<%BANNER%>



IR ANCI8 P. BLIRk & JOHN C- K iVES-
EDITORS AN PROPRIETORS.

Daily paper per anr,u,............ 0 )
Semi-Weekly,.....do.................5 00
Weeky. .... do.... ....... A 50
Extra Globe, for six 'nths,........... 1 00
For less tl.,n a year--
Daily,... II)r nr b .................. 1 00
Serni-weekly, do......................0 50
Subscriptions to the DWily for less than two, to
tihe Semi-Weekly for less than four, or to the
V'eekly for less than twelve months, wil not he
received.
Subscribers may discontinue their paper at any
time by paying for the time, they have received
them; but not without.
Those who subscribe ror a year, and do not at
t ;e time of subscribing order a discontinuance at
the end of it, will be considered subscribers until
tiey eider the paper to be stopped, a d pay ar-
i arages.
PRIcT or .nA)VZTISTBN.
STwelve lines, or less, three insertions, .$1 00
Every additional insertion,.............O0 25
Longer advertisements s charged in proportion.
A liberal discount made to those who advertise
i the year.
All payments to be made in advance. Those
who have not an opportunity of paying other-
, ise, may remit by mail, at our risk, postage paid.
The Postmaster's certificate of such remittance,
x'iall be a suvncient receipt therefore. The notes
of any specie.paying ba-sk will be received.
No attention wili be given to any order, unless
the money or a Postmaster's certificate that it has
Iv'een remitte, 1, accompanies it.
cyj> Letters to the Editors, charged wilh postage,
wil not be ,iken out af the Post OLIce.

GEORGETOWN
DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
West side of Jefferson street, near Bridge street.
7j I WHEATLEY stillcontinues to carry on
j_ the above business in all its various
branches. Hie takes this method of returning his
grateful thanks to his friends and a generous pub-
lic, for the liberal patronage they have so kindly
bestowed on him, and he ardently solicits a con-
tinuance of the same. From his general success
ind long experience, together with his unremit-
ting attention and punctuality, he flatteis himself
that he will be able to give satisfaction to all who
may favor him with their patronage. All manner
of ladies' dressing colored and dressed in the
neatest manner; watering of silk and moreen done
to perfection; gauze, silk, crape, Thibet, and Me
rino shawls, dyed all the various shades of the day;
Rnd those with borders, the borders will be re-
tained. Merino and Cashmere shawls cleansed
and bleached, and the fringe curled to look like
new. Black shawls re-dyed, and the borders re-
lained. The color can be extracted from black
Silk, Merino and Bombdzines, and they can be
made handsome colors. Gentlemen's garments
,f every description cleansed or dyed, and re-
tored to their original lustre. All manner oj
York with which he may be favored, will meet
Yith immediate attention and be executed with
despatch. March 14-3taw

CASH FOR 400 NEGROES,
NCLUDING both sexes from 12 to 25 years of
age. Persons having servants to dispose of,
wili find it to their interest to give me a call, as I
will give higher prices in cash than any other pur-
chaser who is now in the market. I can at all
times be found at the MECHANIC'S HALL, now
kept by B. 0. Sheckle, and formerly kept by
Isaac Beers, on 7th street, a few doors below
J loyd's Tavern, opposite the Centre Market. All
communications promptly attended to.
JAMES H. BURCH,
Feb. 29. Washington City.
1 OLDEN'S Narrative of Shipwireck,Captivity,
1 and sufferings on the Pelew Islands, and tor
two years afterwards among the barbarous inhabi-
tants of Lord North's Island-1 volume, with en-
gravings-price only 50 cents.
For sale by F. TAYLOR.
May 6


FISHING TACKLE.
A general assortment of fine imported fishing
tackle; embracing all items ordinarily used
in angling in this country; for sale at New York
prices by LEWIS JOHNSON,
May 12. Penn. Avenue.
IMPROVED METALLIC MEMORANDUM
BOOKS.--W. FISCHER has just received
an assortment of new Metallic Memorandum books,
very neat and convenient articles; for sale at Sta-
tioner's Hall.
lay 4 (Tel.)
LIFE ON THE LAKES,
Y the author of Legends ofla Log Cabin, is
just published in 2 volumes, with engrav-
ings, being Tales and Sketches, collected during
a trip to the Pictured Rocks of Ltke Superior,
this day received, for sale by F. Taylor, or for
circulation among the subscribers to the Waver-
ley Circulating Library.
May 12
SILVER PLATE, SPOON & FORK
MANUFACTORY,
Southwest corner of Fifth and Cherry streets,
PHILADELPHIA.
Sf tIHE subscri-
_tbers have
constan.]y on hand
a handsome assort-
ment of SILVER
Plate,-Spoons,-
Forks,-and eve-
ry article belong-
ing to the Silver-
smith business, or
_--- made to order in
the neatest and
best manner, or to match any pattern given, at
the lowest manufacturing prices.
Persons who wish to purchase, are requested to
call at their manufactory, where they will find
work not surpassed in the city for neatness, taste,
and elegance of finish.
ff A supply of the best Sheffield and Birming-
ham Plated Ware, of their ewn importing, kept
constantly on hand, and made expressly to their
order.
March 2 R. & W. WILSON.
GERMANY.
R. NICHOLAUS PETERS, a native of
Schmarnen, near Doram, (kingdom of Ha-
nover,) whose last letter was dated from Philadel-
phia, is, if living, or those who may know any
thing of' him, requested by hii anxious sister, Mrs.
Wehme Brus, her husband, and friends, to inform
them of his residence, by addressing them to 2la-
dame de Leonardy, Hamburg, (Europe,) No. 11
Dragonerstall; or to I)r. KUHL,
Washington City.

ENNEDY & ELLIOTT have this day re-
K ceived an additional supply of FlJwers of
Loveliness, Beauties of Byron, Flora's Dictionary,


C


to b


'~Y BLA~t & RIVES.6"THUI WORLD IS OOTZR3ZD TOO XUCH.99O.5..N .33

CITY OF 1VASIINGTON. DI11-I M(Y L~ 3 SG


STEAMPACKET S. CAROLINA.
The Steam-packet SOUTH
iCAROLINA, Capt. William
*Rollins, being in complete or-
der, will resume her regular rurnbetween Norfolk
and Charleston on Friday, the 4th March, and
continue to ply between the above places until
further notice, as follows:
Ltave Norfolk, Leave Charleston,
Friday, March 4 Friday, March 11
Do do 18 Do do 25
IDo April 1, Thursday, April 7
Thursday, do Do do 21
Do do 28 Io May 5
Do May 12 Do do 19
Do do 26 Do June 2
Do June 9 Do do 16
Do do 23 Do do 30
Do July 7 .Da July 14
Do do 21 Do do 28
Do August 4 Do August 11
Do do 18 Do do 25
Apply to DIXON & HUNTER, Norfolk, or to
JAMES FERGUSSON, Baltimore.
March 25--2aw9m
BFOR FRtDERICKSBURG
AND RICHMOND.-The
Steamboat SYDNEY has re-
resurmed her .regular move-
ments. The Sidney leaves Bradley's Wharf every
morning at 6 o'clock for Fredericksburg, &c. and
returns as usual. JAMES GUY, Captain.
March 8-d
FOR NORFOLK.
j The Steamer COLUM-
BIA, Capt. James. Mitch-
S ell, having been placed
permanently on the route
between the District of Columbia and Norfolk,
will leave Washington every Monday and Friday
at 11 o'clock, M.; and returning, will leave Nor-
(olk every Wednesday and Sunday, at 3 o'clock,
P. M.
Passage and fare $5.
Freight destined to Petersburg or Richmond,
must be paid for at the time of shipment.
April 14-tf

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT,
Between Washington City, alexandria, Va., Piney
Point, MAd., &c.
'The Steamboat CHESA-
PEAKE, Captain She-man,
master, will leave Bradley's
wharf every Sunday at 6 A.
M. (brginniiig next Sunday,) arrive at Piney
Point same day, calling at all the intermediate
landings, and visiting the landing at Leonardtown.
The Chesapeake will return the same route
from Piney Point on Monday.
On Thursday following, the Steamboat SYD-
NEY, Capt. Guy, master, will leave the same
wharf, visiting the same landings, and return on
Friday to this city. May 5-3taw6w.


NOTICE-WASHINGTON BRANCH
RAIL ROAD.



A HE Steamboat from Baltimore to Philadel-
-jt_ phia having adopted an earlier hour of de-
parture, it will be necessary that the train of
Cars start from Washington at half after two in
the morning instead of three, on and after Monday
next, the 9th inst.
The evening train will, also, on and after that
day, leave Washington at four instead of twenty
minutes before five. May 17-1lw&wtf
JOHN JOSEPH CLENDENIN.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND GENERAl, I AXt) AGENT,
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS TERRITORY.
REFERENCES :
ROOSEVELT & SoNs, and ) Y
JAMES B. MURRAY, Esq. SNew York.
JACKso', RIDDLE & Co. Philadelphia.
TOLAND & AERSTON', P
JAMEs FINDLAT, Esq., Pittsburg.
H-on. JAMS BUCHANAN, )
lion. SAMUEL McKEAN, Pennsylvania.
Hon. GEO. CHAMBERS,
May 17-2aw3m
G-AME OF SOLITAIRE.-Just received for
" sale at the Snuff, Tobacco, and Fancy Store,
Pennsylvania Avenue.
May 17 LEWIS JOHNSON.
TIRAYED) OR STOLEN from the Washing
ton Race Course, on the night of the 7th inst.
a bay filly three years old,one white hindl foot,a small
star in the forehead, the hair rubbed off across the
breast, about five feet high, tail disposed to curl
a little, remarkably clean legs, shows a high bred
nag. Also, at the same time, a light sorrel horse,
five years old, with a star in the forehead, flaxen
mane and tail, paces well. A suitable reward will
be given if delivered to the subscriber at Brown's
Hotel, or information so that I get them; and if'
with the thief, (I believe they were stolen,) I will
give a reward of fifty dollars.
N. OLIVER.
March 9-dtf
MtpHE subscriber hereby gives notice that ap-
- plication will be made to the next Congress
of the Uni'ed States of America, at their next ses-
sion, for the renewal of a patent granted to WVil-
lard Earl, being a patent for a machine for sawing
shingles, dated 28th d(lay of December, 1822.
WILLARD EARL,
of tie county of Albany and State of New York.
May19-lam3m
ARMER'S MAPS OF MICIIGAN and Frm
er's Maps of Ouisconsin, on a very large
scale, with land sections, &e. (quite new) this
morning received for sale by F. TAYLOR.
May 5
1IAGRAM OF THE FLOOR OF THE
"jD SENATE-New edition, improved and
corrected up to this date (27th May,) is this day
issued from the press, and for sale by
F. TAYLOR,
at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
east of Gadsby's Hotel.
** The only edition of the above, which has
any claim to correctness, is the one bearing the
name of the advertiser; all others are calculated to
mislead, and r.re -worse than useless.
M ty27. F.T.


NOTiICE.
HATYC OFTHE METROPOLI.?~


COLUMBIAN HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY
"L HE Third Annual Exhibition of Flowers,
i Fruits, and Vegetables,has been fixed to take
place at the City Hall on Wednesday and Thurs-
day, the 8th and 9th days of June next.
The following gentlkmcn have been named a
Committee of Arrangements, viz:
WVx. Rice, Chairman.
J. F. Callan, Joshua Pierce,
Rob. Dick, J. A. Smith,
J. S. Guiinell, Alex'r Suter,
P. Mauro, Win. Yeates,
Alex'r McWiliiams, Rob. Barnard.
The committee respectfully invite a renewal,
on this occasion, of that zealous co operation by
the friends of the society in the District, which
has hitherto produced such noble, beautiful, and
encouraging displays, in every branch. Those
who purpose to add their contributions to the
Floral Department are informed that, on appriz-
ing any one of the committee of their wishes in
that behalf, their plants, shrubs, and flowers, will
be conveyed to and from the place of exhibition
at the society's cost, and careful persons will be
employed in their transportation, to insure their
return to their respective owners without injury.
The committee are aware of the disastrous con-
sequences of a repetition of a 19ng and most severe
winter. Yet they are well assured that such diffi-
culties have only stimulated the real friends of the
good cause to renewed exertions; and that as tlihy
have once "put their hands to the plough, they
will not turn back."
It has been further resolved, that upon timely
application by non-residents of the District, wish-
ing to exhibit their collections on this occasion,
they will ba permitted to do so, and that appropri-
ate situations for their advantageous display of them
will be reserved.
The attention of the market gardeners is recalled
to the volunteer prize specified below, offered by
a member of the Society.
By order of the Committee of A-rangements.
WM. RICHI, Chairman.
May 21,1836.

PRIZE.-Silver Cream and Sugar Ladle, value
six dollars, for the best specimen, size, quality,
flavor, and prolific bearing (being all taken into
consideration,) of Strawberries, not less than two
quarts, exhibited by market gardeners on the first
day of the Society's exhibition for the year 1836.
The exhibitor is to accompany them with a declara-
tion of their being the product of his own raising,
and with a description of the name of the variety,
age of the plants, soil whereon grown, exposure,
and mode of cultivation throughout. The award
of this prize to be made on the first day, and the
delivery of it to the successful competitor to take
place on the second d(lay of the exhibition.
But if the exhibition be postponed beyond the
usual season for Strawberries, then the prize shall
be for Raspberries, upon the same conditions.
May 25-3t
OTSPUR.-This distinguished Stallion will
be let to-common bred Mares the remainder
of the season at $20; the rough brcd Mares as be-
fore. W. IL. WHITE.
May 24-3t*
FOR SALE.


LIST OF LETTERS,
Remaining in tie Post Office, Washington city,
June 1, 1836.
0C3 Persons inquiring for letters in the following
list, will please say they are advertised.
A Labarde Placide
Alexander Mrs. C. F. Logan George
Anderson Charles E. Lumbarde Albert
Adams John Langley Charles H.
Ashton Leonard & JanesLederel Leonhard
Armstrong Christopher Lederei Baron de
Armstead Col. John Libbey Mrs. Barbara
Allen Henry Lucas Josiah M.
Adams William Lindsley Abraham B.
Anderson William Little Franklin W.
Anderson Dr. William Lowry Mrs. J. H.
Adams Demas Liemier Louisa
Anderson James MadisonLilly Miss M. E.
Auford Mary Lyn*h Eugene H.
B Lane Nelson 2
Ball Catesby Ap HenryLee Samuel
Boldt T. H. Lynch James
Brim Jacob 2 Laine Charles
Brown William Locke Charles A.
Bean Maj. Jonathan L. Locke Q. L. 2
Brown Charles B. Le Moyne Mr.
Brown John M
Barnes Isaac 0. 3 Mason & Webb
Brooks Benjamin Morgan Henry
Brown, jr. Henry 2 Messerschmidt Justus
Brown George Temple-Martin Col G. W.
man Murray, Miss Margaret
Bunce William J. Morrison David
Beal James 2 Marshall John
Bowles Miss Sarah Magruder Lt. J. B.
Beans Seley Mullay Maj. J. C.
Blake Walter M. Mosby R. H.
Brown Mrs. Rebecca Murray Charles
Bell Henry L. Morgan Capt. Charles
Briscoe Miss Ann Maynadier Lt. Win.
Bronaugh Win. J. Macy Daniel P. 2
Batman Lt. M. W. 3 Mullin Basil
Broadhead D. I). Myers Mrs. Ann M.
Baker Major R. L. Miller James R.
Boatman Miss Ann Me.
Bancker J. W. McRea James M.
Buckley Thomas McKowen John
Berry Z ichariah Magruder J. B.
Bruen Herman McKinley Miss Mary
Byrum Okeley H. 2 McCormick James
Baltzer Capt. Thomas T.McDrugald Gen. Dan.
Braiden Miss Elizabeth Mclntosh Thomas
Bradley Daniel McAfee James C.
Bronson Arthur McColgan John 2
Bootman Miss Nancy McDevitt Anthony
Baker John H. McDonald Mrs. Ann
Butler Henry F. MeGuire John
Bowen John N
Bartlett Abner Neale Mrs. Mary W.
Bartow William A. Northup Lt. Lucius B.
Besan'on L.A. 2 Newman Richard M.
Broadrup George Nelson Thomas
Bradbury Miss M. K. Nichelson James
C 0
Clark Lot Otis Harrison Gray
Coles Tucker Otis James F. 3
Cripps Win. M. L. 2 O'Neal John
Capp George Oxley Charles
Clark Ranson Osbourn Nicholas
Case Horace Orr Isaac 2


LEVERAL American Mocking Birds, corn- Craig Dr. John E.
S only called English Mocking Birds, of (Ctamrnes Peter A.
the very best kind, !nd warranted to be gcod 'Cram Edward L. 2
singers, and all male birds; to be had with or Combs Henry L.
without cages, and directions will be given to Crane Edward L.
any person for their food. Applyto k'rolle Richard K.
JOHN KREEMvER, Colcher William
D. st. between 12th and 13th. Colby A.
May 25-d2wcod2w Carson Samuel P.
Clement Col. Jefferson
C A U TION. C ossfield George
N OTICE is hereby given, that the patent grant- Compau Antonie
Sed to me for cleansing and dressing Feathers, Cusheva David
dated Fbrt;-ry 7th, 1814, has bhen r nswf-^ s-i. G-orfis i'hioWa* -'
a more correct specification according to the act Colvill,jr John
of Congress in such case made and provided; and Colgan John M.
that this renewed patent is dated October 17th, Ca:-roll Wlliam
1835, and has been submitted to the examination Curtiss James
of learnal counsel, who have pronounced it to be Cary Josiah Addison
valid, and the invention well secured to the Pa- Clara Elizabeth
tentee. Now, therefore, this is to caution all per- Cheves Alexander 2
sons against using without my license and consent, Croison Mrs. Ellen
my invention, or any of the different modifications Cissell Mrs. Emeline
of it, with which some portions of the community Crandell Joseph
have benn deceived by designing m in w'-o prefer Clement Jacob
pilfering to an honest livelihood, as I am, deter- Corrick T.
mined to prosecute all infiingements on my right, Clements R.
to the full extent and utmost rigor of the law. Cattine Miss Jane
GEORGE REYNOLDS, Patentee. Cutman Mrs. Ann M.
East Hat/ford, dpil 15/h, 1836.-d3t Coody William S. 2


r "HE LAWS OF ETIQUETTE, o'" short
3J. Rules and RWflections for conduct in Scc.e-
ty, by a Gentleman: one small volume.
Just published, and for sale by
May24 F. TAYLOR.


CHEAP LAW BOOKS.
T HE LAW DIC'IONARY, explaining the
Rise, Progress and preseiit sta'e of the
British Law, defining and interpreting the terms
or words of Art, and compiisiu.g also copious in-
formation on the subjects of Trade and Govern-
nwent, by Sir Thomas E. Tonsline, with extensive
additions by Thomas C. Granger; first American
from the fourth London edition,3 vols. 8vo. $11 00.
Cruise's Digest of the Laws of England, re-
specting Real Property, fourth AmAerican edition
6 voNs. $12in 3, 00.
Reports of Cases argued and determined in the
Court of Exchequer, 6 vols., calf (published at
$27 00.) $21 00.
Chittev's General Practice of the Law in all its
Departments, with a view of Righlts, Injuries, and
Remedies, 3 vols. 8vo. bouad. $13 00.
Do. 3d vol. alone, bound. $5 50.
Laws of the United States complete.
Elliott's Diplomatic Code, and all other law
publications on the very lowest terms.
May 25 PIStEY THOMPSON.
-,, OR RENT,-The pleasant Dwelling House
Sat the corner of Foxali's row, south side of
Bridge street, Georgetown. Also, the, Store un-
der the dwelling. Apply to
SAM'L McKENNEY,
May 24-3t Georgetown.
T"_ARLEY'S MAGAZ1NE, in parts and vo-
1h- lumes, can always be had, wholesale and re-
tail, at the lowest prices, from
KENNEDY & ELLIOTT,
May 24. In the Athenaeum
NO ICE.
rNSHIS is!o give notice that the subscriber has
_-_ obtained from the Orphans' Court of Wash-
inzton county, in the District of Co umbia, letters


Capron Lieut. E. A. 5
D
Daun T.
Day John
Daie George
Dawe Patsy D.
Dash Daniel B.
Dungan H MI
DePe)ste William 2
Duvall Miss Elizabeth
Douglass William B.
D)ielman Henry 2
Duncan John
Dulany Miss Elizabeth
l)ixon S. F.


Pratt I. Tabor
Payne Benj. E.
Pierce Maj. B. K.
Peck J. M.


Porter Pass. Mid. David
Paton Miss S.
Prentiss H. L..
Persico L.
Preston Col. John
Parham John G.
Plummer Samuel A.
Pierc-,e _c.ob H.
Palnw ASittrew 2'
Phillips Aaron
Palmer Strange N. 2
Palmer James H.
Penny Joseph
Peters William
Parrish Brig. Gen. R. C.
Q
Quinlan Frederick
R
Reed Miss Mary Ann
Read Clement H.
Rodd Charles H.
Rice Rev'd. Luther
Rogers Mrs. Maria. 2
Ricketts R.
Ramsay Mrs. Elizabeth
Roberts Mrs.
Ritchie Henry
Rawlings James H.
Richardson Mr.
Richards Felix
Robertson Miss MaiXI
Randell,jr. John
Reigart Miss Henrietta
Russell D.
Rogers Johnson
Rogers George I. 3
Rogers Gen. John
Ramsay Capt. Wm. 3
Reynolds J. N. 3
Royall R.


Dowling Miss Catharine S
D)ouglas John T. Smith Morgan L.
Doty James D. Smith Eliza
Daughaday Archibald Smith John
DIzierozyuski MonsieurSoule P.
D)oughaday Henry Shreeve Samuel
Dicksin James 4 Smith Benjamin P.
Dupais Gustave Schwartz C.
Dixon %lichael Spence Thomas A.
Davis Mrs. Catharine Smith Jcseph W.
Davis Lt. Charles H. Simms Miss Emily
Uarna'son MajorJohn H. Swett Col. Joseph
E Smith Elizabeth A.
Ellis Edmond Smith FrancislJ.
Serving Major J. Snook Isaac W.
Ellery C. Smith William
Easton Capt. T. S. 2 Scott William B. 2
Evans Es wick Smith John H.
Elgen George Smith Henry K.
Edwards Benjamin S. 2 Schermerhorn J. F.
F Sheppard Augustus L.
Ford Miss Catharine St. Clair Miss Gertrude
Fis.k Charles B. Shepherd T. Perkins
French Lt. E. Sans James W.
Frye, Thos. B. J. Sealey Morris 2
Fitzhugh Mead Sherburne J. H.
Fletcher Thomas Stoddart J. T.
FPoier William Sterling Mico
Fitzpatfick John Sullivan Roger
Fisher Charles. Simonton Lt. J. P.
G Stickney B. F. 2


Howard Mrs. Jane F.
Hamilton Jrames W.
Holland H.
Holabird W. S.
Handy Charles N.
Howell John H.
Halder Mr.
Henry Miss Elizabeth
K. 2
Handy Henry S. 2
J
IztrdLt. J. F. 2
Jordan Miss Amelia
Johnson, sen. Col. John
Johnson Mrs. Elizabeth
Ann
Johnson John H.
Johnson John M.
Jarvis Dtming
Jones James G. 2
JonesMiss Sally
Jones E. P.
Jones Gen. Augustus 2
Jones Lt. F. L.

K
Keene William B.
Kavanaugh Rev. B. T.
Kingsbury Lt. J. B
Kelly Robert 3
Kingsberry Sanford
Kubback Daniel.


Wells Laman G.
Ward Ann (colored)
West Lt. Edward L.
Ward Major Joseph D.
Waller A. P.
Worsley N.
Wilson Rev. John S.
Walker Mrs. Catharine
Watson James
Whiting Lieut. C. J.
Weaver Miss Ann M.
Winslow George
Willard J. D.
Waller Gen. C. C.
Whitehead W. A.
Willey George
Weaver Mrs. Jane
Weaver John
Walker Geo. K.
Washington Geo. A.
WVittlesey Mrs. Anna
Wilson J. C.
Winne James
Wilcoxson Jesse P.
Williamson George M. 2
Williams L. M.
Watson M. D E.W.
Walker Mrs. Patsy R.
Y
Young Micajah 2
z
Zabriskee Dr. C. B.


The inland postage on letters to be sent, by
ship must, in a!l cases, be paid; otherwise they will
remain in this office.
WM. JONES, P. M.
TO THE PUBLIC.
T IHE cotton planters of the south are deeply
interested in an inquiry which has been re-
cently suggested as to the production of cotton in
its natural state of various colors. Mr. Lyford of
Baltimore first assured me of the very important
fact that it could be done; and in proof of it he gave
me specimens of these various colors, and also ex-
hibited the seed which had been presented to him
at Chili. Of these varieties, the "light nankeen"
and a "beautiful brown" were shown me.
In a recent publication of my own, entitled the
"Memoir of Samuel Slater, connected with the
History of the Culture and Manufacture of Cot-
ton," I have alluded to this important discovery.
In the further prosecution of my inquiries at
Washington, CAREY SELDE N, Esq., informed me,
that in settling the estate of Commodore Thompson
it was found, that in his lifetime hlie had brought
from Chili specimens and samples of the "light
brcwn," and the light lilac."
He had also brought home with him the seeds
of these various colors, with a laudable desire of
introducing their cultivation, and the seed was
given to the Hon. ,John Forsyth, Dixon H. Lewis,
and Mr. Davis; but upon trial, the seed was found
too old for vegetation.
Thus the death of Commodore Thompson unfor-
tunately prevented the introduction of this new
and valuable article.
I have thought proper to bring these facts to
the notice of all cotton planters, for the purpose
of interesting them in this subject, and; for the
purpose of illLiting their investigation of the mat-
ter, by inquiry and experiment.
GEOR1GE S. WHITE.
PHILADEELPHI A ay 25, 1836.
June 1
1IORE NEW GOODS.-The subscribers
have this day received an additional supply
of seasonable Goods, to which they invite the at-
tent ion of purchasers. Among which are the fol-
lowing:
1 cartoon French worked lace and muslin
Capes,
5 do do and Swis$ worked Collars,
SPlain, itgured, and plaid Silks,
Black Silks of every description,
Superior back Bombasin and Challeys,
Fashionable Shawls and Handke chiefs,
Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs, (a large supply)
Silk and Cotton Hosiery, Gloves, &c.
'Parasols and Umbrellas,
Ginghams, thintzes, Lawns, and Muslins,
Cambric, Book, and Swis-s Muslins, &c.
ALSO-50 pieces Canton Matting, white and
colored,
100 pieces Russia and Irish Sheetings, and Ta-
ble Diapers,
150 do. superior Iri-h Linens,
250 do. Shn'ting and Sheeting Cottons,
A general assortment of Goods for gentlemen's
wear, of the most fashionable kind, all of which
wiil be sold cheap, by
R. C. WASIIINGTON & CO.
June 1-3t


BRUSSiELS CARPETINGS OF NEW
AND HANDSOME PATTERNS.
F ''Hl; subscribers have just received 1,500
yards Brusse!s Carpetings of superior
quality
5 cas(s 12-4 superfine Russia and Irish Sheet.
in )s
1 case 6-4 and 5-4 do.
1 do. 8 4 and 10 4 Russia table Diaper of the
best quality, warranted pure
Damask Napkins
Huckerback and B'rdseye Diapers
3 cases 4-4 Irish Linens, very cheap
Colored damask Table Cloths and Napkins.
Together with a large assortment of other staple
and fancy goods, at reduced prices,
May28-3t DARIUS CLAGITT & CO.
NGLAND in 1835, by VoN ItAuUEi, in one
volume, is just published, and this d:i) re-
ceived, for sale by F. TAYLOR.
June 1
C OLERIDGE's Letters, Conversations, arid
Recollections, in one volume, is jist pti.b-
lished, and for sale by F. TAYLOR.
June 1


SADDLE, HARNESS, AND TRUNK
BUSINESS, IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.
WAMES VANSANT, KING STREET, ALEXAN-
J DRIA, (D. C.) next door to the FCanklin
House, in tendering his grateful acknowledgments
to his friends and the public for the distinguished
patronage hlie has received from them, begs leave
to assure them that, with an ample supply of the
most choice materials, lie will be able to render
entire satisfaction to those who may please to
favor him with their business, either by order or
personal application, and that he will sell all arti-
cles in hs l.ne as low as they can be procured in
Baltimore or elsewhere.


INDUSTRY.
r THIS thorough bred racehorse wil
again occupy his old stand at my
stable, eight miles from Winchester,
-lJ ,eight from Newtown, eight from Bat-
tietown, four from Millwood, and two and a half
from the White Post-and be let to mares at 15
dollars the single leap, if paid within the season;
if not paid within that time, the season price will
be charged. $25 the season, payable on the first
of August, and $40 for insurance, to be paid as
soon as the mare is known to be with foal. (Part-
ing with the mare, or irregular attendance at the
stAnd, forfeits the insurance.) In every case 50
cents cash to the groom, to be sent with the mare.
Mares put by the season or leap last yeae, that
did not prove with foal, will be insured at the sea-
son price this year. Mares from a distance will
be furnished with pasturage without' charge,
Those wishing to put mares' early in season, can
have them furnished with provender of every de-
scripti n at a moderate price. Care will be taken
to avoid accidents and escapes, but I will not be
accountable for them.
Industry is a beautiful dark brown 16 hands
and one quarter of an inch high, :wel years old
this spring, and is one of the largest and best form-
ed thorough bred sons of his distinguished sire (Sir
Archy.) His performances under his former name
(Niger) and his present name, rank him with the
best horses for speed and bottom, and as a foal
getter he is inferior to none. IE one of Ihis races
over the Baltimore course, he ran 4 miles in 7
minutes and 53 seconds.
PEDIGREE -Industry was by Sir Archy, his dam
by Bali's Florazel, his grand dam Celia, by Wil-
dair, great grand dam Lady Bolingbrbke by Pan-
taloon, great great grand dam Cadiz by King He.
rod, by old Fearnought out of Kitty Fisher; Cadiz's
dam was Primrose, who was got by Dove, who
was got by Old Crab, who was got by Stilly, whose
(lam was Selima, who was got by the Godolphin
Arabian.
PERFORtMAcEs.-October, 1827, when three
ye-irs old, he ran for the post stake over the New-
market course, which he won in fine style. Next
week, over the Tree Hill course, he won the
sweepstakes. Next spring, (4'years old,) he was
beaten over Broad Rock course, 4 mile heats, by
Sally Hope-a good race. He was then taken t
Bahltimore, and won the 3 mile heats, beating
Bachelor. Fall of the same year, at Washington,
hlie won the colt's purse, 2 mile heats; next day lihe
won the Jocky Club purse- 3 mile heats, beating
Molatto, Mary, and othe: Next week, at Balti
more, won the 4 mile eats, beating Bachelor.
May, 1829, (then 5 years old,) over the Washing-
ton course, be won the Jocky Club purse, 4 mile
heats. Next fall he was beaten over the Hagers-
town course, in which race he broke down, and
has never started since.
INDUSTRY will only be permitted to attend to
four mares a day, at intervals of four hours, and in
no Instance will any part of this advertisement be
deviated from. Mares put by the season this spring
that do not prove with foal, will be permitted
to go to him throughout the fill season, without
any' additional charge,
INDUSTIT has as yet but few cots old enough
to train. Of those that have been trained, Dr
Duvall's Slender, Thomas J. Godman's Camsidel,
G. L. Stocket's Cippus and Miss Maynard, Gov
Sprigg's Houtensras and Atalanta, G. W. Duvall's
Prince George, Ch. S. W. Dorsey's Nelly Webb,
Pobert Ghiselir,'s Haidee have, been running with
eclat to themselves, and their sire, over the Wash-
ington, Baltimore, Upper Marlborough, and
Charleston courses, contrasting with the get of the
best stallions in the land, and, in almost every in-
stance, winning the prize.-See the Turf Re-
gister.
The season has commenced, and will end on the
,1lst of July. H]PTOR BELL,
arch 10 "inrinia.
Hve WASHING ['ON LIME KILNS, on the
:r, Canal, near Georgetown, having recently
changed owners, are now in full operation, and a
constant supply of the best lime will be kept for
sale, at lower prices than any ini the District. Ap-
ply to ROBERT SPEIDEN,
May 28-2olm On the premises.


SECOND WARD ELECTION.
OTICE is hereby given, that an election will
jbe held at the house of JOHN DOUGLASS
on the first Monday in June, 1836, between the
hours of 10 o'clock A. M., and 7 o'clock P. M.,
for Mayor, and one member of th# Board of Al-
dermen, for the term of two years, and three
members of the Board of Common Council, for
the term of one year, to represent said Ward in
the respective Boards.
JOHN McCLELLAN,
A. B1. WALLER,
LEWIS JOHNSON,
May 30 Commissioners.
m AiL EXPEDITEDj BETWEEN WASH-
INGTON CITY AND NEW ORLEANS.-
On Tuesday the 26th of April, the mail for Rich-
mond and Petersburg will leave Bradley's wharf
in this city, by 3 A. M., arrive same day at Rich-
mond by 8j P. M., and at Petersburg by 12 at
nW-ht. Leave Petersburg every day at 2, A. M.,
arive at Richmond by 5j, A. M., and Washington
city same day by 10, P. M.; thus gaining half a
day between this city and Richmond and Peters-
burg; and from thence it will be further expedi-
ted to New Orleans.
Travellers, in passing between the several east-
ern atlantic cities and Mobile and New Orleans,
wi!l find this line to be the most certain and expedi-
liou,, as therewiM be no interruption in their tir-
vel between the city of New York, and New Or-
leans.
They will be carried over the railroad between
Roanoke and Petersburg, between Richmond and
Fredericksburg, and between Washington city
and Baltimore, &c &c. And when conveyed on
water, in first rate low pressure steamboats.
JAUDON, WOOLFOLK & Co.
April 22-taw8w


EAGLE HOTEL,
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.
--7- Tile subscriber having taken this large,
-;i'f-" spacious and commodious establishment,
I embraces this manner of informing his
friends and the public of the fact, the
central situation of %v which is so generally known, he
deems it unnecessary to mention it; and profes-
sions of capability to keep the good things of this
life are so common and useless, that lie will con-
tent himself by saying, give him a fair trial, and if
he does not prove worthy of patrona.e,desurt him.
CHARLES C. WORD.
N. B.-AllI the principal stage offices are kept at


9100 DOLLARS REWARD.
T HE undersigned having, after many years ex-
perience, succeeded in making, as he be-
lieves, the finest Pistols in the United States, has
juit ascertained that imitations of them, engraved
or stamped with his name, are now in the market.
These Pistols are known by the title of the "DE-
RINGER & ARMS LRONG Pistols." The un-
dersigned will give one hundred dollars reward
for the proof that shall convict the man or men,
who are practising this fraud on the public fn lis
name.
The following certificate is made public, not
only in proof that this fraud is practised, but
that the Mr. Smith named in it may enjoy the
satisfaction of being thus publicly met by a de-
nial of his assertion, that he got the Pistols"
referred to (in the certificate) "of Mr. Derin-
ger, in Philadelphia." That declaration the un-
dersigned pronounces to be FALSZ.
Those who may be curious to see this imitation
of the Deringer & Armstrong Pistol, may have
that opportunity by calling on the uindersigned at
his residence, No. 370 north Front street,Philadel-
phia. HENRY DERINGER.
Philadelphia, 4pril 28, 1836.

The Certificate.
I, Joseph Vann, of the Cherokee nation, do
hereby certify, that at a sale of the property of
John Walker, Jr: deceased, I was about to pur-
chase a brace of pistols, and Joseph Smith,' of
Bledsoe county, in the State of Tennessee, dis-
suaded me from the purchase, saying he was go-
ing to the cast, and would bring me a brace for
less money. I wished to purchase oDeringer's *
make, -and gave Smith. the dimensions wbo, when
he returned, brought me the pistols I have sur-
rendered to Mr. Deringer, and charged me'*thir-
ty-fi've dollars. Smith said be 1ad, in $Ierqon,
got them from Mr. Deriner, in Phil(phii, and
Mr. Deringer says the pistols are counterfeit,*and&
never purchased from him. Given undd4my#
hind, this 23d April, 1836,
JOSEPH VANN.
May 31-eod6t
The Flag of the Union, Ala.; M eissippian,
Mi.; Courier, La; A ertiser, Cincinnati, 0.;
Advertiser, Louisville, Ky., and the Union, Tenn.
will please publish the above advertisement to.
the amount of $2 each, and charge the, Globe
Office. *
SHELL COMBS AND PERFUMERIES.-
S The subscriber has on hand for Mail, an ex-
tensive assortment of Tortoise Shell, and all othgr
kinds of fashionable Combs at mnafttufactory -rices,
for cash only. r
LEWI JOHNSON,
Next door to Mr. P. Thompson's Book Store;
Pennsylvania Avenue.
P. S. All kinds of perfumeries of the veryast
quality for sale as above. May
A SERVANT WOMAN WANTED, for the
general work of a small family. Goo Ire-
cnmmendations required; and to such good w;to
and prompt payment. Apply to L
# J. F. CAtLAN,
May 26 Opposite the Post Office,. ,
J. F. CALLAN,
Corner of E and 7th streets, opposite te 9ost O0ce,
O FFERS for sale, Drugs and Chemicals,Pa-
tent and Family Medicines, Paints, Oils,
Window Glass, Dye Stuffs, Surgical Instruments,
Perfumery, Garden Seeds, E1ancyv Sos and Cos-
metics, Stationary, &c. &c. Agentor Rowand's
Tonic Mixture-Proprietor of Sfagner's Patent
Truss. 4
May 26
NOTICE.
T HE Public are hereby notified that, as I am
about to leave the city on pub c duty, I have
appointed my wife, .M%. Johanna Howle, and Pe.
ter Cazenove, Esq., my attorneys during my ab-
sence.
May 26--3t PARK G. HOWLE.
WAREHOUSE AND WHARF FOR RENT.
NE-HALF of the Stone Warehouse and
Wharf on G street, below,"Georgetovn, is
for rent, which will be modei-at-.'
"The building is about 100 by 50 feet, divided
in four equal houses,%ur stories high, with stone
walls of two and a half to three feet thick, and
good dry cellars.
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal runs in the
rear of ,the buiklingwith afbo#l g0 feet Jharf,
andrinfront the wharituna to tiSxwejaridh 15 to
(io feet water. *
Apply to the subscriber, or to
H. T. PAIRO, 7th and D streets.
THOSE. W. PAIRO,
G street wharf, below Georgetown.
May 26-3t
GENERAL MACQMB'S NEW WORK ON
TACTICS, will be received this day, for
sale by F. TAYLOR.
May 26
ILLINOIS LAND FOR SALE.-As Trustee
for the creditors of TaoMrs JANSiEY & Co., and +
Agent for the United States, I offer for sale the


tract of Land in the American Bottom, Randolph
county, Illinois, formily the residence of Niniaij
Edwards, and supposed to contain about 1,46?
acres. This land lies on the public roadleading
from Kaskaskia to St. Genavieve, Missouri, is
bounded southwesterly by the river Mississippi, ad
is represented by those who have seen it to be
very fertile. It has on it the house occup by
Governor Edwards, is part*r open, and occupied
by tenantry. Money has lately been rerit ted
through the Honorable Mr. Reynolds, member of
Congress from the district, to pay the taxes up to
this year, and it is believed no arrearages of any
kind are due; but to prevent all disputes and diffi-
culties, I guaranty nothing; and the purchaser, who
must investigate for himself, will be liable for any
that may be due, but, at the same time, will be
entitled to all arrearages of rents, &c. due to the
land.
Acting only as Agent and Trustee, I, of course,
convey nothing beyond my powers, though the
title is believed to be unexceptionable.
References is made to Judge Parz and SDYy
BREtEZE, 1Esq. of Carlisle, and DAVID J. BAKEmt,
Esq. of Kaskaskia, who are competent to give any
needful information.
I invite proposals, payable in cash, and expect
to sell bythe 1st of July.
GEORGE JOHNSON.
Alexandria, May 2.
0,' The Missouri Republican and tlW State pa-
per at Vandalia will please to insert the above
twice a week for four weeks, and send their ace
counts to the office of the National Intelligencer
for payment May 4-2aw4w


URE AND CHOICE SHERRY WINES.-
P. Mauro & Son are selling the remainder
of the extensive consignment of these very supe-
rior wines, embracing three qualities, at private
sAle, at the auction prices, with a view to a final
close' of the concern. Purchasers tare requested
to make early application.
May 30-6t
I RITISH AND FOREIGN MEDICAL RE-
VIEW, or Quayterly Journal of PracticalIe-
dicine and Surgery; edited by John Forbes and
John Conolly, M. D.,F. R. S. &c. Thefirstandse- 4


I









CONGRESSIONAL.

