5 p inm.
Leave Covington every Tuesday, Thursday, anc
Saturday at 7 a min, arrive at New Orleans same
days by 5 p inm.
4103. From New Orleans by Coquilla to Pearl-
ington, Mi., 36 miles and back once a week.
Leave New Orleans every Tuesday at 4 a min, ar-
rive at Pearlington same day by 4 p m.
Leave Pearlington every Monday at 6 a min, ar-
rive at New Orleans same day by 6 p inm.
4106. From Donaldsonville by New River,
Iberville, Manchac, Baton Rouge, and Mount
Willing to St. Francisville, 85 miles and back three
times a week in stages.
Leave Donaldsonville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 3 a min, arrive at St. Francisville
every Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 12 noon.
Leave St. Francisville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 1 p m, arrive at Donaldsonville
every Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 10 pm.
Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse post
coaches will also be considered.
4107. From Donaldsonville by Assumption,
Dutch Settlement, Centreville, Franklin, Jeane-
retts, New Iberia, St. Martinsville, Brean's Bridge,
Vermillionville, and Grand Coteau to Opelousas,
151 miles and back three times a week.
Leave Donaldsonville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 5 a min, arrive at Opelousas every
Friday, Sunday, and Tuesday by 6 p nm.
Leave Opelousas every Sunday, Tuesday, and
Friday at 5 a m, arrive at Donaldsonville every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 6 p inm.
4108. From Donaldsonville by Bayou Gould
and Plaquemine to Manchac, 30 miles and back
three times a week.
Leave Donaldsonville every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 3 a min, arrive at Manchac same
days by 1 p m.
Leave Manchac every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 11 a min, arrive at Donaldsonville same
iaysby 9pm.
4109. From Plaquemine by West Baton Rouge
to Point Coupee, 40 miles and back once a week.
Leave Plaquemine every Wednesday at 4 a m,
arrive at Point Coupee same day by 7 p nm.
Leave Point Coopee every Thursday at 4 a inm,


O-Proposals willTe" ceived for carrying the
mail daily on the above route,
4002. From Little Rock byjiaj.c t.BQtesaille,
-'T jrjtn'm n( bacl' three times a reek in four-
horse post coaches.
Leave Little Rock every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 4 a m, arrive at Batesville next
days by 8 p in.
Leave Batesville every Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 4 a min, arrive at Little Rock next days
by 8p m.
4003. From Little Rock by Harrisonburgh, Lew-
isburgh, and Point Remove to Dwight, 77 miles
and back three times a week in tour-horse post
coaches.
A Leave Little Rock every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 5 am, arrive at Dwight next days
Sby 2p m.
Leave Dwight every Tuesday, Thursday, and
I Saturday at 11 a m, arrive at Little Rock next days
by 8 p m.
e 4004. From Little Rock by Collegeville, Ben-
ton, Bayou de Roche, Raymond, Clark C. H., and
e Wolf Creek to Hempstead C. H., 122 miles and
back three times a week in four-horse post coaches.
Leave Little Rock every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 3 a min, arrive at Hempstead C. H.
next days by 10 p m.
Leave Hempstead C. H. every Tuesday, Thurs-
day, and Saturday at 3 a min, arrive at Little Rock
next days by 10 p m.
4005. From Little Rock by Pine Bluff, Hudge-
9 ons, and Bartholomew to Columbia, 150 miles and
back twice a week.
Leave Little Rock every Monday and Thursday
e at 6 a min, arrive at Columbia every Thursday and
Sunday by 6 p m.
Leave Columbia every Monday and Thursday at
6 a m, arrive at Little Rock every Thursday and
* Sunday by 6 p m.
S 4006. From Clarendon by St. Francis and Ma-
rion to Memphis, Tenn., 100 miles and back three
e times a week.
Leave Clarendon every Monday, Wednesday,
e and Friday at 6 a m, arrive at Memphis every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday by 5 p inm.
Leave Memphis every Tuesday, Thursday, and
SSaturday at 6 a m, arrive at Clarendon every
Thursday, Saturday, and Tuesday by 3 p m.
S4007. From Helena by Martin's, Longville,
Houston, and Crow Creek to Saint Francis, 63
Smiles and back three times a week in stages.
Leave Helena every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday at 6 a m, arrive at St. Francis next days by
2p M.
Leave St. Francis every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 12 noon, arrive at Helena next days
by 8 p m.
4008. From Helena by mouth of St. Francis to
Marion, 70 miles and back once a week.
Leave Helena every Saturday at 4 a min, arrive
t Marion next day by 7 p m.
Leave Marion every Monday at 4 a min, arrive at
Helena next day by 7 p m.
4009. From Helena by Wlhite River to Mouth
of Arkansas, 80 miles aid back once a week.
Leave Helena every Wednesday at 8 a m, ar
rive at Mouth of Arkansas every Friday by 11
a inm.
Leave Mouth of Arkansas every Friday at 1 p
m, arrive at Helena every Sunday by 4 p m.