SPEECH OF MR. HILL,
O() NRW HAMPSHIRE.
J.n Senate, Ma]y..27, 1836-On Mr. BENTON'S ex-
punging resolutions.
Mr. PRESIDENT. t! e preamble and rcso!ution of
the Senator from Tennessee, (Mr. White,) which
have be en introduced as a substitute, are of that
hermaphrodite character that pleases neither side,
and being abandoned on all hands, must fall to the
ground. 'They are only important so far as they
countenance the principal argument that has been
i Urged against expunging the record; and it is re-
nrarkablt that the burden of the song has been,
rot that the condemnatory resolution was right, but
1hat it was a violation of the constitution to ex-
npunge wh;t was clearly wrong from the journal
*'E:ach House shall keep a journal of its pro-
ceedings, tnd from time to time publish the same."
]leie is a positive act to be performed; and when
the act is done, the injunction is fully complied
with. If it were intended to apply to all journals,
:as relating to this or that particular session of the
Senate, theQ language would have been so definite
as not to be mistaken. If it had been intended to
keep ar.d press erve the original manuscript journal,
-language conve) ing that idea would have been
used. The mandate of the constitution has been
fully complied smith, when the journal has been
kept a sufficient time to "publish the same."
Copies are then multiplied, so there can be no
mistake as to what the journal contained; and any
subsequent vote of either House to expunge any
particular part of any single copy of the journal,
is no more a violation of the injunction to keep a
journal, than it is of that part of the constitution
which authorizes the people to elect members of
the IIouse of Representatives.
The Senator from Virginia, (Mr. Leigh,) probably
as an offset to the resolutions recently passed by
the Legilature of hls State, directing the Senators
from that State to present and vote for expunging
the condemnatory resolution from the journal, a
few (dlys ago presented a memorial from John
Timberlake, and others of that State, against ex-
punging. 'These memorialists consider the propo-
skion to expunge to be "a plain and palpable vio.
Mlion of the constitution, and it is remarkable that
they offer the following as the only reason against
its constitutionality.
"Suffice it to say, that to their humble under-
standinf, 'to keeF," as here used by the consti-
tution, means to preseri, and that the latter clause
of the. constitutional provision, as previously quo.
t~ d, furnishes a key to the interpretation of that
which precedes it, since it would be obviously im-
possible topublish the journal from time to time, ii
suchljoiWeal had not been' kept and preserved."
tHere'% an admission that the journal is to be
preserved only for the purpose of being published.
'What is the fthference? It can be no other than
* that4'l4n thus kept, the whole purpose of the
constitution- h1s been complied with. 1 will here-
' after make inquiry for what other purpose the
journal can be kept. In relation to the keeping
of the journal of the House of Representatives
thirty-five years, I have received information
from the clerk in the following letters:
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, U. S.,
.pril 6, 1836.5
DExaI SiP In answer to the inquiry contained
'in your letter of this morning, I have to state thai
* the original rough mauscrrpt journal of the House
of Representatives of the United States (those
read on the mornings) have not been preserved tc
aaperiodlanlerior to the commencement of the
first session, eighteenth Congress, (1823, '4.)
For your further information, I enclose you a
copy of a communication from Mr. Burch on the
subject. *i
With very grcat respect, I am, sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. S. FRANKLIN,
Clerk H. R. United States.
lIon. ISAAC HILL,
United States Senate.

OFFICE, HOUSE orF REPS. U. S.
SSApril 6,1836 S
d entered this office a youth, under John Beck.
ley, who was the first clerk of the House of Re-
presentatives uoiaer the present Constitution ol
the United States, and who died in the year 1807.
During the,-recess of Congress he put me al
what was termed* "recording the journal" of the
preceding session, which was to write it off from
the printed copy into a. lathe bound volume. !
inquired of him why it was that it was copied,
when t:;ere were so many printed copies? He an.
swelrd that the printed copies would probably, in
time, disappear from use, &c.-the large*MS. vol.
ume icpuld not ~~t
T he "rough journal," as ,it was then termed,and
is still termed, being the original rough draft read
in the H-ouse on the morning after the day of which
it narrates the proceedings, was not, and had not,
from the beginning, been r;reserved. I inquired
the reason, and was answered, that the printed co
py w the official copy, as it was printed uindei
the official order of the House; and, as errors,
which were sometimes discovered in the iougr


journal, were corrected inthe proofs of the printed
copy, the pi inted copy was the most correct, and
that, therefore, there was no use in lumbering the
office with the "rough journal" after it had been
Sprint d.
Two of Mr. Beckley's immediate successors in
office, Mr. Macgruder and Mr. Dougherty, viewed
? e matter as Mr. Beckley viewed it. I know the fact
rom ha'ing"called their attention to the subject.
I often reflected upon the subject, and it appear.
ed to me to be proper that the "rough journal'
should be preserved; although I could not see
any purpose whatever to be answered by doing
so. I often ponversed with the clerks of the of
fice UWon the subject, lAt as we were only subordi-
nates, the practice was not changed till 1st session
of the 18th Congress, (1823,'4,) when Idetermin.
led, with oticonsulting my superior,that the "Irough
journal" should no longer be thrown away, but
be preserved and bound in volumes; and it has
been regularly preserved and bound since,
With great respect, I am, sir,
*our obedient servant.
S. BURCH.
COI.-WALTER S. FRANKLIN,
Clerk House of Representaives U. S.
By these letters it appears that the original
maftscript journal, the journal which is read in
the morning of every day, succeeding that of the
proceedings, was kept and preserved precisely long
enough to answer the purpose designated by the
* memorial from Virginia. It was kept long enough
,to be plbfshed, when the original journal was
destroyed or laid aside, and a new manuscript
copy was taken from the printed publishedjour.
Ral. Here fre facts in relation to the journal that
cannot be gainsayed; facts which prove, that
efn the destruction of the original manuscript
journal, after that journal has been printed and
published, was never dreamed to be a violation of
that clause of the constitution, which requires
each House of Congress to keep journal of its
proceedings. For the first thirty-five years, in
construing the constitution, plain common sense
had not been driven from our legislative halls by
the refinement of sophistry-the world of argi.
,A 4 44 1 I -


pui'ge, nor even any act of defacing the manu-
scriptjournal, can militate with the mandate of
thia constitution, % which requires each House of
Congress "to keep a journal of its proceedings,
and from time to time publish the same," after the
journal shall have been kept a sufficient length of
time to be published.
Some thirteen years ago, I first visited the
city of Washington, during the sitting of Congress.
The Supreme Court of the United States was at
the same time in session. A gentleman of the
bar, now of the Senate, from Kentucky, (Mr. Clay,)
was engaged before the court on one side of a
case; and another gentleman from the same State,
(Kentucky,) then, and now, a member of the
[House of Representatives, of somewhat rougher
aspect, (Mr. Hardin,) argued the case on the oth2r
t side. I listened attentively to both. The routh-
er gentleman, in the course d" his argument,
talked of tne practice in Kentucky, and with
great nonchalance informed the court how he
gained an important land cause in that State. He
cr, ated, he said, a false or feigned issue before the
sitting of the court, and led the antagonist party
to confine his attention exclusively to the taking
of testimony in relation to that feigned issue.
Keeping the real point a secret from the adverse
party, he carried his case at the triai by surprise.
I Marshall), and Ihtuhrodl Washington, then on the
bench, smiled at the frank expression of the blunt
attorney, who told the story as if he really thought
Slie deserved credit for the trick.
There are many feigned issues, Mr. President;
but few who practise them are as candid as was
this Kentucky lawyer, before the Supreme Court.
When the idea was first broached, that a resolu-
tion having no necessary reference to any existing
laws could not be expunged from the legislative
journal of the Senate, because the constitution re-
quires the Senate to keep a journal of its proceed-
ings, I would not have believed that such a
feigned issue could be entertained so long as
really to have assumed the appearance of settled
seriousness. Surely, in all the expunging that
heretofore has taken place, it never before entered
into the heart of man to conceive such an objec-
tion as this.
It is said the constitution requires a journal to
" be kept; and therefore no part of this journal can
be mutilated, struck out, or destroyed. If it be an
imperative constitutional injunction to preserve,
t there must be some object to be gained by the
preservation. The journal can be useful for no
other purpose, than the preservation of evidence
of proceedings.
All those partsrof the journal relating to laws that
have become obsolete, or to proceedings that are
of no consequence, are valuable only as objects
of curiosity, or as matters of history: the public
interest cou'd not suffer, if such parts were ut-
terly destroyed. The journal of the Senate is
kept and preserved for no other purpose, than to
show when and how laws are passed, and it is of
i as much consequence to preserve the engrossed
bill or resolution in that branch of the Legisla-
ture, in which such engrossed bill or resolution
originated, as it is to preserve the journal of pro-
ceeding, to show the progress and history of the
same bill or resolution. If both the engrossed bill
and the journal were destroyed, the enrolled bill
on parchment would remain, which would be evi-
dence of the existence of the law; and even if that
enrolled bill were destroyed, the law would still
be in existence, if there remained any where pub-
t listed copies, which had been certified as from
the original.
S The object of possessing an official copy of the
journal of legislative proceedings, is simply to pre-
serve collateral evidence that existing laws passed
in due course of legislation: other evidence than
these journals, such as petitions on which laws
are predicated, reports of committees on those
petitions, minutes of reference, original drafts of
bills or resolutions or amendments, may be equally
important; and yet it will not be urged that the
destruction or obstruction of these, either weakens
the force of the law, or violates the constitution.
There are various ways in which the manuscript
journal of the Senate may be obliterated or de-
stroyed. The building may take fire, and that,
with the journal, may be accidentally burned: a
thief may steal it, and carry it off, or bury it in the
water or in the earth: the minutes may take fire
During an evening session, and thus prevent the
SSecretary from copying the proceedings at length.
f The constitution requires journal to be kept:
would all these casualties or acts by which the
t journal shall be destroyed, be so many viola-
- tions of the constitution?
S Even if the resolution now under consideration,
without reciting it, went so far as entirely to ob-
, literate a former resolution that should be deemed
Improper to be retained on the journal, I cannot
Concede that the act of obliteration would be
Unconstitutional. If that resolution were an existing
law, still intended to be kept in force, the act of
Obliteration would no't nullify the law: applied
Sto a simple declaratory resolution that was never
intended to have the force of a law, the oblitera-
, tion cannot harm the people for whose benefit all
I laws are made; and if it does not harm them, it
" can be no infringement of the constitution, such
Sas is worthy of reprobation.
1 marvel much at the pertinacity with which
this question is attempted to be discussed as an
I infrinjrement of the constitution. It seems to me


that, by taking the ground they do, tlie opponents
of the expunging resolution blink the real ques-
tion: it has all the appearance of a mere subter-
fuge. The horns of' this altar will not protect
them-the crylf' "a violated constitution," as it is a
t virtual confession that the people are right in de-
t mending the obliteration of an infamous record,
so it furnishes strong presumptive evidence of
consciousness that the resolution to be expunged
was wrong in itself.
M My object is not, Mr. President, so much to
argue the question of power in the Senate to ex-
" punge, as to show that the sentence of condem-
* nation passed on the Pre sident of the United States
was not only extra-judicial, but unjust; for I con-
ceive it to be a most inglorious evasion that Sena-
tors now say this sentence of condemnation im-
t puted to the President no crime. If the Senators
8 from Louisiana (Porter) and Virginia (Leigh) will
look back to the criminal charges of "high
crimes and misdemeanors" which were almost
daily made in this body two years ago, they may
well conclude that the people of the United States
will repose little fith in the assertion now, that
the resolution of April, 1834, imputed to the
President of the United States no criminal in-
tention. To show that it was the intention to
impute the highest criminality to the President in
the passage of that resolution, the speeches of
more than one Senator who voted for it might be
quoted. One single extract from the speech of
the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Clay) after
the resolution had passed, will serve my purpose:
. IN SENATE, April 30, 1834 -Mr. Clay rose:
"Never," said lie, Mr. president, have I known
or read of an administration which expires with
st o much agony, and so little composure and re-
signation, as that which now, unfortunately, has
the control of public affairs in this country. It
exhibits a state of mind feverish, fretful, and
fidgetty [a beautiful alliteration!] bounding ruth-
lessly from one expedient to another, without any
sober or settled purpose.
"* u i w t
"But I would ask in what tone, temper, and


for the protest is the last stroke upon the last na'l
driven into the coffin (not of Jackson-may he
live a thousand years!) but of Jacksonism!"
In a speech delivered at Concord, New Hamp-
shire, in October, 1834, by a Senator (Mr. Web-
ster) who voted for the condemnatory resolution,
I find the following strong and positive assertion;:
"It is true, that the operation commenced with
the Branch Bank in this State, (New Hampshire )
It was tried to make that bank a political institu-
tion. Men here applied to the President to make
the bank at Portsmouth a political bank. Fhley
wrote to the Secretary of the Treasury to do this.
These are facts-made known to the world-not
disputed."
It never was asserted, then, that the bank
was unconstitutional-that it was a 'monster.' And
there was good reason for this silence. The
bank had taken no part in politics; no one had
been wicked enough to bring it into the political
arena. It is as true as that our fathers fell at
Bunker's Hill, at Lexington, and at Monmouth,
that this outcry against the bank was raised le-
cause the bank refuse t to be made a political en-
gine."-Same speech.
This language was used by that honorable Sena-
tor about the same time that a committee of the
Senate, commonly called the H hitewashiing Com-
mit/tee, reiterated the same and other similar lan-
guage in justification of the Bank and in condem-
nation of those who opposed its recharter.
I intend, in the remarks I have to make, to no-
tice the charge that the operation commenced"
by an attempt on the part of the friends of the ad-
ministration "to make the bank at Portsmouth a
political bank;" and the statement that the bank
had taken no part in politics." The testimony
on which the charge and disclaimer have been
based, is the authority and word of the President
of the bank. I shall confront these statements
generally, with other statements coming from the
same quarter; and if I shall fail to prove by the
President of the bank, that the President of the
bank and the aforesaid Senator charged falsely
when he charged the attempt to make the
Branch Bank at Portsmouth a political engine-
if I shall fail to demonstrate, on the authority of
the President of the bank himself, that he had
entered, with all the money of the bank, into the
political arena, 1 will concede that the friends of
the bank have not been quite as much in the
wrong as the enemies of the bank have alleged.
I understood the Senator from Virginia (Mr.
Leigh) to say, there is no promf of abuses and mis-
conduct of the Bank of the United States, unless
we take charges against the bank for evidence
against the bank. if he intends by this to justify
the resolution of the Senate which condemned the
President of the United States without a hearing-
for it is presumed he would impute these unprov-
ed or false charges against the bank to the Presi.
dent, who has been assailed as the bank's greatest
enemy-I will answer his allegation, that the Presi-
dent is guilty, by making the bank falsify its own
charges, and disprove the bank's innocence by the
confessions of the bank's own principal officer.
The Senator from Virginia says he is strictly and
peculiarly a lawyer, meaning, I presume, a lawyer
as contradistinguished from the legislator or the
politician. Judging from the character of his
speech alone on the expunging resolution, I agree
that his description of himself is correct; for who
so well as the mere lawyer can wrap up the plain-
est proposition in a web of metaphysical subtleties?
To those who place implicit faith in him, all his
propositions and deductions undoubtedly carry the
weight of mathematical demonstration. To my-
self his whole speech appeared in the true charac-
ter of the lawyer, who makes the most for his cli-
ent; his argument was the reversal of that rule
which every plain, unsophisticated mind would
adopt to convince others of the truth as it had con-
vinced itself; he seemed to entrench himself in a
citadel of assumptions, applied to the case as he
would have it; and he afterwards made all his facts
precisely to conform to his assumptions. The late
'Thomas Addis Emmett was once concerned as as-
sociate counsel in a case with Aaron Burr, in which
the latter had the prior management. When the
case was about comi:xg to trial, Emmett asked
Burr what facts they could prove in support of
their client? The answer was, ask not what we
can prove; rather ask what is necessary to be
proved? Here is a specimen of the mere lawyer.
It was in that early age of the practice probably,
when the profe-sion had not learnt to throw off, as
legislators, their ex parte character as lawyers, that
they were excluded from the Britsh Parliament.
"Sir Richard Baker, in his Chronicle, under the
year 1736, records, that the House of Commons
ordered that no man of the law should be returned
as knight of the shire, and, if returned, that lihe
should have no wages." I would by no means
recur to this precedent as a parliamentary prac-
tice at this time binding on either House of Con-
g'iess.
The point on whi h I would first comment, is
the charge which has been so often repeated by
the bank and its friends involved in the contro-
versy, relative to the removal of Mr. Mason from
the presidency of the branch of New Hampshire."
'Ihis charge was not conjured up until nearly
three years after the events to which it alludes
had transpired. It first made its appearance in the
report of' a single member of the committee of the


House of Representatives appointed on the 15th
of March, 1832, to examine and report on the
books and proceedings of the Bank of the United
States "
The committee had been in session twenty-four
days at Philadelphia, (from March 22d to Apri
14th) and were about to close the examination,
when the following proceeding was had:
On motion of Mr. WATMOUG11,
Resolved, That the President of the Bank of
the United States be requested to furnish the com-
mittee with copies of the correspondence between
himself and the Secretary of the Treasury, and
Isaac Hill, late Second Comptroller of theT'reasu-
ry, with reference to charges made against the
official conduct of Jeremiah Mason, President of
the United States Branch B.ink in New Hamp-
shire."
The correspondence, in manuscript, making
more than forty closely printed pages, was pro-
duced by Mr. Biddle on the instant. It bore evi-
dent marks of age, having been thumbed till parts
of it were scarcely legible. The majority of
the committee, it is understood, before that day,
had never heard of this correspondence, nor Had
it entered into the heart of mortal man concerned
in this correspondence, excepting Nicholas Bid-
dile himself, to conceive that it could be tortured
into a purpose or use such as was afterwards made
of it. If a majority of the committee had time
or opportunity to scan this correspondence, they
would by no means suppose that such an infer-
ence could be deduced from it, as seems to have
been discovered by the keen optics of a single
member, (Mr. J. Q. Adams,) and afterwards con-
curred fully in all the statements made, and
principles developed," by another member of the
minority (Mr. J. G. Watmough.) Mr. Adams's
report relative to this correspondence was in the
words following:
I' The complaints made against the president of
the bank at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in the
summer of 1829, and the correspondence be-
tween the board at Philadelphia and the late Se-
cretaries of the Treasury and of' War, form a por-
tion of the documents relating to the books and
proceedings of the bank, called for by the corn-


bank from its vestal purity, into a base political
connexion with the administration.
Having been promulgated by an ex-President
of the United States in the legislative hall, and
thus openly by a director? of the bank, [by a Mr.
Platt, at a public hotel in Trenton, undertaking
to vouch for the truth of Mr. Adams's statement,]
it cannot fail to justify this notice. To be silent
would be to sanction for truth what 1 know to be
false, and deeply prejudicial to my character."
# #
''When the friendly purpose of my letter is
duly appreciated, in connexion with the repeated
declarations pressed upon me of the political
abuses of certain branch banks, in corroboration
of which it was added that the selections of di-
rectors were, in many branches, made entirely
from one political party, it should be rather a
matter of surprise that my suggestions should be
so little obnoxious even to severe and suspicious
criticism. It requires but little knowledge of
the human character to know, that no bank can
be faithfully aind impartially conducted where the
directors are selected from one sect, whatever its
character may be, provided their selection is made
with a view to their sectarian opinions; and when
directors are found thus arranged, however pure
they may be, it will be almost impossible to satisl)
even an enlightened public opinion, that there
may not have been some design in the arrange-
ment. The obvious and natural means to pre-
vent abuse in such a case, as well as to sa-
tisfy public opinion, and even to confound cla-
mor, (which is sometimes necessary in the ad-
ministration of' public affairs,) is to give some
variety to the organization of' the board.-
Such were the reflections which induced the
suggestion of forming suitable 'checks and coun-
terbalances' to preserve a proper equilibrium in
the manageirent of the institution; a measure in
its conception purely admonitory and preserve
tive, not only tending to prevent the pernicious
influence of political bias in the operations of the
bank, but incapable of being perverted to such
abuse; suggested, too, by the constitutional repre-
sei.tative of one-fifth of the whole stock; forms the
solitary point, left by Mr. Biddle. on which it is to be
presumed Mr danis has founded his grave and so-
lrmn charge. I shall not now attempt to show the
difference between a measure proposed to prevent,
and one to promote an abuse, nor enter upon a
discussion of the rights of the constituent or repre-
sentative to advise the agent, or attempt to prove
that what might properly have been addressed to
the directors appointed by the President might,
with the same propriety, be addressed to the
whole board. The question of right is too clear
to admit of a doubt. The character of the pro-
ceeding must therefore depend on its fitness, and
the motives which induced it, on whatever grounds
it shall be placed, I am content to be judged by a
discerning public.
Of Mr. Adams, however unwarrantable his at-
tack upon me, it seems most fit that I should say
as little as possible. A great man has said of him
'that he could not see the truth:' this case is a
striking example of the wisdom of that obser-
vation."
Mr. Ingham says, in the same letter, 1" the Sec-
retary cf tile Treasury, for the time being, is ex-
clusively responsible for all the sentiments con-
tained in his correspondence."
'I'his explanationn of Mr. Ingham, who surely
could hav- no interest to exculpate any person in
the administration other than himself, would seem
to be sufficient. So far as relates to one of the
two departments, he takes to himself exclusively
the responsibility, and denies any and every at-
tempt to exercise an exceptionable or unlawful
control on the part of the government of either the
bank or any of its branches.
Yet in the face of this positive denial of Mr.
Ingham, the directors of the bank (in a report
adopted by a vote of twelve to three, December
3, 1833, many thousands of which report were
gratuitously circulated, and paid for out of the
friends of the bank) reiterate the charge in the
following words:
"It was in the midst of this career of inoffensive
usefulness, whensoon after the accession to pow-
er of the preseittExecutive, the purpose was dis-
tinctly revealed that other duties than those to thle
country were required; and that it was necessary
for the bank, in administering its affairs, to consult
the political views of those who had now ob-
tained the ascendancy in the Executive. II is un-
deirtood that soon after that event, a meeting was
held in Washington of the principal chiefs, to consi-
der, the means of perpelualins' their new auihoiity,
and the possessionof the bank was among the most
prominent objects of the parties assembled. The
first open manifestation of the purpose was in
June, 1829, whena concerted effort was marde by
thle executive officers to interfere in the electionn
of the board of directors at Portsmouth. At the
head of this atteinp was Mr. Levi Wo5dbury, now
a member of tlie present Cabinet at Washiigton,
who did not hesitate to avow in a letter to the
Secretary of the treasuryy, which, though mark-
ed 'confilential,' was subsequently ordered to
be published by thq committee of investigation in
1832,* that he wishedd the interference of the
Government,to remove the President of the branch
at Portsmouth. This letter of Mr. Wood-



bury was transmitted to the bank by the Secreta-
ry of the Treasury, w ho stated that fromm some
expressions in his letter, it may be inferred that
it is partly foundedlon a supposed application of
the influence of tht bank, with a view to political
effect;' in consequence of which, he deemed it
his duty to presentfit to the bank, 'with the views
of the admini traliin in relation to it.' At the
same time, Mr. Isaac Hill, acting as the Comptrol-
ler of the Treasuryiuntil rejected by the Senate,
and now a Senatorof the United States, sent a
memorial from the tnembers of his political party
in the Legislature cf New Hampshire, requesting
the removal of Mr.:Mason. In another commu-
inication presented io the bank, he gave it as his
opinion that no measure, short of Mr. Mason's re.
moval, could tend Ilo reconcile the people of New
Hampshire to the bdnk, and that the friends of
General 'Jackson, ift New Hampshire, have had
but too much reason to complain of the manage-
ment of the branch at Portsmouth.' Finally, the
Secretary at War ottered the transfer of the pen-
sion fund from tho branch bank at Portsmouth,
to another bank in Concord, an fcct so obviously in
violation of the laws, that it was first resisted by
the bank, and then retracted by the Secretary.
"It became then manifest to the bank, that there
was a combined efllrt to render the institution
subservient to political purposes, and that it was
necessary to come to some immediate and dis-
tinct understanding of its rights and duties."
To sustain this reiteration of an already ex-
ploded charge, the managers of the bank are
obliged to resort to!a fiction of their own inven-
tion, for which there is not even the slightest pre.
tence of a foundation. They say "it is under-
stood that soon after that event, a meeting was
held in Washington of the principal chiefs, &c,
and the possession of the bank was among the
most prominent objects of the parties assembled."
Now if there- be any foundation for this story,
coul I not the gentlemen directors furnish some
better evidence than a mere "it is understood?"
Of these "principal chiefs," have we not a right
to suppose !hat either Mr. Ingham or the two
other disaffected members of the Cabinet who re-
tired with him, must have had some knowledge?
and has not each of them discovered at least an in-


$148,000 was thrown under protest: still further
protests were expected, and the actual loss sustain-
ed there will not be less than $112,000. A
confidential officer was despatched to Portsmouth,
who found the affairs of the office in great jeop-
ardy, covered with the wrecks which bad manage-
ment and the most extensive frauds had occasioned.
To retrieve it, it became necessary to select a man
of the first rate character and abilities: such a man
was Mr. Mason."
To correct the "bad management," and "ex-
tensive frauds," there was at no time a change
of direction: the same individuals from that,
to the end of the chapter, continued to con-
trol the bank-the same political coterie at all
times wielded it as their weapon of influence. Mr.
Mason was appointed President--he had been a
director and attorney for the bank before that
time; and he remained associated in the Board
with the same men that controlled it at the time of
" bad management," and the most exten-
sive frauds." Mr. Bidd!e himself says, "Mr.
Mason is only one member of that board,
consisting of the same gentlemen who have had
charge of the branch for many years."
But the management under Mr. Mason, became
from "bad" to "worse." The most profitable and
safe business of the bank had been its country loans
made: in sums of from $500 to $2000 each, under
an agreement that the interest and ten per cent. of
the principal should be checked in every four
months. As the bank had lost in its large loans,
to speculators in factory and other stocks, Mr.
Mason took it into his head that the small debtors
were less safe than the large ones; and violating
the plight'-d faith of the bank, by a circular letter,
called on all to renew their notes every two months,
and at each renewal, to pay twenty per cent. of
the principal. This course, rigid'y pursued,
created a panic at once; and Mr. Mason still fur-
ther contributed to the distress, by taking a large
sum from the circulation, and loaning it in Boston
to his own particular friends and connexions.
Within the town of Portsmouth, the excite-
ment against Mr. Mason became almost universal
among the business men. It was charged on him,that
he arbitrarily changed (by shortenir.g) the periods
of payments of paper amounting to several hun-
dred thousand dollars, reducing the time f)r re-
newals from one hundred and twenty to sixty
days, and increasing each call from ten to twenty
per cent.; that the best paper in the State was re-
fused discount; that he made a run upon one of
the local banks, with a view to stop it; and refused
drafts at sight on a Boston bank, and denied the
P ortsmonth bank time even to send (a six hour's
ride) to Boston, for its money there in deposit;
that the papers,under which the revolutionary pen
sioners had usually drawn, were rejected upon ca-
pricious and technical objections. In conse-quence
of these reasonF, and mainly for the reason that he
threw into jail a citizen, (one of his own political
partly ) by virtue of a process which,as a lawyer, he
issued against him, because he failed to comply
with the requisition which, as President,he exacted
in violation of the terms on which loans were
made, the public indignation against Mr. Mason
became so strong, that his image was hung, and
burnt in effigy in front of his own dwelling.
Mr. Mason had been placed in the office of Pre-
sident and attorney of the bank under a compen-
sation raised from $800 to $2000 per annum. Mr.
Biddle, in his letter to Mr. Ingham, speaking of
Mr. Mason says:--"'Of his entire competency, espe-
cially in detecting the complicated frauds, and
managing the numerous law suits which seemed
inevitable, there could be no doubt." Since
he has been in office, he has been exceedingly use-
ful-has saved the bank from great losses-has
secured the bad debts; nor until Mr. Woodbury's
letter, was I informed of any complaint against
him."
If the bank hed intended to make severe exac-
tions of the people, Mr. Mason was the man of all
others to do their business; but he was not the
man to manage an office of discount and deposit,
either for the benefit of the bank' or to the satis-
faction of men of business; and the result proves
the truth of my proportion. A tabular state-
ment, furnished by the bank, presents the follow-
ing as the profits on the business of the Ports-
mouth branch batik:
In 1828, .25,903 80
1829, 9,697 04
1830, 5,164 16
The truth is, Mr. Mason's severe treatment, and
violation of the plighted faith of the bank, at once
drove fi-om it its most profitable customers, so
that in two years the profits of that branch were
reduced to less than one-fifth the ordinary amount.
These were the causes which induced fifty-eight
respectable individuals and firms, comprising
most of the active business-mien in Pl'ortsmouthl, to
petition the President atd Directors of the mother
bank for a change of the President of the branch
at the end of his term. Of thess fifty-eight houses,
thirty-eight at least were men of the same politi-
cal party as Mr. Mason. The most of them re-
main of that pa ty; and as a proof that the main
rieason for petitioning for a substitution was not
political, I may state the fact, that twenty-four of
tnese names appear on the only petition for a res-
tora'ion of thle deposits to the Bank of the Uni-
ted States, which was presented from New Hamp-


sh:re during the season of panic and distress of
the session of Congress two years ago.
Scarcely any worse condition of the bank coull
be conceived than that represented by Mr. Biddle
himself. He says:-" A confidential officer had
been despatched to Portsmouth, who found the
affairs of the office in great jeopardy, covered
with the wrecks which bad management and the
most extensive frauds had occasioned." Further
on, he admits that no change had been made for
the better, for lie says: Mr. Mason is only one
member of that Board, consisting of the same gen-
tlemen who have had charge of the branch for
many years."
It was against such a state of things as this, that
respectful representations were made by citizens
of all parties in Portsmouth, (and a major part of
those citizens, men who had never supported the
administration of Andrew Jackson, a.sd men who
did not support him so late as the winter of 1834,
in the act of the removal of the depositss) in favor
of a change of' the President, and direction of the
branch at Portsmouth. And it was at the especial
instance of those c tizens, of all parties, that
about sixty members of the Legislature of New
Hampshi: e subscribed their names to another peti-
tion, recommending a change of the direction, and
naming ten persons, a majority of whom was not,
at that time, friends of the administration, as
suitable for directors to that branch. Neither did
Mr. Woodbury or Mr. Hill move in this business
of their own accord, but at the especial request of
the same citizens of Portsmouth, a major part of
whom were then, and since have continued to be,
of the opposition to this administration.
Mr. Woodbury, in a confidential letter to Mr.
Ingham, requests him to lend "any aid for the
relief of the complainers that he can with pro-
priety furnish." lie says "our commercial men
are almost unanimous in their complaints, and the
people in the interior, who were wont to be ac-
commodated formerly at the branch, jo'n with
them in a desire for the removal of the present
President "In making these general repre-
sentations, I am repeating what arc in the mouths
of almost every citizen, of whatever political de.
nomination, and am inviting-, at the request of
many, your influence at the mother Bank, in pro


political aid through the operations of the bank,"
the humble part I acted in' forwarding the wishes
of the citizens of Portsmouth, without distinction
of party, is misrepresented, by quoting from my
letter detached sentences going to show that my
application had a bearing exclusively political.
Then holding a subordinate station in one of the
accounting departments of the Treasury, I was
absent a few weeks in New Hampshire. While
at my place of residence, which is the seat of
goveramant, a messenger, who had arrived the
day before from Portsmouth, presented the peti-
tion, subscribed by'fifty-eight individual firms of
Portsmouth, addressed to the Directors of the
Bank of the United States, remonstrating against
the reappointment of Mr. Mason as a director of
the branch at Portsmouth, and representing that
"the administration of its concerns during the
past year has created great dissatisfaction in this
quarter of the country, and has been of a charac-
ter, in our opinion, partial, harsh, and no less in-
jurious to the bank itself than to those who are
accustomed to do business with it;" and also a me.
morial, signed by between fifty and sixty members
of the State Legislature, representing that they
"have good reason to believe that the late man-
agement of the Board of Directors of the Bran h
Bank at Portsmouth has been oppressive to the
men of business in the State, and tends to the in-
jury of the institution itself';" that the conduct
of the head of the Board has been destructive to
the business of Portsmouth, and offensive to the
whole community;" and respectfully naming ten
individuals who are recommended as candidates
for directors. This petition and memorial he re-
quested me to take on my return to Washington,
and cause them to be laid before the President of
the mother bank. Passing rapidly through Ph;la.
delphia, I had no time to see or consult with the
president and directors, with whom I had no per-
sonal acquaintance. I did, however, consult with
two gentlemen whom I knew, who engaged to
lay the matter before the president of the bank,
whenever I should forward the papers from Wash-
ington. It is my letter to those two gentlemen
that Mr. Biddle not only took and used as a pub-
lic letter, but the contents of which lie has dis-
torted, for the purpose of' forcing an inference
that 1 was interfering in accordance witli the de-
sign of certain "political chiefs at Washington,
to corrupt the vestal purity of the bank, and en-
tice or drive it "into a base political connexion
with the administration."
The following extracts, embracing the whole
scope of the private letter which I addressed to
Messrs. Barker and Pemberton of Philadelphia,
under date of July 17, 1829, decisively prove that
my object, so faras 1 had an object, was entirely
misrepresented in the pamphlet of the Bank Di-
rectors:
"Having recently spent several weeks in New
Hampshire, I am able to say, from my own know-
Iedge,that the sentiment of dlissatisfaction on account
of the recent management of the branch at Ports-
mouth, by Mr. Mason, is general; that his conduct
has been partial and oppressive,and calculated not
less to injure the institution than to disgust and dis-
affect the principal business men, and that no
measure short of his removal will tend to reconcile
the people of New Hampshire to the Bank. *
"The friends of General Jackson in New Hamp-
shire have had but too much reason to complain of
the management of the branch at Portsmouth.
All they now ask is, that this institution in thAt
State may not continue to be an engine of political
oppression by any party. The board has, I be-
lieve, invariably and exclusively consisted of indi-
viduals opposed to the General Government. Of
the ten persons named in the petition for directors,
six are friends of the last, and four are fiends of
the present administration; they are, however,
alike, gentlemen of respectability, who have no
sinister objects to be promoted, understanding well
the responsibilities and wants of business men.
With such a direction, I do not doubt the branch
at Portsmouth will be secure and prosperous, and
satisfy all."
Under these representations the President of
the bank visited Portsmouth, and is understood to
have exhibited every written representation made
to him, confidentially or otherwise, to the eyes or
the ears of the assembled citizens of the town; and
the well known talent of his principal officer, for
small verbal criticism and fbr ridicule, was put in
requisition for an exhibition of the letters and peti-
tions before the people. It was soon discovered
to be no part of Mr. Riddle's object to listen to the
complaints of the people, whether with or without
foundation. He came there for no such purpose.
It was no part of his object to satisfy that commu-
nity by any relaxation of severity, but rather to
conquer the revolting spirit by letting all know
who wanted any indulgence from the bank, how
much and how deeply they wei e under obligations
to his favor. The exclusive political rule of that
bank, from that day to the day it was closed, was
continued. A directorship has in two or three in-
stances been offered to friends of the existing ad-
ministration, and, being obliged to act as mere au-
tomatons, each of them, it is believed, has de-
clined to act.
That this bank, existing there for about eigh-
teen years, without taxation from the State,
and having all thle benefits of the public dleposites
during a greater part of the time, has been of
realinjury to the State, must be admitted. At


first furnishing, by extraordinary capital that
could not be usefully employed, strong tempta-
tions for speculation, this bank terminated the ca-
reer, by prostrating in pecuniary ruin, many men
who might have done a safe business through life
if temptations had not been thrown in their way
to make investments by loans from the bank.
The charge in the'directora' pamphlet, of an ef-
fort at Washington "to render the institution sub-
servient to political purposes," by the order of the
War Department to transfer the pension fund
from the branch bank at Portsmouth to another
bank at Concord, but illy accords with the other
charge which I have at length been considering.
If, in the one case, the a tempt had been to cre-
ate a subserviency on the part of the bank by
changing the political character of the directors,
where would be the consistency in depriving the
bank at the same time of what seems now to have
been a privilege, but which, until that time, had
always been represented to be a burden? The
truth is, that a majority of the Legislature of
New Hampshire, having been always taught by
those concerned in the United States Bank, that
the bank coveted not the privilege of paying the
pensioners, petitioned the Secretary of War to re-
move tihe fund to a more central point, which
would make the average distance of travel for
each and every pensioner from twenty-five to thir-
ty miles less. In several other States, up to that
time, pensions had been paid by agencies other
than those of the Bank of the United States and
its branches. The Secretary of War, doubting
not his right, because it had not before been dis-
puted, diirecte(l the pension agency to be changed.
This direction and change threw new light on the
subject. The Bank of the United States, to mag-
nify its services to the public and make them
more than an equivalent for its exclusive privile-
ges, had represented the holding and disbursing of
the public moneys as extremely onerous. But Mr.
Mason presents an entirely different view of the
subject, which he offers as a reason why the bank
should resist the transfer of agencies. He says:
"The removal contemplated would lessen our
means of circulation, and, as I think, be veryin-


portions of that flourishing territory, the hostile
trump was heard from Charleston to New Orleans;
and the patriotic citizens of South C arolina,Georgia,
Alabama, and Louisiana, not willing to wait the
dull delays of this House for authority, while their
fellow citizens were bleeding under the scalping-
knife of the savages, flew to arms, and hastened to
their protection. The service was national.
It was no more incumbent upon these States
to protect Flor'da, than upon other States;
but without waiting to inquire whether justice
would be done by the nation, they met the
impending danger. They justly regarded the
citizens of that territory as a branch of the Ame-
rican family; and that was enough to kindle in the
bosoms of the chivalro.:s southrons the fire of
American patriotism. The palmetto was lost in
the eagle; and his talons were stretched to grasp
the hand which was lifted against their country-
men; the bill now before us makes provision to
defray the expense. The emergency of the occa.
sion did not admit of hesitancy, and moneys were
advanced in the city of Charleston, and other towns
in that and the other States, to meet the exigency.
The great question now is, shall we authorize the
payment? The honor and future safety of the
country require, that there shall be no hesitancy
nor delay. Even while we are wasting the time by
cold deliberation upon the subject, the threaten-
ing danger upon the Georg:a a';d Alabama fron-
tier may be bursting into a flame, and demanding
similar advances upon the credit of our sense of
national justice. An awful responsibility awaits
him who can make this the unfortunate occasion
for party crimination, for censures against the ad-
ministration, and against the Committees of Ways
and Means and on Military Affairs. To produce
delay by complaints of irregularity, because the
measure has been proposed by a committee, with-
out an order from the [louse, or a reference from
the House of an Executive communication, or by
motions and debates in favor of committal, is in
effect to oppose the bill; or at least to deprive it,
without any countervailing benefit, of much of its
utility.
It is not the method of proceeding on ordinary
occasions, to start objections upon these grounds;
and how can it be reconciled to a proper sense of
the duty which we owe the country in a case
like this, connected as it is with the Florida and
the Creik war? I have been, said Mr. Johnson,
a member of Congress for many years, and for
more than twenty-five years have I been honored as
chairman of some important committee; and dur-
ing the whole of that period, the present mode of
proceeding has been in practice; Whatever sub-
ject comes within the general scope of duties for
which a standing committee is appointed, as well
as subjects referred to them by the House, it has
been the uniform custom for the committee to act
upon, and report the result of such action to the
House. This s'ibject has in like manner been de-
liberated upon by the committee, and the result of
that deliberation is presented in the bill before us.
It is simply to refund what has been liberally ad-
vancedl in the hour of danger by those patriotic
States, at a time when the honor and safety of our
common country required the advance for the use
of the nation, before the national coffers could be
unlocked for the purpose. Whether that money
was paid regularly, according to specified forms,
or not; or whether the requisitions in which it was
paid were drawn, verbatim et lileratim, according
to' the usual forms, is to me a matter of no im-
portance. If one of your family is perishing with
st;,rvation,and your friend will purchase food for his
relief, you will not inquire into the form in which
he mide tie payment. It will be sufficient for
you to know that the benefit was received. So in
this case, it is sufficient for me to know that the
money was advanced; that it was expended in
the public service, and that the country re-
ciived its value. Deeds of patriotism like this
merit a public acknowledgment, rather than
a dull, protracted, reluctant compliance with
the imperative demand of justice. We should
faithfully and promptly refund the last cent ad-
vanced in such a case. We should do it, because
it is the dictate ofjustice-because honor requires
it-because the character of this House and of
the whole nation demands it. We should do it,
to show to the world that the impulse of pratriot-
ism is not despised by a Republic; and to inspire
in our citizens a confidence, that voluntary sacri-
fices in the extremity of danger, shall be cheerful-
ly and promptly remunerated.
T'he amendment proposed to the bill is merely
to explain a former law of a similar character. It
proposes to pay for the services of the volunteer
militia who were called into service by the com-
manding General il the first moments of the Semi-
nole war. The sudden rupture of the savages
was like an unanticipated flame breaking out ia
the midst of a city, which requires the immediate
exertions of the firemen to subdue. A little de-
lay would involve the whole town in irrecover-
able ruin. So the ravage; of the Indians, if per-
mitted to pursue the work of devastation till de-
spatches would be sent to the seat of Government,
and an order issued from the Executive for call-
ing out he militia, would have completed the
work ofdestruction through the whole of the
country where it raged. The commanding Gene-
ral, as in duty bound, called for militia aid to check


the rava ges of this desolating war, and the patriotic
citizens volunteered their services. They were
gladly accepted. These are the citizen soldiers,
who have been braving the dangers and enduring
the storm of that sanguinary conflict, whose ser-
vices have been recognized by the Government,
that the amendment proposes to pay. They made
the first sacrifice in their country's defence; met
the danger at the threshold, and voluntarily pour-
ed out their blood upon the altar of their suffering
country. We intended to provide for their pay,
and thought we had done so by a law already pass-
ed; but in the multiplicity of business, there was an
accidental omission in the framing of the law to
meet their case. The amendment proposed is
only to give such an extent to the application of
that law as to embrace the case of these men, and
so carry into effect our declared intention. Upon
this bill and this amendment, subjects as plainly
just, and as clear to the understanding as the
simplest proposition that could be stated, we
are consuming the day, and wasting the precious
time of the House in animadversions that have
no direct bearing upon the subject. Is this the
proper theme for introducing fastidious complaints
and party denunciations against the administration
of the Gavernment? Or are there no questions
that can arise, even upon the common measure of
justice between citizens and their Government,
but what must be converted into party strifes?
Among other complaints, imputations have been
made against those who are conducting the war
in Florida, as if our regular officers, whose busi-
ness and whose duty it is to obey the orders of
any executive, were political partisans. These
censures are, at least, premature. The officers
of the regular army are in command there; men
who, on former occasions, have given incontesti-
ble proof of their valor, their devotion to the
country, and their capacity to conduct military op-
erations. Though at thii distance it would appear
that mere ougLt t., have been done, yet we are not
acquainted wi h all the difficulties which they
may have had to encounter. The character
which they have established ought to be regarded
as a pledge for their good conduct in the present
trial, and should at least shield them from censure
till all the facts are known; and if it shall then ap.









War, rie ommnendling the measure, and that the
subject has not been specially referred to the com-
mittee by the House. It appears to be a very re-
cent thing with some gentlemen, to have tranisfer-
red all confidence from themselves, to the Secre-
tary of War, so as to be incapable of acting upon
the most simple proposition, without his recom-
mendation. I would remind them that the pro-
posed amendment is founded on official informa-
tion from the War Department, that the men who
claim the pay have faithfully served their country
as represented; and that no provision is made, by
which they can receive their pay. Now, sir,
where is the independence of the members of this
body, if they cannot act upon their own responsi-
bility in matters of plain justice When all the
facts are before us, must we fear to act without
the direction of an Executive officer to govern us
in legislation, and bear the responsibility of our
measures? Our constitutional duty is to legislate;
and that of an Executive officer, to execute the
law. When all the facts are made know to us,
we must act upon our own responsibility; and,
right or wrong, we must bear that responsibility,
whether recommended or not. In the case now
before us, there is no imposition, no deception.
It is a plain proposition, founded on plain matters
of fact; and the House must adopt or reject it.
We must, in the case, do justice, or withhold the
demands of justice; and every nrember will act
upon his own responsibility.
It is wise, on ordinary occasion%, to refer pro-
positions to committees, that the information out
of which they grow, and their minute details, may
be more thoroughly investigated; but the deci-
sions of committees are always subject to the
House, and it is the right of any member to pro-
pose amendmEnts to measures reported to the
House by committees. The practice has ever
p evailed; and to be deprived of this right, would
be to fetter legislation with a clog, which it could
never bear.
Independence in legislation by the representa-
tives of the sovereign people, is of the first im-
portance to the preservation of our liberties. It is
in this House that their voice is more immediately
heard, than in any other branch of our Govern-
ment. Its value cannot be over estimated, nor its
dignity too carefully preserved. The most sacred
regard to justice should characterize all its meas-
ures. It is a convention of the nation itself; and
upon the purity, the intelligence, and the inde-
pendence of this House, more than upon any other
department of Government, the liberties of this na-
tion, the last hope of man, essentially depend.
It is always with reluctance that 1 trespass upon
the time of the House; but in defence of the Mili-
tary Committee, from whom the measure emana-
ted, I have been compelled to submit these re-
marks.


TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS,
FIRST SESSION.

IN SENATE.
WEDNESDAY, June 1, 1836.
The following messages, in writing, were received from the
President ol the United States by Mr. DONELSON, his Secre-
tary:
WVASHINGTON, June 1, 1836.
To the Senate:
I transmit herewith to the Senate a communication which
has been receive from Mr. B. F. CUaRRY, in answer to a call
made upon him by the President, through the War Depart-
ment, in consequence of the serious charges which were pre-
ferred against him by one of the honorable members of the
Senate. It seems to he due to justice that the Senate should
be furnished, agreeably to the request of Mr. Curry, with the
explanations contained in this. communication, particularly as
they are deemed so far satisfactory as would render his dis-
missal from the public service, or even his censure, undeserv-
ed and improper. ANDREW JACKSON.
WASHINGTON, May 31, 1836.
To the Senate:
I transmit herewith the response of Samuel Gwin, Esq. to
the charges affecting his official conduct and character, which
were set forth in the evidence taken under the authority of
the Senate; by the C-mmittee on Public Lands, and which was
referred to the President by the resolution of the Senate bear-
ing date the 3d of March, 135N. This resolution and the evi-
dence it refers to, were officially communicated to Mr. Gwin
by the Secretary of the Treasury, and the response of Mr.
Gwin has been received through the same official charnel.
ANDREW JACKSON.
The messages having been read-
Mr. BENTON observed, lhat with respect to the paper last
referred to, the answer of Mr. Gwin to the charges made
against him on that floor, he should, as an act ofjustice to that
gentleman, move that it be printed. The Senate directed in-
vestigations to be made which involved his official character
and conduct, and which lie thought, from the nature of the in-
structions under which they were carried on, were entirely ex
parte. The instructions t6 the Commissioners who were to
take the depositions, were partly to this effect: -
[Here Mr. Benton read from the document as follows:]
It is not expected that you are to give notice to any one of
the time and place ,f taking depositions; nor will any one be
permitted, either as principal or counsel, to interfere with you
in the performance of your duty; but you may at your option
furnish to any officer who resides at a convenient distance,
copies of any depositions in which he may be implicated.
This, however, is left to your own discretion"
The instructions went on to say that if the Commissioner
deemed it proper to have counsel, the fees paid for such pur-
pose would be allowed him.
Mr. WALL inquired who these instructions were signed by?
Mr. BENTON answered that they were signed by George
Poindexter, Chairman of the Committee on Public Lands. He
apprehended that these proceedings were a novelty in the his-
tory of this country or in that of Great Britain, and he trusted
that they never would occur agdn. Mr. Gwin having become
acquainted with the manner in which these investigations had
been carried on-depositions to be taken in the ark without
giving him an opportunity of being heard in his defence-coun-
sel to be feed against him, &c., had collected a mass oftesti
mony for the purpose of defending himself, and rebutting the
charges made against him; and all that was now asked, was
that this defence might be printed, andlsent abroad in the
same manner as the accusations against lm had been.
Mr. WALL said he would be glad to know if these instruc-


tions were the act ofa committee of the Senate, or of the man
whose name was signed to them. They seemed to him to be
at war with every thing like justice.
Mr. BENTON, in answer, read the resolution of the Senate
under which the Committee on Public Lands were directed to
make examinations in relation to alleged frauds with respect
to the public lands, and the resolution authorizing the chair-
man of the committee to continue the examinations in the re-
cess of the Senate. It seemed therefore that the instructions
emanated from the Land Committee, and were sent by their
chairman, George Poindexter.
Mr. CALHOUN said that hlie knew nothing at all relative
to the charges made against Mr. Gwin; but it appeared to him
that the regular course would be to refer the whole subject
to the Committee on Public Lands. If Mr. Gwin had satisfac-
torily refuted the charges made against him, or had not suc-
ceeded in doing so, the fact would appear by the report of
the committee. The best way of doing justice to all parties
would be to subject thle whole matter to the investigation of a
committee.
Mr. EWING of Ohio hoped that the reference to the Comn-
mittee on the Public Lands would not be made. The charges
against Mr. Gwin had been niade two years ago. lie (Mr. E.)
was not a member of thie Committee on the Public Lands at
that time, and there were very few of that committee who
were now in the Senate. If the reference proposed were not
perfectly idle, the eflbct would be to renew the investigation
into the charges against Mr. Gwin, together with his defence.
Mr. BENTON was also opposed to the relfrence. Hle did
not want to see any committee of that body sit as inquisitors on
a citizen of the United States. It seemed to be carrying the
business of extra judicial impeachments beyond anything yet
sanctioned by the people of this country, or warranted by tlhe
constitution. They had seen enough of these inquisitorial pro-
ceedings in that body. The whole thing was wrong from its.
inception; it began wrong, it went on wrong, and it ended
wrong. The Senate had geot itself into a false position, and
could not get forwards or backwards without another false
step. The most becoming thing they could now do, was to
drop the whole affair, an[ print the papers, in order to allow
the defence to take thec same direction that had been given to
the accusation. It would sound strange to the ears of the
people of the United States, that the Senate of eighteen hun-
dred and thirty four, which set itself up to rectify all the
abuses in the country, should issue a commission to investi-
gate the character and conduct of an individual, and expressly
foIbrbidthe commissioner to give any information to the accused
of the time and place of taking dcpositio.s against him, or to
permit any person to interfelre with the performance of his
duty, though he might, at hiis option, give copies of such depo-
sitions to any officer implicated, who might beside within a
convenient distance. Sir, said Mr. B., the whole thing is
wrong from beginning to end, and they had better have done
with it at once. All that was asked by Mlr. Gwin was, that as
these charges against himi had been printed, and made a part
of the public documents, his, answer should also be printed
and put upon the record.
Mr. EWING ol'f Ohio wa.' notdisposed to answer in behalf of
the gentleman who was chairman of the Committee on Public
Lands at the time these investigations were ordered. If that
gentleman was here lie could answer for himself. With re-
spect to frauds on the public lands, it was right that each branch
of Congress should enter into investigations to ascertain them,
-i i.., i,.. .... r,- i-tn v. it was rioht th t theyv shonutl not


fence placed by the side of the accusation. Let the testimony
in favor of Mr. Gwm circulate as widely as did that against
him, and then only can any thing like justice be done him.
As to any action by the committee, he agreed with the Senator
from Ohio, (Mr. Ewing) that it was out of the question, and
therefore a reference was not necessary.
Mr. PORTER was one of those who voted for these resolu-
tions, and the responsibility that he took, on that occasion, he
was perfectly willing to justify. He averred, that the Senate
formed no incorrect conclusions on that occasion, and that its
conduct was not oppressive and unjust, as alleged. It qould
have taken no other course than the one it did, without de-
leating the object in view. Many believed that the greatest
frauds were carried on in the sales of the public lands, and
an inquiry was, therefore, absolutely necessary. But what
was the nature of the inquiry? It was not into the conduct
of any particular officer of the Government, but the inquiry
was directed to be general as to all the land office-. If repre-
sentations were made now that frauds were commit-
ted in any one branch of the Government, would the
Senator from Alabama refuse to institute an inquiry
because a particular officer of the Government might be im-
plicated, and the Senate be called on to impeach him? Was it
not common in the governments of all other countries as well as
this to institute inquiries into the conduct of their officers, to
ascertain whether frauds had been committed; and was it ever
heard ofbefore that such investigations should not go on be-
cause frauds were alleged against individuals? It was said
that the resolution was extraordinary, because no opportunity
was allowed the individuals who might be implicated to defend
themselves by a cross-examination of the witnesses. But was
there a charge agair;st any individual? The inquiry was to be
a general one, and would it therefore be right to give notice to
every individual, who might be supposed to be implicated, to
come forward to disprove what might be alleged against him?
It would be very extraordinary indeed if it should have been
thought necessary to all who might by possibility be involved
in the inquiry. Mr. P. here read the resolutions and instruc-
tions of the committee, commenting on them at some length,
and( justifying them as proper and necessary for the occasion.
The motion of the Senator from New York to amend, that had
been referred to by the Senator from Alabama, was resisted op
the ground that the resolution was a mere matter of inquiry,
no person believing that any judgment was to follow it; that it
was purely intended as a foundation for legislative proceedings.
It was to proceed like a grand jury; and he recollected that it
was averred at the time that this investigation would tend to the
injury of no person whatever, because no judicial proceedings
would be gone into without giving time to any person implica-
ted to offer evidence in his defence. If any person was to 6e
tried, it was on all hands determined to give him an opportunity
to conime forward and exculpate himself before any further ac-
tion would be had. Mr. P. thought, therefore, that there was
no grounds for finding fault with the proceedings of the Senate
The investigation was a general one, and while it was going on,
it would have defeated its objects to give notice relative to the
depositions that were to be taken. Mr. P. had no objection to
placing these papers on the files of the Senate. If the individual
had any evidence, he had rather receive it than his allegations;
but he thought the whole matter ought to be referred te the ex-
amination of the committee.
Mr. CALHOUN very much regretted that the chairman of
the Committee on Public Lands should object to the reference
of this paper. His object was that full juice should be done
to Mr. Gwin, to Mr. Poindexter, and to the Senate. He would
not agree that the Senate had not the right to inquire into the
conduct of public officers when serious frauds had been charg-
ed against them, as he had heard alleged on that floor. Serious
frauds had been alleged against Mr. Gwin, and among other
charges was that he had amassed a large fortune in a ve-
ry short time. This, alone, was very suspicious, and an
investigation was ordered. The session was a short one,
and the committee reported they could not get through with
he examination before its close, the chairman proposing by a
resolution, that he should be authorized to go on with the ex-
aminations in the recess. This was agreedto. He did not now
purpose to inquire whether these examinations were conducted
properly or not. One thing was now assumed here, and that
was the innocence of Mr. Gwin, and the guilt of Mr. Poindex-
ter. Now something was due to the absent, and an investiga-
tion by a committee was necessary before coming to the conclu-
sion that Mr. Poindexter was culpable. Now as these papers
had taken an accusatory course against Mr. Poinlexter, he
would ask, was that gentleman called on for his evidence? Was
he notified that he was to take Mr. Gwin's place, and that de-
positions were to be taken to implicate him? Was this an ex
parte examination? If it was so improper on the part of the
Senate to clothe Mr. Peindexter with these extraordinary pow-
ers, he would ask, were they prepared to sanction the same
thing done by the Executive, who had given to Mr. Gwin or
somebody else, the power to examine into the conduct of Mr.
Poindexter?
Now they were called on to vote in the dark for the printing
of these papers, of which they knew nothing, for the purpose
of implicating Mr. Poindexter and the Senatelitself. He took it
for granted, that the inquiry into alleged frauds, relative to the
public lands, was a proper one; and if Mr. Poindexter abused
the power with which he was entrusted, it was not the fault of
the Senate; and the fact whether this was so or not, could be
best ascertained by the examination of a committee. They had
been told that there was nothing for the action of a committee.
Now hlie thought otherwise. The character of an officer of the
Government had been implicated-he had been charged with
an abuse of office, and his defence was before them. Now it
Mr. Gwin was innocent, lie ought to be called so. When he
voted for thie inquiry, his object was to do justice to Mr.
Gwin and to the public, an.l in voting now for tile re-
ference, he had the same object in view. Justice
both towards Mr. Gwin, and one who had formerly been a
member of that body required the reference. If they condemned
Mr. Poindexter, it oughTt to be with their eyes open. They all
knew what an arduous task a Senator in high party times had to
perform, anti how liable the strict execution of his duty was to
subject him to censure. No member of that body would be
willing that his conduct should be censured after he left here
without an exam mination; and he called upon gentlemen by what
was due to themselves, as well as to justice, to vote for the re-
ference.
Mr. SHEPLEY said, if the Senator from Louisiana (Mr.
Porter) understands that the investigations of the Conimittec
upon the Pul):ic Lands were extended only to inquiries ofa gen-
eral character into alleged frauds in the sales of thIe public land
that they were designed for the legislative purposes only, and
that they did not relate to individual character, as his remarks
would lead us to suppose, he is greatly in error.
The language of the resolution of the Senate giving the
chairman of thie committee tthe power to make an ex part in-
quiry during the recess of Congress is, in some respects, ex-
pressed in general terms. But the resolution directs the chair-
man to proceed in the investigation which had been prosecute
ed during the session, and thus refers to the original resolutions
by virtue of which the investigation had been commenced.
I find those resolutions in the Journal, and to enable thie Se-
nate to come to a correct understanding of the character o f the
investigation, I will read an extract frem one or two of them.
In the third resolution is found this language:
"That the Committee be instructed to inquire whether the
Registers of the Land Offices and the Receivers of Public Mo-
neys at any of the land offices of the United States. or either
of thnt, have, in, violaiisn of law anrd of their official ',tr' c
manded Cr accepted a tonu, or premium from any purchase,
or purchasers of the public lands at public or private sale fot
the benefit of such officer or officers," &c.
And the following language is found in the fourth resolu.
tion:
"And whether any Register or Receiver has, at any time, ta-
ken in payment the promissory note of any purchaser or pur-
chasers, bearing an interest, to accrue to the benefit of such Re-
gister or Receiver."
Sir, it is very difficult for me to understand how such lan-
guage can be said not to authorize investigations into the con
duct and characters of individual men. If the object was only
to enlighten us in regard to our legislative duties, it. would not
seem to be necessary to inquire whether a Register or Receiver
had violated the law and his official duties.


What were the facts, it might be proper to inquire, to enable
us to legislate; but whether the man had been guilty of a viola
tion of law and of official duty, was an inquiry directly involve
ing individual character; and it does not seem to be necessary
for mere purposes of legislation.
It was well understood, at the time the resolutions passed, to
involve individual character; and as the Senator from Ssutt
Carolina (Mr. Calhoun) has remarked, Mr. Gwin was openly
charged by the chairman of the Committee on Public Land,
with a gro.s violation of official duty.
Such was the language of thie resolutions, and such were the
circumstances in which it was proposed to enter upon thein-
vestigation.
I then thought, as I now think, that it was due to the officer
implicated; due to the character of the Senate itself; and due
to truth and justice, that the investigation should not proceed'
in secret, so that the accused could know nothing of tire at-
temnpt to destroy h-is character; could have no opportunity
even to know the persons who would appear against him, much
less to cross-examine them, or to introduce any explanatory oi
rebutting testimony.
Feeling that the first principles of justice were to be violated
in such a proceeding, I offered an amendment to the fifiht reso-
lution. It is thus stated on the Journal:
On motion of Mr. Shepley, to amend the fifth by strik-
ing out all after the word committee, and inserting, have
power to cause testimony to be taken on oath, where any ntis-
conduct is supposed to have taken place touching the matters
aturesaid; and in case any person is implicated, such person to
be notified, and be entitled to introduce testimony in exculpa-
tion of himself; and to cross-examine all witnesses introduced
against him.'
This proposed amendment was rejected upon a division, by
yeas and nays, a party vote.
And thus ilid thie Senate deliberately enter upon an investiga
tion directly impeaching individual character, and at the same
time refuse to the individual all opportunity of being heard.
A proceeding thus commenced in wrong, could be expected
to end only as it has done-in wrong.
Commencing thus before a committee of time Senate, the
investigation was continued during the recess of Congress by
the resolution before referred to, when another attempt was
made by the then minority to obtain for the persons implicated,
an opportunity to be heard, and without success. It is now
after two years have elapsed, that testimony is offered, said to
disprove the charges made against the officer; and we now are
asked to refuse to print this testimony, that it may be placed
upon our records with that which was thus secretly obtained
and placed on record against him. I trust that we may no
longer continue to act a part so unjust. This testimony should
be printed with our documents, that an opportunity may be
afforded to judge of the truth of the whole matter.
Mr. MANGUM said he voted for the resolutions, and against
thie amendments; and in doing so, he thought that he did what
was not only proper, but absolutely necessary, under the cir-
cumstances then presented to him. It must be remembered.
that in 1834, the entire southern country was rife with reports
of frauds that had been committed with respect to the sales of
the public lands in the southwest. Ile recollected, that when
he first caine into the Senate, he brought with hini such impres-
sions. There was a general impression, that such frands had
been practised, and under such circumstances, the investigation
was ordered. What then did this investigation propose? It


against this officer of the Government, should be published.
What was the next step? Was it to take measures for ain im-
peachment? Why did they not do this? It was the next regular
step. There was nothing that they coulddo, following from the
documents before then, but impeach; and li now declared Ps a
Senator, that upon such testimony, with nothing to couiiiterdci
it, he should, on an impeachment, vote thie officer guilty, and eject
him from office. Why did they not proceed?I They hadl impeach-
able matter enough on hand. Whiy did they stop? It was be-
cause they found that they could go nofarther, without imnplica-
ting themselves. WVhat did they do? Did they frame a law? No.
Did they frame an ex parle impeachment like the one they dlid
against the President of the United States? No. Imprimnis, they
ordered 5,000 copies to be printed, and in the next place referred
the whole affair to the President, in oiler that he might dismiss
the accused from office. Why did they send this impeachable
matter to the President? What did the President do? He sent a
copy of the report to every officer implicated. This, he pre-
sumed, was the President's course, for it was the just one. One
of these implicated officers had returned an answer to the charges
against him, and this answer was now sent to the Senate. What
strange condition the Senate was placed in. They commenced
an impeachment, collected an abundance of impeachable mat-
ter, and then sent it to the President, who sends a copy of it to
the officer impeached, who was not allowed a hearing while his
trial was going on; and the answer of that officer was now sent
back to them. Since the movement now was to refer these
criminal charges that had been made two years ago, and then
shuffled off, and which were now brought home to them, he had
no objection to that course, because he wished to see how the
committee would act on them-to see whether they would bring
in a resolution to send the papers to the IHouse of Representa-
tives, for the purpose of having an impeachment framed. Sir,
said Mr. B., the Senate has got itself into a false position. It is in
the same position it was in when it shoved off the affair upon the
President. It could not go on with the business. Could they try
the impeachment? He apprehended riot. No member, he
thought, would lay a resolution on the table, declaring that
Samuel Gwin was guilty, and ought to be impeached.
The debate on thie expunging resolution had circulated too
widely for gentlemen to venture on that. The gentleman
from Ohio had said that he would never refrain from inquiring
into frauds for the purpose of applying the proper remedy.
Why then did not the gentleman go on? Here was impeacha-
ble matter swoin to, and let the gentlemnan proceed with it.
lie would tell the gentleman that "thie Senate would be ruined
ifit went on much farther with these extra judicial proceed-
ings. The matter had gone far enough already; and if they
went farther without the House of Representatives, they would
violate the constitution.
Mr. EWING of Ohio replied to Mr. Benton at length, and
contended that the resolutions of the Senate, and the manner of
conducting the inquiry, were proper-necessary to attain the
objectin view. Ile dmfnotbelieveithat information couldhave
been obtained if notice had been given of the time and place of
taking the depositions; and instance the investigations that
were made by the Post Office Commitee, calling upon the
chairman to inform the Senate how these were conducted, and
whether, in his opinion, correct information could have been
obtained it they had notified the parties implicated, of the
time and place of taking depositions,
Mr. GRUNDY being thus called on, replied that vwhea the
Post Office Committee were about to enter on their examina-
tions, they came to the determination unanimously, that their
best course would be to take depositions without giving the par
ties implicated notice ofthe time and place of so doing. This
was done in every case; but when the testimony in each case
was concluded, he, as the chairman of the committee, notified
each individual implicated, of the matter brought against him,
and called upon him to defend himself.
Hie did inot believe that correct information, with regard to
matters before the Post Office Committee, could have been ob.
rained by any other modr of inquiry.
Mr. SOUTHARD proceeded to take a view of the reasons
which induced the Senate to institute the inquiries referred to.
Early in the session of 1834, complaints in a great variety of
forms were ma,4e in regard to frauds in relation to the lands
ceded by the Choctaws, and in regard to the conduct ofthe com-
missioners under that cession. Subsequent charges were made
as to extensive frauds that had been committed, not only in
Mississippi but in other States; it was not against one man,
but against the general administration ofthe land officers.
The question then before the Senate was, Will it do any thiug
*o arrest these firauds and make the necessary inquiries for tihe
purpose ofascertaining how they can be arrested? This was
his inquiry. He had no reference to Samuuel Gwin, or to any
other single individual. His only object was to ascertain
whether such frauds had been committed, and how they could
be prevented by the legislation of Congress. The votes he
gave were governed by these considerations, and no other. If
any thing improper had been done in conducting the inqui-y,
it did not prove that it ought not to have been instituted. Eve-
ry step in that inquiry was directed by its legislative action,
and every other step was accidental. Mr. S. read the diffe-
rent proceedings on the subject from the Journals of 1834.
The inquiries were general, in order to ascertain what legisla-
tion was necessary, and the Senate would find, by reference to
the Journals, that an act was reported, a fact omitted in the
discussion of this morning. Suppose, in the course of the inves-
tigation,they should find that an officer had received a bonus for
the sale of a tract of land; would it not be proper for them to
introduce a resolution providing for the introduction of a law
to prevent such acts for the future? not to go back to punish
the officer who was guilty, for that would be too late, but for
the purpose of framing a law that would guard against such
frauds in future. The senate would find, on looking at the
whole proceedings, that legislative and not judicial action was
contemplated from beginning to end.
By a resolution introduced 1y Mr. Poindexter, the inquiry
was pursued through the Treasury and War Depara.nents, antl
the answers from these Departments did not come in until the
13th of June. On the 22d. of June, Mr. Poindexter offered a
resolution authorizing the chairman to proceed in the investi-
gations already commenced. Now, what then was the duty ol
the Senate? The Secretaries of War and Treasury had made
'heir communications, and the committee hadt reported that
they could not conclude their investigations that session. The
inquiry was, should they stop there? Every body believed
that stupendous frauds haid been committed; it was too late to
dleny the fact now; and he for one !i,.., i-l! that these in-
vestigations should proceed. And as it woull have been impos-
sible lbr the committee to go to the different States where these
examinations were to bIe n.ade, Mississippi, Alabama, Ohio,
Michigani, &c. he had no (hfliculty in coming to the conclu-
-ion, that it would be proper to trust the him-ther prosecution
of the business to their chairman. They could have contend
thIe inquiry in no other mode. Ile was not here the apolo-
gist of the chairman, but lie thought that justice should be done
to him, as well as to others. VWell then, it was proper to nmake
these investigations by depositions. If it was not so, it was
wrong for the Post Office Committee to do so. The testimony
coult not be justly taken in another way. If there had been
error in the chairman of time committee, the Senate was not
:o answer for it. If blood had been shed, in consequence of
the manner of conducting these inquires, the Seniate was not
chargeable; they did not direct that tlhe inquiries should be
made in an improper manner. They only directed that the
inquires should be made by depositions.
He would not defend the instiructiunsxi the-.caimi,.dioa>sj
but he would say than if instrnctions ]lad been givfet to il-mu,
>o give noiices to thi- arties iF10icated, and to tuike their cot. -
;er testimony, such proceeding would constitute tlhe commis-
sioners into a criminal court for thie trial of individuals, and
'I, make the inquiry a criminal process, instead of a fuimdatin
ior legislative proceedings. These were the views on whidih
lie voted. Thie result was, tltat at tie succeeding session, time
chairman, Mr. Poindexter, made a report, acconmpanied by a
-esolution, that the charges be referred to the President of the
United States. Where mhen was the voice tit is now raised
against the judicial proceedings of the Senate? No man pre-
tended to say then timat mIne Senate had placed itself in a false
position. Mr. S. proceeded at length to defend the propriety of
this course on thie part of the Senate. It was said that the
whole affair was ended by printing the report, and its re-
terence to time President; but this was a very incorrect view of


the subject; the reference to tie Presidenut was merely inici-
dental. But on the everyday Ime chairman reported a bill, with
the very view of fulfilling the purnpo:se for which this inquiry
was made, being a bill ofsix pages, to provide against.the coinm-
mission of these frauds. Was it true, then, thIat the inquiry
was fruitless, and that it ended in reference of this subject to
the President? No, the result of that investigation would be
found in the bill that had been reported, and would be found in
the labors of thie Committee on Public L.ands, who had made
use of this very information, and would very soon place before
them a bill which would show how useful that inquiry had
been. Where, then, was the evidence that the Senate had
placed itself in a false position?
Mr. CALHOUN agreed partly with his friend from North
Carolina, but was clearly of opinion that thie printing ought to
be after the report of thie committee.
Not a single Senator had read the whole of thi;i evidence; not
a Senator knew whether it exculpated the officer implicated, or
whicthler it implicated thie conduct of tihe chairman: and in the
.lark they wereasked to print the testimony. Now, lie thought
dtha to do justice to all partics, to Mr. Gwvinn himself, as well
as others, the proper course was to refer it to a committee. If
the object in sending thit' document here was to implicate a for-
mer member of that body, who had, in the discharge of ardu-
ous duties, been implicated, every principle of honor and jus
twice required that they should be referred and examined before
-ending them abroad to the world. As to the dangerous doc-
trine, that this body is not to look into malfeasances in office,
it had been avowed here for the first time. Never had it been
avowed in the British Parliament,ffrom which we took our prac-
tice, nor had it been advanced in any of the State Legislatures.
Sunch a doctrine would surrender entirely the Legislative pow-
er of thIe Senite.
Mr. CALHOIUN continued his remarks to some considerable
length; after which,
Mr. WIHITEI and Mr. WAILKER expressed themselves
briefly in favor of printing.
The debate was further continued by Messrs. PRENTISS,
MIANGUM, PRESTON, PORTER, WALL, NILES and
BROWN; when,
On motion by Mr. PORTER to lay the whole subject on the
table, it was decided in the negative, by the following vote-
YEAS-Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Crittenden, Ewing of Ohio,
Goldsborougk, Kent, King, Leigh, Mangum, Porter, Prentiss,
Prestorn,Southard,Tomrnlinson, and White-15.
NAYS--Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Cuthbert, Ew-
ing of Illinois, Grundy, HIend-ricks. Hubbaid, King of Georgia,
Morris, Nicholas, Nilcs, Rives, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley,
Tallmadge, Walker, Wall, and Wright-20.
On motion of Mr. BLACK,
The Senate then adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
TponsoAv, June 2, 1836.
Mr. MILLER asked the consent of the House to take up and
consider the iesoluttion on the Speaker's table, reported some
time since from lthe Committee on Invalid Pensions. to set apart
a portion of Saturday next for the consideration of bills reported
Ifromi the committees on Revolutionarv and Itnvalid Pensions
Objection being made, Mr. MILLEIR moved a sispepsion, cf
tie rule; lost.
Mr. PATTON asked leave to a offer a resolution setting apart
S ridav an l Salum'daIv np--t til I o 'lh for u 1., en id-p.t tion of


Portland canal; and dithe same was committed to a Committee of
the Whole on the state of the Union.
On motion of Mr. LOYALL,
The Joint Committee on the Library were discharged from
the memorial and papers of Dr. Liebetr.
Unfavorable reports were n;ade by Mr. JARVIS, front thle
Committee on Naval AiTffairs; by Mr. DROMGOOIE, from the
Conmiittee on Military Allkirs; by Messrs. CRAIG, KINNAI DI,
and MUHLENGERG, froam the Committee on Revolutionary
Claims; by Mr. MORGAN, from the Comrmittge on Revo!u-
tionary Pensions; and by Mr. MILLER, from the Committee
on Invalid Pensions.
Petitions and memorials were, on leave, presented by
Messrs. PEARCE of Rhode Island, PIERCE of New IIamp-
shire, SLOANE, BOND, PATTERSON, and PINCKNEY.
[Mr. PEARCE, of Rhode Island, stated that lie had on hand
a memorial which he had been anxious to present foi the last
three or four weeks; a memorial of a peculiar character, and
signed by David Mellville, of Newport, Rhode Island, com-
plaining that he had been unceremoniously reformed out of
office by the Collector of that port, and praying that a law
may be passed restraining Executive patronage. Mr P.
said a similar memorial had been presented in the other
branch, and there referred to the Committee on Commerce-
that he supposed this would be the appropriate committee
here. Leave was granted to present the memorial, and it was
referred to the Committee on Commerce.]
[Mr. PINCKNEY presented the memorial of Christopher
Werner, praying to be refunded a certain sum paid into the
Treasury by mistake; which was referred to the Committee
on Commerce.]
[Mr. PATTERSON presented the petition of John Morrel, of
Richland county and State of Ohio, a soldier of the late war;
which was referred to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.]
On motion of Mr. CRANE,
Resolved, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of allowing a pension
to Charles Young, a soldier in the late war.
On motion of Mr. RUSSELL,
Resolved, That the Committee qn Revolutionary Pensions
be instructed to inquire into the expediency of granting a pen-
sion to Samuel Pettcngill, ofthe State of New York, for ser-
vices rendered in the war of the revolution.
On motion of Mr. RUSSELL,
Resolved, That the Committee on Revolutionamy Pensions
be instructed to inquire into the expediency of granting a pen-
sion to Simeon Moss, of the State of New York, for services
rendered during the war of the revolution as an Indian spy.
On motion of Mr. CHAPMAN,
Resolved, Thatthe Committee on Revolutionary Pensions
inquire into the expediency of placing the name of Wmin. Wil-
son, of Jackson county, Alabama, ol the roll of revolutionary
pensions.
On motion of Mr. KILGORE,
Resolved, That the memorial of the President and Secretary
of the Franklin College, Ohio, asking aid from Congress for
said institution, be referred to the Committee on Public Lands,
with instructions to inquire into the expediency of granting to
said College a township of land, to be selected in Ohio from
any of the public lands subject to private entry.
On motion of Mr. CONNOR, tt Ilouse then proceeded to
the orders of the day.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
The "bill to change the organization of the Post Office De-
dartment, and to provide more effectually for the settlement of
the accounts thereof," was take up, the question being on its
final passage.
Mr. JOHNSON of Louisiana moved to recommit the bill to
the Committee of the Whole on thestate of the Union, with in-
structions to strike out the sections, being 43 and 44, depriving
the postmasters of the privilege or perquisites of the boxes or
pigeon holes.
Mr. CONNOR suggested that it weuld be better to let the bill
pass and go to the Senate, where the clauses could either be
stricken out, or some other provision made, to provide a suita-
ble compensation therefore, or some modification ofethe salaries
of postmasters of large cities.
After some remarks from Messrs. JOHNSON of Louisiana,
CAMBRELENG, LAWRENCE, REED, MANN of New York,
and BELL:
Mr. JOHNSON modified his motion by instructing the com-
mittee, either to strike out the provisions referred to, or to pro-
vide for the increase of the salaries of the Postmasters ofthe ci-
ties and large towns ofthe different States.
The motion was discu sed by Meers. MASON of Virginia,
PEARCE, of Rhode Island, IBRIGGS, EVEREIT, and GREN-
NELL.
Mr. EVERETT called for a division of the question, first
on the motion to recommit, and then on the motion to in-
struct.
Mr. REED moved to amend the motion by striking out all
after the word "instructions,' and insert a provision "that the
operation of the said 43d and 44th sections shall not go into
effect, until the 4th day of March next."
After some further remarks from Messrs. REED, UNDER-
WOOD, WISE, LANE, and JENIFER,
Mr. SPEIGHT demanded the previous question, which was
seconded by the House-ayes 67, noes 57.
The main question was then ordered and put, and the bill
was passed.
The "bill to establish certain post roads, and to alter and
discontinue others, and for other purposes," was then taken up,
i ead a third time, and passed.
INDIAN ANNUITIES, &c.
Mr. CAMBRELENG remarked that the "Fortification bill"
was properly the first in order, but there was another bill, for
"Indian annuities," returned from the Senate with some im-
portarnt amendments, which was much more urgent than any
other, and which he hoped would be taken up.
Mr. EVERETT hoped the bill would be postponed till to-
morrow, inasmuch as it would brin& up a debate, and the ne-
cessary documents had not all come m, in relation to the origin
of the Seminole war.
Mr. CAMBRELENG would merely state that this bill was
sent to the Senate two months ago, and remained there unacted
upon until the War Department wrote and urged the Senate to
act upon it. If, however, a discussion was to arise respecting
the origin of the Seminole war, the sooner it was brought on
thie better. The people of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida,
were sutlering for want of the passage of this bill. He moved,
therefore, that the House resolve itself into a Committee of the
Whole on the state of the Union, which was agreed to; and,.
The House accordingly went into Committee of the Whole,
Mr. SMITH in the chair, and proceeded to the consideration of
the amendments of the Senate to the bill 1t making appropria-
tiens for the current expenses of the Indian department, for In-
dian annuities, and for other similar objects, for the year 1S36."
T'ie following amendments of the Senate were agreed to
without a division:
1st. For the payment ofa clerk in the office of the Superin-
tendent of Indian Affairs for the Territory of Wisconsin,
2d. "For the payment of interest on an annuity on 1C3O to
the Cherokcesby the treaty of the 24th of October, 1804, and
which was not paid till the year 1825, $12,6C9; which sum
shall be paid in the same manner and in the same proportions
to the Cherokees east and west of the Mississippi, that the an-
nuity itself is payable."
uor the Florida Indians shall be paid to anv Indians Wiro have
been engaged in hostilities against the tfaited States, unless
in sutrh change of circumstances as may induce the President
of tIe United States to di- rect 'he same to be paid."
The fourth amendment of the Senate was to increase the
item for locating reservations, and certifying contracts, tn-
der the treaty with the Creeks, of the 24th of March, 1832,"
from 7,oC' to $14,000.
Mr. BELL,, from the Committee on Indian Affairs, moved to
disagree to this amendment, and entered int, a minute expla-
nation in relation thereto.
After some remarks from Messrs. LAWLER, GLASCOCK.
IIAYNES, TOWNS, CAMBRELENG, OWENS, BELL, and
LEWIS,
Mr. LEWIS moved an amendment to the Senate's amend-
ment authorizing the President of the United States to appoint
additional agents for certifying and forinvestigating frauds, if he
shall deem it necessary.
The amendment was discussed by Messrs. BELL. Me


KAY, ASIILEY, GLASCOCK, LEWIS, LYON, IIAWES,
TOWNES, and OWENS.
At the suggestion of Mr. BELL, both amendments were pass-
ed over for thie present, and the committee proceeded to the con-
sideration of the other amendments, some of which were con-
cuirred in.
On motion of Mr BELL, the committee rose and reported
progress.
The SPEAKER having resumed the chair
On motion ofMr. BELL, the bill was made the specialorder
ofthe day from the hour of 12 o'clock to-morrow.
Sundry documents from the War Department, on the sub-
ject, of Indian hostilities were ordered to be printed.
The House then adjourned at a little before 6, P. M.

UUGENE ARAM.-Eugene Aram, forming
J the 6th volume of Harper's uniform edition
of Bulwer's works, this day received by
KENNEDY & ELLIOTT,
June 3 In the Athenaeum.

SUPERIOR ENGRAVINGS.-F. TAYLOR
has this day opened a lot of Engravings just
imported from France and England, few in num-
ber, but of the finest finish and by the first artists;
Scrap Prints, plain and colored; Illustrations of
thie Passions, very large size; Sporting and Nauti-
cal Engravings; Figures; Landscapes; Heads;
Groups; Historical Engraving's, large and small
'ized; splendid French Lithographs; English Mez-
zotint and Line Engravings, c. Of the finest of
lhe above but a single copy of&ch is received. An
immediate application is therefore advisable at the
Wavcrley Circulating Library, imnlmedately east of
Gadsby's Hotel. June 3

#,- SALE OF GOOD FURNITURE,
'yY postponemnent, in consequence of the utin-
Bfavorable state of the weather. The stle
at the residence of Mr. George M. Davis, 12th
street, third above E., will take place mn Friday
morning, 3d June, 10 o'clock. The furniture
was purchased only eighteen months since, has
been well kept, and consists, in part, of best
IngTlin Carpets, and Wilton Rugs; excellent
Mahogany Sidt-board, Dining, Card, Breakfast,
and Centre Tables; fine Spring-seat Rocking
Chair; Astral and Mantle Lamps, Plated Candle-


GI GL0, .E




FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 3, 1836.

APPOINTMENT BY THE PRESIDENT,
By and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
HEBny S. FOOTE, to be Surviyor generall of
Public Lands south of Tennessee.

THE BRIBERY BANK AND THE GOVERN-
MENT STOCK.
It is a most remarkable thing, that while the
opposition in the Senate every day parade before
the public the seven millions, in the stack of the
Bank of the United States, as a pait of the sur-
plus in the Treasury, they so contrive it that not
a dollar of it can reach the Treasury. Judge
White, Mr. Calhoun, Mr. Clay, and Mr. Webster,
are ever and anon pointing to the seven millions of
bankstock, as a fund for distribution, while Mr.
Webster, as chairman of the Committee of Fi-
nance, holds back for months, from the action of
the Senate, the bills passed by the House of Re-
presentatives to provide against the notorious con-
version by Biddle of the means of the old bank
to the purposes of the new. The bill repeal-
ing the obligations on the officers of the Go-
vernment under the old charter, to receive the
notes of the Bank of the United States, notwith-
standing it is known that Biddle is reissuing the
notes of the old bank, fer the new pretended
State Bank, has been smothered for many
weeks in the Senate. Even the appointment
of an agent, clothed with powers to look into
the concern which the Government had in the
old bank, cannot be obtained. Bidd!e, by
his proxies, has appointed the managers of both
these banks-has himself, in fact, the management
of both; and he is making over all the property of
the old concern to the new[one, at agreed prices.
The great banking house at Philadelphia has
been sold; and the bribery bank, we believe,
is already in possession. So it will be all over the
Union, with regard to the immense and valuable
real property acquired by the old corporation.
As Biddle said of the circulation, so will it be with
the property of the old bank-it will be "the in-
heritance" of the bribery concern; and the Goyv-
ernment can get no agent and no authority to
bring its partnership with the sharpers now prey-
ing upon its interests, to a close. If the country
inquires how this is, we must refer them to the
chairman of the Committee of Finance, Mr. Web-
ster, who, while he stands retained as a Senator to
take care of the national interests, is retained as
Mr. Biddle's attorney-and on account of one re-
tainer or the other, retains the simplest and most
necessary bills passed on this subject in the other
branch for an inordinate time in his committee, or
in the House, and gives precedence to the most
subordinate subjects.