4010. From Marion by Greenock and Barney's
Bayou to Barfield's Point, 90 miles and back once
a week.
Leave Marion every Monday at 12 noon, arrive
at Barfield's Point every Wednesday by 8 p m.
Leave Barfield's Point every Thursday at 4 a m,
arrive at Marion every Saturday by 12 noon.
4011. From Barney's Bayou to Randolph, Tenn
10 miles and back once a week.
Leave Barney's Bayou every Monday at 12 noon,
arrive at Randolph same day by 3 p inm.
Leave Randolph every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Barney's Bay u same day by 9 a m.
4012. From Barfield's Point to New Madrid, 60
miles and back once a week.
Leave Barheld's Point every Thursday at 8 a m,
arrive at New Madrid next day by 6 p m.
Leave New Madrid every Tuesday at 8 a m, ar-
rive at Barfield's Point next day by 6 p m.
4013. From St. Francis by Litchfield and Plea-
sant Island, to Batesville, 80 mile3 and back three
times a week in stages.
Leave St. Francis every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 12 noon, arrive at Batesville every
'Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday by 4 p m.
Leave Batesville every Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 4 a m, arrive at St. Francis next
days by 9 p m.
4014. From St. Francis by Walnut Camp, Coun-
ty Line, Greenfield, Crowley's and Pocahontas, to
Jackson,,128 miles and back once a week.
Leave St. Francis every Sunday at 3 p m, ar-
rive at Jackson every Wednesday by 9 p m.
Leave Jackson every Thursday at 6 a m, arrive
at St. Francis every Sunday by 6 p m.
4015. From Batesville by Sulphur Rock and
Strawberry River, to Jackson, 50 miles and back
twice a week in stages.
Leave Batesville every Wednesday and Saturday
at 8 a m, arrive at Jackson next days by 12 noon.
Leave Jackson every Monday and Th'ursday at
12 noon, arrive at Batesville next days by 4 p m.
4016. From Batesville by Tecuruseh, Pine
Bayou, to Izard C. H., 71' miles and back twice a
week.
Leave Batesville every Tuesday and Saturday at
6 a m, arrive at Izard C. H. next days by 6 p m.
Leave Izard C. H. every Tuesday and Saturday


Leave Cantonment Gbhson every Thursday at
a min, arrive at Fort Smith next day by 6 p m.
4029. From Fort Coffee by Choctaw Agency
to Fort Towson, 115 miles and back once a weet
Leave Fort Coffee every Tuesday at 1 p in, ar
rive at Fort Towson every Friday by 6 pm.
Leave Fort Towson every Saturday at 6 ar n
arrive at Fort Coffee every Tuesday by 12 noon
4030. From Collegeville by Caldwellton ati
Alum Fork, to Hot Springs, 42 miles and bec
twice a week.
Leave Collegeville every Tuesday and Saturda
at 10 a m, arrive at Hot Springs next days by
pm.
Leave Hot Springs every Tuesday and Saturda
at 6 a min, arrive at Collegeville next days by I
noon.
4031, From Pine Bluffby New Gascony, Heel
atoo, and South Bend, to Arkansas Post, 53 mil
and back once a week.
Leave Pine Bluff every Wednesday at 12 noor
arrive at Arkansas Post next day by 6 p m.
Leave Arkansas Post every Friday at 6 a an, a:
rive at Pine Bluff next day by 12 noon.
4032. From Arkansas Post by mouth of Arkan
sas, Bolivar, and Fulton, to Columbia, 60 mile
and back once a week.
Leave Arkansas Post every Friday at 6 a min, a;
ve at Columbia next day by 6 p inm.
Leave Columbia every Monday at 6 a m, arrive
at Arkansas Post next day by 6 p m.
4033. From Arkansas Post to White Rivei, 2
miles and bark once a week.
Leave Arkansas Post every Friday at 8 a m, ar
rive at White River same day by 4 p inm.
Leave White River every Saturday at 8 a min, ar
rive at Arkansas Post same day by 4 p m.
4034. From Columbia by Hamilton, to Monroe
La., 90 miles and back once a week.
Leave Columbia every Monday at 6 a m, arriv
at Monroe every Wednesday by 6 p inm.
Leave Monroe every Friday at 6 a in, arrive a
Columbia every Sunday by 5 p m.
4035. From Columbia by Lake Port, Gran
Lake, Princeton, La., Lake Providence, Peca
Grove, Milliken's Bend, and Tompkinsville, t
Vicksburgh, Mi., 110 miles and back twice a week
Leave Columbia every Monday and Friday at
a min, arrive at Vicksburgh every Wednesday an
Sunday by 6 p inm.
Leave Vicksburgh every Monday and Friday a
6 a min, arrive at Columbia every Wednesday an
Sunday by 6pm.
4037. From Columbia by Cabeens, to Corea Fa
bre, 120 miles and back once a week.
Leave Columbia every Monday at 5 a min, arriv
at Corea Fabre every Thursday by 12 noon.
Leave Corea Fabre every Thursday at 1 p nm
arrive at Columbia every Sunday by 7 p m.
4038. From Hudgeons by Cabeen, to Monroe
110 miles and back once a week.
Leave Hudgeons every Tuesday at 5 a m, arrive
at Monroe every Thursday by 6 p m.
Leave Monroe every Friday at 5 a min, arrive a
Hudgeons every Sunday by 6 p m.
4039. From Corea Fabre to Hempstead C. H
60 miles and back once a week.
Leave Corea Fabre every Friday at 6 a m, arrive
at Hempstead C. H. next day by 6 p m.
Leave Hempstead C. H. every Sunday at 6 a ni
arrive at Corea Fabre next day by 6 p in.
4040. From Hempstead C. H. by Zebulon, t
Scott C. H., 75 miles and back once a week.
Leave Hempstead C. H. every Monday at 5 a min
arrive at Scott C. H. next day by 7 p min
Leave Scott C. H. every Wednesday at 5 a mn
arrive at Hempstead C. H. next day by 7 p m
4041. From Hempstead C. H. by Spring Hill
Lost Prairie, and Lafayette C. H. to Conway, 5
miles and hack once a week.
Leave Hempstead C. H. every Tuesday at I p mn
arrive at Conway next day by 9 p m.
Leave Conway every Monday at 4 a m, arrive
at Hempstead C. H. next day by 12 noon.
4042. From Hempstead C.'H. by Columbus, Pin
Woods, Paraclirta, Ultima Thule, and Eagletowr
to Fort Towson, 105 miles and back twice a week
Leave Hemps'ead C. H. every Monday an(
Thursday at 5 a min, arrive at Fort Towson ever3
Wednesday and Saturday by 6 p m.
Leave Fort Towson every Monday and Wednes
day at 5 a in, arrive at Hempstead C. H. ever3
Wednesday and Friday by 6 pm.
4043. From Hempstead C. H. to Miller C. H.
60 miles and back once a week.
Leave Hempstead C. H. every Thursday at 6
m, arrive at Miler C. H. next day by 6 p m.
Leave Miller C. H. every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar
rive at Hempstead C. H. next day by 6 p m.
4044. From Miller C. H. to Lafayette C. H., 6i
miles and back once a week.
Leave Miller C. H. every Tuesday at 4 a m, ar
rive at Lafayette C. H. next day by 4 p m.
Leave Larayette C. H. every Thursday at 6 a mi
arrive at Miller C. H. next day by 6 p m.
LOUISIANA.
4101. From New Orleans by Lafayete, Bonne
Care, and Bringiers to Donaldsonville, 73 mile:
and back three times a week in stages.
Leave New Orleans every Monday, Wednesday
and Friday at I a m, arrive at Donaldsonvillesaml
days by 12 night.
Leave Donaldsonville every Tuesday, Thursday
and Sa'urday at 1 a m, arrive at New Orleans sami
days by 12 night.
Proposals to carry the mail in four-horse pos
coaches will also be considered.
4102. From New Orleans by Madisonville tk
Coving'on, 46 miles and back three times a wee
in s eamboats.


. 4116. From? inbn by Woodland, Darlington, of a Postmaster, or other equivalent testimony,
Greensburgh and ..Amakersvil e to Oak Grove, 58 that the guArantors are men of property, and able
Y9 miles and back, on`e a week. to make good their guaranty.
k- Leave C'int-n eVery Tuesday at 9 a m, arrive 2 This guaranty being required by law, no
- at Oak Grove next day by 6 p m. ext mption can be allowed in favor of old contrac-
Leave Oak Grove every Thursday at 6 a m, ar- tors, rail-road companies, or any other companies
", rive at Clinton next day by 3 p m. orp-rsons whatsoever
4117. From Clinton by Greensburgh to Frank- 3T pThe stancess stated in this advertie-
nd linton, 60 miles and back, once a week. 3. The dbstancel su stated in hcs advertie-
SLeave Clinton every Tuesday at 9 a m, arrive at ent, are believed to be substantially correct; but
Frk Leanke Clinton next day by 7 p i. the bidder will inform himselfon that point, as no
Franklinton next day by 7 p m.
ay Leave Franklinton every Thursday at 5 a m, ar- increased piy will be allowed for any difference
4 rive at Clinton next day by 3 p m. when the places are named correctly.
Service is to commence on the 1st July, 1338. 4. The sheduleq are arranged so as to allow
ay 4118. From Clinton by Mount Pleasant, St He- seveR minutes to each post office foe opening and
12 lena, Marburyville, Sweet Water, andi Pine Grove closing mails generally, and one hour to the distri-
to Madisonville, 74 miles and back, once a week. buting post offices ; but the Postmaster General
k- Leave Clin'on every Sunday at 6 a m, arrive may extend the time on allowing like extension to
es at Madisonville next day by 6 p m. the contractors.