In another column, we give the grounds as-
signed by the Hon. Waddy Thompson for his re-
fusal to vote on Mr. Pinckney's resolution.
His reasons will not be satisfactory to the pub-
lic. When the resolution was first introduced
he voted for it, but he would not vote for it
again, because "he saw his vote paraded by Mr.
Pinckney as authority in favor of that resolution."
If the resolution was right in itself, and Mr.Thomp-
son could vote for it "because, as far as it went,
he assented to it," was it wrong to vote for
it, because Mr. Pinckney afterwards quoted
Mr. Thompson's vote, to show that he did
assent to it? This is precisely the reason
why the constitution requires that members
shall vote on the yeas and nays; it is that
the. sountiy -maay ]waaw ^w-bo -mad -t ytolt
propositions when they are acting as representa-
tives of the people. And would such a stickler as
Mr. Thompson for strict adherence to the cor-
stitution violate it in that vital part which is
meant to secure the responsibility of the repre-
sentatives, merely because it afforded Mr. Pinck-
ney the opportunity of quoting Mr. Thompson's
vote in favor of a proposition which Mr. Thomp.
son still admits to be true?
But Mr. Thompson further says, that by voting


that Congress had no right to interfere with
slavery in the States, he would have recognized the
jurisdiction of Congress over the subject. This
seems to be a strange interpretation. Congress
declares by a resolution that it has nothing to do
with a certain subject, and Mr. Thompson says
this is taking jurisdiction of it! To ordinary minds,
on the contrary, it is an absolute protest against
taking jurisdiction of it. The resolution denies
such right to exist in Congress; and because it
did deny it, Mr. Adams and eight others voted
against the resolution, when, for the opposite rea-
son, the great body of the House voted for it.
The question was not on the abolition of slarery in
the States. It was whether Congress had ju-
risdiction over the subject-that is, a right to
interfere with it in the States. The resolution
was a flat and plump denial of all authority or
jurisdiction over it in any shape or form. And
yet Mr. Thompson could not vote that Congress
has no jurisdiction u(,ver the subject, because by
such a vote lie would recognize that Congress had
jurisdiction over iti!
I-low is it, when a plea is put in against the
jurisdiction of a court, and the court decides
that is not entitled to jurisdiction-is this tak-
ing jurisdiction?
Duff Green once made some direful charge
against Mr. Van Buren, if we recollect rightly.
It was denied positively, and on authority. The
proof was demanded. But Duff said the denial
was an admission. This is a case in point for Mr.
Thompson.


GREAT CANAL FROM THE LAKES TO
THE ATLANTIC.
We observe that a grand project is agitated in
s.1- -* / v P ... .


JUDGE WHITE'S SUN.
Our neighbor Gales, who is a great man to note
the weather and the signs of the times, has said not
a word about the ten days' rain, and total obscura-
tion of the sun, which is the wonder of the day.
He duly noted the partial eclipse of the heavenly
luminary, which occurred, as foretold in the alma-
nac, and did no harm; but the unexpected extinc-
tion of Judge White's luminary-THE SUN-'-
THE LEARNED SUN-which "has hung the
heavens with black" for almost a fortnight, and
set the elements weeping at such a rate as
absolutely to submerge Jackson city under the.
flood of the Potomac, and which" offers as yet
no sign of truce by displaying the white flag,
our contemporary has been in too much con-
sternation to announce. Will he tell us when
Judge White's Sun will shine again? But, if we
can't get that, will he tell us when we shall have
a glimpse of the ordinary blessed" Sun?

THE INDEMNITY.
We had the pleasure yesterday of seeing some
of Napoleon's spoliations already turned to Ameri-
can eagles in our own mint. These new fledged
golden eagles will give assurance to our mer-
chants that the republican bird can now defend its
nest.


THE NEWS.

TEXAS.


A letter received from General Gaines at the
War Department, dated 10th of May, confirms
the Texas news. It is brought by Captain
Hitchcock, just from General Gaines's head quar-
ters.
Extract of a letter from Maj. Gen. Gaines to the
Secretary of War, dated
"HIEAD QUARTERS, WESTERN DEPARTMENT,
"Camp Sabine, May 10, 1836.
The reports from Texas, referred to in my
letters of the 28th ult. and 2d inst.* ofthe defeat
of the advance corps of the Mexican army in
Texas, with the capture of the President, Santa
Anna, his staff and principal officers, and six hun-
dred men, and about the same number killed,
,have received daily confirmation, and are placed
beyond a doubt."

'This letter has not been received at the War Department.

LATEST FROM FLORIDA.
CAPTAIN HOLLOMAN'S ]DEATH.-The following in-
formation contained in a slip from the office of
the Apalachicola Gazette, dated the 19th inst., con-
tains the latest information relative to the exposed
situation of the brave fellows under Capt. HoLLo.
MAN at the Block House at the Withlilacoochee,
and the death of that ill fated officer.
Colonel Wood arrived on Wednesday last from
Tallahassee. We learn from him, that before he
left Tallahassee, three individuals had arrived there
from Capt. Holloman's command, on the Withla-
coochee. It seems they were ordered to this
Block House on the 5th of April; and chivalric
Scott disbanded his forces without giving them a
thought-and they have subsisted ever since
merely upon corn and water! The Indians have
given them very little respite; pressing upon them
in vast numbers. On one occasion they were at-
tacked on all sides by not legs than one thousand
Indians; Capt. Holloman's men returned their fire,
with tremendous effect; they pressed upon the
Block House in such dense masses, that every
shot of the brave defenders took effect. After
this contest, which terminated so fatally to the In-
dians, they failed to show themselves for several
days. It was during this respite, that Capt. Hol-
loman unw!ertook to strengthen his defences, be-
tween the Block House and the river. But while
enwatied in this duty, he was shot down by the
Indians; the balance of the party secured their
retreat to the house. This fact showed the de-
sieged, that though the Indians had learned the
folly ofendeavoring to shout them through their
defences, yet that they continued to be strictly
observed. After the death of Capt. Holloman,
the command of the company devolved upon
Lieutenant who is determined, at all
hazards, to maintain his position till relieved.
It-was to relUeve these brave fellows, tlat the
late cajl for men froom this county was made by the
Executive of the Territory. Col. Wood received
orders to hasten his company forward with all des-
patch. But on his arrival here, and learniing the
unpleasant intelligence by the different points on
the river above, we understand he has concluded
to postpone his departure, till a despatch can be
forwarded to the Governor, informing, him of our
exposed situation here, and the imprudence of
calling men abroad to fight, when their presence
is absolutely required to guard their own homes.
It is expected that the orders to detail men from
this regiment, to serve on the expedition above
referred to, will be countermanded.
The reflections upon Gen. Scott in the above,
are unjust. He ordered Major- Read to the With-
lacoochie, partly with a view to relieve HOLLo-
nAN and his party. Why that was not done by
him, the public is not yet informed. Moreover,
it is well known, that the army was disbanded be-
cause the time of service of most of the volunteers
had expired, and they were already clamorous
for discharge.

HoxonR TO TU BRAvE.-Gen. Clinch, on land-
ing at St. Mary's, was escorted to his lodgings by
Major Cooper's battalion, addressed the volun-
teers, was responded to by Major C., and the
whole, after a salute from Captain Holland's corps,
partook of Capt. H.'s hospitality.--Georgian.

ANOTHER DEMOCRATIC VIcTORYn-We learn
that at the election for commissioners of the dis-
trict of Kensington, on Monday last, the democrats,
fiends of VAN BUREN and JOHNsON, succeeded in
electing twelve out of fifteen of their candidates,
by a lrge majority. The (lays of opposition mis-
rule are numbered in the county of Philadelphia;
and in despite of the tricks of the minority Legis
nature, democracy will obtain its accustomed as-
cendancy there in October.--- nerican &ntinel.

Among the passengers in the ship Philadelphia,
at New York from London, are the Rev. W. H.
l)elancey, of Philadelphia; the Hon. Wm. Wilkins,
late Minister to the Court of St. Petersburg; .lames
Brooks, Esq., the author of Letters from Europe,
and Dr. V7alemltine Mott and lady, of New York.

The Connecticut House of Representatives have


rejectedthe bill authorizing any number of persons,
not less titan five, to organize themselves together
into a joint stock company, with a capital not less
than 10,000 dollars, nor more than 200,00Q dollars.
For the bill 94; against it, 104.

From the New York Journal of Commerce.


sented, and as in one of those resolutions a propo.
sition was asserted which had my asset, I felt at
the moment, having no time for reflection, that I
ought to vote for it. I very soon saw my vote
paraded by Mr, Pinckney, as authority in favor of
that resolution, although he knew I was decidedly
opposed to its introduction. I resolved not again
to give such authority, however slight it might be.
I could not vote against the first resolution, be-
cause as far as it went, I assented to it. I could
not vote for it, because my whole course on the k
subject had been in the nature of a plea to the
jurisdiction, which jurisdiction I shall have os
much recognized by voting for one resolution as
for another. Once let the subject be submitted
to the jurisdiction of Congress, and it is manifc st
that one Congress may resolve djctly the re-
verse of a preceding Congress; and again, I
regarded the negation of constitutional power as to
slavery in the States, when taken in .connexion
with the second resolution, as an admission of that
power in this District; and the report itselfregards
the two objects as inseparably connected, both in
the designs of the abolitionists and in practical re-
sults.
I could not for the same reasons vote for the
second, and for the additional reason, that this re-
solution only asserts that Congress ought not to in-
terfere with slavery in the District, omitting the
wqrds in the instructions, "Because it would
be a violation of pu lic faith, &c," which is all that
ever was pretendM, either by the chairman of
that committee, or by the report itself, as ftrnish-
ing any guarantee to the South, and leaves it
purely a question of expediency; changing with
every change of the opinions of he majority on
that question a resolution f*Lwh- any aboon-
ist might have voted, and fo'vhich some, as Tbe-
lieve, did vote. I have no doubt that this con-
c ssion in the resolutions reported, and departure
from instructions given, was to get as large a vote
as possible for the resolution; and on the other
hannas far as it went, the resolution assetted-
whI I believe to be true, and I'could not there
fore vote against it. I refused to vote, and did so
in the most courteous and east defying manner.
I could not vote for the reasons fiveni. I could
oot ask to be excused, because, by admitting the
rght to excuse, I shoujlhave admittew-he right
of the House to force me to vote, and"f inse,
quence its jurisdiction 6f the subject #hadil Mn'1
the slightest objecWn to be|g excuse f it was
done not on my ownapplication, or b-* agency
of mine. Youinbed't serv't, *
W. THOMPSON.


OFFICIAL.*

DrPARTMENT T o0S TAT,
Washington, June I 1836:5
The following important notices to naviga-
tors have been transmitted to this Doartment
by Mr. Aspifiwall, United States Consul at London.
LIGHT HOUSE ON THE START POINT.
TaixXTY-Hoaiiu, I.iDOx,
27th April. 1836,r
Notice is hereby given, that a light willAW ex-
hibited in the light house which has been erected
on the Start Point, on the cqat of Devonshire, on
the evening of Friday the 1s' of July next, and
thenceforth continued every night, froznsun set to
sun rise, for the benefit of navigation. 9
The character of this light, witch will burn at
an elevation of 204 feet above the level of the sea,
at high water spring tides, will be that of a pot1er-
ful revolving light, showing brilliant flash at reg-
ulated intervals of one minute; and in addition
thereto, a statiorW*ry light will also be exhibited in
the same light house, in the direction of te Berry
head.
PORTLAND HIGH LIGHT.
Notice is also given that on and after Friday the
said 1st of July next, the high light at Portland will
cease to be exhibited as a revolving light, and will be
then and thenceforth continued as a fixed or sta-
tionary light; together with the cow light, both be-
ing visible as fixed lights, in the same direction
seaward as heretofore.
By order,
J. HERBERT.
Seretary.

CITY AFFAIRS.

CANDIDATES.
For Mayor.-HENRY M. MORFIT.
A .lldftman, First W iar.
GHra. W. OL!)SBOflOUGH. '-
.ldwrman, Second Ward:
FREDERICK KELLER.
Councilman- N. TRAVERS,
.alderman, Third Ward:
DAVID SAUNDERS.
Common Cojncil.-SETH HYATT,
JAMES HOBEN,
%JOHN PURDY.
.alderman, Fourth Ward:
CAREY SELDEN.
Councilmen.-JOHN LYNCH,
JAMES CARBERRY,
JAMES ADAMS.


Alderman, Fifth TY ard:
WM. R. MADDOX.
Councilmen.-JOHNI CAROTHERS, ,
WM. SPEIDEN,
WM. HOWARD.
Councilmen, SiA Ward:
JAMES MARSHALL;
MARMADUKE DOVE,
J. L. HENSHAW.

7 HIS DAY PUBLISHED, THI DEBATES
JT in the several State Conventions, on the adp-
tion of the Federal Constitution, as recommended
by the General Convention at Philadelphia, in
1787. Together with the Journal of the Federal
Convention, Luther Martin's Letter, Yates' Min-
utes, Congressional Opinions, from 1789 to 1836,
Virginia ang Kentucky Resolutions of '98, '99,
and other Illustrations of the Constitution- in
4 volumes. Collected and revised from conim-
porary publications. Second edition, with conside-
rable additions. By JONAATHRAn ELLIOTT. Pub-
lished under the sanction of Congress.
For sale by the editor, on the Pennsylvania
Avenue.
June 3-eodSt
BY P. MAURO & SON.
Two Private Libraries: Valuable Books at auction :
O N Saturday afternoon at P. Mauro and Son's,
opposite Brown's Hotel, the private libra-
ries of Baron de Krudener and the late Captain
Kuhn, embracing valuable English, French, Ital-
ian, and Spanish Books; the two libraries forming
an unusually valuable collection of works in his-
torical, classical, scientific and general literature,
many of them extremely rare. They may be ex-
amined and catalogues had prior to sale. Pale to
commence at 4 o'clock, and the whole collection
to be closed same day. The attention of the liter-
ary is invited. P. MAURO & SON,
Auctioneers.
S* In consequence of the unusual inclement
state of the weather, the sale of Mr. PISHEY
THOMPSON'S furniture is postponed to Monday,






N


I '-._"-t"


CNEAP GLOBES.
S EVEN INCH GLOBES, mounlted on nahog-
any stands, engr;ivt 6, ita the btut &,yle cuf' the art, with 3 zodiac, brass
Meridianr, Aaw.n'wa, &c. &c., (Mn every way a first
rate articki) prire $3 50.
S For sale by
F. TAYLOR,
Lt the WavIrlcy Circulating Library, immedi-
ately east of Gadsby's hotel.
liay 2
H[1LEN'S NARRATIVE.
A NAPRRA'I IVE of the shipwreck, captivity,
and sufferings of Horace Holden and Benja-
minN. Nite, who were cast away. in the Ameri-
can ship Mentor, on the Pelew islands, in the year
1832; -nd fortwo years afterwards were subjected
to tlhe crty of tho inhabitants of Lord North's
island: by 1. Hold, n, a few copies; price 50 cents
On sale by
Vl2s2 I'. THOMPSON.
IHlt',(-() KS ELECTRIC. ANOI)DYNE,
For the T7o I/dce enmd a2gue; the only sure remedy
,rtf (discovered, by an external application.
: iiF, sub's-c;bcr is happy in having discovered
simple and sovcreign cure for this painful
disease. The Electric Anodyne, as a co're for
this cornpli .Int, was discovered by me about six
yenrsinc'-, and has been in successful, but gratui-
tosus "s in my immediate neighborhood and vi-
cinity, since that period. A feel warranted in say-
ing, that rmany hundred persons have applied to
me,f'r ,ef, andl been effectually curecd; and
that, ii '"l my experience, v..ry few pe-so!s have
failed in fii ding it an effectual rmedy; snd noner)
to my knowledge,o when the directions for using it
*re strictlyA'm!jad with. The subscriber claims
no skiil in the heVwRg art generally, that shal! com-
pare with that exercised by the Faculty; but I-do
claim to be the fortunate man, to whom coincidence
of circumstances has developed the surest, mostper-
Ianent, and agreeable remedy for the Toothache and
ague, ever before discovered. The Anilyne is
perfectly harmless, and may be applied to the
fairest and most delicate skin, without causing the
slightest blemish. It is used by applying it ac.
cordini to tfe printed directions, signed by I.
MOORE, :iccompanving each bottle, to the out-
side cr.ie face; and istus conveyed, through the
mnIium of tie skin, to the affected nerves. A
Sgreat1 1be r oficertificate are In the possession
of tlr'subscrib&, and hu'ndreds more may be
readikyjbtamined, showiri the efficacy of the
Electric Anodyne. I deerit, however, unneces-
sary to subjoin more than the following, which
aMe subscribe. by respectable persons in the vi-
cinity of rMy rsidence, ard ii this city.
JOSEPH HISSOCK.

hi CERTIFICATES.
This cetTfies, that I was troubled with a severe
Toothache, at times, for two or three months,
durina*which time I made application of every
means of relief I was possessed of, short of extrac-
tion, without success. Being presented with a
bottle of tle Elecric Anodyne, I made one appli-
ichn of iWa;)d hfvInot been troubled with the
Toothache since. JOHN COOK, M. D.
New Sharon, Me., June 9, 1834.

We, the subscrilprs, having made a fair trial of
the Electric Anodyne, can cheerfully recommend
it to tl_4 public, as a safe, efficacious, and sure
remedy-or t'1 Toothache and Ague.
FRANCIS BUTLER,
Z. T. MILLIKEN,
tLEMUEL BURSLEY,
"IOMAS D.BLAKE, M. D.
JONATHAN NOWLTON,
JAMES GOULD.
.lzrmi, gton, Me., July, 1834.

Being exposed by my situation as toll-man
of one of the bridges in the city, to all kinds of
weather, by day and by night, and having been af
flicted, for several years past, with frequent attacks
of the Toothache and Ague, without being able to
obtain relief from the numerous prescriptions for
the cure oftliis complaint, I was presented by Mr.
I. Moore, i' July last, with a bottle of Hiscock's
Electric Anodyne, their suffering under a violent
attack of the Toothache and Ague, and received
fiom its applicationn immediate relief. At the
time referred to, s' ch was the severity of the dis-
ease, I felt unable to attend to my business; my face
was greatly swollen, and I had been deprived of
rest for several nights. By applying the Ano-
dyne once only, thle pain, in a few minutes, en-
tirely sub)sided the swelling in my face came down,
and I have not. been troubled with the complaint
wince. ..- BA-NW L -PU COTT.
B6sto:', October,22, 1834.

We, the uindersigned, having heard, the past
summer, &* i-iicck's Electric Anodyne, as a cure
for the ct. eof the Toothache and Ague, heieby
ceitify, that we made application of it some weeks
since, a'id found it an effectual, safe, and immedi-
ate remedy; anid that we have not since been
troubled with the complaint. We therefore cheer-
fully recommend it to the public, as a valuable
medicine for the above d-isorders.
REUBEN D &VIS,
JOHN HODBROOK,
HARRIET C. FAIRBANK,


ABIEL FISK,
SUSAN FISK.
Boston, November, 1834.
For sale by TODD & CO.
ST'AGNER'S PATEN'F "I'RUSS.
|p ATENT Rl(GI1# FOR SALE. The sub.
L scri er being unable to attend to the call
for this instrument in Geot getown and Alexandria,
will s, ,I t.e right of the ''russ in these cities, i
applied tu im1Mediuhly.
., n?6--Jf J. F. CA1.LAN
SCRItP.
t'RIP bought and sold; highest price always
givenn by
JOHN F. WEBB, Broker.
Orders from a distance (post paid) will be
promptly attended to. Three thousand acres on
hand, and for sale. Wanted VirginiaiLand War-
rants. Feb. 19.
6S UNDERR' PATENT TABLETS FOR
;7 SHARPENING RAZORS.-The subscriber
hasjust received an invoice of the above, which
undoubtedly surpasses all other inventions for
sharpening dull Razors, warren! ed genuine.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
SSnuff, tobacco, and fancy store, Penn.Av.
April 30
BY RICHARD PENN SMIT'IL.
rV'% HE Actress of Padua, and other Tales, the
_J whole in two volumes, is just published,
and this day received for sale by


MIay 18


F. TAYLOR.


HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING, GLAZING
AND GILDING.
Z K. OFFUTT having removed his shop to
11th street, '(opposite Carusi's saloon, and
next to the Washington Library,) being thankful
for past favors, continues still to solicit s share of
public patronage, which, by promptness and de-
spatch, lie hopes to merit.
NOTE.--1 hIe above, in all ita various branches,


* 1~ft~-.~~'-" aA~Lh~L


HISTORY OF THE I UNITED STATES
LAWS, FINANCES, &c.
AMERICAN State Papers and Public.Docu-
ments, from the adoption of the Federal Con-
stitution, to April, 1818, 12 vols., 8vo. $20.
Diplemitic Correspondence ef the American
Revolution, concerning the foreign relations of
the United States, during the whole period of the
revolution; edited by Jared Sparks, 10 vols, 8vo.
$20.
The Laws of the United States, from the com-
mencement of the Government to the fourth of
March, 1833, 8 vols. 8vo., with Birch's Index to
the first seven volumes, handsomely bound. $35.
Secret Journals of the acts and proceedings of
Congress, from the first meeting thereof, to the
adoption of the Constitution, 4 vols., 8vo., very
scai ce. $15.
Journal of the Senate of the United States, from
the fourth March, 1789, to the fourth March, 1815,
5 vols., half bound, $20.
American Annual Register, 6 vols.
The Federalist, by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay,
various editions.
The History and Topography of the United
States, edited by John Howard Hinton, with a
series of fine Engravings, 2 vols. 4to. $14.
Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and
ScienceF, to the end of the year 1783, 4 vols. 4to,
very rare. $25.
Ellicott's Journal for determining the boundary
of the United States, with six Maps and an Appen-
dix, 4to. $5
Historical Collections, consisting of State Papers,
collected by Ebenezer Hazard, 2 vols., 4to. $16.
The Geographical and Historical Dictionary of
America and the West Indies, from the Spanish of
Alcedo, 5 vols. 4to. $20.
[List to be continued.]
On sale by PISIHEY THOMPSON.
AprWS9
G ARDEN SEED)S.-A small as.ortmnent for
retail, amongst which are some of the ear-
liest and best kinds of peas, as Bishop's early
dwarf, extra early, Dwarf Marrowfat, &c.

LEWIS JOHNSON.
Snuff, tobacco, and fancy store, Pennsylvania
Avenue.
P. S. A few articles of Garden Tool;, asPrun-
ing Scissors,an excellent article for light shrubbery,
vines, flowers, &c. ditto Knives and Sawvs; small
floes, Rakes, &c., for sale at reduced prices, as
above. March 5
EAGLE QUILLS, SWAN QUILLS.
W TALOR has just received a few hundred
j. EAGLE QILLS, the only ones for sale in
the country, which have been just imported from
Germany, the first that have been seen in Wash-
ington or in the United States. Public officers
and others are respectfully invited to call and ex
amine them, or send -for samples to the Wa-
verly Circulating Library, immediately east of
Gadsby's Hotel.
Also imported by the same Packet, a large sup-
ply of Swan Quills, of great length and strength
of barrel, and a very superior quality. These
are offered for sale at prices materially cheaper
that the same artic e has before been sold for.
heir great durability renders them in the end
more.economical than the Goose Quill, even when
leaving out of view the more important economy
of time and trouble.
SAlso a large supply of German Goose Quills,
by the same packet, some of the largest and fin-
est ever seen in Washington. English and Ame-
rican Quills, in great variety; all of the most ap-
proved kind of Metallic Pens, to which additions
are made of every new article immediately upon i's
receipt in this country. Terry's British Ink, red
and black; Bertinguiot's French Ink, red and
black; and all the American kinds.
April 30.


COBB'S SERIES OF SCHOOL BOOKS.
`PIELLING COURSE.--Cobb's First Book,
or Introduction to the Spelling Book.
Cobb's Spelling Book, containing the rudiments
of the English language, arranged in catechetical
order; an organization of the alphabet, a greater
number of spelling lessons than are generally
inserted in spelling books, many useful tables, and
the proper names in the New Testament.
Cobb's Expositor, a Sequel to the Spelling
Book; containing about twelve thousand of the
most common words in the language; in wh-ch
each word is accurately spelled, pro .ounced, di-
vided, and explained, and the primary and se-
condaryV accent noted; to which are prefixed con-
cise principles of pronunciation, and rules for the


DR. SF. 'PLE'S PATENT TRUSS,


O/ 0ACHMAKER'S NOTICE.
L KNOWLEKS & CO., formerly KNOWLES
& & THAYER, of Amherst, Mass., inform
their friends and the Public, that they have re-
ceniy made large additions to their Manufacturing
Estabi~muenet, and will in future be able to manu-
f.cture more extensively. No pains has been
spared to obtain the most expcr enced workmen;
and all the materials are selected with great care,
and one of the firm will attend personally to the
Manufacturing.
Coaches, Chariots, Lundans, Barouches, Car-
ryalls, Buggi':, Giggs, and Pleasure Wagon, con-
stantly on hand, for sale at the Shop, or made to
order at ,hort notice, of the best finish and
latest style.
Also., they intend to keep a supply of Carriages
for sale at the Philadelphia Bazaar, No. 38 and 40,
Dock street below Second, managed by T. BIRCH
ir. &CO.
JUVENILE CLASSICS.
SFARNHAM & CO., No. 5 Varnum's
Row, hive just received the Juvenile Clas-
sics, in one hundred volumes-price $28. The
following works are composed in these volumes.
1, Atlantic Tahes; 3, Children's Friend; 11,
Ad entures of Paul Pry, 12, The Value of Time;
13, The Value of Money; 14, Sandford and Mer-
ton; 16, Stories Worth Telling; 17, Familiar Let-
teis; 19, Adelaid&; 20,. Daughter of a Genius;
21, Miner of Iceliand; 22, Poetry without Fiction
23, Original Poems; 24, Juvenile Plutarch; 26, Ele';
ments of Morality; 27, Trimmer's History of Eng-
land; 29, The Beloved Sister; 30, The Parent's
Assistant; 26, Tie Y<,ung Cade'; 37, Stories from
Scripture; 39, Infantine Stories; 40, Conversa-
tions on Massachussetts; 41, Conversations on
Common Things; 43, Godfrey Hall; 44, The
Young Naturalist; 45, First Letters of New Eng-
land; 47, Roman Stories; 48, Edgeworth's Les-
sOM, parts 1 and 2; 49, Harriet and Lucy, parts
3 amnd 4; 50, Harriet and Lucy, concluded; 53,
Rosamond; 57, Life of Linneus; 58, The Story
Ttller; 60, The Officer's Widow; 61, Evening
Hours; 63, Eugene and Lolotte; Leigh Richmond;
64, The White Kitten, The Knapsack, Intellectual
Philosophy; 65, Bible Biography, Sunday School
Hymns, Sabbath School Present; 66, The Faithful
Little Girl, Little Warbler of the Cottage; 67,
Lights of Education; 69, Tales for Ellen; 71,
Little Agnes, The Storm, Stories in Verse; 72,
Leading Strings; 73, Nursery Fables; 74, Little
Child's Book; 76, Boy's Own Book; 78, Ameri-
can Girl's Book; 80, Child's Own Book; 83, Ro-
binsin Crusoe; 85, Swiss Family Robinson; 87,
Barbauld's Lessons; 90, Northern Regions; 92,
Belzoni in Egypt; 94, Portraits from Life, Poetic
Tales, Lessins from Scripture; 95 to 100, Parley's
Mgazaine.
April 21


S'T'AGNEi'S PATENT TRISS,
For the radical cure of irnia, or Rvpture
7rqilHIS instrument has been fund to effect
permanent cures in all cases, even in old
and invwterae ruptures, and is better calculated
to restrain ob.;tinate protruseions than any other
truss known to the profession.
The subscriber being so fully convinced of the
importance of this invention, has purchased from
the proprietor the privilege of introducing' it into
thie practice of Surge-ry in the District of Colum-
bia, and invites those who are subjects of Her-
nia to make trial of Stagner's Truss. iHe has pzr-
mission to refer to all the Physicians in the Dis-
trict of Columbia, and to many of the most emi-
nent and respectable Physicians in the United
States whose certificates are in his possession.
J. F. CALLAN,
opposite the Post Office.
The following testimonials are selected from among
a large number which have been spontaneously
offered by distinguished members of the pro-
fessisn.
WILLIAM GIBSON, M. D. the able and dis-
tinguished Professor of Surgery in the University
of Pennsylvania, has spoken of this Truss in the
most favorable manner in a clinical lecture to his
pupils. After having spoken of the ordinary
Trusses now in use, which he observed, merely
palliated or prevented the further extension of the
disease, with the exception of some few cures
wnich had been effected in children, he went on
to say, that although he was favorably impressed
with the invention, as he had said in a previous
lecture, he could not at that time form any certain
conclusion as to its merits, not having then ex-
amined any cases in which the inst-ument had
been applied; but since then he had examined
three cases, in which the most perfect cures had
been effected. He said one was a case of a gen-
tleman aged upwards of 60 years, who had been
laboring under Scotal Hernia nine years, on one
side as large as a cocoa nut; he had never obtained
any radical relief until Stagner's Truss was ap-
plied, which has to all- appearances, effected a
perfect cure. Another not so far advanced in
age, but whose case was equally intractable, who
had tried every species of Truss heretofore in use,
without even a palliation of the symptoms, as he
found it impossible with them to keep his bowels
in their proper situation, who, by the application
of Stagner's Truss, has been radically cured, a
perfect cicatrization of the part having taken
place. And the third was that of a young man
who had been cured of Inguinal Hernia by the
same instrument.
Dr. Gibson then said: From these cases, trom
the testimony of other gentlemen entitled to the
most profound respect, who have had ample op-
portunity of witnessing the cures effected by this.
Truss; and from his former impressions with re-
spect to the indications to be fulfiled in the treat-
ment of this terrible malady, he had the most fa-
vorable impression towards it, and had great
hopes that it will cause an entire revolution in
this department of Surgery."
Dr. McCLELLAN, Professor of Surgery in tihe
Jefferson Medical College, stated, irt one ofhs
lectures on Hernia, delivered the present session,
that he considered the improvement of Stagner to
be an important contribution to the interests of hu-
manity. Several students in that College have
offered extracts from their note books, in which
they represent the Professor as saying, that he
considered this Truss to be the only one on which
hlie could depend in the way for a radical cure. lHe
stated that he had seen it effect speedy cur- s in
several cases, where every other contrivance had
;aitct-tvenin restraining the fleriialdescenit. lie
particularly mentioned the case of a gentleman
who had been for a long time troubled with an ob.
stinate Femoral Rupture, which he had never been
able to keep frem descending, until h(; resorted to
Stagner's Truss; and although he was s-o carele s
as to lay aside tile int-trmumeiit in eight or nine day.,
in consequence of an ulceration of the skin, the
Hlernia never returned, and a firm durationin and
closure was established in the course of the pas-
sage, under Poupart's Ligament.
Dec. 22-dtf

FOR RENTr,
SA new brick house, two stories and
!I basement, pleasantly situated on 13
.street, between B and C street south, con-
taining .iine rooms, a larger lot for a garden, stable
and carriage-house, a pump of fine water opposite
the door. To a good tenant the rent w'ill be mo-
derate.
Inquire of Mr. WV. H. GUNNEL, living next
door, or to the proprietor,
WM. A. McCAULEY.
N. B. The subscriber haa removed his Copper
and Tin establishment to the house late occu-
pied by Mr. Kenedy as a book store, between 11th
and 12th street, north side Pennsylvania Avenue.
March 9-tf WM. A. McCAULEY.

AMERICAN HISTORY, &c.
SIFE of Alexander Hamilton, by his son J. C.
j Hamilton, vol. 1. $2.
Hazard's Pennsylvania Register, 16 vols., quam to.
$48.
Life of the Rev. Horace Holley, L. L. D., 8vo.
$1 50.


Transactions of the American Philosophical So-
ciety, held at Philadelphia, vol. 1. $2 75.
Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts, third edi-
tion, 2 vols. $5.
Annual Messages, Vtto Messages, Proclama-
tions, &c. of Andrew Jackson, 8vo. $1.
Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellanies of
Thomas Jefferson, 4 vols., 8vo. $9. '
Lee's Memoirs ot the war in the southern de-
partment of the United States, new edition; 1827.
$1 75.
Observations on the writings of Thomas Jeffer-
son, by H. Lee. $1 50.
Memoir of the Life of William Livingston, by
Theodore Sedgwick,jr., 8vo. $2.
Indian wars in New England in 1675-four
very rare pamphlets relating thereto, 1 vol., folio.
$12.
Indian Treaties, and Laws and Regulations rela-
ting to Indian Affaiis, with thie Appendix. Very
few copies left. $4.
Laws of the Colonial and State Governmentsre-


FOR ITHE RELIEF AND CURE OF HERNIA.
IhE subscriber has just received an addition-
al supply of the above Truss, and can now
adapt it to any sized patient, and every variety of
rupture.
The most satisfactory references can be given
to persons in this District, who have used this
instrument. For sale at the Drug store of
G. S. FARQUHAR,
Agent for the proprietor, corner between
Brown's ,rnd Gadsby's.
April 20


M'Ny 30-dl


PECK, WELLFORD, & CO.
Fredericksburg and Danville, Va.
y


CLARK'S OLD ESTAIILLAIED
LUCKY OFFICE,
N. TV. Corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets,
(Under the Museum.)
Where have been sold PRIZES! PRIZES! in
Dollars, Millions of Millions!!
Baltimore, 1836.
NOTICE.-Any person or persons throughout
the Union, who may desire to try their luck, either
in the MARYLAND STATE LOTTERIES, or
in authorized Lotteries of other States, some one
of which is drawn daily, tickets from one to ten
Dollars, shares in proportion, are respectfully re-
quested to forward their orders by mail (post
paid) or otherwise, enclosing Cash or Prize
T ickets, which willbe thankfully received, and
executed by return mail, with the same prompt
attention, as if on personal application, and the
result given (when requested) immediately after
the drawing. Please address
JOHN CLARK,
N. W. Corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets,
Nov-dly under the Museum.

AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE AND)
TRUS T COMPANY.
OFFIcES. No. 136, Baltimore street, Baltimore,
and corner of Wall and Broad streets, New
York.
Ar.ENcY, At Elliott's Buildings, Pennsylvania
Avenue, near 4j street, Washlington City.
Established by act of the Legislature. Capital
$1,000,000.
This company from its large capital, and various
means of accommodation, affords ample security
and great facility to parties who transact their
business with it. The terms are as low as any of-
fice in the Union.
They make _
1. IxsURANCE 8rlIYIES.
2. GRANT AlNNUITIES.
3. EXECUTE TRUSTS.
4. SELL ENDOWMENrTS.
The Legislature having directed the m.nnner in
which th- capital of this company must bK secur-
ed, an-1 the whole being under the immediate sut-
pervirion of the Chancellor, to whom stated re-
turns will be made, it becomes the secure deposi-
tory f,-r the moneys, property, and estates of all
such as may desire the. intervention of a perma-
n -nt Trustee or Guardian; to such as require punc
ttual payment of interest upon sums deposited; or
such as may make deposits for the benefit of ac-
cumulation. Underthe charter, real or personal
property can be confeyedi or devised to the corn-
p.ny in trust, and they may execute any trust in
the same manner, and to the same extent, as any
trustee-they may make all contracts in which
the casualties cf life or interest of money are in
vulved.
Money willbe received in Deposite by the com-
pany and held in trust, upon which interest will be
allowed, payable semi-annually.
Rates of Insurance for $100, on a single life.
Age. One year. Seven years For life.
25, 1,00 1,12 2.04
30, 1,31 1,z6 2,36
35, 1,35 1,53 2,75
40, 1,69 1,83 3,20
50, 1,96 2,09 5,60
TRUSTEES,
Patrick Macaulay, Joseph L. Joseph,
Morris Robinson, 7 Gotrham Brooks,
James Boorman, 4 S.muel Wetmore,
Charles A- Davis, Philip T. Dawson,
William E. Mayhew, Matthew L. Bevan,
Frederick W. Brune, Samuel B. Ruggles.
Applications, post paid, may be addressed to
PA'[TRICK MACAULAY, Esq. President, Balti-
more; or MOURNS ROBINSON, Esq. Vice Presi-
dent, New York; to which immediate attention
will be paid. Oct 23-y
Applications may Mlso be made personally, or by
letter, post paid, to FRANc Is A. DIcKINs, Agent
for the Company in the City of WASHINGTON.
Hjs office is in Elliott's Row, Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, near. street.
PATENT RIGHiT SECUREI.
remedy fJr dsiatic Cholera, Cholera I4or-
us, 1 Diarrh a, e4c.
S -N consequence of the very great and increasing
1 demand mor this nvaluable preparation,induced
by the many cures which have been effected by
the use of it in cases of Asiatic Cholnra and com-
mon Cholera Morbus in children, and disorders of
the bowels generally, the proprieto: has prepared
and will continue to keep on hand, a large supply.
Read and believe! This remedy ha. hin ,,.fd


'i,..,^ -*,' -r ... =* & y^


.' Ui V ,VFrSI'?RN OR UPPi)ER iATL
ROUTE.
Washington City and illedgeville, Geo., thence
to New Or'eans. New arrangement, Jan. 1835.
Swo thwestern and Piedmont Lines Consolidated.
-. ECK, WELLFORD, & Co., now owning the
intersecting Lines, which formerly render-
cd -n uninterrupted passage through this route,
unceitain, promise travellers a passage through
the wholr route, "secure from all interruption
from conflicting interests."
TWO STEAMBOATS daily leave Washington
for Fredericksburg, Virginia; where, on Tues.
days, Thursdays, and Saturdays, coaches are in
waiting to take passengers on to Cartersvil!e,
Farmnville, Prince Edward Court-house, Halifax
Court.h-.use, Virginia; Nliluon, Greenboro', Lex-
ingrton, Salisbury, Charlott2, &c., North Carolina;
Yorkvi Ie, Uninnville, Abbville, &c., South Caro.
lina; Washington, Gre nsboro', Eatonton, &.c., to
Miledgevitle, Georgia; where this iine units with
thei Metropolitan line to New Orleans: distant f'ornom
WVashington City, hy thds route, 1,217 miles only.
Intersecing lines to Columbia, Augusta, Knox
ville, Tallahasse, &c.
The SouthlweAtern 1'Yne leaves Milledgeville for
Wastington Cily, Tuesdays, Fridays, and Sun-
days; d stance 658 milts; through in eight and a
half dcys, allowingfu/ll time for sleep and refresh
mernt. Speed as graat as is consistent with health
and safety. A superior natural road, neither
mountainous nor sandy, passing through the famed
gold region of Noith Carolina.
Good water, healthy country, excellent taverns,
with low charges, temperate drivers, and supe-
rior horses and coaches.
The proprietors solicit passengers to oblige
them, by giving this line one trial; feeling confi-
dent they wi! travel it afterwards to oblge thernm-
selves. It is their anxious wish to make this a
popular line, and worthy of patronage. They
therefore beg to be informed of any misconduct
of persons in their service.
6- We are now arriving at Fredericksburg,
Virginia, from the South; the night previo:.s to
the time above stated, to sapp-r, which gives paI-
sengers a full night's rest at Fredericksburg;
a!so, making seven and a half days only from Mil-
ledgeville. This arrangement will contirmnue from
1st April to 1st December.
May 25, 1835.
CAUTION.-Travellers south of Mlledgeville,
going north, should be careful to enter to Milledge-
ville only.


April 1.


LEWIS JOHNSON,
Snuff, tobacco, mid fancy store,
Pennsylvania avenue.


LIVE OAK OF LARGi- DIMENSIONS
FOR S\LE.
F 11HIS grove of Live Oak, is situated on St.
} Rosa Bay, distant 45 miles fiom Pensacola,
and 6 from East-pass inlet, into the Gulf of Mexi.
co, the dimensions range from 2 to 6 feet and over
in diameter, sound healthy growing timber, which,
by a survey made in 1829, by the surveyor of
the Navy Departmen', was reported to contain
7U thousand cubic feet, exclusive of smaller sizes;
none of this timber lays farther than 100 yards
from the shore of the B,3y, where convenient
landings are reached over a level and hard soil,
rendering transportation to the water edge& as easy
as can be found anywhere.
For terms and particulars, apply to CHARLES
L. GARNIER, at New Orleans; or to JOHN GAR-
NIER, at Pensacola, West Florida.
Dec. 28-

ALEXANDRIA FOUNDRY AND
STEAM ENGINE FACTORY
SIGH and Low Pressure Steam Engines
n Machinery of every description, heavy
Castings of Iron, Brass, and Composition, include
ig- Church Bells of any weight made of goo
quality and on the usual terms, 1y
THiOS. W. S WiTH & CO.
Alexandria, D. C. August 6. dly

UNIVERSAL ATLAS.-A new and Uiiver-
j sal Atlas, comprising separate maps of all
the principal Empires, Kingdoms, and States
throughout the world, and formiin, a distinct atlas
of the United Statos, carf fully compiled from the
best authorities extant, by David H. Burr; jist
published and received by
Rt. FARNIHAM & CO.
April 27 No. 5, Varnum's Row, Pa. Av.
AULDING'S LIFE OF WASHIINGTON
in 2 vols., with four beautiful engravings,
pr ce $1 25, is just published and this day receiv-
ed for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Also, Random Recollections of the House of
Commons, from 1830 to 1835, including personal
sketches of the leading members of ail parties;
one small volume.
T ;e second series of the "Naval Sketch
Book," two volumes.
Notices of the war of 1812, by General John
Armstrong, Secretary of War at that period, one
volume.
April 4
'T,1EBHUHtu'S R-OME, &c.-the History of
., Rime by G B Niebuh.,', translated byJ. C.
lHare ,nd C. Thrlwall, 2 vols, 8vo, $4 50. The
American ) Diplomatic Code, embracing a collec-
ti -n oftreiatis and conventions between the Unit-
ed States and foreign powers from 1778 to 1834,
with important judicial decisions on points con-
nected ith our foreign relations; also a concise
Diplomatic Minual, containing a summary of the
law of nations, from Vattell, Wicqu-fort, Martens,
&c., by Jonathan Elliot, 2 vols, 8vo, handsomely
bound in calf $12,00. On sale by
April 29. PISHEY THOMPSON.
FA RISERY-THE HORSE, &c. &e.
'_ATELY published, and for sale by F. TFAY
LOR, at the Waverley Circulating Library,
immediately east of G.adb) 's hotel.
Hind's Groom's Oracle; Lawrence on the
Ilorie; Lebaud's Principles of Horsemanship for
L:dies and Gentleman. "The Horse," as pub-
I shed by the British Society for thile diflusion of
us:fil knowledge; Barnum's American Farrier;
Farmers' and Graziers' Guide, by Lawrence; New
England Farrier and Farmers' Cattle Book; Mow-
bray on Poultry, Sheep, Cows, Swine, and other
domestic animals; their breeding, rearing, fatten-
ing, and management. Farriery and Veterinary
M-d'cine, by J. W white, Veterinary Surgeon to the
koyal Dragoons; Hind's Veterinary Surgeon; Gib-
son's- Farrier's Dispensatory; the Farrier's and
Hor.emlnans' compLete Dictionary; Bartlett's Gen-
tlemens' Farrier; The Gentleman's Jockey or Far-
rier's approved Guide; Allen's Essay on Horses;
Claten's Cattle Doctor; Salters' Angler's GuiLle;
Walton's and Cotton's complete Angler, together
u iPh many other valuable works of the same class
and description, all at the lowest prices.
M +y 12-

:FEW BOOKS -Paris and the Parisians, by
J,.. Mrs. Tro!ope.
The Self-condemned, a n~vel, in one volume.
Sallust, a new edition, with commentary and
other additions, by Professor Anthon.
Marryatt's complete works, handsomely printed
and bound, with portrait; the whole eight novels,
complete, for $3 50. F. TAYLOR.
May 5
^ PAIN REVISITED, by "A yvunrg Aunurican,'
author of A Ye"r in Spain-in two vohunes,
with engravings-is just published and this day
received for sale bv F. TAVIORI


AMERICAN HISTORY, LAWS, &c.
RT.. EPORTS of the Convention on the Constitu-
-i tion of the State of New York, 1821.
53 50.
Nw Enrand's Memorial, by Nathaniel Mor-
ton, 5'h edition. $2.
Adams (J. Q.) on Weights anrd Measutres.
$1 25.
Adams's (J. Q.) Duplicate Letters, the Fishe-
ries, and the Mississippi, 8vo. $2 25.
Life of James Otis, of Massachusetts, by W.
Tudor. $2 25.
Review of the Constitution &c. of Pennsylvania,
from its origin, by Dr. Franklin, London, 1759.
$5.
National Calendar, by P. Force, for 1836.
$1 50.
Moses's Digest of the Commercial Regulations
of thie Unit d States.
Atkins's Statistics of the United States, Cornm-
merce, &c., second edition, just published. $3 50.
Life, Writings, and Speeches of William Pink-
ney, by H. Wheaton. 02.
Speeches, Addr'esses aand Messages of the Pre-
sidents of the UnritLd 2Statc s, 8vo. $3.
Prince's Chronological History of New England.
112 50.
Proud's History of Pennsylvania, from 1681 to
1742, two volumes, 8vo. F5.
iiULitory of the great Indian war under King
Philiip, in 1675 and 1676, by Tnomas Church
second edition; plates. $1 50.
The Plc tician's Register, cont'.ining the Consti-
tut:on;-, &c. 50 cents.
Memoir ofjos*ah Quincy jr, by hiis son. $2.
Letters of John Randolph to a young relative.
$1 25.
Ramsay's Life of George Washington, 8vo. $3.
Rr1;uet's Principles of Free Trade, 8vo. $2 50.
Sketch of the Internal condition of the United
States of America, and of their political relations
with Europe, by a Russian, M. Poletica. $1.
On sale by
PISLHEY THOMPSON.
M y 12
AD'.:.iE YELLOW LEAF CHEWING TO-
_ BACCO.-T h' subscr'iber ihas on hand for
retail a few boxes very superior yellow leaf chew-
in-r tob:>cco, believed to be unequallvd in this Dis-
t ict, at 75 cts.


Kt.CAMEttON OF BOCCACCIO, cueap edi-
tion, in 2 vols. English edition, well bound,
and printed with portrait, containing also all his
suppressed novels, just received and for sale by
F. TAYLOR; price only $2, the usual cost being
$4. May 27
INAUGURAL ADDRlKS- OF GEN.
AN DREW JACKSON,
E NGRAVED in a beautiful style, on an ena-
melled tablet, with a borer of Hickory and
Laurel leaves, containing also an excellent Portrait
Autograph and Chronological Table of the circum-
stances and dates of his life-price only 25 cents.
for sale by F. TAYLOR,
at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
east of Gadsby's Hotel.
Ppril 24.
W HATMNIAN'S ENGLISH ANTIQUARIAN
DRAWING PAPER -A supply (war-
ranted genuine) is this day opened by F. TAY-
LOR, at the Waverley Circulating Library, imme-
diately east of Gadsby's Hotel; where Drawing
Mteriads of aI kinds, Paints, Mathematical and
Drawing Instriuments, French Vegetable Tracing
P-per, Drawing Books, &c. &c. may always be
had in great variety. Apr.1_21
-THE MUSICAL LIBRARY;
Published under the superintendence of the Boston
academy of Music.
LOWELL MAsox AND GLO. J. WEBB, EDITORS.
A part, containing 16 superroyal quarto
pages ofi music, and four pages of letter press,
neatly done up in an ornamental covtr, will be
published each month. Price four dollars per
aninum.
Extract from the Editors' address .
"The design o0 1he MUSICAL LIBRARY is to fuir-
nish monthly a choice collection of music, both
vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular, pre-
sented in such a form as will render it a desirable
companion in t.c parlor, the social circle, and in
private instruction. Pieces will be occasionally
inserted suitable for the private practice, or public
performances, of choirs or singing societies. The
music wiil be selelected from the works of the best
commposers, ancient and modern. Ori-inal cornm-
positions m .y occasionally appear. The editors
wiil coIstantly aim to select such music, and such
only, as possesses an elevated character, an is
really good and worthy of preservation-music
that os .all ;,i ..... -..o.. l rA1 .... ...- -1.. .I-:.. -' _, _


ARTRIDGE'S ORIGINAL LEATHER PIRE-
RERVATIVE, or OIL BL.ACKING-a pa-
tent composition, or cleaning, nourishing, and
preserving either; renewing the color, rendering
it soft, pliable, and elastic, and when corrimpetely
filled, impenetrable by water, or water proof.
This composition is aot only the best, but the
most convenient and ch.:apest article ever known,
for cleaning and preserving Chaise and Carriage
Tops, Tlhorough-Braces, and Harness. It reno-
vates and nouris-hes the leather, renders it soft and
elastic, renews the color and strength, and pre-
vents it from drying and cracking.
For boots and shoes it is invaluable. When al-
lowed to dry, it closes the pores of the leather,
renders them impenetrable by the wet, and keeps
them soft and comfortable to the feet.
For Factory BWnds, it is peculiarly beneficial,
giving them an adhesiveness and elasticity that no
other substance will give.
It is also applicable to Engine Hose, Forge Bel-
lows, 'Travelling Trw.'ks, and to all leather expos-
ed to the action of heat, cold, or wet, and en-
tirely super.e.:les the use of oil.
I ECOi)' MENDYATIONS.
Havir.g made use of this composition for the
purposes above named, and finding it superior to
ai-y other article we have ever used, in its beiog
not only more economical, but more beneficial in
its effets upon leather, we recommend it to the
public' as a highly useful and important discovery.
Galen IIolmes, Boston; E. G- House, Bcstoin;
Ph. Adams, u)unstable; Samuel Wat son, Leicester,
Caleb Cushing, !?oxhury; John Cook, Cambridge-
port; Edgar V. Davis, New York; who use tlhe. ar-
ticle on Boots, Shoes, Harness, Carriage-Tops, &c.
Carton & Balch, Medway; who use the prisr-rva-
tivein their Shoe Manuflictory. J. Mellen, West-
borough-having experienced its beneficial effects
on Forge Bellows. Niles & Whiting, and W. J.
Niles, who use the article on Chaise-tops and Har-
ness, at their extensive Livery Establishments,
Boston.
The following new certificates have been volun
ta-ily offered bfor publication. Among the num-
ber "re those who are the proprietors of Stagcs
and Livery Stables, and some who have long been
driers The undersigned having made use of Par-
ti idge's Original Leather Preservative, and fil'y
tested its effects, cheerfully certify to the fact
that we have found it all that it purports to be.
We find one of its most essential and most de-

sirable properties to consist in its preserving Har-
ness, Chaise-Tops, &c. &c. exposed to wet and
muddy weather, from becoming hard and stiff,
and from tarnishing or changing their color; and
the circumstance that its effect is more durable
than oil, requiring also a less quantity and less fire-
quentapplication, renders it a much cheaper arti
cle. (Signed) Reuben D,.vis, Joseph Stone, WSJ-
liam MIunroe, Charles Field, Z. Wyman, Jr. A.
Dummer, S. II. G. Rowley, Job Brooks.
For a further recommendation of Partridge's
Leather Preservative, the proprietor refers to eve-
ry person who makes use of it. By many it is
said that "Leather will last nearly twice as long
by rising this composition, as it will without"
Neatly put up in half pint tin canisters with
printed directions for its use; and packed in boxes
o;'one dozen each. Also in canisters of one gal-
lon and a halfeach.
A constant supply~of this valuable article will
hereafter be kept by TODD & CO.
Nov 10 Agents for the Proprietor.
(CCI.ESIASTICAL IHSTOItY OF VIR-
GINIA.-Contributions to the Ecclesiastical
History of the United States of America; by F.
L. Hawks, Rector of St. 1 homas's Church, New
York. This volume contains a narrative of events
connected with the rise and progress of the Pro-
testant Episcopal Church in Virginia; to which is
Idded an appendix, c-,ntaining the Journals of the
Conventions in Virginia from the commencement
to the present time. One large volume, 8vo.
$2 50. For sale by
March 16 PISHEY THOMPSON.
.~-'i OR SALE, for a term of years, a likely
.V colored Boy, now about 15 years of age.
'he boy is not to be sold for any fault, but can
be recomnme)ided as equal to any in the District,
of his age, for integrity and capacity.
Inquire of E. DYER.
Dec 17-tf
MEXICAN REVOLUTION.
J US'F received and for sale by
F. TAYLOR,
MEMOIRS OF THE MEXICAN R1 VOLU-
TION, including a narrative of the expedition of
General Mi a,with observations on the praclicabili-
ty of opening a commerce between the Pacific and
Atlantic throt'gh the Isthrrus, and the Lake Mica-
rajua,, and on the importance (present and pros-
pective) of such a communic ion to the civilized
world, andti specially to the Unted States;one vol.
octavo; 396 printed pages-price only $1 25.
May 27.


'
S TAGNEI'S ORIGINAL PATENT TRUSS,
for the radical cure Hernia.-This is the
instrument approved of by nearly all the medical
and scientific gentlemen of the United States, and
particularly recommended by Drs. Gibson, Mc-
Clellan, and Pattison, of Philadelphia, and all the
physicians of the District of Columbia.
The committee of physicians appointed by the
Medical Society of Philadelphia to examine all
the Trusses now before the public, and to report
upon their pretensions in the radical cure of Her-
nia, have given Stagner's Truss the decided pre-
ference to all others.
The subscriber having purchased, at a great
price, the privilege of introducing it into the
practice of Surgery in the District of Columbia,
invites all those who are subjects of Hernia, to make
trial of Stagner's Truss. J. F. CALLAN,
March 9 Opposite the Post Office.
Fi HE subscriber has constantly for lease, fo
Perpetuity, or for any term of years, with o
without the privilege to purchase, Squares, Lots
Houses, and Tenemeota, of almost every variety
and in every ward of the city.
J MES HOBAN,
Attorney at Law.
Louisiana Av May 26-l'aw f
N OTI(WE TO BOARDING SCHOOLS-or,
a Private Family, wishing to employ a
French Teacher.
middle aged French Lady, accustomed for
several years to teach her language, on Grammati-
cal principles, in School or in a Private Family,
is desirous to find employment. Letters of ',e-
commendation, showing her qualifications will be
produced, when required. Attention will'be given
to any letters, post paid, addressed to
A. MA. D.
Reference, Rev. Mr. HiBnr,
Rev. Mr. POSTE,
Washington City.
Dec. 23-
NEW PEN-HOLDERS.
JrUST received, at Stationers' Hall, a great va-
J variety of Silver, Ivory and Cocoa Wood Pen-
hol)ders; some o(f them constructed upon a new
principle, suitable for every kind of metallic pens,
and wvhih rl.tpn hbe worn in t'he Apno'lre t ;tK hK+i.


A SERVANT WOMAN WANTED, for the
general work o la small family. Good re
commendations required; and to such good wages
and prompt payment. Apply to .
L. JOHNSON,
April 4 Pa. Avenue.
', OW IS THE TIME.-From the flattering en-
J., couragement the proprietors have met with,
in the sale of their tickets, they have some assur-
rances that they may have it in their power to
draw their lottery on the 15th day of August next.
VALUABLE REAL AND PERSONAL PRO-
PEATY BY LOT FERY, to be disposed of under
the superintendence of the Trustees appointed by
an act of the General Assemby of Maryland:
passed at December session 1834; to authorize
Ienry Shafer George Shafer, and Henry I. Sha-
for, to distribute their estate by lot.
'This property is situated in the village of Funks-.
town in Washington county, on the National Turn-
pike Road leading fr'am Baltimore to Wheeling,
and distance two miles from Hagerstown, being in
the centre of one of the most populous, wealthy
and thriving counties in the State of Maryland.
'! he mills are upon the waters of the Antietam
and driven by said stream with ample water pow-
er, and which is very constant and never failing.
The advantages attached to the mills are numer-
ous, being in one of the most productive counties
cf the State for wheat, and all kinds of grain, wool,
&c &c. being distant only six miles from Wil-
liainsport on the Chesapeake and Ohio c.nal, and
n-r Iagerstown, (with a turnpike, leading to
both places,) one of the best wh; at markets in the
State ,where large quantities of grain finds its
market from Penwisyivaniia, &c. The proposed
railroad contemplated from Chamnbersburgh, and
passing through Hagerstown to intersect the Bal-
timore and Ohio railroad at Weverton on the Po-
tomac, will pass very near to this place. There
is not much doubt but that the Antietam will be
mcde navigabh', so as to intersect the Chesapeake
aEnd Ohio canal at the Antietam iron works; as
there is now a lock at this place, built by the Po-
tomac company, which will pa's a boat from the
waters The lots of ground are situated in and adjoining
Funkstown, being many of them valuable building
lot, and in a very high state of cultivation.
The Mansion house is a large and commodious
dwelling house, celebrated for the flower and fruit
garden attached to it.
This property was valued by commissioners ap-
pointed by the Legislature. The prizes in this
lottery are subject to no discount; the prizes that
may be drawn will be delivered after forty days
subsequent to the drawing, if demanded within
twelve months from its date.
The title to this property is unquestionable. A
plot of the real estate is deposited with the Trus-
tt es.
The price of a ticket is but Ten Dollars.
SCHEME ,
Arranged and valued by the Commissioners ap-
pointed by the Legislature of Maryland.
1 prize valued at $33,333
1 do 16,000
1 do 6,667
1 do 2,637
1 do 1,067
2 do 6 7 each, 1,334
1 do 690
1 do 400
6 do 300 each,1jl,800
1 do 336
3 do at 267 each. 801
1 do 250
1 do 234
1 do 187
1 do 167
13 do at 134 each, 1,742
1 do 113
2 do at 100 each, 200
Together with other prizes, making in the
whole 408 prizes, amounting to $80,310.
This Lottery will be drawn upon the plan of
the old Maryland Lotteries, under the direction of
the Trustees appointed by the Legislature.
In this Lottery, any one disposed to risk the
small sum ,f $10, may venture without any scru-
ples. It is nut a scheme of speculation, but sim-
ply to relieve the proprietors of the late Antietam
Wooh n Factory which was destroyed by fire; and
(hl chances are as good if not better than in mo-
neyed Lotteries.
Who would not r'sk the sum of $10 ror such val-
uable property? Nothing venture, nothing" win-
delays are dangerous-send on the cash and you
shall have the prizes.
For tickets address
GEORGE SHAFER, Agent,
FrN KSTOWN, Md., March, 2.




The globe
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073656/00001
 Material Information
Title: The globe
Uniform Title: Globe (Washington, D.C. Daily)
Physical Description: v. : ; 56-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: F.P. Blair
Place of Publication: City of Washington D.C
Creation Date: June 3, 1836
Publication Date: 1831-1843
Frequency: daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular
Edition: Daily ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 13, 1831)-v. 13, no. 170 (Dec. 30, 1843).
General Note: Publisher: Blair & Rives, <oct. 10, 1835>-
General Note: "The world is governed too much."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 08786354
lccn - sn 82014043
System ID: UF00073656:00001
 Related Items
Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Semiweekly)
Related Items: Globe (Washington, D.C. : Weekly)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1832)
Related Items: Extra globe (Washington, D.C. : 1834)
Related Items: Weekly globe (Washington, D.C. : 1841)
Succeeded by: Daily globe (Washington, D.C. : 1844)

Full Text






CISP.BLAlik&JOHN C. H IVES .
EDITORs Asw puopSrE.-'ros.

3apkerper anruam,............10l)
Veekly,.do.....d .. ......... ....... 5 00
y,........do...............02650
Globe, for six.ronths,........... 00
less t ka3 yer--- S.- c.j.,Ei--. a.' l -- a- w.=- -------
....p _r Y A.nt .................o 1 00 VES. ."
weekly do...................0. 50 BLA l& & RIVES....MWaZ1 V ooMC."
-iptions to the Daily for less than two, to
a-Weekly for los than four, or to the
for less than twelve months, wil not be .-----
ibers may discontinue their paper at any
paying fr the time they have recei STEAMPACKET CAROLINA. COLUMBIAN HORTICULTURAL SOCITY LIST OF LETTERS,
P y mH-lIE9 Third Annual Exhibition of Flowers, Remaining in the Post Office, Washington city, H
tnot without. 'd n t TheSteam-packet SOUTH Fruits, and Vegetables,has been fixed to take Juie 1, 136. H
who subscribe rora year, and do not at CAROLINA, Capt. William place at the City Hall on Wednesday and Thurs- Persons inqung for letters inthe following H
of subscribing order a discontinuance at being in compete or day, the 8th and 9th days of June next. Persons inquiring for letters m the following
ofitEuwll b 0 6.2,sid11ed01ub11r1bers1uutil & -*- > Rollins, being in complete or- day, the 8th a:nd 9th days of June next. list; will please say they are advertised.
rf it, will be considered subscribers until der, will resume her regular run,between Norfolk The following gentlemen have been named a list will leasesay they are advertised.
Sthe paper to be stopped, d pay arand Charleston on Friday, the 4th March, and Committee of Arrangements, viz: A Labarde Placide H
continue to ply between the above .places until WM. RICe, Chairman. Alexander Mrs. C. F. Logan George H
sRZiE ro ..AvzZRTlaET further notice, as follows: J. P. Callan, Joshua Pierce, Anderson Charles E. Lumbaide Albert
e lines, orless,- three insertions,.$1 00 Lrave Norfolk, Leave Charleston, Rob. Dick, J. A. Smith, Adams John Langley Charles H.
additional merion,............. 0 25 Friday, March 4 Friday, March 11 J. S. Gunnell, Alex'r Suter, Ashton Leonard & JanesLederei Leonhard
advertisemei.t charged in proportion Do do 18 Do do 25 P. Mauro, Wm. Yeates, Armstrong'Christopher Lederei Baron de I
-al discount made to those who advertise Do April .Thursday, April 7 Alex'r McWilliams, Rob. Barnard. Armstead Col. John Libbey Mrs. Barbara Jo
:ar. Thursday, do 11 Do do 21 The committee respectfully invite a renewal, Allen Henry Lucas Josiah M.
/ments to be made in advance. Those Do do 28 Ilo May 5 on this occasion, of that zealous co operation by Adams William Lindsley Abraham B. Jo
e not an opportunity of paying other- Do May 12 Do do 19 the friends of the society in the District, which Anderson William Little Franklin W.
7 remit by mail, at our risk, postagepaid. Do do 26 Do June 2 has hitherto produced mich noble, beautiful, and Anderson Dr. William Lowry Mrs. J. H.
master's certificate of such remittance, Do June 9 Do .do 16 encouraging displays, in every branch. Those Adams Demas Liemier Louisa Jo
k sutpcient receipt therefore. The notes 10 do 23 Do do 30 who purpose to add their contributions to the Anderson James MadisonLilly Miss M. E.Ja
ecie.paying batk will be received. Do July 7 Do July 14 Floral Departmentt are informed that, on appriz- Auford Mary Lynch Eugene H. JO
ion wil be given to any order, unss Do do 21 Do do 28 ing any one of the committee of their wishes in B Lane Nelson 2J
V or a Postmastcr's certificate that it has DP August 4 Do August 11 that behalf, their plants, shrubs, and flowers, Will Ball Catesby Ap HenryLee Samuel Jc
!teul, accompaniesit. Do do 18 Do do 25 be conveyed to arid from the place of exhibition Boldt T.H-. Lynch James
tiers to the Editors, charged with postage, Apply to DIXON & HUNTER, Norfolk, or to at the society's cost, and careful persotis will be Brim Jacob 2 Laine Charles Jo
e taken out of the Post Office. JAMES, FERGUSSON, Baltimore. employed in lheir transportation, to insure their Brown William Locke Charles A.
-az--Em -..B March 25-2aw9m return to their respective owners without injury. Bean Maj. Jonathan L. Lockee Q. L. 2
GEOGETOWNThe committeeare aare of the disastrous con- BroKwn arles B. LBe oyne Mr. K
GEOR G TOW N -- FOR -RDaEDERICKSBURG sequences of a repetition ofa lyng and most severe Bro Joh M
EiNG -ESTABL ASHMENTal _. ". AND .RICHMsON-D.--The winter. Yet they are well assured that such diffi- Barnes Isaac 0. 3 Mason & Webb
e of Jefferson street, near Bridge street. Steamboat SYDNEY has re- cueshaveonly stimlatedthe realfriend othe Brooks Benjamin MorganHenry K
WHEATLEY still'continues to carry on -- -resumed her regular move- ooduse to teved exerons; nd t Brown, jr. Henry 2 Messerschmid Justus K
he above business in all its various ments. The Sidney leaves Bradley's Wharf every have once "pput their hands to the plough, they Brown George Temple-Martin Col G. W. K
l He takes this method of returning his morning at 6 o'clock for Fredericksburg, &c. and will not turn back." man Murray, Miss Margaret Ku
hanks to his friends and a generous pub- returns as usual. JAMES GUY, Captain. It hass been finurther resolved, that upon timely Bunce William J. Morrison David
ie liberal patronage they have so kindly March 8-cd application by non-residents of the District, wish- Beal James 2 Marshall John sh
on aim, and he ardently solicits acon-collections on this occasi Bowles Miss Sarah Magruder Lt. J. B. e
of the same. From his general success FOR NORFOLK. heg til er e so at BesSeley MullayMiss Sarah Maj. J. C.
Experience, together with his unremt OLUM- ate situations for their advantageous displayofthem Blake Walter M. MosbyR.H.
nation and punctuality, he flatters himself BIA, Capt. James. Mitch- willbe reserved. Brown Mrs. Rebecca Murray Charles
rill be able to give satisfaction to all who ell, having been placed The attention of the market gardeners is recalled Bell enry L. Morgan Capt. Charles
Briscoe Miss Ann Maynadier Lt. Win. i
- him with their patronage. All manner permanently on the route to the volunteer prize specified below, offered by Bronaugh Win. J. Macy Daetiel P.2 cW
dressing colored and dressed in the between the District of Columbia and Norfolk, a member of the Society. Bronaugh W J. Macy Daniel P. 2 ce
manner; watering of silk and moreen done will leave Washington every Monday and Friday By order of the Committee of A'rangements. Batman Lt. M. W. 3 Mullin Basil its
:ion; gauze, silk, crape, Thibet, mnd Me at 11 o'clock, M.; and returning, will leave Nor- CH BroadheadD. Myers Ms. Ann M. B:
Is, dyed all the various shades of the day; folk every Wednesday and Sunday, at 3 o'clock, May 21,1836. M. RICH, chairman. Baker Major R. L. Miller James R. fa
with borders, the borders will be re- t. M. Boatman Miss Ann Mc. m
merinoo and Cashmere shawls cleansed Passae and fare $5. PRIZE.-Silver Cream and Sugar Ladle, value Bancker J.W. McRea James M. hi
ed, and the fringe curled to look like Fre t destined to Petersburg or Richmond, six dollars for the be ecimeBuckley Thomas McKowen John at
ack shawls re.dyed, and the borders re- mst be paid for at the time of shipment, fi an prothfic bestarin eimen, size, quality Berry Zhariah Magruder J. B.an
The color can be extracted from black Apmusil 14tf .me spent flavconsideration,) of Strawberaring es, not lessl taken intwo Bruen Hermnan McKinleyMiss Mary ,
noP consideration,) of Strawberries, not less than two and
ino and Bombzines, and they can be quarts, exhibited by market gardeners on the first Byrum Okeley H. 2 McCormick James
dsome colors. Gentlemen's garments S MER ARRANGEMENT,. day of the Society's exhibition for the year 1836. Baltzer Capt. Thomas T.McDrugald Gen. Dan.
description cleanse d or dyed, and re- Between Washington City, .exandria, a., Piney The exhibitor is to accompany them it a decar Braiden Miss Elizabeth McIntosh Thomas
:h whicir origie ma l lustre. All manner oj Point, Md., c& tion of their being the product of his own raising, Bradley Daniels r McAfCoeean Johnames C.
dihie tt mtioa be eThe Steamboat CHESA- and with a description of the name of the variety, Bronson s Nancy MceColgan John t
t y oiM bef redwithiss Nancy McDevittlAnthony
March 14-be executawith .PEAKE, Captain She-man, age of the plants, soil whereon grown, exposure, tman Miss Nancy McDeltt Anthony t
March 14 taw master, will leave Bradley's and mode of cultivation throughout. The award Baker John H, McDonald Mrs. Ann i
kSH FOR 400 NEGROES, wharf every Sunday at 6 A. of this prize to be made on the first day, and the Butler Henry F. McGuire John br
DING both sexes from 12 to 25 years of M. (beginning next Sunday,) arrive at Piney delivery of it to the successful competitor to take Bowent Abn -Neale Mrs r W
persons having servants to of point same day, calling at all the intermediate place on the second day of the exhibition. BartlettAbner Nea Mrs ary W. of
ttPersons havir ing servants todispose of, as I landings, and visiting the landing at Leonardtowi. But if the exhibition be postponed beyond the Bartow William A. Northup L. Lucius B. of
higher thprices in cash than any other pur- The Chesapeake will return the same route usual season for Strawberries, then the prize shall Besroadn GLA. 2 Newman Richard M. gi
o is now in the market. Ican at al from Piney Point on Monday. be for Raspberries, upon the same conditions. Broadrup George Nelsoet Tomas an
oundCHOn Thursday following, the Steamboat SYD- May 25-3t Bradbury Miss M.K. Nichelson James
B. 0. Sheckle, and formerly kept b NEY, Capt. Guy, master, will leave the same OTSPUR.-This distinguished Stallion will Clark Lot Otis Ha Gray
ers, on 7th street, a few doors below w visiting the same landings, and return on be let to-common bred Mares the remainder Coles Tucker Otis James F ra3 tu
avern,,opposite the Centre Market. All Friday to this city. Mbay.5-3tsw6v. of the season at $20; the rough bred Mares as be- Cripps Wm. M. L. 2 O'Neal John ar
nationss promptlyattended to. NOTICE-WASHINGTON BRANCH fore. W. L. WHITE. Cpp George Oxley Charles
JAMES H. BURH, RAIL ROAD May 24-3t* Clark Ranson Osbourn Nicholas th
3-F. Washington City. OA : FOR SALE. Case Horace OrrIsaac of
N'SNarraiveofshiwrck cativit 5 EVERAL American Mocking Birds, comi- Craig Dr. John E. P t
Iufferng' s on the Polef Islands, aptndri only called English Mocking Birds, of Cares Peter A. Pratt 1. Tabor
afterwards among the barbarous inhabi- f~F HE Steamboat from Baltimore to Philadel- the very best kind, t:nd warranted to be good Cram Edward L. 2 Payne Benj. E.
ord North's Island-1 volume, with en- j phla having adopted an earlier hour of de- singers, and all male birds; t be had with or s Henry L. Pierce Ma. B. K.
-price only50 cents parture, it will be necessary that the train of Without cages, and directions will be given to Crane Edward L. Peck J. 14.
e by F. TAYLOR.cents, parture, t frwi be necessary that the train any person for their food. Applyto rolee Richard K. Porter Pass. Mid. David
eby F. TAYLOR. Cars start fromWashington at halt after two in JOHN KREECER Golcher -William Paton Miss S. I
the morning insteadof three, on nd after Monda JOHN KREEMER, Colcher-William Paton Miss S.
themorninginsteadf three, on and after Monday D. st. between 12th and 13th. Colby A. Prentiss H. L. of
FISHING TACKLE. next, the 9th inst. May 25--d2wr 2w Carson Samuel P." Persico L'tel
The evening train will, also, on and after that Clement C 25-ol.2wod2w Col.Jefferson Samuel P. Preston Col. Johnte
eral assortment of fine imported fishing day, leave Washington at four instead of twenty CAUTION. ClosEfield George Parhatn John G.
:le; embracing all items ordinarily used minutes before five. May 17-31w&wtf OTICE is hereby given, that the patent grant-opau Antoni Plmm amuel A.
in this country; for sale at New York E hereby given, that t patent grant- ompau Antoni Pluimer Samuel A.
i It iHNfN cOHr JEP flr se a Ned to me for cleansing and dressing.Feathers, Cusheva David P,-ce .Lacob H.
1,L.% -IJHNSON, -_. JOiHN JSEPH-LENDENIN, dated Febrtury-7th, 1834, has bN raentWe-d iwR4l -O,-Alinshol.a..- ,-A ,invr ,,.." A ; "-
ATORE ATJ- t A,- TND 1,0:-1 --s'1r 1sVT %'.F.%-1 1 a more correct specification according to the act Cohlvill,jr. John Phillips Aaron
VED ME r.'LLIC ME.MRANDLi LITTL ROC EREANSAS of congress in such case made and provided; and Colgan ohn M. Palmer Strange N. 2
S.-\V. FIS('-ER- has just received ROOSEVELT & SoNs, and } that this renewed patent is dated October 17th, Carroll Wdliam Palmer James H.
entof'nrev .I'tAlt .-n .rarii books, JAES B. MsiRA, Esq. New York. 1835, and has been submitted to the examination Curtiss James Penny Joseph
and co,''.iCr,,nt -,rt;ir, t, r b-.ie at Sta- JAdKSso', RIDDLE &.Co.) of learns d counsel, who have pronounced it to be Cary Josiah Addison Peters William
l ToAn & AERSTO, Philadelphia. valid, and the invention well secured to the Pa- Clara Elizabeth Parrish Brig. Gen. R. C.
(Tel.) JAMES FIDLAY, Esq.,Pittsburg. tentee. Now, therefore, this is to caution all per- Cheves Alexander 2. Q
.FE ON 1N TH LAKES, Hlon. JAMES BUCHANA ,) sons against using without my license and consent, Crosson Mrs. Ellen Quinlan Frederick
FE O Ho. SAMUEL MCKEAL, -Pennsylvania. my invention, or any of the different modifications Cissell Mrs. Emeline R
e author of Legends of a Log Cabin, is Hon. GEO. CHAMBERs, of it, with which some portions of the community Crandell Joseph Reed Miss Mary Ann
,publhedin 2 -.olnes, with engrav- May 17-2aw3m have benn deceived by designing men who prefer Clement Jacob Read Clement H.
Sl and sk-t.:, coected during pilfering, to an honest livelihood, as I am deter- Corrick T. Rodd Charles H.
ie I',ctured R.:.ck of Lake Superior, g AME OF SOLITAIRE.-Just received for mined to prosecute all infringements on moy right, Clements R. Rice Rev'd. Luther
S,-C,, ed, o10. ,.:e I.v F. Taylor, or for A sale at the Snuff, Tobacco, and Fancy Store, to the full extent and utmost rigor of the law. Cattine Miss Jane Rogers Mrs. Maria. 2
rr,.:.r,g the ,utb-.ribers to the Waver- Pennsylvania Avenue. GEORGE REYNOLDS, Patentee. Culeman Mrs. Ann M. Ricketts R.
,t;ng Lbli a May 17 LEWIS JOHNSON. East Hailifrd, dpril 15th, 1836.-d3t Coody William S. 2 Ramsay Mrs. Elizabeth w
ITRAYED OR STOLEN from the Washing rH|iHE LAWS OF ETIQUETTE, or short Capron Lieut. E. A. 5 Roberts Mrs. w.
R PLATE, SPOON & FORK -ton Race Course, on the night of the 7th inst. .1. Rules and Reflections for conduct in Sccie- D Ritchie Henry
a bay filly three years old,one white hind foot,a small ty, by a Gentleman: one small volume. aun T. Rawlings James H. J
MANU F AC T O RY, star in the forehead, the hair rubbed off across the Just published, and for sale by Day John Richardson Mr. -
est corner of Fifth and Cherry streets, breast, about five feet high, tail disposed to curl May 24 F. TAYLOR. 1)ale George Richards Felix B
PaIIIAsEaLPHA. a little, remarkably clean legs, shows a high bred HEAP LAW BOOKS. Dawe Patsy D. RobertsonMiss Ma
'-HE subscri- nag. Also, at the same time, a light sorrel horse, HEAP LAW BOOKS. Dash Daniel B. Randell,jr. John
Hers have five years old, with a star in the forehead, flaxen lHE LAW DICIIONARY, explaining the Dungan H M Reigart Miss Henrietta-.
constamyon hand mane and tail, paces well. A suitable reward will Rise, Progress and present stale of the De Peyste William 2 Russell D.
a handsome assort- be given if delivered to the subscriber at Brown's British Law, defining and interpreting the terms Duval Miss Elizabeth Rogers Johnson
meant of SILVER Hotel, or information se that I get them; and if or words of Art, and comprising also copious in- Douglass William B. Rogers George I; 3
Plate,-Spoons,- with the thief, (I believe they were stolen,) I will formation on the subjects of Trade and Govern- Dielman Henry 2 Rogers Gen. John
Forks,-and eve- give a reward of fifty dollars. m ent, by Sir Thomas E. Tonshine, with extensive Duncan John Ramsay Capt. Win. 3
ory article belongv- N. OLIVER. additions by Thomas C. Gr-anger; first Americau Dulany Miss Elizabeth Reynolds J. N. 3
ing to the Seloner- March 9-dtf from the fourth London edition,3 vols. 8vo. 1100. Dixon S. F. RoyallR.
sith bu.sn to tie veilver- Cruise's Digest of the Laws of England, re- Dowling Miss Catharine S
smith business, or ir HE subscriber hereby gives notice that ap- sccting Heal Property, fourth American edition Douglas John T. SmithsMorgan L.
S made to order in plication will be made to the next Congress 6vols, ija 3, $12 00. Doty James D. Smith'Eliza
the neatest and of the United States of America, attheir next ses- Reports of Cases argued and determined in the Daughaday Archibald Smith John
,er, or to match any pattern given, at sion, for the renewal of a patent granted to Wil- Court of Exchequer, 6 vols., calf (published at Dozierozyuski MonsieurSoule P.
manufacturing prices. l.rd Earl, being a patent for a machine for sawing 27 00.) $21 00. Dl)oughaday Henry Shreeste Samuel a
who wish to purchase, are requested to shingles, dated 28th dlay of December, 1822. Chittev's General Practice of the Law in all its Dickson James 4 Smith Benjamin P.
eih manufactory, where they will find WILLARD EARL, Departments, with a view of Rights, Injuries, and Dupais Gustave Schwartz C.
surpassed in the city for neatness, taste, of the county of Albany and State of NewYork. Remedies, 3 vols. 8vo. bound. $13 00. Dixon Michael Speunce Thomas A.
acepof attbsh. fMayld9-ndamtm tnDo. 3d vol. alone, bound. $5 50. Davis Mi's. Catharsie Smith Joseph W. c
SWare their own importing, kept AIRMER'S MAPS OF MICHIGAN and Farm Laws of the United States complete. Davis Lt. Charles H. Siimms' Miss Emily
on hand, and made expressly to their es's Maps of Ouisconsin, on a very large Elliott's Diplomatic Code, and all other law Darnalson MajorJohunH. Swett Col. Joseph
scale, wvith latd sections, &e. (quite new) this publications on the very lowest terms. E Smith Elizabeth A.
R. & W. WILSON. morning received for sale by F. TAYLOR. May 25 PIS11EY THOMPSON. Ellis Edmontd Smith FrancisJ. lis
Ra & WtErring Major J. Snook Isaac W. 'lie
GEy RMANY .. OR RENT,-The pleasant Dwelling House Ellery C. Smith William
GERMANY. 'IAGItAM OF THE FLOOR OF. THE at the corner of Foxall's row', south side of Easton Capt. T. S. 2 ScottWilliamB. 2
NICHOLAUS PETERS, a native of SENATE-New edition, improved and Biidge street, Georgetown. Also, the Store un- Evans Estwick SmithJohnH. S
marnen, near oram (kingdom of Ha- corrected up to this date (27th May,) is this day der the dwelling. Apply to Elgen George Smith Henry K.
fse last letter was dated from Philade- issued from the press, and for sale by SAM'L McKENNEY, Edwards Benjamin S. 2 Schltermerhorn J. F.
f living, or those who may know any F. TAYLOR, May 24-3t Georgetown. F SheppardAugustusL.
mr, her husband, and friends, to inform at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately ARLEY'S MAGAZINE, in parts and vo- Ford Miss Catlaarine St. Clair Miss Gertrude H
residence, by addressing them to Mear- east of Gadsby's Hotl. ALes, can always he had, wholesale and o- Fisk Charles B. Shepherd T. Perkins t
.conardy,, -ambusrg, (Europe,) No. 11 ** The only edition of the above, which has tail, at thc lowest prices, from French Lt. E. Sans James W. p
tall- or to Dr. KUHL, any claim to correctness, is the one bearing the KENNEDY & ELLIOTT, .Frye, Thos. B. J. Sealey Morris 2 tc
Washington City. name of the advertiser; all others are calculated to May 24. In the Athenaeum Fitzhugh Mead Sherburne J. H. m
mislead, and are worse than useless. Fletcher Thomas Stoddart J. T. et
TEDY & ELLIOTT have this day re- i M'y 27. F, T. NO iILCE. Foster William Sterling Mico fa
ad an additional supply of Flbwers of N OIC EHIS isjo give notice that the subscriber has Fitzpatlick John SullivanaRoger p
Beauties of Byron Flora's Dictionary, NOTICE. obtained from the Orphans' Court of Wash- Fisher Charles. Simonton Lt. J. P. cl
f beautiful colored engra, ns. BANrK 0' THE METROPOLIS, ington county, in the District of Co umbia, letters G Stickney B. F. 2 B
in Iu e Athenxum, Penn. Avrte. May26, 1836. 5 of administration on the personal estate of Mar- Gates James Stepper-.Martin
A N election for twelve Directors of this bank tlia A. Russell, late of Charles county, Maryland, Green Thomas A. Sherborne Joseph A. t.,


will be held at the Banking House on Moin- deceased. All persons having claims against said Guy Capt. James 5 Shoemaker Tacy tic
FOR RENT, day the 4th day of July next, from 10 o'clock, A deceased, are hereby warned to exhibit the same, Goens Patrick Stewart Mrs. Rachael te
qVENIENT and well built two story M. to 3 o'clock, P. M. with the vouchers thereof, to the subscriber, at Glenn James 2 Spencer R-chard
c House, with basement story, situated GEO. THOMAS, Cashier. Frederick Town, Md., on or before the 22d day of Guy William B. Segar Joseph 2
ner of Fourteenth street and M street May 27-3tawte April n.xt. They may otherwise, by law, be ex- Greene Roscoe G. Somers Miss Rosa
the yard there is an excellent pump of eluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Green Thomas Staples John B. of N. Y.
-eisa large:.i- n nach d to i LARGE LANDED ESTATE. Given under my hand, this 21st day of May,1836. G, iffin Joanna Skipleyj Joseph
le and car'ri.c thouze. Possen-,.r, can In the Gold Region in North Carolina for sale. WILLIAM C. RUSSELL, Garritt Eli 3 Sessford J.
aediately. Inquireof .' BOUT 350,000 acres of Land, situated in the May 23-3t.. Administrator. Goldin John Sitter Daniel
.4-eodtf C. L. COLTMAN. A tree counties of Buncombe, Rutherford, SALT, NAILS, RICE, kc. Grayson Miss Elizabeth Stonestreet Mrs. Ann E.
and Mecklenburg, in the State of North Carolina. THOS. W. PAIRO has received 200 kegs nails, B. Sturgeon Daniel
METALLIC PENS.-W. FISCHER The lands in Buncombe lie in the vicinity of the a brds and spikes, all sizes, tnd expects daily Goodwin F.D. T
just received from New York, a large projected gi eat railroad from Cincinnafi to Charles- by the schooner Eliza, from Charleston South Car Griffith John Morris 2 Thorp Anson C.
the ne plus ultra Bank and Office Pens, ton, South Carolina. Those in Rutherford.and lina, Garrison Roy A.M. Twiggs Mrs.Priscilla D.
t Perfectum Spring Regulating and Im- Mecklenburg are in the gold region, which are 500 sacks Liverpool fine ground alum salt. GibsonuMrs. S. E. Turk Dr. William
el Penss aalo, an additional supply of daily attracting the attention of the public. S me 30 tierces and half tierecs of prime rice, which ('uedron Thomas C. Thomas William H.
'illott's, Heeley & Son's, Skinner's, Att- of the richest developments of surface mines, in will be sold low, if applied soon, and totkcn from Graham Lt. John 2 Turner Lt. Thomas
nes', &c, &c., comprising about thirty veins, have been already opened on the lands in the vessel on her a. rival. H Thornton F. A., Purser
inds, all of which will be sold at the Mecklenburg, which lie in the immediate vicinity PAIRO'S Wharf, Stone Warehouse, below I;nds George U. S. N.
es at Stationers' Hall. oi'the celebrated:PhiferMine,knowninthecountry Georgetown. li. tch Rev. F. W. 2 Thompson Richard W. le
(Tel) I W. FISCHER. as The Mitt;" and the purest gold found in the May 27-3t IHyde George Toomey Mrs. th
mining region has been discovered in the deposit 1 Huise William Thompson Miss Jane
'RIAL OF REUBEN CRANDALL, mn in ihas been d iscove.d in th deposit WARREN'S T,LA-WV ST'U 1 ES, &c. H6bbs Mrs. Priscilla Thomas Martinu
-Just published, the trial of Reuben
S u cia ed, wthe tblsn and These valuable lands abound with hydrau'aic POPULAR andPractical Introduction to Law Hunk Thomas Taylor Miss
dtious d ineidiary papers, Ic., in power, In a region of country unsurpassed in sa- Studies, by Samuel Warren, Esq.; one vol- IsI-ath Adeline Thruston Capt. Chas. M.
editions and incendiary papers,t c .,i lubrity by any part of the United States, and are ume. $4. Iillery W. Taylor Henry
Stinsurrection cart-fully reported and now offered for sale to close a concern; and it is The Actress, of Padua, and other Tales, by the Holbrook D. B. 2 Tillman W. a
believed that they afford great opportunities to author of The Forsaken; two vob!mes. $l1 37i. IHoward Gen. John C. Talbot Mrs. J.
elfrom thbye i member of the bar. For sale geitleme, ofcapital auti nterprize. Thetermsoft Tactics and Regulations for thle Militia and Iutchinson Jeremiah Thompson Mrs.Emily E,
byammberofthe ba For sale will b liberal. Volunteers of the United States, by Captain S. lolbroolc Wm. K. Thompson John W.
,R. FAN HAM, For further particularsias to the quality of the Copper, under the supervision.of Major General ItI ,-a Dr. James 2 V
No. 5 Varnum's Row, Penn Ave lands, and productiveness of the mines, reictrelice Alexander Macomb,in one volume. Price $1 25 11 i I Rev. S. F. Van Rensalear Gen. S. 2
4EDY & ELLIOTI' have this day re- is made to JudgeForman, theagentof the frop.i..- For sale by PISHEY THOMPSON. IHo'ison W. G. Vincent Frederick
ved an additional supply of Osborn's tots, resident at Rutherfordton, Rutherford county, May 17 Haiett Samuel W
lor3, assorted sizes, in boxet andl sepa- North Carolinai anrd,for terms of sale, personally TE PLUS ULTRA PENS.-An additional HCtiston Joseph White'B. A. M
s; red Sable Pencils; patent India Rub- or if by letter, post paid, to I supply of these celebrated Pens this cdy re- Hfanilton James White John 4
-oe's and Cohen's Drawing Pencils, to be FREDERICK BRdNSON, ceived by KENNEDY & ELLIOTT, Il.nilton John Ward Allen
Atheneum; Pennsylvania Avenuo No. 34, Wall street, in the city of New York. In the Athenaeum, Pa. Avenue HIarbison Robert White Edward B,
A April 7-oSaM Apriril 27 arris John W. Wite Philq


49




VOL6....O o

FRIAY, JIUNE31- 1IS6.