Leave Madisonville every Tuesday at 6 a m, ar- 5. The Postmaster General may alter the sche-
n, rive at Clinton next day by 6 p m. dule, an I alter the route, he allowing a pro rata
4119. From St. Francisville by Jackson, Clin- increase of compensation for any additional ser-
r- ton, Richland Hill, and Rose Hill, Mi., to Liberty, vice required, and for any increased speed, when
49 miles and back, three times a week in stages, the employment of additional stock or carriers is
n- Leave St. Francisville every Monday, Wednes- rendered necessary.
es day, and Friday, at 1 p m, arrive at Liberty next 6. He may discontinute, or curtail the service,
days by 5 pm. whenever he shall consider it expedient to do so,
r- Leave Liberty every Monday, Wednesday, and he allowing one month's extra pay on the amount
Friday at 6 a in, arrive at St. Francisville next dispensed with.
'e days by 12 im.o 7. lie may impose fines for failure to take or
!5 osProposals "to carry the mail in four-horse deliver a mail, or any psrt of a mal; for suffering
5 post coaches, with greater speed, will also be con- the mail to be injured, wet, lost, or destroyed; and
sidered.
r- 4120. From St. Francisville to Point Coupee, miy exact a forfeiture of the pay of the trip,
4 miles and back, three times a week on horseback whenever the trip is lost, or the mdil arrives so far
r- and in boats, behind schedule time as to lose connexion with a
Leave St. Francisville every Monday, Wednes. depending mAil.
e, day and Friday at 1 p m, arrive at Point Coupee 8. He may annul the contract for repeated fail
same days by 3p m. ures to perform any of the stipulations, for re-
re Leave Point Coupee every Monday, Wednes. fusing to discharge a carrier when required, for
day, and Friday at 4 p m, arrive at St. Francisville violating the Post Office law, for disobeying the
it same days by 6 p m. instructions of the department, or assigning a con.
4121. From Point Coupee by Deglaise, Bayou tract without the previous consent of the Post-
d Rouge, and Bordeaux to Marksville, 75 miles and master General.
n back, once a week. 9. If the contractor shall run a stage or other
o Leave Point Coupee every Monday at 5 a m, vehicle more rapidly or more frequently than he is
k. arrive at Marksv'lle next day by 6 p m. required by the contract to carry the mtil, he shall
6 Leive Marksville every Wednesday at 5 a m, yive the same increased celer.ty and frequency to
d arrive at Point Coupee next day by 6 pm. the mail, and without increase of compensation.
4122. From Opelousas by Plaquemine Brulee, 10. Contractors on stage and coach routes shall,
it Martin's Ferry, and Calcasieu to Bal ou's Ferry, to in the conveyance of passengers, give a prefer
d return by Cole's Settlement andBoyes Malet, once ence to those who are brought in the connecting
in two weeks, equal to 140 miles and back. mail lines, over those travelling in any other; so
- Leave Opelousas every other Tuesday at 5 a m, that connecting mail stage routes shall form con-; s
arrive at Ball u's Ferry next Thursday by 8 p m. tenuous travelling mal stage routes shall form con-s.
e Leave Ballou's Ferry every other Friday at 11. On routes where the maravellingl is transported lines.
a mn, arrive at Opelousas next Monday by 12 m. On routes where the mail is transported in
n, 4123. From Opelousas by Ville Platt, Bayou stages, and the present contractor shall be super-
Chicot, and Chaneyville to Alexandria, 82 miles seded by an underhidder, who may not have the
e, and back, twice a week. stage property requisite for the performance ot the
Leave Opelousas every Wednesday and Saturday contract, he shall purchase from the present con
e at 4am, arrive at Alexandria next days by 10 pm. tractor such of.the stage horses and property as
Leave Alexandria every Wednesday and Satur- may be suitable for the service, at a fair valuation,
it day at 4 a m, arrive at Opelousas next days by 10 and make payment therefore by reasonable instal-
pm. ments. Should they not agree as to the suitable-
., 4124. From Opeloucas by Washington, Holmes- ness of the property, the term, or the security,
ville, and Prairie Rouge to Marksvil'e, 50 miles each may choose a person who mny appoint a third,
e and back, once a week. and their decision shall be final, or the Postmaster
Leave Opelousas every Monday at 7 a m, arrive General will name the umpire. This will be made
i, at Marksvile next day by 3 p m. the condition of any bid under that of a present
Leave Marksville every Wednesday at 7 a min, contractor ; and should the underbidder fall to
o arrive at Opelousas nixt day by 3 p m. comply, his bid will be offered to the eontrpctor;
4125. From Vermillionville to Perry's Bridge, but should he decline it, the proposals of the un-
, 25 miles and back, once a week. derbidder will be accepted unconditionally.