Howard Mrs. Jane F. Wells Laman G.
Hamilteon James W. Ward Ann (colored)
iolland H. West Lt. Edward L.
Iolabird W. S. Ward Major Joseph D.
tandy Charles N. Waller A. P.
lowell John H. Worsley N.
alder Mr. Wilson Rev. John S.
Jenry Miss Elizabeth Walker Mrs. Catharine
K. 2 Watson James
andy Henry S. 2 Whiting Lieu t. C. J.
J- Weaver Miss Ann M.
-,rdLt. J. F. 2 Winslow George
ordan Miss Amelia Willard J. D.
)hnson, sen. Col. John Waller Gen. C. C.
)hnsoni Mrs. Elizabeth Whitehead W. A.
Ann Willey George
)hnson John H. Weaver Mrs. Jane
ohnson John M. Weaver John
irvis Diming Walker Geo. K.
ones James G. 2 Washington Geo. A.
onesMiss Sally Whittlesey Mrs. Anna
ones E. P. Wilson J. C.
ones Gen. Augustus 2 Winne-James
ones Lt. F. L. Wilcoxson Jesse P.
hIi. ,i-.-.. George M. 2
K \M il,,nm L. M.
eene William B. Wrtson M. D E. W.
avanaugh Rev. B. T. walker Mrs. Patsy R.
ingsbury Lt. J. B Y


elly Robert 3
ingsberry Sanford
ubback Daniel.


Young Micajah 2
eD C Z
Zaibrisliee Tip- C2. Tt.


V- The inland postage onletters to be sent. by
ip must, in all cases, be paid; otherwise they will
main in this office.
WM. JONES, P. M.
S TO THE PUBLIC.
HFIE cotton planters of the south are deeply
interested in an inquiry which has been re-
ently suggested as to the production of cotton in
s natural state of various colors. Mr. Lyford of
altimore first assured me of the very important
ct that it could be done; and in proof of it he gave
e specimens of these various colors, and also ex-
bited the seed which had been presented to him
Chili. Of these varieties, the "light nankeen"
id a "beautiful brown" were shown me.
In a recent publication of my own, entitled the
'Memoir of Samuel Slater, connected with the
history of the Culture and Manufacture of Cot-
n," I have alluded to this important discovery.
n the further prosecution of my inquiries at
Vashington, CAREY SELsr.N, Esq., informed me,
at in settling the estate of Commodore Thompson
was found, that in,his lifetime he had brought
om Chili specimens and samples of the "light
vown," and the "light lilac."
He had also brought home with him the seeds
* these various colors, with a laudable desire of
troducing their. cultivation, and the seed was
ven to the Hon. John Forsyth, Dixon H. Lewis,
id Mr. Davis; but upon trial, the seed was found
o old for vegetation.
Thus the death of Commodore Thompson unfor-
nately prevented the introduction of this new
id valuable article.
I have thought proper to bring these facts to
e notice of all cotton planters, for the purpose
Interesting them' in this subject, and, for the
itrpoze of illiciting their investigation of the mat-
er, by inquiry and experiment.
GEORIGE S. WHITE.
PHILAntELPHIA ay 25, 1836.
June 1
.ORE 'NEW GOODS.-The subscribers
have this day received an additional supply
seasonable Goods, to which they invite the at-
ntion of purchasers. Among which are the fol-
wing:
1 cartoon French worked lace and muslin
Capes,
5 do .ap s ,', SS ;- wr,:-..i Collars,
"plain, i.b.ii.I, ,,n.I l*.i., 1 -IlK-
Black Silks of every description,
Superior r back Bombasin and Challeys,
Fashionable Shawls and Handkerchiefs,
Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs, (a large supply)
Silk and Cotton Hosiery, Gloves, &c.
Parasols and Umbrellas,
Ginjghams, Chintzes, Lawns, and Muslins,
Cambric, Book, and Swiss Muslins, &c.
ALSO-50 pieces Canton Matting, white and
colored,
100 pieces Russia and Irish Sheetings, and Ta-
ble Diapers,
150 do. superior Irish Linens,
250 do. Shirting and Sheeting Cottons,
A general assortment of Goods for gentlemen's
ear, of the most fashionable kind, all of which
ill be sold cheap, by
R. C. WASIINGTON & CO.
rune 1-3t
RUSSELS CARPETINGS OF NEW
AND HANDSOMEE PATTERNS.
'- HBE subscribers have just received 1,500
1 yards Brussels Carpetings of superior
quality
5 casts 12-4 superfine Russia and Irish Sheet.
ing s
1 case 6-4 and 5-4 do.
1 do, 8 4 and 10 4 Russia table Diaper of the
best quality, warranted pure
Damask Napkins
Huckerback and Birdseye Diapers
3 cases 4-4 Irish Linens, very cheap
Colored damask Table Cloths and Napkins.
Together with a large assortment of other staple
id fancy goods, at reduced prices,
Ma 28-3t DARIUS CLAGETT. & CO.
jNGLAND in 1835, by VoN RAusmER, in one
volume, is just published, and this d:ay re-
ived, for sale by F. TAYLOR.
June 1


d OLERIDGE's Letters, Conversations, and
S Recollections, in one volume, is Ijst pub-.
ished, and for sale by F. TAYLOR.
June 1
ADDLE, HARNESS, AND TRUNK
BUSINESS, IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.
fAMES VANSANT, KINo STIIEET, ALEXAN-
DRIA, (1). C.) next door to the Franklin
house, in tendering his grateful ack-nowledgments
his friends and the public for the distinguished
atronage he has received from them, begs leave
assure them that, with an ample supply of the
ost- choice materials, he will. be able to render
entire satisfaction to those who may please to
vor him with thei,' business, either by order or-
ersonal application, and that he will sel- all arti-
es in his 1.ne as low as they can be procured in
altimore or elsewhere.
He has on hand at this time, and will continue
keep, a large assortment of the following arti-
cles, wholesale and retail, on the most moderate
;rms:
,.Patenit spring Saddles
Men's Saddles, best quality, stuff flaps
Do do do plain
Do do common do
Ladies' do best and common
Plated and steel-bitted Bridles, of various kinds
Plated and steel-mosnted Martingales
Saddle-bags of the latest fashion, and common
Velisses and carpet Travelling Bags
Plated mounted Carriage Harness
Do Gig do
Brass and) japan-mounted Gig Harness
Plated, brass, and japanned [mounted cariole
harness
Wagon, cart, and dray Harness
Fire Buckets and Halters
And, also, a general assortment of elegant hard
father Travelling Trunks, and a great variety of
se best Gig and Riding Wlhigs.
Plated, steel, and brass Spurs
Plated, steel, and brass Bridle Bits and Stirrups
Saddletrees asd Buckskins, assorted
Buffalo skin Saddle Covers. -
Old Saddles neatly covered with hog, buck,
ad calf skin, and quilted at shorted notice.
Old Saddles, .II -., .iii Trunks,.of all kinds,
paired .r t .1 1 l,:.i,'(t [ ,o 'c:-.
Mlay 3'.-- ? ". 41.'

Fi Y HARNESS MAKERS,
W ILL find employme t at the United States
Allegheny Arsena near Pittsburg, upon
military Accountrements.*
R. L. BAKER,
Major U. S. Army, commandings.
Allegheny Arsenal, Z
Ma)y 3,, 183 May 25~-2m


INDUSTRY.
.iTHIS thorough bred racehorse wil
I( again occupy his old stand at my
stable, eight miles from Winchester,
eight from Newtown, eight from Bat-
tietown, tour from Millwood, and two aind a half
from the White Post-and be let to mates at 15
dollars the single leap, if paid within the season;
if not paid within that time, the season price will
be charged. $25 the season, payable on the first
of August, and $40 for insurance, to be paid as
soon as the mare is known to be with foal. (Part-
ing with the mare, or irregular attendance at the
stand, forfeits the insurance.) In every case 50
cents cash to the groom, to be sent with the mare.
Mares put by the season or leap last year, tliat
did not prove with foal, will be insured at the sea-
son price this year. Mares from a distance will
be furnished with pesturage without charge,.
Those wishing to put mares- early in season, can
have them furnished with provender of every de-
suripti ,n at a moderate price. Care willbe taken
to avoid accidents and escapes, but I will not be
accountable for them.
Industry is a beautiful dark brown, 16 hands
and one quarter of an i...h h ;.11 ,1 h years old
this spring, and is one of tile largest and best form-
ed thorough bred sons of his distinguished sire (Sir
Arichy.) His performances under his former name
(Niger) and his present name, rank him with tlie
best horses for speed and bottom, and as a-foal
getter he is inferior to none. Ih one of his races
over the Baltimore course, he ran 4 miles in 7
minutes and 53 seconds.
PEnDIGRE.-Industry was by Sir Archy, his dam
by Ball's Florazel, his grand dam Celia, by Wil-
dair, great grand dam Lady Bolingbrbke by Pan-
taloon, great great grand dam Cadiz by King He'
rod, by old Fearnought out of Kitty Fisher; Cadiz's
dam was Primrose, who was got by Dove, who
was got by Old Crab, who was got by Stilly, whose
clam was Selima, wvho was got by the Godolphin
Arabian.
PERFORuxAtcEs.-October, 1827, when three
yeirs old, he ran for the post stake over the New-
market course, which hie wdn in fine style. Next
week, over the Tree Hill course, he won the
sweepstakes. Next spring, (4 fears old,) he was
beaten over Broad Rock course, 4 mile heats, by
Sally Hope-a good race. He was then taken t
Baltimore, and won the 3 mile hents, beating
Bachelor. Fall of the same year, at Washington,
he won the colt's purse, 2 mile heats; next day lie
won the Jocky Club purse- 3 mile heats, beating
Molatto, Mary, and othe" Next week, at Balti
more, won the 4 mile seats, beating Bachelor.
May, 1829, (then 5 years old,) over the Washing.
ton course, be won the Jocky Club purse, 4 mile
heats. Next fall he was beaten over the Hagers-
town course, in which race he broke down, and
has never started since.
InnusTRt will only be permitted to attend to
four mares a day, at intervals of four hours, arid in
no Instance will any part of this advertisement be
deviated from. Mares put by the season this spring
that do not prove with foal, will be permitted
to go to him throughout the fall season, without
any additional charge. a.
InnesTnr has as yet but few colts old enough
to train. Of those that have been trained, Dr
Duvall's Slender, Thomas J. Godman's Camsidel,
G. L. Stocket's Cippus and Miss. Maynard, Gov
,Sprigg's Houtensras and Atalanta, G. W. Duvall's
Prince George, Ch. S. W. Dorsey's Nelly Webb,
Robert Ghiselin's Haidee have, been running with
eclat to themselves, and their sire, over the Wash-
ington, Baltimore, Upper Marlborough, and
Charleston courses, contrasting with the get of the
best stallions in the land, and, in almost every in-
stance, winning the prize.-See the Turf Re-
gister.
The season ha'i corimmnced, an-'l- ll end on the
Jst of July,' H lu0 BELl.,
"March 10 (7..,>,>i." "
,1SH4 WASHING tON LIME KILNS, on the
l'i Canal, near Georgetown, having recently
changed owners, are now in full operation, and a
constant supply of the best lime will be kept for
sale, at lower prices than any ini the District. Ap-
ply to ROBERT SPEIDEN,
May 28-2olm On the premises.
SECOND WARD ELECTION.
N OTICE is hereby given, thatan election will
be held at the house of JOHN DOUGLASS
on the first lMonday in June, 1836, between the
hours of 10 o'clock A. M., and 7 o'clock P. M.,
for Mayor, and one member of the Board of Al-
dermen, for the term of two years, and three
members of the Board of Common Council, for
the term of one year, to represent said Ward int
the respective Boards.
JOHN McCLELLAN,
A. B. WALLER,
LEWIS JOHNSON,
May 30 Commissioners.
-AIL EXPEDLTEDj BETWEEN-WASH-
INGTON CITY AND NEW ORLEANS.--
On Tuesday the 26th of April, the mail for Rich-
mond and Petersburg will leave Bradley's.wharf.
in this city, by 3 A. M., arrive same day at Rich-
mond by 8j P. M., and at Petersburg by 12 at
night. Leave Petersburg every day at 2, A. M.,
arrive at Richmond by 5j, A. M., and Washington
city same day by 10, P. M.; thus gaining half a
day between this city and Richmond and Peters-
burg; and from thence it will be further expedi-
ted to New Orleans.
Travellers, in passing between the several east-
ern atlantic cities and Mobile and New Orleans,
will find this line to be the most certain and expedi-
lious, as there'will be no interruption in their tra.-
vel between the city of New York, and .New Or-
leans.
They will be carried over the railroad between
Roanoke and Petersburg, between' Richmond atnd
Fredericksburg, and between Washington city
and Baltimore, &c &c. And when conveyed on
water, in first rate low pressure steamboats. -
JAUDON, WOOLFOLK & Co.
April 22-taw8w
EAGLE HOTEL,
RICHIMOND, VIRGINIA.
n-.- The subscriber having taken this large,
'.|- ~s spacious antd commodious establishment,
'l' *I embraces this manner of informing his
M. s friends and the public of the fact, tihe
central situation of \s which is so generally known, he
deems it unnecessary to mention it; and profes-
stons of capability to keep the good things of this
life are so common and uselesstthat hie will con-
tent himself by saying, give him a fair trial, and if
lhe does not prove worthy of patronamte,des(rt him.
CHARLES C. WORD.
N. B.-All the principal stage offices are kept at
this establishment. C. C. WORD.
0' Having engaged the services ofa young man
to devote his unnremitted attention to his stables,
lhe will here remark that nothing shall be wanting
in that department.
May 12-eop8t.


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, WASuINGTON
COUNTY ss.-I Ihereby certify, that John
tiolohan, of said county, brought before me, a
Justice of ihe Peace for the county aforesaid, as a
stray trespassing on his enclosures, a small dark
bay mare; about thirteen hands high, five or six
years eld; a large star in her forehead; her two
hind feet white, shod before; trots and gallops.
Given under my hand this 16th day of May, 1836.
WILL. HEBB.
The owner of the above mare is requested to
prove property, pay charges, and take her alvay
near the Spring Tavern.
May 17 JOHN HOLOHAN.
TO COACH MAKERS AND SAD
DLERS.
'7 TlE have established a Manufactory eac
i. sively for making TOP LINING AN
BAG IIIDES FOR SADDLERS. From the great
number of slaughter Hides we take in to salt for
exportation, we select for our purpose the larg.-
est size, free from cuts and other injuries; and a
we have both the 'tanning and Currying done un
der our personal direction, by workmen skilled
in the most delicate branch, we confidently pro-
mise an article unsurpassed in quality, and free
from that gumming so] vexatious to the Coachma-
ker, and more abundantly so to his customer
Our whole operations being directed to those arti-
cles, we shall he able to fill all orders we may re-
ceive, on a liberal credit.
.V. & D. LOWBEiR,
No.- ,23 Sorth Third street,
May 10- Philadelphia,


I100 DOLLARS REWARD.
T-flfHE undersigned having, after many years ex-
4 perience, succeeded in making, as he be-
lieves, the finest Pistols in the United States, has
just ascertained that imitations of them, engraved
or stamped with his name, are now in the market.
These Pistols are known by the title of the "DE-
RINGER & ARMS rRONG Pistols." The tin-
dersigned will give one hundred dollars reward
for the proof that shall convict the man or men,
who are practising this fraud on the public in liis
name.
The following certificate is made public, not
only in proof that this fraud is practised, but
that the Mr. Smith named in it may enjoy the
satisfaction of being thus publicly met by a de-
nial of his assertion, that he got the Pistols"
referred to (in the certificate) "of Mr. Derin-
ger, in Philadelphia." That declaration the un-
dersigned pronounces to be FALSE.
Those who may be curious to see this imitation
of the Deringer & Armstrong Pistol, may have
that opportunity by calling on the uindersigned at
his residence, No. 370 north Front street,Philadel-
phia. HENRY DERINGER.
Philadelphia, ./pril 28, 1836.

The Certlficate.
I, Joseph Vann, of the Cherokee nation, do
hereby certify, that at a sale of the property of
John Walker, Jr: deceased, I was about to pur-
chase a brace of pistols, and Joseph Smith,- of
Bledsoe county, in the State of Tennessee, dis-
suAded me from the purchase, saying he was go-
ing to tho east, and would bring mne a brace for
less money. I wished to purchase otDeringer's -.
make, -and gave Smith, the dimensions, who,, when
lhe returned, brought me the pistols I have sur-
rendered to Mr. Deringer, and charged rr-. t'i-.r-
ty-five dollars. Smith said he had, in person,
got them from Mr. Deringer, in Plillaailphia, and
Mr. Deringer says the pistols are counterfeit,'and
ntver purchased from him. Given ,.,.r.l ''
,htnd, this 23d April, 1836.
JOSEPH VANN.
May 31-eod6t
The Flag of the Union, Ala.; M1sissippian,
Mi.; Courier, La ;_ Advertiser, Cin6innati, 0.;
Advertiser, Louisville, Ky., and the Union, Tenn.
will please publish the above advertisement to.
the amount of $.2 each, and charge the Globe
Office.
HELL COMBS AND PERFUM.ERIES.-
The subscriber has on hand for retail, an ex-
tensive assortment of Tortoise "Shell, and all other
kinds of fashionable Combs at inari'factory p.;-,
for cash only. '
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Next door to Mr. P. Thompson's Book Store,
Pennsylvania Avenue.
P. S. All kinds of perfumeries of the veryfirst
quality for sale as above. May :
A SERVANT WOMAN WANTED, for the
A general work of a small family. Good re.
commendations required; and to such good wt.egs
and prompt payment. Apply to
J. F. CALLAN,
May 26 Opposite the Post Office., 4
J. F. CALLAN,
Corner of E and 7th streets, opposite the Post Off. ,
0 FFERS for sale, Drugs and Chemical., Pa.
tent and Family Medicines, Paints, Oils,
Window Glass, Dye Stuffs, Surgical Instruments,.
Perfumery, Garden Seeds, -Eancy Soaps and Cos-
metics, Stationary, &c. &c. Agent f6r Rowand's
Tonic Mixture-Proprietor of Sfagner's Patent
Truss.
May 26 -r
NOTICE.
7~5HE Public are hereby notified that, as I am
about to leave the city on public duty, I have
appointed my wife, Mrs. Johanna Howle, and Pe.
ter Cazenove, Esq., my attorneys during my ab-
sence.
May 26--St PARK G. HOWLE.
WAREHOUSE AND WHARF FOR RENT.
NE-HALF of the Stone Warehouse and
Wharf on G street, below,`Ge6rgetovan, is
for rent, which will be modeiath.- ,
The building :; about 100 by 50 feet, divided
in four equal house.', fuur storiesi high, with stone
walls of two an.i a half to three feet thick, and
good dry cellars.
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal runs in the
rear of ,the; building, with about 20 feet whtrt',
.,. i frat',,.u tf-e ahrtFiunrctnhdr:e.ri.-idi' I i o

Apply to the subscriber, or to
H. T, PAIRO, 7th and D streets.
THOSE. W. PAIR,
G street wharf, below Georgetown.
May 26-3 t
0-1 GENERAL MACQMB'S NEW WORK ON
X TACTICS, will be received this day, for
sale by F. TAYLOR.
May 26
ILLINOIS LAND FOR SALE.-As Trustee
for the creditors of ToxMAs JANEYr & Co., and
Agent for the United States, I offer for sale the
tract of Land in the American Bottom, Randolph
county, Illinois, formily the residence of Ninian
Edwards, and supposed to contain about 1,465
acres. This land lies on the public.road'leading
from Kaskaskia to St. Gtnesieee, Missouri, is
bounded southwesterly by the river Mississippi, afid
is represented by those who have seen it to be
very fertile. It has on it the house occup by
Governor Edwards, is partly open, and occupied
by tenantry. Money has lately been rettted
through the Honorable Mr. Reynolds, member of
Congress from the district, to pay the taxes up to
this year, and it is believed no arrearages of any
kind are due; but to prevent all disputes and diffi-
cultlies, I guaranty nothing; and the purchaser, who
must investigate for himself, will be liable for any
that may be due, but, at the same time, will be
entitled to all arrearages of rents, c, due to the
land.
Acting only as .Agent and Trustee, I, of course,
convey nothing beyond my powers, though the
title is believed to be unexceptionable.
References is made to Judge Pops and Srdr
BREEZE, Esq. of Carlisle, and DAVIDn J. BAKER,
Esq. of Kaskaskia, who are competent to give any
needful information.
I invite proposals, payable in cash, and expect
to sell by the 1st of July. .
GEORGE JOHNSON.
Alexandria, May 2.
e The Missouri Republican and the State pa-
per at Vandalia will please to insert the above
twice a week for four weeks, and send their ac-
counts to the office of the National Intelligencer
for payment May 4-3aw4w
URE AND CHOICE SHERRY WINES.-
P. Mauro & Son are selling the remainder
of the extensive consignmentof these very supe-
rior wines, embracing three qualities, at private
s dle, at thle auction prices, with a view to a final
clos" ot the concern. Purchasers ?are requested
to make early application.
May 30-6t
RITISH AND FOREIGN MEDICAL RE-
VIEW, or Quarterly Journal ofPractica~'iIe-
dicine and Surgery; edited by John Forbes and
John Conolly, M. D.,F. R. S. &c. Thefirstandse-
cond numbers of the above work are this day re- '
ceived by F. TAYLOR, by whom the work will


be supplied to the District of Columbia, or fur-
nished safely by mail to any part of the United
States, at a light postage. Physicians, surgeons,
students, &c. are invited to call and examine the
plan and character of the work, at the Waverley
Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's
Hotel. May 30
C ANTON MATTING.-Received this day-
4-4 and 6-4 Canton Matting, super quality
1 case fancy and plain Parasols
Painted Lawns and Muslins
French Chintz, new style
Black Italian Lustrings
Plaid Silks
French worked Capes and Collars
Cotton Hosiery of all kinds
7-8 and 4-4 Irish Linens
With a complete assortment of Goods for gen
tlemen's and children's Summer wear
May 4-2aw3w JOHN T NOYES.

T HERMOMETERS.-The largest assortment
Sof English and American Thermometers is
constantly kept for sale at Stationers' Hall, where
an additional supply has just been received.
May SO [Tel.] W. FISHER,
"I aIa ACOMNB'S TACTICS attnd r( gulationTs fr Mi-
y' itia and Volunteers, either as Infantry,
Light IfanItry, Riflemen, Cavalry, or Artillery,
the manner ot doing duty in Garrison, Carn'p Pa-
ta Ie, &c
Just published, and this day received for
sa'e by F. TAYLOR, in one volume., prepared and
arranged by 1Brrvet Captain S. C)o'p. r. M rdI.
the supiririon ot 'Major Gencral Alcx.,t'ic'r M.
comb.
May Sp











to REGRESSI1ONAL.

SPEECH OF Mil. HILL,
(oFr Nanr HAMt11SHIRr.
i, ,.Amx.y27, 1836-On Mr. BENTOa's ex-
Sptinging resolutions.
I ,IE -.rT. tl e preamble and resolution of
1in,- ,.. m rennessee, (Mr. White,) which
'en introduced as a substitute, are of that
hrIodite chl:ract er that pleases neither side,
rig abandoned on all hands, must fall to the
1"hey are only important so far as they
sance the principal argument that has been
against expunging the record; and it is re-
,. that thie burden of the song has been,
the condemnatory resolution was right, but
was a violation of thie constitution to ex-
',Iat iwas clearly wrong from the journal
House shall keep a journal of its pro-
s, hid from time to time publish the same."
na positive act to be performed; and when
is doine, the injunction is fully connplied
fit i wre intended to apply to all journals,
nig to this or that particular session of' tihe
thi language would have been so definite
be mistaken. If';t had been intended to
d pre.' erve the original manuscript journal,
e conveying that idea would have been
'hie mandate ofthe constitution has been
iplied ith, when the journal has been
efficientt time to "publish thIe same."
re then multiplied, so there can be no
is to what thie journal contained; and any
-nt vote of either House to expunge any
r part of any single copy of the journal,
re a violation of the injunction to keep a
than it is of that part of the constitution
ithorizes the people to elect members of
-e of Representatives.
nator from Virginia, (Mr. Leigh,) probably
7set to the resolutions recently passed b y
nature of h's State, directing the Senators
SState to present and vote for expunguibg
lemnatory resolution from. the journal, a
ago presented a memorial from John
,ke, and others of that State, against ex-
These memorinalists caontside tnhe propo-
p ; :. to be ", lanr akid slpsthe vio-
'he constit"utiors rus t "is 'lSad-teAble that
Sthe following as tw awty r"-asiin against
'utionali(y.
;e it to say, that toa their humble nnder-
n, 'to ke'..r.' s i.n.: used by the coiisti-
cans topr.-.'"-'v, .ie d lthat the latter clause
institutional pevision, as previously quo-
shies a key to the interpretation of that
ecedes it, since it would be obviously im-
o publish the journal from time to time, if
pal hiad not been kept and preserved."
'is an admission that the journal is to be
only for the purpose of being prnblished.
the inference? It can be no other than
thus kept, the whole purpose of the
me has been complied with. 1 will here-
e inquiry for whIat other purpose the
an be kept. In relation to the keeping
urnal of the House of Representatives
-five years, I have received information
lerk in the following letters:
JOose OF REPRESENrTATIVES, U. S., ?
.dp,i 6, 1836.5
ia: In answer to the inquiry contained
tIter of this morning, I have to stale that
al rough mauscr"pt journal ofthe House
entanives of the United States (those
e mornings) have not been preserved to
anterior to the commencement of the
a, eighteenth Congress, (1823, '4.)
ir further information, I enclose you a
communication from Mr. Burch on the

very great respect, I am, sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. S. FRANKLIN,
Clerk H. -. United States.
c HILL, -
ited States Senate.

OrricE, HOusE or REPrs. U. S. t
S4pri76,1836. V
d this office a youth, under John Beck-
iwas the first clerk of the House of Re-
es u:miaer the present Constitution of
I States, and who died in the year 1807.
the recess of Congress he put me at,
termed "recording the journal" of'tIhe
session, which was to write it off from
d copy into al.'rg'c bound volume. 1
,of him whiy it was that it was copied,
e were so many printed copies? He ans-
4t the printed copies would probably, ins
)pear from use, &c.-the large MS. vuol--
l not, .- ........- .. -* .....
,l i.. r,-, ii,"as it was then termed, and ,
ned, being the original rough draft read
se on thie morningafter the day ofwhichl i
the proceedings, was not, and had not,
-eginning, been preserved. I inquired
and was answered, that the printed co-
official copy, as it was printed under
I order of the House; and, as errors,
'e sometimes discovered in the rough
!re corrected inthe proofs ofthe printed -i
ii hinted copy was the most correct, andt
bore, there was no use in lumbering the,
the "rough journal" after it had been

Ir. Beckley's immediate successors in
Magruder and Mr. Dougherty, viewed
s Mr. Beckley viewed it. I knowthe fact
7 called their attention to the subject.
ucted upon the subject, and it appear-c
3 be proper that the "roughi journaP'l"
areservdi; although I could not see
e whatever to be answered by doing
conversed with the clerks of the (A-p
e ijr.j..:t, biit .1s we were only subordi-
'actice was not changed till 1st session
2ongr'ess, (1823,'4,) when I determin- ,
onsnulting my superior,that the 'rough t
3uld no longer be thrown away, but
'1 and bound in volumes; and it hass
*!y preserved and bound since. :
great respect, I am, sir,. "
3our obedient servant. ,
S. BURGH.
I S. PnNlleIrn',
House of Representawes U. S. t
letters it appears that Ilhe original i
journal, the journal which is read in
of every day, succeeding that of the i
was kept and preserved precisely long
iswer thie purpose designated by tire
m Virgirnia. It was kept long enough
led, when the original journal was t
lail aside, and a new manuscript t
en from the printed published jour-
'e facts in relation to the journal that
;ainsayed; facts which prove, that
struction of the original manuscript
that journal has been printed and '
s never dreamed to be a violation of !
r the constitution, whieh requires '
if Congress to keep a journal of its t
For the first thirty-five years, in
constitution, plain common sense -
driven from our legislative hialls by
t of sophistry-the world of argiu-
then been turned upside down-in- -
not then contrived to turn a plan -
epresentative to obey his consttiu-
'eiolaion of his oath, and his con-


1823, thie Senate of Massachusetts
ation to expunge another resolution
rnal, passed in 1813, which the pub-
ad condemned. A member of the
that State for the present year, in-
t he recently examined the manu-,
containing both the expunged and ,
cautions. Both of them were pass- C
t vote of the two political parties.
1 party had the ascendancy in thee
Senate in 1813, and the resolution, f
becoming a moral and religious
rce in the success of our army and
ed by the votes oftliat party alone;
's afterwards, thie first time the de-
had the full ascendancy, that party
ige the resolution from the journal.
on of Massachusetts requires the d
journal, and directs that the ayes ,
:h branch of the Legislature shall i
hiat journal; but it does not require t
I shall be published. In thii itddif-
inslitution of'the United States in
journal, of Congress; but the dis-
altogethler in favor of the doctrine
In the case of Massachusetts, the
expunged, but the manuscript t
y official copy inn existence) was I
ni orn case, thIe condemnatory re-c
expunged, and either tile mamne- c
nay remain unmolescted, or it may hr
and crossed, or it may be entire. h
Ond in neither case can it be con- e
ion of the 'constitution, beiarse, S
the journal has been kept long ht
bhihed, every printed copy of that P
icial gopy? 49 that no vote to ex- cm


li,tr'e,minort even any act of defacing the manui-
script journal, can militate within tile mandate of
lthe constitution, rhich requires each House of
Congress "to keep a journal of its proceedings,
and from time to time publish the same," after tine
journal shall have been kept a sufficient length of
time to be published.
Some thirteen years ago, I first visited the
city of Washington, during the sitting of Confress.
The Supreme Court of the United States was at
thIe same time in session. A gentleman of the
bar', now of the Senate, from Kentucky, (Mr. Clay,)
was engaged before the court on one side of a
case; and another gentleman from the same State,
(Kentucky,) then, and now, a member of the
House of Represent-itives, of somewhat rougher
aspect, (Mr. Hardin,) argued the case on the otit-r
side. I listened attentively to bo'h. Thie ronrhll-
er gentleman, in the course df his argument,
talked of trioe practice in Kentueky, and with
great nonchalance informed the court how lie
gained an important land cause in that State. He
cc ated, hlie said, afnlse er feigned issue before the
sitting of the court, and led tihe antagonist party
to confine hlis, attention excihsively to the taking
of testimony inn relation to that feigned issue.
Keeping the real point A secret from the adverse
p:urty, lie carried hiis ease at t1)e trial by surprise.
MarshaIl, and hnthli'ro(' iVaehin,,ton, then on tlie
bench, smiled at thie frank expression of the blunt
attorney, who told the story as if hlie really thought
lie deserved credit for time trick.
There are in .: .'",',,d issues, Mr. President;
but few who i. 'ci- 'ctit ri are as candid as was
this KenthiktVy l yer, before the Supreme Court.
When tihe idl anas first broached, that a resolu-
tion haviingI no necessary reference to any existing
laws could 'not be expunged from lithe legislative
journal of the Senate, because the constitution re-
quires tine Senate to keep a journal of its proceee-
mg4,S I would not have believed that such a
f in.t"l issue could be entertained so long as
o: Jh no have assumed the appearance of settled
I seriousness. Surely, in all thIe expunging that
heretofore has taken place, it never before entered
into the heart of man to conceive such an objec-
tion as this.
It is said thIe constitution requires a journal to
be kept; and therefore no part of this journal can
be mutilated, struck out, or destroyed. If it be an
imperative constitutional injunction to preserve,
there must be some object to be gained by the
preservation. The journal can lie useful for no
other purpose, than the preservation of evidence
of proceedings.
All those partsrofthe journal relating to laws that
have become obsolete, or to proceedings that are
of no consequence, are valuable only as objects
of curiosity, or as matters of history: thIe public
interest cou'd not suffer, if such parts were ut.
terly destroyed. The journal of the Senate is
kept and preserved for no other purpose, than to
show when and how laws are passed, and it is of
as much consequence to preserve the engrossed
bill or resolution in that branch of the Legisla-
ture, in which such engrossed bill or resolution
originated, as it is to preserve the journal of pro-
ceeding, to show the progress and history of the
same bill or resolution. lf both the engrossed bill
and the journal were destroyed, the enrolled bill
on parchment would remain, which would be evi-
dence of the existence of the law; and even if that
enrolled bill were destroyed, the law would still
be in existence, iflthere remained any where pub-
lished copies, which had been certified as from
the original. "
The object of possessing an official copy of thfe
journal of legislative proceedings, is simply to pre-
serve collateral evidence that existing laws passed
in due course of legislation: other evidence than
these journals, such as petitions on which laws
are predicated, reports of committees on those
petitions, minutes of reference, original drafts of
bills or resolutions or amendments, may be eqally
important; and yet it will not be urged that the
destruction or obstruction of these, either weakens
the force of'the law, or violates the constitution.
There are various ways in which the manuscript
journal of the Senate may be obliterated or de-
stroyed. The building may take fire, and that,
with the jourri'al, may be accidentally burned: a
thief may steal it, and carry it off, or bury it in the
water or in the earth: the minutes may take fire
during an evening session, and thus prevent the
Secretary from copying the proceedings at length.
The constitution requires journal to he kept:
would all these casualties or acts by which tihe
journal shall he destroyed, be so many viola-
tions of the constitution ?
Even if the resolution now under consideration,
without reciting it, .went so far as entirely to ob-
literate a former resolution that should be deemed
improper to be retained on the journal, I cannot
concede that tihe act of obliteration would be
unconstitutional. If that resolution were an existing-
law, still inter,.fe' 1 o be kept in force, the act of
obliteration would not nullify the law: applied
to a simple declaratory resolution that was never
intended to have the force of a law, the oblitera-
tion cannot harm the people for whose benefit all
laws are made; and if it does not harm them, it
can be no infringement of thie constitution, such
as is worthy of reprobation.
1 marvel much at the pertinacity with which
tfiis question is attempted to be discussed as an
infringement of the constitution. It seems to me
that, by taking the ground they do, the opponents
of the expunging resolution blink the real ques-
tion: it has all the appearance of a mere subter-
fuge. The horns "of thins altar will not protect
them-the cry f "a violated constitution," as it is a
virtual confession that the people are right in de-
manding the obliteration of an infamous record,
so -it furnishes strong presumptive evidence of
consciousness that the resolution to be expunged
was wrong in itself.
My object is not, Mr. President, so much to
argue tke question of power in the Senate to ex-
punge, as to show that the sentence of condem-
nation passed on the Ptr.sident of the United States
was not only extra-judicial, but unjust; for I con-
ceive it to be a most inglorious evasion that Sena-
tors now say this sentence of condemnation im-
puted to the President no crime. If the Senators
from Louisiana (Porter) and Virginia (Leigh) will
look back to the criminal charges of "high
crimes and misdemeanors" which were almost
daily made in this body two years ago, they may
well conclude that the people of the United States
will repose little fifth in the assertion now, that
the resolution of April, 1834, imputed to the
President of the United States no criminal in-
tention. To show that it was the intention to
mpute the highest criminality to the President in
Ihe passage of that resolution, the speeches of
msore than one Senator who voted for it might be
quoted. One single extract from the speech of
the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Clay) after
the resolution luad passed, will serve my purpose:
IN SxENATB, April 30, 1834 -Mr. Clay rose:
"Never," said lie, Mr. President, have I known
ar read of an administration which expires with
no munch agony, and so little composure and re-
signation, as that which now, unfortunately, has
lhe control of public affairs in this country. It
exhibits a state of mind feverish, fretful, anid
idgetty [a beautiful alliteration!] bounding ruth-
/essly from one expedient to another, without any
sober or'settled purpose.
*. ri *
"But I would ask in what tone, temper, and
spirit does "te President come to the Senate?
As a great State culprit who has been arraigned
at the bar of justice or sentenced as guilty? Does
he manifest any of those compunctions visiting
of conscience which a guilty violator of the con-
ititution and laws of the land ought to feel?


Does he address himself to a high court with the
respect, to say nothing of humility, which a per-
son accused or convicted, would naturally feel?
No, no. He comes as if the Senate were guilty;
mand as if he were in thIe judgment seat, and tihe
Senate stood accused before him. He arraigns the
Senate; puts it upon trial; condemns it. He
comes as if hie felt himself elevated far above the
Senate, and beyond all reach ofthe law, surr'onund-
ed by unapproachable impunity. He whIo pro-
fesses to be an innocent and injured man, gravely
accuses the Senate, and modestly asks it to
rput upon its own record his sentence of condemn.
nation! When before did the arraigned or con-
victed party demand of thie court which was to
try, or had condemned him, to enter upon their
records a severe denunciation of their own con-
duct? The President presents himself before the
Senate, not in the garb of suffering innocence,
but in imperial and royal costume, as a dictator
o rebuke a refractory Senate; to command it to
record his solemnprotest; to chastise it for diso-
bedience."
Concluding:
1" The Senator (Mr. Grundy of Tennessee)
thinks that there is no coverlet large enough to
rolect all the various elements ofthe opposition
He is mistaken; there is one of sufficiently eapa-
rious dimensions, r, cenly wove at :a Jackson
torn, called a protest on which is marked a vio-
ation ofthie constitution, and an assumption of
normoius Executive power; and the honorable
senator had belter ha.nsen to place himself under
he banners of those who a e contending against
rower and prerogative for free institutions and
ivil liberty. Arid he tadl better' 19s no time,


for the protest is thie last stroke upon thie last nail
driven into the coffin (not of Jackson-may ihe
live a thousand years!) but of Jacksonism!"
In a speech delivered at Concord, New Hamp-
shire, in October, 1834, by a Senator (Mr. Web-
Sster) who voted for the condemnatory resolution,
I find thie following strong and positive assertion:
"It is true, that the operation commenced with
thie Branch Bank in this State, (New Hampshire,)
It was tried to make that bank a-political institu.-
tion. Men here applied to the President to make
the bank at Portsmouth a political bank. Fhey
wrote to thie Secretary of thie Treasury to do this.
These arefacts-made known to thie world-not
disputed." ,
It never was asserted, then, that the bank
w'as unconstitutional-that it was a 'mtonster.' And
there was good reason for this silence. The
bank had taken no part in politics; no one had
been wNicked enough to bring it into the political
arena. It is as true as that out' fathers fell at
Bunker's Hill, at Lexington, and at Monmouthli,
that this outcry against the bank. 'as raised be-
cause the bank refused to be made a political en-
gine."-Same speech.
This language was used by that honorable Sena-
tor about the same time that a committee of the
Senate, commonly called tihe Ulhltwashing Com-
nmittee, reiterated the same and other similar lan-
guage in justification of the Bank and in condem-
nation of those who opposed its rechliarter.
I intend, in the remain ks I have to make, to no-
tice the charge that the operation commenced"
by an attempt on the part of the friends of tihe ad-
ministration "to make the bank'at Portsmouth a
political bank;" and the statement that thIe bank
had taken no part in politics." The testimony
on which tihe charge and disclaimer have been
based, is the authority and word of thie President
of the bank. I shall confront these 'statements
generally, with other statements coming from the
same quarter; and if I shall fail to prove by the
President of the bank, that thie President of tIe
bank and the aforesaid Senator charged falsely
When hie charged the attempt to make the
Branch Bank at Portsmouth ;i political engine-
if I shall fail to demonstrate, on thie authority of
the President of the bank himself, that hie had
entered, with all the money of the bank, into the
political arena, 1 will concede that the friends of
the batik have not been quite as much in the
wrong as the enemies of the bank have alleged.
I understood thie Senator from Virginia (Mr.
Leigh) to say, there is no provf of abuses and mis-
conduct of the Bank of the United States, unless
we take charges against the bank for evidence
against the bank. if lie intends by this to justify
the resolution ofthe Senate which condemned the
President of the United States without a hearing-
for it is presumed he would impute these unprov-
ed or false charges against the bank to the Presi-
dent, who has been assailed as the bank's greatest
enemy-I will answer his allegation, that the Presi-
dent is guilty, by making the bank falsify its own
charges, and disprove the bank's innocence by the
confessions of the bank's own principal officer.
The Senator from Virginia says he is strictly and
peculiarly a lawyer, meaning, I presume, a lawyer
as contradistinguished from the legislator or the
politician. Judging from thIe character of hiis
speech alone on the expunging resolution, I agree
that his description of himself is correct; for who
so well as the mere lawyer can wrap up the plain-
est proposition in a web ofmetaphysical subtleties?
To those who place implicit faith in him, all his
propositions and deductions undoubtedly carry the
weight of mathematical demonstration. To my-
self his whole speech appeared in the true charac-
ter of the lawyer, who makes the most for his cli-
ent; his argument was the reversal of that rule
which every plain, unsophisticated mind would
adoptto convince others ofthe truth as it had con-
vinced itself; he seemed to entrench himself in a
citadel of assumptions, applied to the case as ihe
would have it; and he afterwards made all his facts
precisely to conform to his assumptions. The late
Thomas Addis Emmett wsas once concerned as as-
'ociate counsel in a case with Aaron Burr, in which
thie latter had thie prior management. When tihe
case was about coming to trial, Emnmett asked
Burr what facts they could prove in support of
their client? The answer was, ask nbt what we
can prove; rather ask what is necessary to be
proved? He'e is a specimen ofthe mere lawyer.
It was in that early age of the practice probably,
when the profe-sion had not learnt to throw off, as
legislators, their ex part character as lawyers, that
they were excluded from the Britsh Parliament.
"Sir Richard Baker, in Ilis Chronicle, under tlh
year 1736, records, that the House of Commons
ordered that no man of the law should be returned
as knight of the shire, and, if returned, that lie
should have no wages." I would by no means
recur to this prec-dent as a parliamentary prac-
tice at this time binding on either H-Iouse of Corn-
Sfi ess.
The point on whiI h I would first comment, is
the charge which has been so often repeated by
the bank and its friends involved in the contro-
versy, relative to tihe removal of Mr. Mason front
the presidency of the branch of New Hampshire."
'Ihis charge was not conjured up until nearly
three years after the events to which it alludes
had transpired. It first made its appearance in the
report of a single member of the committee of the
House of Representatives "appointed on the 15th
of Marchli, 1832, to examine and report on the
books and proceedings of the Bank of the United
States "
The committee had behn in session twenty-four
days at Philadelphia, (from March 22d to Apri
14th) and were about to close the examination,
when the following proceeding was had:
On motion of Mr. WATMVOUGa,
Resolved, That the President of the Bank of
the United States be requested to furnish the com-
mittee with copies of the correspondence between
himself and the Secretary of the Treasury, and
Isaac Hill, late Second Comptroller of the ,Treasu-
ry, with reference to charges made against the
official conduct of Jeremiah Mason, President of
thie United States Branch B:mk in New Hamp-
shire."
The correspondence, in manuscript, making
more than forty closely printed pages, was pro-
duced by Mn'. Biddle on the instant. It bore evi-
dent marks of age, having been thumbed till parts
of it were scarcely legible. Tha majority of
thue committee, it is understood, before that day,
had never heard of this correspondence, nor riad
it entered into the heartof mortal man concerned
in tins correspondence, excepting Nicholas Bid'
dile himself, to conceive that it could be tortured
into a purpose or use such as was afterwards made
of it. If a majority of the committee had time
or opportunity to scan this correspondence, they
would by no means suppose that such an infer.
ence could be deduced from it, as seems to have
been discovered by the keen optics of a single
member, (Mn'. J. Q. Adams,) and afterwards con-
curred "fully in all the statements made, and
principles developed," by another member of the
minority (Mr. J. G. Watmough.) Mr. Adams's
report relative to this correspondence was in the
words following:
'i The complaints made against the president of
the -bank at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in the
summer of 1829, .nd the correspondence be-
tweei the boarn at Philadelphia and the late Se-
cretaries of the 'treasury and of War, form a por-
tion of the documents relating to the books and
proceedings of the bank, called 'br by tlie com-
mittee ant communicated to them. They are"


not noticed in tlihe report of the chairman, but,
in thIe opinion of the subscriber, are more deserv-
ing of the attention of Congress and of the nation,
than any other part of the papers commented upon
in the report. An effort, very thinly veiled, on tihe
part of two of the executive departments of thie
General Government, to exercise a control, po-
litical and pecuniary over tie proceedings of
the bank and its branches-a control highly ex-
ceptionable in principle, and even contrary to
law, appears to him to be fully disclosed in those
papers. He will not permit himself to inquire
into thIe motives of the agents in those transac-
tions. It is sufficient for the protection of the
public interest that the projected encroachments
of power were disconcerted and laid aside."
So much for tire high accusations made by
Mr. Adams against "two of the executive de-
partments of the General Government." It
would, perhaps, be a sufficient answer--an an-
swer that would foinrever shut the mouths of all ac-
cusers-to quote tihe statement of Mr. Ingliam in re-
lation to this matter, written in June, 1832, near time
time at which Mr. Adams's report first appeared,.
At the time of writing this letter, Mr. Ingham
was no friend oftlihe administration; and from the
temper he discovered after leaving the office of
Secretary of the Treasury, it might well be ex-
pected that lie would be no less willing to see
anry charge of "projected encroachments of pow-
er" established against the administration, than
even Mr. Adams himself. Noticing the unatithor
ized publication of a confidennial correspondence
nearly three years after it took place, and tine
accusation made in the report of Mr. Adams, Mr.
lngliam, in a letter published in thie Philadelphia
Sentinel, says:
"But my motives were misunderstood, and',my
friendly purposes wholly disappointed, and I nr w
founl myself virtually accused of a desire to ex-
ert thi0 p9wr of the Poverlpmnt to seduco thq


bank from its vestal purity, into a base political $148,000 was thrown under protest: still further
connexion with the administration, protests were expected, and the actual loss sustain-
Having been promulgated by an ex-President ed there will not be less than $112,000. A
oif the United States in the legislative hall, and confidential officer was despatched to Portsmouth,
thus openly by a direeto of the bank, [by a Mr. wlio found the affairs of the office in' great jeop-
Platt, at a public hotel in Trenton, undertaking ardy, covered with the wrecks which bad manage-
to vouch for the-truth of Mr. Adams's statement,] ment and the most extensive frauds had occasioned.
it cannot fail to justify this notice. To be silent To retrieve it, it became necessary to select a man
would be to sanction for truth what Iknow to be of the first rate character and abilities: such a man
false, and deeply prejudicial to my character." was Mr. Mason."
To correct the "bad management," and "ex-
When the friendly pupose of my letter is tensive frauds," there was at no time a change
duly appreciated, in connexion within the repeated of direction: the same individuals from that,
declarations pressed upon me of the political to the end of the chapter, continued to con-
abuses of certain ranch banks, in corroboration Irol the bank-the same political coterie at all
of which it was added that the selections of di- times wielded it as their weapon of influence. Mr.
rectors were, in many branches, made entirely Mason was appointed President-lie had been a
from one political party, it should be rather a director and attorney for the bank before that
m-itter of surprise that my suggestions should be time; and he remained associated in the Board
so little obnoxious even to severe and suspicious with the same men that controlled it at the time of
criticism. It requires but little knowledge of bad management," and the most exten-
the human character to know, that no bank can sive frauds." Mr. Biddle himself says, "Mr.
be faithfully and impartially conducted where thie Mason is only one member of that board,
directors are selected from one sect, whatever ils consisting" of thie same gentlemen whi have had
character may be, provided their selection is made charge of the branch for many years."
with a viewv to their sectarian opinions; and when But the management under Mr. Mason, became
directors are found thus arranged, however pure from "bad" to "worse." The most profitable and
they may be, it will be almost impossible to satisfy, safe business of the bank had been its country loans
even an enlightened public opinion, that there made in sums offr'om $500 to $20(00 each, under
may not have heen some design in the arrange- an agreement that the interest and ten per cent. of
meant. The obvious and natural means to pre- the principal should be checked in every four
vent abuse in such a case, as well as to sa- months. As the bank had lost in its large loans,
tisfy public opinion, and even to confound cla- to speculators in factory and other stocks, Mr.
mor, (which is sometimes necessary in the ad- Mason took it into his head that the-small debtors
ministration of public affairs,) is to give some were less safe than the large ones; and violating
variety to the organization of the board.- the plighted faith of the bank, by a circular letter,
Such were the reflections which induced the called on Iall to renew their notes every two months,
suggestion of forming suitable 'checks and coun- and at each renewal, to pay twenty per cent. of
terbalances' to preserve a proper equilibrium in the principal. This course, rigid'y pursued,
the management of the institution; a measure in created a panic at once; and Mr. Mason still fur-
its conception purely admonitory and preserve their contributed to the distress, by taking a large
tlve, not only tending to prevent the pernicious sum from the circulation, and loaning it in Boston
influence of political bias in the operations of the to his own particular friends and connexions.
bank, but incapable of being perverted to such Withini the town of Portsmouth, thie excite-
abuse; suggested, too, by the constitutional repre- ment against Mr. Mason became almost universal
sentative of one-fifth of the whole stock; forms the among the business men. It was charged on him,that
Solitary pointl, left by Mr. Biddle, on whidct it is to be lie arbitrarily changed (by shortenir.g) the periods
presumed Mr .1daims has founded his grave and so- of payments of paper amounting to several hun-
lemn charge. I shall not now attempt to show the dried thousand dollars, reducing the time for.re-
difference between a measure proposed to prevent, newals from one hundred and twenty to sixty
and one, to promote an abuse, nor enter upon a days, and increasing each call fi'om ten to twenty
discussion of the rights of the constituent or repre- per cent.; that the best paper in tie State was re-
sentative to advise the agent, or attempt to prove fused discount; that he made a run upon one of
that what might properly have been addressed to thie local banks, with a view to stop it; and refused
the directors appointed by the President might, drafts at sight on a Boston bantik, and denied the
with the same propriety, be addressed to the P ortsmonth bank-time even to send (a six hour's
whole board. The question of right is too clear ride) to Boston, for its money there in deposit;
to admit of, a doubt. The character of the pro- that the papers,uinder which the revolutionary pen
ceeding must therefore depend on its fitness, and sioners had usually drawn, were rejected'upon ca-
the motives which induced it, on whatever grounds pricious and technical objections. In consequence
it shall be placed, I am content to be judged by a of these reasons, and mainly for the reason that he
discerning pbliec. threw into jail a citizen, (one of his own political
Of Mr. Adams, however unwarrantable his at- party,) by virtue of a process which,as a lawyer, he
tack upon me, it seems most fit that I should say issued against him, because he failed to comply
as little as possible. A great man has said of him with the requisition which, as President,he exacted
'that lie could not see tile truth:' this'case is a in violation of the terms on which loans were
striking example of the wisdom of that obser- made, the public indignation against Mr. Mason
nation." became so strong, that his image was hung, and
Mr. Ingham says, in the same letter, "the See- burnt in effigy in front of his own dwelling.
retary cf thie Treasury, for the time being, is ex- Mr. Mason had been placed in the office-of Pre-
clusively responsible for all the sentiments con- sident and attorney of the bank under a compen-
tained in his correspondencee" station raised from $800 to $2000 per annum. Mr.
This explanation of Mr. Ingham, who surely Biddle, in his letter to Mr. Ingham, speaking of
could have'no interest to exculpate any person in Mr. Mason says:-"Ofhis entire competency, espe-
the administration other than himself, would seem cially in detecting the complicated frauds, and
to be sufficient. So far as relates to one ofthe managing the numerous law suits which seemed
two departments, he takes to himselfexclusively inevitable, there could be no doubt." "Sincee
the responsibility, and denies any and every at- he has been in office, hie has been exceedingly use-
tempt to exercise an exceptionable or unlawful ful-has saved the bank from great losses-Ihas
control on the part of the government of either the secured the bad debts; nor until Mr. Woodbury's
bank or any :of its branches, letter, was I informed of any complaint against
Yet in the face of this positive denial of' Mr. him."
Gingham, thie directors of thie bank -(in a report If thie bantik hird intended to make severe exac-
adopted by a vote of twelve to three, Decembher tions of the people, Mr. Mason was the man of all
3, 1833, many thousands of which report were others to do their business; but hlie was not the
gratuitously circulated, and paid for out of the man to manage an office of discount and deposit,
friends of the bank) reiterate the charge in tihe either for the benefit of the bank"l or to the satis-
following words: faction of men of business; and the result proves
"It was in the midst of this career of inoffensive the truth of my pIoposition. A tabular state-
usefulness, when.soon after the accession to pow. ment, furnished by the bantik, presents the follow-
er of the present Executive, the purpose was dis-' ing as the profits on the business of the Ports-
tinctly revealed that other duties than those to the mouth branch bank:
country were required; and that it was necessary In 1828, $25,903 80
for the bank, in administering its affairs, to consult 1829, 9,697 04
the political views of those -who had now ob- 1830, 5,164 16
tainted tire ascendancy in the Executive. It is un- The truth is, Mr. Mason's severe treatment, and
dilc.tood that soon after that event, a meeting was violation of the plighted faith of the bank, at once
heldin Washington f fthe principal chiefs, to consi- drove frioomn it its most profitable customers, so
der the mineans of perpeltualing their new aulhorilty, that in two years the profits of that branch were
and the possession iftl/he bank owas among the minot reduced to less than one-fifth the ordinary amount.
prominent objects of the parties assembled. The These were the causes whics induced fifty-eight
first open manifestation of thie purpose was in respectable indiiiduals and firms, comprising
.June, 1829, when a concerted effort wasi made by most of the active business-men in Portsmouth, to
thie executive officers to interfere in thie t election petition the President anl Directors ofthe mother
of tIhe board of-directorsat tPortsmouth. At the bank for a change of the PI'resident of the branch
head ofthis iatetrmpt was Mr. Levi ,or:.ll.t,n., rnow at the end of his term. Of these fifty-eight houses,
a member of thie present Cabinet at Washington, thirty-eight at least were men of the safme politi-
who did not hesitate to avow in a letter to the cal party as Mr. Mason. The most of them re-
Secretary ofithe Treasury, which, though mark- main of that pa, ty; and as a proof that the main
ed 'confidential, was subsequently ordered to r'easro for petitioning fobr a substitution was not
be published by tlhe committee of investigation in political, I may state the fact, that twenty-four of
1832," that hie wished the interference of the tnese names appear on the only petition for a res-
Government,to remove the President of the branch tora'ion of the deposites to the Bank of'the Uni-
at Portsmouth. This letter of Mr. Wood- ted States, which was presented from New Hamp-
bury was transmittedto the bank by the Secreta- sirere during the season of panic and distress' of
ry of the Treasmury, w ho stated that 'frnom some the session of Congress two years ago.
expressions in his letter, it may be inferred that Scarcely any worse condition of the bank court ,
it is partly founded on a supposed application of be conceived than that represented by Mr. Biddle
the influence of the bank, with a view to political himself. He says:-" A confidential officer had
effect;' in consequence of which, lie deemed it been despatched to Portsmouth, who found tihe
hiis duty to present it to the bank, 'with the views affairs of tlhe office in great jeopardy, covered
of the admini tral/ion in relation to it.' At the with the wrecks which bad management and the
same time, Mr. Isaac Hill, acting as the Complrol- most extensive fr'auds had occasioned." Further
ler of the Treasury, until rejected by the Senate, on, he admits that no change had been made for
andnow aSenatorofthe United States, sent the better, for lie says: Mr. Mason is only one
memorial from the members of his political party member of that Board, consistingof the same gen-
in the Legislature of New Hampshire, requesting tiemen who have had charge of the branch for
thie removal of Mr. Mason. In another commu- many years."
nication presented to the bank, hlie gave it as his It was against such a state of things as this, that
opinion that no measure, short of Mr. Mason's re- respectful representations were made by citizens
rnoval, could tend 'to reconcile the people of New of all parties in Portsmouth, (and a major part of
Haiinmphire to the bank, and that the friends of those citizens, men who had never supported the
General 'Jackson, in New Hampshire, have had administration of Andrew Jackson, ald men who
but too much reason to complain of the manage- did not support him so late as the winter of 1834,
mnent of the branch at Portsmouth.' Finally, the in the act of the removal of the deposited,) in favor
Secretary at Waar ordered the transfer of the pen- of a change of the President, and direction of thIe
sion fund from the branch bank at Portsmouth, branch at Portsmourth. And it was at the especial
to another bank in Concord, an act so obviously in instance of those c.tlizens, of all parties, that
violation of the laws, that it was first resisted by ahout sixty members of the Legislature of New
the bank, and then retracted by the Secretary. Hampshire subscribed their names to another peti-
"It became then manifest to the bank, that there tion, recmnmenling a change of the direction, and
was a combined effon't to render the institution naming ten persons, a majority of whom was not,
subservient to political purposes, and that it was at thait time, friends of the administration, as
necessary to come to some immediate and dis- suitable for directors to that bransehs. Neither did
tinct understanding of its rights and duties." ,Mr. Woodhinny or Mr. Hill nmove i this business
To sustain this reiteration of an ah'eady ex- oftlneir own accord, but at tine especial request of
ploded charge, thie managers of the banks arc the same citizens of Portsmouth, a major part of
obliged to resort to a fiction of their own inven- whom were then, and since hav'e cnntiinied to be,
tion, for whichl,there is not even the slightest pre- of tire opposition to this administration.
tenee of foundation. They say "it is undcr- Mr. WoodblTn'y, in a confidential letter to Mr.
stood tiht soon after that event, a meeting was Ingham, requests him to lend "any aid for' the
held in Washington of the principal chletf, &c relief of thie complainers that he can with pro-
and thie possession of the bank was among the priety furnish." lie says "our commercial meen
most prominent objects of the parties assembled." are almost unaninons in tiein' comnplints, and the
Now if there, be any foundation Ior this story, people inn the interior, whio were wont to be ac-
coul l not thie gentlemen directors funrniish, suone comnmodated formerly aut the branch, jiarn withi
better evidence than a mere 'it is understood?" them in a desire for the removal of the present
Of these principal chiefs," have we riot a right President" "In making these general repre-
to suppose hat either Mr. Ingham or tine twvo sentatiens, I am repn'nting what are in the mouths
other sdisaffected members of thei Cabinet wsho re- of almost every citizen, of whatever political de.
tired within him, must have had some ktnowlesdge? nomination, and am inviting', at the request of
pand has not each of them discovered at least an in- ~uny,' 'your influence at the mother Hank, in pro
elination to expose. before tile public any and vuecing a change." "Never, on any occasion,
every t'ransactior which might go to disgrace thie have I known complaints so wide 'and bit er as in
administration? ThIe alleged meeting is desproved the case now nnder consideration."


by every circumstance vwhiich can go to establisla a We have just seen how compktely ?Mr. Ingiharn,
negative! The facts of the case itself, and among then Secretary of thie Treasury, exonerates all
them the fact fully established by the correspond others than himself from any intention of' assunm-
ence that the ground of complaint against Mr. Ma- ing political control over the bank, and how he
son wais not political, demonstrate that both thie al- likewise demonstrates, that in making the repre-
leged meeting and its objects were the mere in- sentation lie did, hie disclaimed "a.l desire to
ventions of a mind predetermined to seek a. plausi- derive political aid through the bank." Mr.
ble pretext for an accusation of some sort. Itiddle himself shall speak, of what were the mo-
lt will not be denied that the object of some o' ties of Mr. Woodbury. In his letter of" July 18,
the petitioners for a change in the Board of Direct 1829,to Mr Inglianm,he says: "It appears,tthcn,'from
ors of the Portsmouth branch, was an exemption Mr. Woodbmury's own statement, that, so lnar f'rom
from that exclusive political management which employing the influence of the bank," wNithi a
had been practised for years at that branch, hi view to political effect, 'it is a notorious fact
was a matter of notoriety, that utip to ihat time that thie c mtplaints arena made by Mr'. tson's own
every member of thie Board was opposed to thi oliiticalf'iends; so that, in truLthi, if there be any
administration; and for tine last three years, th n politics in sie in-itter, it is it question between Mr.
bank had been managed (whether with or wilho' u n laon and politicians of his own pursuation."
thie sanction of the Directors of thie mother bank) Is it not surprising, that in thie Lipse of little
with a view to political tivoritism. Tht: 'bank ihanir mie than a year afterwards, Mr. Bniddle should
been before, as almost every branch bank has beu "el'prsent Mr. Woodbury, as at thie ihead of the
since, a political machine, operating on the ecc tittempt" to create a political subscrviency of the
tions. At thie time of tie first election of Prcsi bankul to the administrator ? And this charge is
dent Jackson, all thie Dire'ctors wee active parti- niade by him in the pamphlet report of Ia com-
zeins against him; and in timnt of scarcity, inmone minittee of directors of tinhe Bank of thie United
aecommodalions were understood to be. granted t- 'tales, adopted by the HBoard, Dccuemher 3, 1833
a matter of political favor, lnay we not account for this discrepancy in tiht
This- political management of th Bank Iia'! change of circumstances of thIe case? In July,
proved t6 be badly management. iMr. Biddle, in n: t829, there was not even an expaetaiion r.f chlirg-
letter to Mr. Ingham, of July 18, 1829, says: ing thie effort's made fori' the removal of the Pre
IThe office at Portsmouth hiad originally the i.n- 4id'nt of the Portsmnuath branch .to it design o
fbi tune to have at its head a Mr. Cutts, who end ( lie administration to convert the bank into a poh-
by defi'auding the United States of upwards ol ical instrument in its own hands; while in D,-
i20,000 of tihe pension fund, which the Bank was 'ember, 1833, it became highly important that thi
obliged to replace; and last year the office wa directors of the bank should fix on certain un-
nearly prostrated, in thie general ruin which spread :iamed "political lchiefs" as having '" distinctly)
over the country. Out of $460,000 of loans, revealed" that other "duties than those to the
country were required" of the bank.
"Thiisi inn.tritc: thi cominmittee never direteld ithe publica In the same pamphlet, for the purpose of
tion. It t ivaas Mr. tindlin hsinnsl; whor wilihon l asking l]ibet' -
fronl Up Wflturn0 sihrn iinPeli s pi lti l.i.r eosfndcgntcl trenrlr'heing' thi charge of a $ desie to derive


political aid through the operations of the bank,"
the humble part I acted in" forwarding the wishes
of the citizens of Portsmouth, without distinction
of party, is misrepresented, by quoting from my
letter detached sentences going to show that my
application had a bearing exclusively political.
Then holding a subordinate station in one of the
accounting departments of the Treasury, I was
absent a few weeks in New HTampshire. While
at my place of residence, which.is the seat of
government, a messenger, who had arrived the
day before from Portsmouth, presented the peti-
tion, subscribed byfifty-eight individual firms of
Portsmouth, addressed to the Directors of the
Bank of the United States, remonstrating against
thereappointment of Mr. Mason as a director of
the branch at Portsmouth, and representing that
"the administration of its concerns during the
past year has created great dissatisfaction ia this
quarter of the country, and has been of a charac-
ter, in our opinion, partial, harsh, and no less in-
jurious to the bank itself than to those who are
accustomed to do business wilh it;" and also a me-
morial, signed by between fifty and sixty members
of the State Legislature, representing that they
"have good reason to believe that tihe late man-
agement of the Board of Directors of thle Bran-h
Bank at Portsmouth has been oppressive to the
men of business in the State, and tends to the in-
jury of thie institution itself'" "that the conduct
of the head of the Board has been destructive to
.the business of Portsmouth, and offensive to the
whole community;" and respectfully naming ten
individuals who are recommended as candidates
for directors.. This petition and memorial he re-
quested me to take on my return to Washington,
and cause them to be laid before the President of
the mother bank. Passing rapidly through Phila-
delphia, I had no time to see or consult with the
president and directors, with whom I had no per-
sonal acquaintance. I did, however, consult with
two gentlemen whom I knew, who engaged to
lay the matter before the president of the bank,
whenever I should forward -the papers from Wash-
ington. It is my letter to tliose two gentlemen
that Mr. Biddle not only took and used as a pub-
lic letter, but the contents of which hlie has dis-
torted, for the purpose of forcing an inference
that 1 was interfering in accordance with the de-
sign of certain "political chiefs" at Washington,
to corrupt the vestal purity of the bank, and en-
tice or drive it "into a base political connexion
with the administration."
The following extracts, embracing the whole
scope of the private letter which I addressed to
Messrs. Barker and Pemberton of Philadelphia,
under date of July 17, 1829, decisively prove that
my object, so far as I had an object, was entirely
misrepresented in the pamphlet of the Bank Di-
rectors:
"Having recently spent several weeks in New
Hampshire, I am able to say, from my own know-
iedge,that the sentitnent ofdissatisfaction on account
.of the recent management of the branch at Ports-
mouth, by Mr. Mason, is general; that his conduct
has been partial and oppressive,and calculated not
less to injure the institution than to disgust and dis-
affect the principal business men, and that no
measure short'of his removal will tend to reconcile
the people of New Hampshire to the Bank. 0
"The friends of General Jackson in New Hamp-
shire have had but too much reason to complain of
the management of the branch at Portsmouth.
All they now ask is, that this institution in tht
.State may not continue to be an engine of political
oppression by any party. The board has, I be-
lieve, invariably and exclusively consisted of indi-
viduals opposed to the General Government. Of
tile ten persons named in the petition for directors,
six are friends of the last, and four are fiends of
the present administration, they are, however,
alike, gentlemen of respectability, who have no
sinister objectsto be promoted, understanding well
the responsibilities and wants of business men.
With such a direction, I do not doubt the branch
at Portsmouth will be secure and prosperous, and
satisfy all."
Under these representations the President of
the bank visited Portsmouth, and is understood to
have exhibited every written representation made
to him, confidentially or otherwise, to the eyes or
the ears of the assembled citizens of the town; and
the well known talent of his principal officer, for
small verbal criticism and for ridicule, was put in
requisition for an exhibition of the letters and peti-
tions before the people. It was soon discovered
to be no part of Mr. Biddle's object to listen to the
complaints of the people, whether with or without
foundation. He came there for no such purpose.
It was no part of his object to satisfy that commu-
nity by any relaxation of severity,- but rather to
conquer the revolting spirit by letting all know
who wanted any indulgence from thie bank, how
much and howdeeply they were under obligations
to his favor. The exclusive political rule of that
bank, from that day to the day it was closed, was
continued. A directorship has in two or three in-
stances been offered to friends of the existing ad-
ministration, and, being obliged to act as mere au-
tomatons, each of them, it is believed, has de-
clined to act.
That this bank, existing there for about eigh-
teen years, without taxation from the State,
and having all tile benefits of the publicly deposits
during a greater part orf the time, has been of
real injury to the State, must be admitted. At
first furnishing, by extraordinary capital that
could not be usefully employed, strong tempta-
tions for speculation, this bank terminated the ca-
reer, by prostrating in pecuniary ruin, many men
who might have done a safe business through life
if temptations had not been thrown in their way
to make investments by loans from the bank.
The charge in the'directors' pamphlet, of an ef-
fort at Washington "to render the institution sub-
servient to political purposes," by the order of the
War Department to transfer the pension fund
from the branch bank at Portsmouth to another
bank at Concord, but illy accords with the other
charge which I have at length been considering.
If, int the one case, the attempt had been to cre-
ate a subserviency on the part of the bank by
changing the political character of tire directors,
where would be those consistency in depriving thle
bank at the same time of what seems now to have
been a, privilege, but which, until that time, had
always been represented to be a burden? Tlhe
truth is, that a-majority of the Legislature of
New Hampshire, having been always taught by
those concerned in the United States Bank, titat
the bank coveted not the privilege of paying the
pensioners, petitioned the Secretary of War to re-
move the fund to a more central point, which
would make the average distance of travel for
each and every pensioner from twenty-five to thir-
ty miles less. In several other States, up to that
time, pensions had been paid by agencies other
than those of thIe Bank of the United States and
its branches. The Secretary of War, doubting
not Ilis right, because it had not before been dis-
puted, directed tire pension agency to 1e changed.
This direction and change threw new light on thie
subject. The Bank of the United States, to mag-
nify its services to the public anti make them
more than an equivalent flu, its exclusive privile-
ges, had represented the holding and disbursing of
thie public moneys as extremely onerous. But Mr.
Mason presents an entirely different view of thle
subject, which re offers as a reason why thie bank
should resist the transfer of agencies. He says:
"The removal contemplated would lessen our
means of circulation, and, as I think, be vert/in-
jstrious to the bank." It is difliclult to perceive
how the other of "thIe two Executive Depart-


ments," tile Srcretary of War, should have been
acting in concert with thile Secretary of thie Trea-
sury, when he directed thie pension agency to be
removed from a bank which thie latter was attempt-
ing to control, to another bank over which, by
possibility, hlie had no right of control. It appears
to me that the "'two Executive Departments," if
designing to do what they are charged with doing,
were acting directly at cross purposes,
['Tb be continued ]

REMARKS OF Mr. JOHNSON,
Or KENTUC-KY,
In House of Representativres, May, 1836-0On the
bill to pay itoney advancedd by Charileston and
other' southern cities, to prosecute the Florida
war, &c.
It is not, said Mr. JOIINtox, to give utterance
to indign'anit feelings at thie opposition to tis iula-
sure, that I unow address the House. It is not a
party measure which is before us, but a measure
which calls for concert of action with all parties.
It is a subject of too great importance to admit
ofprocrastirtation, by indulging in party inveetivcs.
t)t.r responsibilities are not to each other, but
to our' constituents and to our countr'v. Eachl
member of this House holds the same relation to
Jis inmitediite constituents, and I aim willing to
refer tire con(duet of each to that trlibunal. Tihe
wivole nation is interested i the n'Course pur-lrld
by each meyibler; and to thie test of pubi c opinioii
throughout the whole country, each individual
imlust submiit; whether the award be censure, or
applause, there can be no evasion, mno appeal. It
is our part to act, and thie part of tihe country to
judge of our actions.
When this murderous savage war broke out in
Florida, which has spread ruin and desolation
to many families, an4 half depopulated somen fair


portions of that flourishing territoiy, the hiostil'
trump was heard from Charleston to New Orleans,
and the patriotic citizens of South Caroliria,Georgia
Alabama, and Louisiana, not willing to wait th<
dull delays of this House ,for authority, while theii
fellow citizens were bleeding under the scalping
knife of the savages, flew toarms, and hastened tc
their protection. The service was national
It was no more incumbent upon these States
to protect Florda, than upon other States;
but without waiting to inquire whether justice
would be done by the nation, they met the
impending danger. They justly regarded the
citizens of that territory as a branch of the Ame.
rican family; and that was enough to kindle in the
bosoms of the chivalrouts southrons the fire of
American patriotism. The palmetto was lost in
the eagle; and his talons were stretched to grasp
the hand which was lifted against their country.
men; the bill now before us makes provision to
defray the expense. ThIe emergency of the occa.
sion did not admit of hesitancy, and moneys were
advanced in the city of Charleston, and other towns
in that and tihe other Slates, to meet the exigency.
The great question now is, shall we authorize the
payment? The honor and future safety of tihe
country require, that there shall be no hesitancy
nor delay. Even while we are wasting the time by
cold deliberation upon the subject, the threaten-
ing danger upon the Georgia a.d Alabama fron-
tier may be bursting into a flame, and demanding
similar advances upon the credit of our sense of
national justice. An awful responsibility awaits
him who can make this the unfotbrtunate occasion
for party erimination, for censures against the ad-
ministration, and against tihe Committees of Ways
and Means and on Military Affairs. To produce
delay by complaints of irregularity, because the
measure has been proposed by a committee, with-
out an order from the Hlouse, or a reference from
the House of an Executive communication, or by
motions aind debates in favor of committal, is in
effect to oppose the bill; or at least to deprive it,
without any countervailing benefit, of much of its
utility.
It is not the method of proceeding on ordinary
occasions, to start objections upon these grounds;
and how can it be reconciled to a proper sense of
the duty which we owe the country in a case
like this, connecteJ as it is with the Florida and
the Creek war? I have been, said Mr. Johnson,
a member of Congress for many ears, and for
more than twenty-five years have I been honored as
chairman of some important committee; and dur-
ing the whole of that period, the present mode of
proceeding has been in practice. Whatever sub-
ject comes within the general scope of duties for
which a standing committee is appointed, as well
as subjects referred to them by the House, it Ihas
been the uniform custom for the committee to act
upon, and report the result of such action to the
House. This subject has in like manner been de-
liberated upon by the committee, and the result of
tliat deliberation is presented in thie bill before us.
It is simply to refund what has been liberally ad-
vanced in the hour of dcinger by those patriotic
States, at a time when the honor and safety of our
common country required'the advance for the use
of thie nation, before the national coffers could be
unlocked for the purpose. Whether that money
was paid regularly, according to specified forms,
or not; or whether the requisitions in which it was
paid were drawn, verbatim et literatim, according
to! the usual forms, is to me a matter of no im-
portance. If one of your family is perishing with
starvation,and your friend wilt purchase food for his
relief, you will not inquire into thie form in which
lie made tie payment. It will be sufficient for
you to know that the benefit was received. So in
this case, it is sufficient for me to know that the
money was-advanced; that it was expended in
the public service, and that the country re-
ceived its value. Deeds of patriotism like this
merit a public acknowledgment, rather than
a dull, protracted, reluctant compliance with
the imperative demand of justice. We should
faithfully and promptly refund the last cent ad-
vanced in such a case. We should do it, because
it is the dictate ofjustice-because honor requires
it-because the character of this House and of
the whole nation demands it. We should do it,
to show to the world that the impulse of pratriot-
ism is not despised by a Republic; and to inspire
in our citizens a confidence, that voluntary sacri-
fices in the extremity ofdanger, shall be cheerful-
ly and promptly remunerated.
The amendment proposed to the bill is merely
to explain a former law of a similar character. It
proposes to pay for the services of the volunteer
militia who were called into service by the com-
manding General in the first moments of the Semi-
nole war. The sudden rupture of the savages
was like an unanticipated flame breaking out in
the midst of a city, which requires the immediate
exertions of the firemen to subdue. A little de-
lay would involve tthe whole town in irrecover-
able ruin. So thie ravages of the Indians, if per-
mitted to pursue thie work of devastation till de-
spatches would be sent to the seat of Government,
and an order issued from the Executive for call-
ing out hae militia, would have completed the
work of'destruction through the whole of the
country where it raged. The commanding Gene-
ral, as in duty bound, called for militia aid to check
the ravages of this desolating war, and the patriotic
citizens volunteered their ser-vices. They were
gladly accepted. These are the citizen soldiers,
who have been braving the dangers and enduring
the storm of that sanguinary conflict, whose set-
vices have been recognized by the Government,
that the amendment proposes to pay. They made
the first sacrifice in their country's defence; met
the danger at the threshold, and voluntarily pour-
ed out their blood upon the altar of their suffering
country. We intended to provide for their pay,
anrd thought we had done so by a law already pass-
ed; but in the multiplicity of business, there was an
accidental omission in the framing of the law to
meet their case. The amendment proposed is
only to give such an extent-to the application of
that law as to embrace thie case of these men, and
so carry into effect our declared intention. Upon
this bill and this amendment, subjects'as plainly
just, aird as clear to the understanding as the
simplest proposition that could be stated, we
are consuming the day, and wasting the precious
time of the House in animadversions that have
no direct bearing upon the subject. Is this the
proper theme for introducing fastidious complaints
and party denunciations against the administration
of the Government? (" are there no questions
tlrat can arise, even upon the common measure of
justice between citizens and their Government,
but what must be converted into party strifes?
Among other complaints, imputations have been
made against those who are conducting thie war
in Florida, as if our regular officers, whose busi-
ness ani whose duty it is to obey the orders of
any executive, were political partisans. These
censnres are, at least, premature. The officers
of the regular' army are in command there; men
who, on former occasions, have given incoirtesti-
ble proof of their valor, their devotion to the
country, and their capacity to conduct military op-
erations. 'rhrnugh at tins distance it would appeal'
that mere ougit ts have been done, yet we are not
acquainted wi h all the difficulties which they
may have rlad to encounter. Tire character
which they Ilirve established ought to be regarded
as a; pledge for their good conduct in the present
trial, and should at least shield them from censure
till all the facts are known; and if it shall then ap-
peat' that they have not done the best that could
be done, of wsrieh we have as yet io evidence, it
will not establish any chrarg.. against the volunteers
whio have obeyed the laws otthe country by plac-


ing themselves under their command. 'l'he regu-
lar army is otherwise provided for; this bill and
its ameinldment have reference only to the volun-
teer militia. Look at their character, andwe can-
not doubt their bravery nor their patriotism. The
southern volunteers have ever sustained the high
character ot'American soldiers. Their deep sense
of honor; their disregard of danger; their noble-
ness of soul in the camp; and theirclhivalry in the
field, are but their common characteristics; and
after volunteering their services to meet the first
shock of defensive war, we cannot presume that
they would prove recreant to every tring dear to
themselves. We know they ar:e incapable of it.
Theyhave unfluiled their country's banner, and
have marched under it to iedlendit from insult;
and thIe result imust show that they will have sus-
tainLed i is honor'. It is our part to provide tihe
means; to pAy threI tlhe pittance to which their
services entitled them, and they will 'not be spar-
ing of their blo(d in tihe day of battle. Let us
plass the bill, with the proposed amendment, with-
out a moment's 1h Ila ; and it will be time enough
tor uIs to complain after wo learn that there is cause
lor complaint. Till evidence appears to the con-
trary, let us not indulge a suspicion that an officer
bearing a commission in the A"-crican service, whe-
ther regular or militia, is ideficilmt either inl courage
or' condiuct. Complaints, in adivaicnre of evidence,
are Al i ii '.onrb' Ile t(o ur country and to the
'celinigs four gallant oflici rs almind soldiers. Lett us
disclharge tihe debt of justice, and withhold our
censures till a knowledge of fliacts shall warrant
theum.
SMuch stress appears to be laid upon the fact,
.hat for this amendment, whiiclh provide for the
payment of the volunteers, no communtoation
ia4 been imsade tjlh House by th0 SeQrlta7r of














r, recommendlng the
ject has not been speci
tee by the H-ouse. It a
thingg with some gent
all confidence from th
of War, so as to be in
most'simple proposition
nation. I would remi
-d amendment is found
from the War Departme
.n the pay have faithful
-presented; and that n
Ih they can receive t
re is the independence
', if they cannot act u
, in matters of plain
are before us, must w
direction of an Executi
gislation, and bear th
-ures? Our constitution
h iat of an Executive
When all the facts
nust act upon our own
or wron,g, we tust be
her recommended or n
e us, there is no imp
; plain proposition, fo
-t; and the House must
ust, in the case, do j
.nds of justice; and e
his own resp
s wise, on ordinary oc
-ns to committees, th
ich they grow, and th
)re thoroughly inves:a
of committees are a
c, and it is the right
amendments to means
a by committees. Th
led; and to be depriive
fetter legislation with
be
!pendence in legislati
)fthe sovereign people
ice to the preservation
House that their voice
than in any other b
Its value cannot be o
r too carefully prese
to justice should char
It is a convention of
he purity, tlte intell
ice of this House, mo
nent of Government, th
.e last hope of man,
always with reluctance
:e of the House; but i
mmittee, from whom
have been compelled