Leave Vermillionville every Tuesday at 12 m, 12. The Postmaster General is prohibited by
i, arrive at Perry's Bridge same day by 8 p in. law from making contracts fbor the transportation 1
Leave Perry's Bridge, every Tuesday at 4 a m, of the mail with any person who shall hive enter.
l, arrive at Vermillionville same day by 11 a m. ed into any combination, or proposed to enter into
0 4126. From Alexandria by MALrksviile, Borodi- e any combination, to prevent the making of any bid
no and Red River Landing, to Fort Adams, Mi., for a mail contract by any other person or per-
', 84 miles and back three times a week. osal any rper or
Leave Alexandria every Sunday, Tuesday, and sons; or who shall have made any agreement, or
e Thursday at 5 a m, arrive at Fort Adams every shall have given or performed, or promised to
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday by 12 noon. give or perform, any consideration to do, or not to
e Leave Fort Adams every Tuesday, Thursday, do, any thing whatever to induce any other not to
n and Saturday at 1 p m, arrive at Alexandria every bid for a mail contract.
. Thursday, Saturday, and Monday by 5 p m. 13. On post coach and stage routes where that
d 4127. From Alexandria by Cotile. Rigolets Bon kind of transportation is sometimes difficult, pro-
Y Dieu, Plaisance and Cloutiersville to Natchitoches, posals will be received for carrying the mails on
74 miles and back three times a week. horseback, in wagons, or carts,for a specified num-
*- Leave Alexandria every Sunday, Tuesday, and her of months, wecks, or days in each year ; but
y Friday at 5 a min, arrive at Natchitoches next days no dispensation of post coach or stage service will 1
by 6 p m. be tolerated unless it be stipulated for in the pro- .
Leave Natchitoches every Sunday, Tuesday, posa's and embaced in the contract.
and Friday at 5 a m, arrive at Alexandria next days '14. The proposals should be sent to the Depart-
Sby9 6 pm. met sealed, endorsed "Mail proposals in the State
4128. From Alexandria by Burshly Creek, to of ," and addressed to the First Assist- E
- Harrisonburg, 60 miles and back once a week. ant Postmaster General, S. R. Hobb;e.
Leave Alexandria every Monday at 6 a m, ar- AMOS KENDALL.
5 rive at Harrisonburg next day by 5 p m. Pose Orrte DEPARTMENST, 1
Leave Harrisonburg every Wednesday at 6 a m, J 6, 1337.
- arrive at Alexandria next day by 5 p in. June 6, 1_7.
4129. From Natchitochesby Bean's Bridge, Fort -
, Jesup, and Negreet, to Gaines' Ferry, 59 miles APPENDIX.
and back twice a week between Natchitoches and Proposals also are invited for supplying the fol-
Fort Jesup, and once a week the residue of the lowing offices, at a sum to be named, and subject
t route, to the condition of not exceeding the nett proceeds i
s Leave Natchitoches every Sunday and Thursday of the office:
at 4 a m, arrive at Fort Jrsup same days by 12 IN ILLINOIS.
noon.
Leave Fort Jesup every Sunday and Thursday Crystal Lake to be supplied from McClure's
at 1 p m, arrive at Natchitoches same days by 9 p m. Grove, miles and back once a week.
Leave Fort Jesup every Thursday at 1 p m, ar- Elhsville to be supplied from Chicago, 30 miles
e rive at Gaines' Ferry next day by 12 m. and back once a week.
Leave Gaines' Ferry every Friday at 1 p In, Genoa to be supplied from Sycamore, miles ^
t arrive at Fort Jesup next day by 11 a m. and back once a week. t
4130. From Natchitoches by Campti, to Russell- Hadley to be supplied from Juliet, 9 miles and ^
k ville, 80 miles and back once in two weeks, back once a week.r


next, to file allegations (if any they have) against
said petitioner: Provided, a copy of this order be
inserted in some newspaper published in the Dis-
trict of Columbia or State of Maryland, once a
week for three successive months before the said
lay. Teste:
AQUILLA BEALL,
Clerk Prince Georges county.
June 28-law3m
A fgHE ROCKVILLE ACADEMY.---The
Classical department of this institution, late-
y under the care of the Rev. JOHN MINES, was
opened on the 22d inst. under the supervision of
Mr. JOHN NEELY, a gentleman of high scholastic
attainments, unexceptionable character and con-
giberable experience in the instruction of youth.
The Trustees congratulate the patrons of the
Academy, and the public, that the vacancy occa-
ioned by the retirement of their late learned and
venerated principal, has been so fortunately sup-
?lied.
The English departments of this school are un-
ler the control of two highly qualified and efficient
instructors, Messrs. HENRY ALLAN arid A. MCLEAN
SCOTT.
Few Academies in the country present as many
claimss to public patronage as this. The number,
ability, and experience of its teachers, the variety
ind extent of their instructions, the health of the s
countryy which surrounds it, and the morals of the
-ommunity in which it is situated, combined with
he unusually moderate terms of tuition, concur to E
recommend it to Parents and Guardians.
Course of instruction in the Classical Department.
Latin and Greek languages-French if requested
-the higher, branches of mathematics-natural t
nd moral Philosophy-Geography, with use of e
qaps and Globes, etc.
English department-Reading, Writing, Arith- (
netic, Grammar, Geography, and Mathematics.
TERMvs or TuITION.-In the Classical department, I
20 per annum. In the English department, 8 to
16 per annum. (
Board, including washing may be had in re- a
pectable families for $100.
By order of the Board:
JOSEPH H. JONES. President. '


Aeasanftrove" tobe supplied from Coc1ran~s
Mills, miles and back once a week.
Uchee to be supplied from Society Hill, 15
miles and back once a week.
Saint Helena to be supplied from New Market,
miles and back once a week.
IN MISSISSIPPI.
Coopersville to be supplied from Raymond, 7
miles and back once a week.
Indian Spring to be supplied from Raymond,
miles and back once a week.
IN LOUISIANA.
Water Proof to be supplied from Rodney, Mi.
12 miles and back once a week. A. K.

P ROPOSALS for carrying the mails of the
United States from the 1st of January, 1838,
to the 31st December, 1838, on the following post
route in Georgia, will be received at the Depart-
ment until the 10th October next inclusive, to be
decided by the 21st day of said month.
IN GEORGIA.
No. 2468. From West Point, by Long Cane,Ver-
non, La Grange, Mountville, Gray Rock, Green-
ville, Woodhouse, Flat Shoals, Post Oak Level,
Zebulon, Van Buren, Unionville, Planters, Monti-
cello, and Mount Horeb, to Eatonton, 134 miles,
three times a week, in four horse post coaches.
Leave West Point every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday, at 10 a m, arrive at Eatonton every
Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, by 10 a m.
Leave Eatonton every Thursday, Saturday, and
Monday, at 12 noon, arrive at West Point every
Saturday, Monday, and Wednesday, by 12 noon.
NOTE.
No proposal will be considered unless it be ac-
companied by a guaranty, signed by one or more
responsible persons, in the following form, to wit:
"The undersigned guaranty that
if his bid for carrying the mail
from to be accepted by
the Postmaster General, shall enter into an obliga-
tion prior to the 1st day of March next, with good
and sufficient sureties, to perform the service pro-
posed."
This should be accompanied by the certificate of
a postmaster, or other satisfactory testimony, that
the guarantors are men of property, and able to
make good their guaranty.
No exemption from this requirement is'tllowed
in favor of old contractors, railroad companies, or
any other company or persons whatever.
The proposals should be sealed, and addressed to
the First Assistant Postmaster General.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, June, 1837.
July 7-lawtOl
By the 'resirdernt of the United Stote.q.
N pursuance of law, I, MARTIN VAN BUREN,
President of the United States of America, do
hereby declare and make known, that a public sale
will be held at each of the undermentioned land
offices, commencing on Monday, the ninth day of
October next, for the disposal of the public, unap-
propriated lands within the limits of the townships
herein described, to wit:
AT LAPORTE, IN THE STATE OP INDIANA, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township numbered thirty-three, north of range five,
west of the second principal meridian.
AT HELENA, IN THE STATE OF ARKANSAS, for the
disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township numbered six, north of range numbered
six, east.
AT OPELOUSAS, IN THE STATE OF LOUISIANA, for
the disposal of the public lands within the limits of
township numbered eleven, north of range twelve
west.
AT ST. STEPHENS, IN THE STATE OF ALABAMA,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of township numbered seven, south of the thirty-first
degree of latitude, of range two, west.
AT CHOCCHUMA, IN THE STATE OF MISsISsIPPI,
for the disposal of the public lands within the limits
of township numbered twenty-two, of range two,
west.
AT MILWAUKEE, IN THE TERRITORY OF WISCON-
SIN, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of township numbered ten, of range eleven,
east.
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools,
military or other purposes, will be excluded from
sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks
(unless the lands are sooner disposed of) and no
longer; and no private entries of land in the town-
ships so offered will be admitted until after the ex-
piration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washing-
ton, this twenty-eighth day of June, anno
Domini, 1837.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
June 29-wt20ct
P RINCE GEORGES COUNTY, scT.--Or-
dered by Edward W. Belt, one of the Judges
of the Orphans' Court of Prince Georges county,
that the creditors of HENRY STUART, a peti-
tioner for the benefit of the insolvent laws of the
State of Maryland, be and appear before Prince
Georges County Court, to be held at Upper Marl-
borough town on the second Monday in October


ache, and that remedies, prescriptions, and diet, had
been tried in vain. Nothing relieved her until she
commenced the use of Dr. Spohn's Headache Remedy,
which gave her immediate relief; and by the use of
a few bottles she has become entirely cured. I
therefore recommend it to all laboring under that
dreadful complaint, as a certain remedy.
I have also witnessed its virtues in many other
cases, in all of which it has proved effectual.
WM. H. WHITAKER.
For sale at CALLAN'S Drug Store, corner of
Eand 7th streets. June 30
p A1MBOEUF'S PATENT FIRE PROOF
PAINT.-To THE PuBLIc.-The subscriber
informs those interested in the preservation of
property from fire, that a second public experiment
of the preservative qualities of his fireproof com-
position has been made in the city of Washington
under the superintendence and direction of Dr.
Thos. P. Jones, whose letter of the 28th February
on the subject, evincing the great value and im-
portance of the article, has been published in the
National Intelligencer and Globe-that, in conse-
quence of the confidence which these trials and
others have inspired, as shown by the numerous
applications made to him from various parts of
the United States, he has been induced to make
such preparations for its manufacture as will in-
sure a prompt supply of any quantity that may be
ordered. A few barrels of this paint have been.
sent to Philadelphia, New York, and Boston, and
it will hereafter be kept for sale by agents in those
and other places.
There are two kinds of my paint: one is pre-
pared with oil, the other without it. They are
equally, efficacious as a protection against fire
The former cannot be affoibred at less than three
dollars per gallon, which quantity will cover about
ifty square feet. The latter will cost one dollar
per gallon, covering about forty square feet, say
two coats. In one respect, the preparation without
oil has a decided preference; it dries immediately,
mand at once protects the building to which it is
applied, whereas the oil paint is not a perfect safe-
guard until it has become hardened, which will
usually require several weeks.


TOT U. S. E7GINEERb.
IMPROVED STEAM DREDGE.-The usb-
scribers will construct their improved Dredging
Machines (with or without locomotive powers)
for any part of the United States or the Canadas,
capable of raising from twenty to three hundred
tons of earth per hour, and excavating from four
to twenty square rods without raising the anchors,
leaving the bottom smooth and level, to any depth
under fifty feet, and depositing the earth on the
bank at a distance of from six to twenty feet, draw-
ing from one to three feet of water, with or without
improved machinery for taking up logs or rocks
with great facility, not exceeding ten tons in
weight, at a cost of from three to thirty thousand
dollars. The expense of excavating common earth
from a depth of fifteen feet, and discharging it into
lighter scows, will not exceed four cents per ton,
estimating wood at $5 per cord, and coal at $7 per
ton.
The subscribers have constructed four machines ,
for the Hudson river improvement; one for Lake
Champlain, one for Lake Ontario, and two for,
Lake Erie. They are confident that persons wishb
ing to contract for machines, have only to examin-.
theirs to be satisfied of their superiority over any
thing of the kind heretofore used.
All machines constructed by us will be war-
ranted, and their performance guarantied, or no
sale.
Contracts for dredging to any extent, will be
taken on reasonable terms by the undersigned.
Communications directed to Lyonsdale, Lewis
county, N. Y. or Monroe city, Michigan, will be
promptly attended to.
References: Captain Ezra Smith, United States
agent, Whitehall, N. Y. Captain A. Talcott, (late
of U. S. Engineers, and superintendent Hudson
river improvement,) Dunkirk, N. Y. Capt. Henry
Smith, U. S. agent and superintendent of public
works at Lake Erie, Monroe city, Michigan; Hon.
David Thorburn, Queenstown; Hon. Charles Dun-
combe, Burford, commissioners for purchasing
steam dredge for Upper Canada.
LYON & HOWARD.
Lyonsdale, May, 1837.-May 4-l1aw6m*
Y1's0 ENTERPRISING YOUNG PRINTERS-
% The subscribers, editors of the Gazette, St.
Clairsville, Ohio, being about to engage in other
business, offer for sale their Printing establishment.
The Gazette is a large imperial paper, has 950 sub-
scribers, has an extensive advertising custom, and
does a large amount of job work. It was the first
paper established in the county; has always been
democratic in its politics, and will be disposed of
to no other individual than one who will continue
to advocate the same principles.
St. Clairsville, the town in which the paper is
published, is a healthy and beautiful location; is si-
tuated on the National road, 11 miles from Wheel-
ing, and has a population of about 1500. The
county ranks as the second in the State in point of
wealth, intelligence, and population.
The terms upon which the office will be sold are
as follows: $1200-$800 in hand, and the residue
in payments to suit the purchasers. For further
information touching the above, address
J. Y. & J. GLESSNER.
N. B. All letters addressed to the editors, must
be post paid, to receive attention. J. Y. & J. G.
St. Clahisville, Belmont co. O.-June 12-law7t.

DR. SPOHNS-PERMANENT CURE FOR
SICK HEADACHE.-Further directions
in addition to those on the labels.-The quantity
may be increased to a table-spoonful, but should
always be mixed well with half a tumbler of cold
water, and even a tumbler full, if unpleasant with
less, with sugar if necessary to make it agreeable.
It is, however, preferable to use as little water as
possible when it is often to be taken. It is a gene-
rally admitted fact by all Physicians, that Head-
ache, whether it is what is called nervous or bilious,
proceeds in almost every case from the disordered
state of the stomach. In some cases where the sys-
tem has long been out of order, a little time with con-
stant use of the remedy will be required. In many
cases, by following the directions on the bottle, it is
cured immediately; but in other cases, the headache
will come on in slighter attacks for a few times,
and then entirely disappear. The use of the reme-
dy should then be continued for a few weeks, avoid-
ing excesses of all kinds, particularly of eating, or
exercise.
This medicine may be used with the greatest ad-
vantage in any complaint whatever, and particular-
ly where cold, coughs, or fevers of any kind are
present, by mixing a table-spoonful or two with a
tumbler of water, and drinking a few swallows of
it every half hour for a day or two. There is never
the least danger of using too much of the medicine,
in small quantities. To place a remedy so valua-
ble to suffering humanity within the reach of all,
the proprietor has consented to put up a 50 cent
size bottle. The larger size is one dollar, and the
largest two dollars per bottle.
E. SPOHN, M. D.
Of the Royal College of Physicians of London,
Inventor and Proprietor.
A thousand positive certificates might be added,
but the following is too respectable to require
others.
NEW YORK, Dec. 11, 1833.
I hereby certify that my wife has been for yeais
afft.icted with a most distressing periodical sick head-


Leave Natchitoches every other Thursday at 5 La Fox to be supplied from Aurora, 8 miles and 6
a m, arrive at Russellville next day by 6 p min. back once a week. r
Leave Russellville every other Saturday at 5 a Payson to be supplied from Quincy, 7 miles and s
Sm, arrive at Natchitoches next day by 6 p m. back once a week. in
4131. From Natchitoches by Campti, Loggy PropheLstown to be supplied from Dixon's Ferry, t
SBayou and Coates' Bluff, to Grand Cane, 110 miles 25 miles and back once a week.
Sand back once in two weeks. Rock River Rapids to be supplied from Gap d
Leave Natchitoches every other Monday at 5 a Grove, miles and back once a week.
m, arrive at Grand Cane next Thursday. by 12 Sycamore to be supplied from Napiersville,
noon. miles and back once a week.
Leave Grand Cane every other Thursday at 2 p I W TRIO .
min, arrive at Natchitoches next Sunday by 7 p min. IN WISCONSIN TERRITORY.
4132. From Harrisonburg, La., to Natchez, Mi., Moscow to be supplied from Clark's Ferry,
40 miles and nacKt wice a week miles and back onee a week.
Leave. Harrisonburg every Wednesday and S New Lexington to be supplied from Sweet 1;
urday at 4 am, arrive at Natchez same days by S p m. Home, Mo. 15 miles and back once a week. o
S Leave Natchez every Tuesday and Friday at IN MISSOURI.
4 a min, arrive at Harrisonburg same days by 8 Bluffport to be supplied from Fayette, 12 miles a
p Mi. and back once a week. s
4133. From Harrisonburg by New Kentucky Cincinnati to be supplied from New London,
and Caldwell, to Monroe, 70 miles and back once 15 miles and back once a week. A
a week. Kendall to be supplied from Liberty, 11 miles "
Leave Harrisonburg every Wednesday at 5 a m, and back once a week. V
arrive at Monroe next day by 6 p m. Plate to be supplied from Liberty, 12 miles and P
SLeave Monroe every Monday at 5 a m, arrive Plate to be supplied from Liberty, 1 miles and P
L at Harrisonburg next day by 6 p min. back once a week.
4134. From Harrisonburg by Deer Creek and Saverton to be supplied from New London, 10
SBayou Macon, to Lake Providence, 120 miles and miles and back once a week. i
back once a week. Sweet Home to be supplied from Des Moines, 12 S
Leave Harrisonburg every Wednesday at 5 a m, and back once a week.
arrive at Lake Providence every Saturday by 6 Taylor's Mills to be supplied from Palmyra, 10' c
pm. miles and back once a week. a
Leave Lake Providence every Wednesday at 5 West Ely to be supplied from Palmyra, miles a
a m, arrive at Harrisonburg every Saturday by 6 and back twice a week. c
pm. -IN KENTUCKY. c,
4135. From Grand Gulf, Mi., by Lake St. Joseph, Bradfordsville to be supplied from Lebanon, 8 re
New Carthage, Roundaway, and Walnut and miles and back once a week.
Bushy Bayou to Milligan's Bend, 83 miles and Currey's to be supplied from Wilsonville, 5
back once a week. miles and back once a week.
Leave Grand Gulf every Tuesday at 5 a m, ar- Grass Hill to be supplied from Ghent,, 6 miles a:
rive at Milligan's Bend next day by 8 pmin. and back once a week.
Leave Milligan's Bend every Thursday at 5 a m, Higbee's Store to be supplied from Keene, 7
n Higbee'S toetob supplied from Keene, 7
arrive at Grand Gulf next day by 8 p mi.
4136. From New Carthage, La., to Warrenton, miles and back once a week. M ,
Mi., 20 miles and back once a week. Keysburg to be supplied from Marcus, Te. 4
Leave New Carthage every Wednesday at 5 a miles and back once a week.
min, arrive at Warrenton same day by 12 noon. Martinsville to be supplied from Allen's Springs, 1
Leave Warrenton every Wednesday at 1 p im, 6 miles and back once a week.
arrive at New Carthage same day by 8 p m. McGee's Mills to be supplied from Taylorsville, sJ
4137. From Monroe to Lake Providence, 80 6 miles and back once a week.
miles and back once a week. Miller's Mills to be supplied from Oak Grove, 7