'NTY-FOURT
FIRST S

IN SE
WEDINESDAY, June 1,
towing messages, in writing
ol the United Slates by M
WASHINGTON, Ju1
mate
lit herewith to the Sena
-eceived froni Mr. B. F. U
n hins by the President,
consequence of tie serious
tiast ihim by one of the h
t seems to be due to just
.ed, agreeably to the requeo
ns contained in this, commn
vemed so Ihr satisfactory
in the public service, or e
proper. AND
WASHISGTON, May
-'ate: b
-ta
.it herewith the responses
s affecting his official con
artih in the evidence take
by the Committee on Publi
the President by thle resol
:e 3d of March, 1835. This
afers ito, were officially
-retary of the Treasury, a
icon received through the sa
ANDREW
-ages having been read-
'TON observed, that with r
S the answer of Mr. Givin
1 on that floor, he should, a
move that it be printed.
to be made which involved
t,and which lie thought,
underr which tielthey were carr
e instructions t o the Com
Positions, were partly to thi
Benton read from the doct
expected that you are to g
d place-of taking doepositi
itheras principal or counso
-mance of your duty; but
ny officer who resides at
-y depositions in which
er, is left to you
lotions went on to say t
oper to have counsel, the
be allowed him.
., inquired .wio these lstI(ri `
'ON answered that they
Chairman of the Committe
I that these proceedings
country or in that of Great
ver would occur again.
vith the manner i n which t
on-depositions to be take
in opportunity of being hear
I against him, &c., had
Purpose of defending hisl
e against him; and all th
ence might be printed, ans
as the accusations against
Said he would be glad to
e act of a committee of
was signed to them. The
-very thing like justice
ON, in answer, read these r
the Committee on Public
nations in relation to al
ends, and the resolution a
,mmittee to continue the i
nate. It seemed therefore
n the Land Coinmmittee, a
srge Poindextr
1UN said that hlie knew no
made against Mr. Gwin; b
ir course would be to r
tee on Public Lands. If
he charges made against
so the fact would app
Thle best way of doing j
sjlct the whole matter to
I
of Ohio hoped that the r
publicc Lands would no
in had been made twao ye
ser of the Committee on
there were very few
Senate. If tise referen
he effect would be to r
against Mr. Gwin, together
i was also opposed to th
my committee of that body
United States. It seeite
judicial impeachments
me people of this country
tey'had snen enmtgh of the
body. The whole tisi
;an wrong, it went on
late ha-i got itself into
rwarda, or bacekwardst
becoming thing they c
flir, anis print the p
c the same direction th
It wouli sound strange
tiled Stater, that the Se
3ur, which set itself u
tarry, should issue a eo
and conduct of ais indiv
sioner to give any inform
ice of liking depositions
n to interfere with the
ighit, at his option, giv
er implicateth, who mi
'e. Sir, said Mr. B.,
sing to end, and they
11 tliat was asked by Mr
tat hiln had beet print
nsents, his- answer s
-ecord.
)bin war- notdisposed mo
was citrman of the C
these investigatians-we
lie could answer fo
e public lands, it aes r
snter ints investigati
-r remedy; it was right
without investigati
thIer there invaesiga
ie. The gentleman w


amn that i matter; but h
aty great anxiety to ge
tion was a very proper
existing, thie Senate co
it. It was not his pur
igations were eonducte
u object to the reference
passed over. It could
a present evil, but t
)eits done.
a
banta observed thatl
I not but express his reg
lid have been made t
i do 'the greatest inj
this Government. IHe s
'as an act of great in
tiIe committee to enter
mndtl official coadutet of a
I, and unable to def h
nity of ', .. .. : I. -. .
ie tIsti-.....i
cd thle reeouliona givii
cr io send for person
r ex iiiintations till to
presented that they we
rctqujstud that tile ex
irnii. The chairman l
oni the table, and to his
solion was tis staincdstt
:resolution.]w.
laid o the table and
llt day, when these t
lpost.l to amend it b
t, to guard this riglits
-ward atd defend them
teaching their charac
WIIIGIIT'S amend
the amendment propo
)owter il theehairnani
*is. awitiout giving n
Sinpuired into, anid v
,tonislhing as itwast
tuken by the yeasan
e yeas and nays fro
miclse power given t
a country to malo ke
Sincur any expenses
I evidence this ses
I been carried,) ref
red. This having b
'he part of thie Senat
:11 an1 opporunit7"OFd


fence placed by the side of the
it favor of Mr. Gwm ciculate
him, and then only can any t
As to any action by the commit
from Ohio, (Mr. Ewing) that i
therefore a reference
Mr. PORTER was one.of those
tions, and tle responsibility ith
was perfectly willing to justify
formed no incorrect conclusions
conduct was not oppressive and
tave taken no other coursese tht
ibating the object i n view. M
frauds were carriol on ila the
an inquiry was, therefore a
was the nature of the inquiry
of any particular officer of ti
was directed to be general as to
sentations were made now
ted inh any one branch of
Senator from Alabama refu
because a particular officer
plicated and the Senate be ca
not condition in the governments of
this to institute inquiries into
ascertilt .min i-' li 'adi '-cov
heard of I. i i i..i : .,i.
cause tiauds were alleged agas
that tile resolution was extraor
was allowed time individuals wh
themselves )y a cross-examina
there a charge tsai!;st any indu
a general out, aud would it 'the
every idivihdual, who might ile
come olurward to disprove whai t
It would be very extraordinary
nmhought necessary to aill who i
in the inquiry. Mr. P. here re
tions of the committee, comumeti
and jnstiying thenm as proper
The moilion f the Senator fro
[been referred to by the Senator
tile ground that the resolution
no person believing that any jud
was purely intended as a foundati
It was to proceed like a grand
was averred ill ee timne that thi
injury' of no person whatever, be
would be gone into without giv
led to oleter evidence in his de
tried, it was on all handsdeteri
to comenI forward and exculpate
tion would Ibe had. Mr. P. tho
no grounds for finding fault wit
Thie investigation was a general
it would have defeated its objec
depositions thliat were to be tak
placing these papers on tile flee
had any evidence, h hi had rather
but lie thought thle-lwhole matter
atuinationa of
Mr. CALHOUN very much regr
the Committeeon Public Lands
of this paper. His object was t
to Mr. Gwin, to Mr. Poindexter
not agree that the Senate had n
conduct of public officers when
ed against them, as he had hear
frauds had been alleged again
charges was that he had anmass
ry short time. This, alone, av
ivestigationa was ordered.
and the committee reported th
he examination before its close
resolution, that he should be au
aminations in the recess. This
purpose to inquire whether these
properly or nuot. One thin ag wa
was thie'innoecece of Mr. Gwiun,
ler. Now something was due to
tion by a committee iwas necessa
sion that Mr. Poindexter was c
had taken an accusatory course
would ask, was that gentleman ce
he notified that he was to take
positions were to be taken to im
parte examination If it was s
Senate to clothe Mr. Poindexter
ers, hie would ask, were they p
thing done by the Executive, wh
somebody else, the power to exa
Poindexter?
Now they were called on to vot
of these papers, of which they
if implicatung Mr. Poindexter andt
for granted, that the inquiry into
public lands, was a proper one;
the power with which he was entrst
he Senate; and the fact whether
best ascertained by thle examinat
been told that there was nothing
NSow le thought otherwise. The
Government had been implicated
an abuse of office, and his del
Mr. Gwin was innocent, lie ought
'oted foir lite inquiry, his obj
Gwin and to tihe public, anu
erence, he lhad 'tle same
both towards Mr. Gwvin, and
number of that body required th
i'r. Poindlexter, it oughTt to be
new whatan arduous task a Senat
perform, and how liable the strict
uuject him to censure. No me
willing that his conduct should
without an examination; and lie
was due to themselves, as well as
erence. ,
Mr. SHEPLEY said, if the Senat
'orter) understands that these in
pon thle Public Lands were extend
ral character into alleged frauds
that they were designed fior the ls
tat they did not relate to individh
would lead us to suppose he is gre
Thie language of the resolution
chairman ofthe committee tle ioe
uiry during tile recess of Cong
dressed in general terms. But the
nian to proceed in the investigate
d during the session, and thus refer
y virtue ofwhich thie investiga
I find tIhose resolutions in the
ate to camoie to a correct underst
investigation, I will read aon extra
n the third resolution is found
"That the Committee be instru
Registers of the Land Offices an
eys atanyofthe land office .-I"
them, haeve-i-,im--ioulr-uimn '
andeed or accepted a bonus .or
r purchasers of the public lands
he benefit of such officer or office
And the following language is
on:
"And whether any Register or Re
en in payment thie promissory n
lasers, bearingan interest, to aceo
sister or Receiver."
Sir, it is very difficult for me
uage can be said not to authorize
uct and characters of individual
Senlighten us in regard to our le
sem to be necessary to inquiry e w
ad violated the law and his office
What were the facts, it might be
s to legislate; but whether the m
on of htlaw and of official duty, w
gi individual character; and it
r merse purposes of legislation,
It was well understood, at the t
evolve individual character; an
arolina (Mr. Calhoun) has rem
barged by thle chairman of the
ith a gro a vioation of official
Such was the language of the re
ircumnstatices in whichli it was p-
estigation.
I llthen thought, as I now think
plicated; due to .the character
o itruh and justice, that the inv
in secret, so that the accused
empt to destroy his character;
iril to know the persons who woua
ss to cross-examine them, or to
ebutiing testimony. "
Feeling that the first principles
i such a proceeding, I offered an
dtion. It is thus stated on the Jo
" On motion of Sir. Shepley, to
ig out all after the word comm
power to cause testimony to be
onductis supjiesed to tave take
oresaid; and in case any person
3 notified, and be entitled to in
an of himself; and to cross-exam
against
This proposed amendment was r
eas and nays,
And thus dlid the Senate delibera
in directly impeaching individ
me refuse to the individual ait o
A proceeding thus commenced
euend only as it h
Commencing thsts before a eo
nvesiigatton was continued du
ie resolution before referred to
ads by the then minority to ob
n opportunity to he heard, and
oier tWo years have elapsed, that
sprove the charges made agaitt
!ked to refuse to print this tes
pn onur records with that whic
mI phtced on record against hi
oger contUnue to act a part so
e printed with our documents
forded in judge of the t
Mr. MANGUM said he voted for
-e amendments; and in doing s
as not only proper, but ahsolu
imstances thetn presented to
iat in 1834, the entire southern
f frauds that had bern eummutns
ue public lands in tlie southtes
e first rameminss tile Senate, he
otis. There was a general impr
een practised, and uuderstch c r
tas ordered. What uhtn did t
as not to inqnire whether A B
suire whether abuses existed its t
applying a legislative remedy
ior, luat in this State of Mtisis
- ilreathe a wvisjaper its relasioa
souul not give their deposit


ere to De present. It wias undet
as willing, at this incipient st
oimnitte. s -How could such in
uall' The President would not
x parl/e testimony. But it was
individual would be affected. Was
he Senate would adopt a report wit
a opportunity of selefnding himself
Ile did not concur in thi dotr
.-t tq enter into'inquirios into th
. h. Government. Ile held it t
orruption wherever it wassuppo t
ay, that he did not approve of t
) the commissioners, as to tlue
ons, and lie was for that reason l
i.- -l ro i -.:,. ..f'ir. Gwin. A
!. .,h.. i. i ,.,t that it ass le
.ah. d lhe Senate with virus i
r.. m..i under which the deposit
'y irregular, hlie was willing to
y .,,: oI ..I, by voting for
'I ,' m observed tha
sew ofthe subject to take a br
'hey all recollected the charge
hr. Gwin; and although his n
tn, yet all knew h at the lnquilry
uid directed against him. He ha
ut itself in a italse position Ar
ind lie would take it upon him
Ike what Seunators now said, to t
with what they had done. They
tent was incipient; that it was l
re, tlIoen, was art inquiry institute
government; and it was said tlha
irv, was not bound to give noti
was to hbe inquired into. Every g
course ofthe Senate, must put i
nations being thus conducted, eom onersw
lunrged with stlking testimony
expected tiat they should give no
itt place of their lak:ng deposit
observe, that the Ihnec eommissio
mny against IMr. Gwin, were in
uith him, mnus leat one of them s
'len what was ile t tesiutony tha
cnael? Why, it was impeachalie
ialveroations in ohice, end filled
Vhat, then dill this S-sate do,
o them this impeachable mail
Vhy, the very next step of the S
n a false noslton, ound that t
irgcild hagt g o00O1 o %pls oI f i


against this officer of tie Go
VWhat was tile next step? Was
peacheincti IWheoy did they notl
step. There was nothing tliat tu
documents before their but impea
Senator, thit upon such testimo
it, hlie should, an an imnpeachiuntie
him from office. WIlhy did they
able matter enough on Itaudl. I
cause they found tllhat they conul
ti lt themselves. Whatdid they
Did itey fraine an exparte iimp
against tlie President ofthe Uni
ordered 5,000 copies to be pr:nte
ite whole affair to ilie Presideni
the accused from o office. Whiy
matterto the President? What
copy of the report to every off
sumed, was the President's course
oftlteseimplicatied officers lead re
against him, and this answer was
strange conditionthe Senate
an impeachinent, collected an
ter, and thel sent it to the Pre
the officer impeached, who wasn
trial wvas going on; and the ans
back to them. Since thle mov
criminal charges that had bee
shuffled off, antd which were no
no objection to that course, bh
committee would act on them-i-
in resolution to send thie pap
tives, for the purpose ofhavina i
said Mlr. B., the Senate hIas- got-it
the same position it was in whenis
President. It could niot go on wi
thle inmpeachmnent? He appre
thought, would lay a resolution
Samuel Gwin was guilty, a
The debate omn the expunging
widely for gentlemen to vent
from Ohio had said that lie wou
into frauds bfor the purpose o
Why then did not the gentleman
ble matter swoain to, and let th
He wohul tell tihe gentleman th
ifit went on much farther with
ings. The matter had gone fa
went farther without the House
violate the
Mr. EWING of Ohio replied t
contended that tile resolutions of
conducting the inquiry, were p
objeetin view. HSe dicfnoti heiio
been obtained if notice lind bee
taking the depositions; andh ins
were made by tle Post Office
chairman to inform, the Senates
hc.ri...i i. his opinen, corr
,.... they had notified i !
time and place of laing dpo
Mr. GRUNDY being thus calle
Post Office Coammittee were about
tions, they came to the determine
best course would be to take des
ties implicated notice ofthetivs
was done in every case; but wh
was concluded, eits, as tlihe hair
each individual implicatedo, of
and called upon hime
He did not believe that correct
matters beforethe Post Office C
tainedh by Iny oth
br. SOIUTIHARD proceeded to t
which induced the Senate to ins
Early in thie session of 1834,
torms were nmasIo in regard tro
c:etlcd by the Choceaws, and t in r
itiissioners under that cession
as to extensive frauds that ha
Mississippi but in odter State
but against the general admin
The question then before the S
,o arrest these frauds and make
purpose of ascertaining how tIet
his inquiry. He had no refer
other single individual. His
whether such-frauds had been
be prevented by the legislate
;ave were governed by these cose
any thing improper had been de
it did not prove that it ought n
ry step in that inquiry was dir
ind every other step was accid
rent proceedings on the subj
The inquiries were general, in
tion was necessary, and the Sen
he Journals, thatan act was re
discussion of this morning. Supp
tigationthey should find that a
ie sale of a tract of hland; wot
introduce a resolution providing
o prevent such acts for the fu
lie officer who was guilty, for
tile purpose of framing a law
rauds in future. The Senate o
hole proceedings, iliat legislae
contemplated irom
By a resolution introduced
-as pursued through the Trea
he answers from these Depait tm
3th of June. Os thle 2d of .
solution authorizin tlhie chai
actions already cominienced. No
le Senate! Tle Seeretaries o
heir communications, and thme
heicy could not conclude their i
aquiry was, should they stop
hat stupendous frauds had been
esy the fact now; and ho for
vestigations should proceed. Ani
ible hor the committee to go to
examinations were to be sindi
hichican, &c. he liad no dificut
ion, thai it would be propelrt t
fi the business to their chairman
lie inquiry in no oilier mode.
ist of thlie chairman, but lie tho
o him, as wellR as to others. Well
these investigations by deposit
strong for the Post Offi e Commtet
Vout not be justly taken in anot
rror in ithe chairsinticde of tllie w
o answer for it. If blood had
use manner of conducting these
hargeable; they dlid not direct
tade in an im proper manner.
inquires should be
He would not defbnd the instructim r
lit-C :in i" I .- 0- 11' [1 t-1-il .. .
o give notices to the parties impli
er testimony, such proceeding
ioners,into a crimina l court fot
) make the inquiry a criminal p
ir legislative proceedings. T'v
e voted. Thie result was, tliat at
chairman, i Mr. Poindexter, mad
solution, lithat thie charges be re
united States. Where tien waste
against thie judicial --.... -..1 .
ended tosay hElictn 11 I,. ..
position. Mr. S. proceeded at len
his course on tllie p art of tie
'hole aflhir wis ended bly pri
trence so tIe IPresident; but t
he subject; the reference to th
mental. But on the verydlay ltehi
me very view of fulfilling stie
was made, being a bill of'six pag t
mission of" these frauds. Was i
was fruitless, and lhat it ended
ie President? No, the result
found in the bill that had be en
ihe labors of the Committee on
se of this very information, a
ihem a lill which would sho
eCn. Where, then, was thlie e
laced itself in
Mr. CALHOUN agreed partly -
arolina, but was clearly of opini
e after the report
Not single Senatorm had read t
Senator knew whether it exculp
whether it implicated the conduo
ark they were asked to print th
la to se justice to all parties,
S others, tile proper course wasos
ie objecting sending thin docum.e
ler member of that body, who
us duties, been implicated, ev
ce required that tdey shlouhl b
ending then abroad to the wo
ein, lhat this body is not to l
had been avowed hter for the
cowed in the British Parliamn'est
re, nor had it been advanced i
tchl a doctrine would aurrende
tt (if te
Mr. CALHOUN continued his rer
:igtlh; af
Mr. W ITEs anSir. WAL
rigny in fsve
The diesate was fumlher cn
,ANGUM, PRESTON, POil
110OWN;
On motion by Mir. POiRTER to
hsle, is was dechled ill ite ne
YEAS-M'es~srs. Bhtek, Calhioun
oldoborough, Kent, King, Lei
restou,SouihardToml
NAYS--lsessrs. Benton, iBraw
ng of Illinois, Grundy, Hendlic
eorrio, Nichhlts, Nitcs, Rive
'altmadge, Walker, W
On motionof
The Senate tl

'HOUfE QF REP
TpoaoeAV, J
Mr. MILLER asked the consemite
insider thie resolution ou thes
me since irom tlle Comnittee on
portion ol'Saurday next fur thi
out the committees on Rovoalu
Objection being made, Mr. MIL
le rnle; lost.
Mr. PATTON asked leavn so aflr
'rinay assd Saturtdtuy vest t 1 t
ills on thus Territories with Cl
ur lin admisi ; .-...rl;. i, I
Oljection .. -.._. "i. .i.. tu
sle: wtiri


Mr. TALIAFERRO, fromu thie Cot
bill for tile relief of Captain Joh
mited,
Mr. JARVIS, from the Cmminiiue
ie following resolution:
Resolved-, That thus Secretary
certain as far as praclicable, and'.
hefirstweek ftohenoxtsession, 1.
ig a navy yard at or nesr Great e '
1 East river which connects
York bay; tihe comparative advanags
hat site nd the site ofrthe navyyard
island, for the purposes of a na
ie works recommended by Col. l(0
irding to the lpla n presented b
dry dock at creif llis above p- i
basing the necessary ri utntity l
f'equal conveniennce with th
tates at tlie Wallabout; and th
...~ l 1.... ,,_ .

nder uthe rule, lies over one (la
Mr. GALIIRAITH, from Ihi C
lai m .. ..- i ill, d i h r dth
and lll
M h M iii"t. i "', .from I
ins, reported illil I fior lie r
lad twice and com id,
Mr, R. .. JOIHNSON ihen asked
n move to go into Cornmitlee of t
nly, on the bill o provide ifor
onal paymaste
Objection being ma nude, Mr. J
lie, which was lost.
Mr. McKAY moved to set apar
'clock, for thli s u
Mr. SPEIGIIT-rose to ask ilheus
establish ia marine hospital at
eorth Carolina. He would, with
ate that Ihis was not only of
whence hse came, but to the who
lie northern mtatc.s. (Olwig toil
tr.vailed in tliat section, andth
ion, vessels were not unfrequen
'as in the sickly season; and f i
great many seamen died, ino sta
1 tilhe Uniled Statesa wheree a ho
mis p
Thie motion was objected to; a
end the rules for th
On motion o
The Commleile of tho Wholeo w
her Co0slderttltlet of tlA bill ji


. Portland canal; and thle same
- lie Whole on the s
r Oil motion
c The Joint Committiee oitn ite h
a the memorial and p
i Unfavorable reports Nwere a
SConuittiuse on Naval AiThairs;
*- Commit e on Military Ahiti
;ind AIUHLENGEIRG, fr-ni the
- Claims; by Mr. MORGAN, f-r
s :ionary Pensions; and by Air.
itun Invalid
S Petitions and memorials wer l
i Meseri. PEARCE of Rhode Ia
s shire, SLOANE, BOND,
e (Mr. PEARCE, of Rhode Island,
a a memorial which he had been
Three or four weeks; a memorio
e signed by David Mellville, of
s plaining that hie had been unc
Office by the Collector of th
Smay be passed r-estrainiEng
Said a similar memorial had
branch, and there referred t
9 that he supposed this would
t here. Leave was granted to pr
Referred to the Com
([Mr. PitNCsNEY presented t
Werner, praying to he refund
Treasury hy mistake; which w
on Com
[Mr. PATTERnSO presented the
Richland county and State of O
awhielh was referred to thlie Co
On motion o
resolvedd, That the Committe
structed to inquire into the e
to Charles Young, a so
On motion of
Resolved, That the Committe
be instructedI to inquire into t
sion to Samuel Pettengill, oft
vices rendered itn the
On motion of
Resolved, That the Committe
be instructed to inquire into t
sion to 'Simeon Mloss, of the S
rendered during the war of tb
On motion of
Resolved, That thie Committe
inquire into the expediency of
son, of Jackson county, Alabam
pens
On motion of
Resol-ed, That the minemoral
of the Franklin College, Ohio
said institution, be referred to
with instructions to inquire in
said College a township of lan
any of the public lands
'On motion of Mr, CONNOIR,,
the orders
POST OFFICE
The "bill to change the organic
dartment, and to provide more e
thle accounts thereoff" waso tako
final p
Mr. JOIINSON of Louisianaa moe
the Committee of the Whole on t
structions to strike out the sec
thi postmasters of thie privile
pisgeon
Mr. CONNOR suggested that it
pass and go to the Senate, where
stricken out, or some other pro
ble compensation tiherefor, or s
ofpostmastersoi
After'seome remarks from M
CAMBRELENG, LAWRENCE,
and
Mr. JOHINSON modified his mo
mittee, either to strike out the p
vide for the increase of the sale
ties and large towns o
The motion was discumsed bv
PEARCE, of Rhode IslandC, a
NELL
Mr. EVERETT called for a div
on the minotion to recommit,
str
Mr. REED moved. to amend th
after the word "instructions,"
operation of the said 43d and
effect, until the 4t
After some further remarks
WOOD, WISE, LANE, a
Mr. SPEIGHT demanded thipre
seconded by th lie Hou
The -main question was then
was p
TheI "bill to establish certain
discontinue others, and for oth
read a third tim and passed
INDIAN ANN
MIr. CAMBRELENG remarked th
was properly the first in order
"Indian annuities," returned f
portant amendments, which h w
other, andhi wle he ho
Mr. EVERETT hoped the bill
morrow, inasmuch as it would b
cessary documents had not all co
of lthe Semui e
IMr. CAMBRELENG would mere
sent to the Senatle two months
upon until tlie War Department
act upon it. If; however, a dis
the origin of thie Seminole ware
the better. The people of Ge
were sutlring for want of the p
therefore, that thie House resolve
VWholeo on the state of the Unio
Thie House accordingly went i
Mr. SMITH in the chair, and proei
thie amendments of the Senate
lions for the current expenses of
dan alnniities, ant for othel- si
T'ie following amendments o
without a
1st. For thie payment ofa clrer
.tendent of Indian Affairs forth
2d. "Ftr thie payment of inte
tie Cherokees by the treaty of
whiiclawas not paid till thie
shahl bbe paid in the sani manie
to thei Cherohbes east and west o
.1 i,~- Li.- r- t tr
J sIt 'Florlihl hidians shaltpidh
engaged in hostilities ags
in sir.b change of citciimsan
of tihe United States to di-
The fourth ntmedelint citlef hl
itnm fior locating reservations
I,.. ,. -,, ti. ." Creekof
Mr. BELL, Ifronimll thee Commistten
disagree to this amendment, an
inatinu in relh
After snimc remarks from
IIAYNES, TOWNS, CAMIRLlt
LEWIS
Mr. LIVIS moved an amendme
useut aulttioriZng lthie PresidentO
additional agents for certifying a
shall dtee necessary.
The amendment was discuss
KAY, AShLEY, GLASCOCK
TOWNES, and OWENS.
At lue suggestion of Mr. BELL
ed over for their present, and thCt
sideration of the oilier amends
ctrre
On motion of Mr BELL, the
prog
Tie SPEAKER havines
On motion ofMr. BELL, the bi
ofthe day from the hour
Sundry documents from the
ject, of Indian hostilities
The House then adjourned a

E GENE ARAM.-Euge
the 6th volume of Har
of Bulwver's works,
KENNEDY &
June 3

SUPERIOR ENGRA
has tis day opened a
imported from France a
bet-, but of the finest fini
Scrap Prints, plaii and
the I'assious, very large
cal Engravings; Figur
Groups; Historical Engr
-ized; splendid French L
zotint amid Line Engravi
Ishe above but a single co
immediate application is
WVaverley Circulating Lib
Gistsby's Hotel.

gQ7 SALE 0? GOO
BY postponement, in c
iuvorahle state of t
at the residence of Mr
street, third above E.,
morning, 3d June, 10 o
was purchased only el.g
been well kept, aiad co
Ingi'its Carpets, and
M .hi..-yrnv Sideboard,
and Centre Tables; fin
Chair; Astral and Manta
sticks, Looking Glasses,
na, Brittania Wggp, Kn
Crockery, 'ancy Parlor


Ctsrtains, Cut Hall Lam
tlipr leds, Mattress, Bur
Sheets, &c,, Kitchen Uten
Also, a first rat
Ter ms at sale.
Jutc 2

BY P. MAU
Genteelanild Vcll kept Fu
at au
"NN Monday, 6th June,
y 10 o'clock, A. M., re
Thom"pson, Pennsylvani
and 19th streets, his ent
part, a first rate Piano
as desire a superior ins
notice; two large Dinins
India China, two hund
Breakfast, and Tea Sets;
Cut Glass; Plated Caste
&c. Silver Spoons, Ladle
&c. Mantel Time Pelce; Din
Tables Asttral and L Ma
other Window Curtains;
sage and Stair Carpets; Br
Hair Seat Sofa, Fancy
Curtains, Feather Beds,
Bureaus, Looking Glasses,
tar; one do. Violin; super
or coal; and tn unusual
and Table Linens of the v
Terms at sale. a'lie fu
excellent condition.
P. MAUR
June 2--3t

N EW NOVEL.-Harry Ca
j' thor of Cecil Hyde,
day received by K
May 7 I Ipn tAth


E GL 0 11



FRIDAY MORNING

APPOINTMENT BY
By and with the advice a
HESnOT S. FooTx, to b
Public Lands sou

THE BRIBERY BANK
MENT
It is a most remarkable
opposition in the Senate
the public the seven mill
Bank of the United State
plus in the Treasury, the
a dollar of it can rea
White, Mr. Calhoun, Mr.
are ever and anon pointing
bankstock, as a fund for
Webster, as chairman o
nance, holds back for mo
the Senate, the bills pa
presentatives to provide
version by Biddle of th
to the purposes of the
ing the obligations on
vernment under the old
notes of the Bank of the
standing it is known tha
notes of the old bank,
State Bank, has been
weeks in the Senate.
of an agent, clothed w
the concern which the
old bank, cannot be
his proxies, has appoin
these banks-has himself,
of bolh; and he is making
the old concern to the n
The great banking hou
been sold; and the bri
is already in possession.
Union, with regard to t
real property acquired
As Biddle said of the circ
the property of the old
heritance" of the bribe
ernment can get no age
bring its partnership wi
ing upon its interests, t
inquires how this is, W
chairman of the Committ
ster, who, while he stand
take care of the national
Mr. Biddle's attorney-a
tainer or the other, reta
necessary bills passed on
branch for an inordinate
in the House, and gives
subordinat

In another column, we
signed by the Hon. Wad
fusal to vote on Mr.
His reasons will not be
lic. When the resolute
he voted for it, but h
again, because "he saw
Piickney as authority in
If the resolution was righ
son could vote for it "be
he assented to it," wa
it, because Mr. Pinck
Mr. Thompson's vote,
assent to it? This i
why the constitution
shall vote on the yea
-the country- may kniv wtr
propositions when they a
tives of the people. And
Mr. Thompson for stric
stitution violate it in
meant to secure the resp
sentatives, merely because
ney the opportunity of
vote in favor of a prop
son still admi
But Mr. Thompson fourth
that Congress lihad no
slavery in the States, lie
jurisdiction of Congres
seems to be a strange i
declares by a resolution
with a certain subject
this is taking jurisdiction
on the contrary, it is an
taking jurisdiction of i
such right to exist in
did deny it, Mr. Adams
against the resolution, wh
son, the great body of
The question was not on t
the States. It was wh
risdiction over the sub
interfere with it in the
was a flat and plump den
jurisdiction over it in
yet Mr. Thompson could
has no jurisdiction over
such a vote lie would rec
jurisdiction
How is it, whens a ple
jurisdiction of a court
that is not entitled to
ing juri
Duff Green once made
against Mr. Van Buren,
proof was demanded. Bu
was an admission. This i
Thom

GREAT CANAL FR
THE AT
We observe Ihat a grand
the State of New York, f
the great western lakes w
by a ship and steamboat
of large burden. The pl


vigation of the Oswego
Oneida lake, and extend
from the latter to thle
Utica; and from that poi
that river, or construct a
ley, to the tide waters
wego to Utica, about hal
lhas been surveyed, and is
ble facilities, being alre
nel two-thirds of the way
$l,200,000 to complete i
the.route is said to be fe
proportion
This is certainly a magn
with incalculable advant
nent, and worthy of the
terprise of the age. The
developing the resources
ly be lorescen; and thle
trade through those inla
miles into the heart of a f
sells that navigate the
give an impulse to the g
Union, which would not
as agriculture and comme
its en


We are requested to
Muat is not a candidate f
suing C


JUDGE WHI
Our neighbor Gales, who
the weather and the signs
a word about the ten days
tion of the sun, which i
He duly noted the partial
luminary, which occurred,
nac, and did no harm; bu
Stion of Judge White'
THE LEARNED SUN-wh
heavens with black" for
set the elements weeping
absolutely to submerge
flood of the Potomac,
no sign of truce by dis
our contemporary hlas
sternation to announce
Judge White's Sun will
can't get that, will he t
a glimpse of the ord

THE INB
We had thle pleasure ye
of Napoleon's spoliations
can eagles in our own
golden eagles will giv
chants thlat- the republic
nest.


THE

TEX
A letter received from
War Department, dated
the Texas news. It
Hitchcock, just from Gen
ters.
Extract of a letter from
Secretary o
HEADn QU.ARITEIIS, WESTE
"Camp Sabine,
S "TlThe reports from Te
letters of the 28th ult.
of the advance corps
Texas, with the capture
Anna, his staff and princi
dred men, and about t
hJave received daily con
beyond a

S 'This letter has not been re

LATEST FRO
S CAITAIsN HOOMASo E ho's
formation contained in a
the wlpalaehicola Gazette,
tains the latest-informati
situation of the brave fl
vtAxr at the Block Hous
and the death of tha
Colonel Wood arrived
s Tallahassee. We learn
* left Tallahassee, three in
t from Capt. Holloman's
coochee. It seems the
r Block House on the lth
Scott disbanded his force
t thought-and they hav
merely upon corn and w
given them very little re
in vast numbers. On one
tacked on all sides by no
Indians; Capt. Holloman's
with tremendous effect
Block House in such de
shot of the brave defend
This contest, which termi
t dians, they failed to sh
days. It was during this
Ioman undertook to stre
tween the Block House a
enrai;ed in this duty,
Indians; the balance oft
retreat to the house. T
sieged, ihat though the
folly ofendle.tvoring to
defences, yet that they
observed. After the d
the command of tlhe
Lieutenant ---, who
hazards, to maintain his
k --t s- d t_ -.o rv'f tlss Acit
late call for men from th
Executive of the Territ
orders to hasten his comp
patch. But on his arriva
unpleasant intelligence b
the river above, we und
to postpone his departure
forwarded to the Governo
exposed situation here
calling men abroad to fi
is absolutely required t
It is expected that those
this regiment, to serve
referred to, will
The reflections upon G
are unjust. He ordered
lacoochie, partly with a
xAN and his party. W
him, the public is not
it is well known, that t
cause the time of service
had expired, and they
for dis

Ho-son TO TEa BaoAvE.-
ing at St. Mary's, was es
Major Cooper's battalio
teers, was responded t
whole, after- a salute f-Io
partook of Capt. H.'s

ANOTHER DEMrocrtIrC
that at the election for
trict of Kensington, on M
friends ofVice ButExr at
electing twelve out of fi
by a 1 irge majority. Th
rule are numbered in the
and in despite of the tri
lature, democracy will o
cendancy there in Octob

Among the passengers in
at New York fiom Lond
Delancey, of Philadelphi
late Minister to the Cour
Brooks, Esq., the auto
and Dr. Valentine Mott

The Connecticut House o
rejectedthe bill authol-i
not less titan five, to or
into a joint stock company
than 10,000 dollars, nor
For the bill 94;

From the New York J
TWO DAYS LATE


Just as our evening edit
have received, by a spe
ship Carioll of Carrollt
2d, and Liverp
London Monry Mlarklet
ment of the Stock Exchan
the slightest change to
has characterized it
The market for railway
pared with the excitement
this inactivity is chief
speculations of minor imp
depreciation in the value
still of common tra
Liverpool Cotton Alirk
market on Saturday and
tive than for some days pa
4,500 bales, and on Satu-
alteration in prices since
cotton are incle

Froms the United
To TUiE EI
As Il hAd not al opportut
floor of Cotgress, the i
vote upon thle resolutions
ot the subject of slavery
my conduct have been gr
am forced against my wil
press. I will only prentmise th
an evil portent of the ti
oftithe people has no opp
expressing the reasons o
tion of deep importance t
to himself. I think I ma
priety, tliat my general
more particularly oi t
should protect me from
macy, or a desire to intet
House, or defy
Whcp Mir, ,Phnokneyr' op


sented, and as in one o
sition was asserted
the moment, having t ni
ought to vote for it
paraded by Mr, Pinckne
that resolution, alth
opposed to its introdu
to give stich authority
I could not vote again
cause as fatr as it went
not vote for it, beca
subject had been in t
jurisdiction, which j
much recognized by vo
for another. Once le
to the jurisdiction of
that one Congress ma
vlerse of a preceding
regarded the negation
slavery in the States
with the second resolute
power in this District;
the two objects as ins
the designs of the aboli
sulI
I could not for the
second, and for the add
solution only asserts t
terfere with slavery in
words in the instruct
be a violation of public
ever was pretondiA,
that committee, or by th
ing any guarantee to
purely a question of
every change of the op
that question a resoluti
ist might have voted, a
lieve, did vote. I hav
ck ssion in the resolut
from instructions given,
as possible for the rus
hand, as far as it went
slist I believe to be tr
fore vote against it. I t
in the most courteous
I could not vote for t
not ask to be excused,
r'ght to excuse, I should
of the House to force
quence its jurisdiction
the slightest objection
done not on my own apple
of mine. Yourfbe
W. THO

SOFF

DEPARTMENT
Washington, J
The following import
tors have been transmi
f by Mr. Aspinwall, Unite
LIGHT HOUSE ON
STuirNIY101y O~N

27th Apri
Notice is hereby given,
hibited in the light hou
on the Start Point, on th
the evening of Friday t
thenceforth continued eve
sun rise, for the ben
ThIe character of this l
an elevation of 204 feet a
Sat high water spring tide
ful revolving light, showing
ulated intervals of one
i thereto, a stationary light
the same light house, in
head.
PORTLAND H
Notice is also given tha
said 1st of July next, the
cease to be exhibited as a
then and thenceforth cont
tionary light, together wi
ing visible as fixed ligh
seaward as
By o
J. HE
Secre

CITY AFF

CANDI
For Mayor.-HEN
Aldei-nman,
.HS. W. GOL
Jldla-men,'
FREDERIC
Councilman.
Alderman, Third
DAVID S
Common Concil
JAMES
_.JOHN
Aldermnan,
CAREY
Councilmen.-
JAMES C
JAMES
.Alderman,
WM. R. MDDOX
Councilmen.-JO
WM. SP
WM. H
Councilmen,, W
JAMES M
MARMADU
J. L. H

T fHIS DAY PUBLIC
in the several State Co
tion of thie Federal Con
by the General Convent
1787. Together with the
Convention, Luther Mart
utes, Congressional Opiu
Virginia and Kentucky R
and other Illustrations
4 volumes. Collected
porary publications. Seco
rable additions. By J
lished under the sa
For sale by the edito
Ave
June 3
BY P. MAU
Two Private Libraries: Va
'hN Saturday'aftersoo
V4y opposite Brown's Ho
ries of Baron de Kruden
Kuhn, embracing valuable
ian, and Spanish Books;
an unusually valuable co
torical, classical, scienti
many of them extremely
amined and catalogues ha
commence at 4 o'clock,
to be closed same day. T
ary is invited.
A Auction
* :S,* In consequence o
state of the weather,
THOMPSON'S furniture i
6th inst.
V ALUA3LE LOTS
V Friday, Juno 10, at 5
sell, on the premises, th
fronting on 23d street


Avenue
Lot 1, containing 3,362
Lot 2, do 3,
Lot 20, do 1,
Terms ofsale-Cash; an
are not.complied with wit
sale, they will be resold
of tlhe former purc
The titles to the ab
EDWARD DYER,
June

A PAIR of handsome Colo
sale by K
June 2
"t AUMER'S ENGLAND
S being a series of Lett
in Germany, during a r
Excursions into the Prov
RtIAUiE: translated fro
AvsrTIs and H-. E. LLO-
for sale by KEN
In the Athenim
Jun
NOT
HE sale of Negro
was to have been sol
other expenses, on 271h
until Monday thIe 6th of
A.
For A. IIUNT
May 30 RO
SPAIN REVISITED), [y
inuSpith; ju-t public
KiFNNEDY
Mb uy 7 In $












EAP GLOBES.
I GLOBES, moouinted orn mamhog-
-ngraavetd, coloredd, and variished a
fl' the art, with 3 zcdiac, brass their l
a, &c. &c., (in every way a first cin'.ly
Si3 50. Establ
or sale by fictre
F. TAYLOR, sparedI
ey Circulating Library, immedi- and all
bvy's hotel, and on
Manufr

iN'S NARRATIVE. alls,
VE of the shipwreck, captivity, stantlyI
ngs of Horace Holden and Benja- order
o were cast away.in the Ameri- latest
on the Pelew islands, in the year Also
I years afterwards were subjected for- sal
"tha inhabitants of Lord North's Dockt
)lId..n, a few copies; price 50 cents 1r. &C
On sale by
PI. THOMPSON.
-.' "r :tC. ANODYNE,
!e rnd .igue; the only sure remedy sics, n
d, bv, an 0 xternal application. follow
..br is happy in having discovered 1, A
nd sovereign cure for this painful Adven
Electric Anodyne, as a cure for 13, Thm
was discovered by rme about six ton; 16
has been in successful, but gratui- teis;
immediate neighborhood and vi- 21, Mi
rt period.4. feel warranted in say- 23, Ori
hundred persons have applied to mentsc
anil been efiectually cured; and land; 2
experience v<-ry few pcso.lOI have Assista
it an effectual remedy; nmid none'; Scriptu
Ce, ,when the directions for using it tionso
np.didwith. Thesubscriber claims Comm
le1tAlg art generally, that shall com- Young
exercised by the Faculty; but I-do land; '
fortunate man, to whom coincidence sonar,
s has developed the surest, mostper- 3 and,
reeable remedy for the Toothache and Rosami
Fore discovered. The An6dyne is Teller
less, and may be applied to the Hours;
t delicate skin, without causing thle 64., Tli
sh. It is used by al>plying it ac- Philoso
printed directions, signed by I. Hymn,
nmpansing each bottle, to the'but- Little
:; and is us conveyed, through tihe Lights
skin, to the affected nerves. A LittleA
f certificates. are in the possession Leadin
Fiber, and mnundre.le more may be Child's
ied, showing the efficacy of the can Gi
ne. I deem it, however, unneces- binsin
n more than the following, which Barbat
by respectable persons in the vi- Belzoni
sidencce, and ih this city. Tales,
JOSEPH HISCOCK. Mgaza
-- Apri
CERTIFICATES.
es, that I was troubled with a severe HIS'1
t times, for two or three months,
time I made application of every AM
f I was possessed of, short of extrac-
success. Being presented with a stitutio
Electric Anodyne, I made one appli- DipI
-,.1 Ie nriot been troubled with the R.-volu
ice. JOHN COOK, M. D. the Un
n, Me., June 9, 1834. revolui
$20.
ascr ibers, having made a fair trial of '[The
snody ne, can cheerfully recommend mence
blic, as a safe, efficacious, and sure March
ce Toothache and Ague. the fir:
FRANCIS BUTLER, Secm
Z. T. MILLIKEN, Congr
LI EMtiULL BURSLEY, adopti
'II I.1 A S D. BLAKE, M. D. scai ce.
JONATHAN,KNOWLTON, Jour
JAMES GOULD. the fou
n, Me., July, 1834. 5 vols.
Ami
)osed by my situation as toll-mal The
e bridges in the city, to all kinds of various
day and by night, and having been af The
averal years past, with frequentattacks States,
ache and Ague, without being able to series -
'from the numerous prescriptions for Men
his complaint, I was presented by Mr. Science
July last, with a bottle of Hiscock's very rt
odyne, then suffering under a violent Elli<
,e Toothache and Ague, and received of the
plication, immediate relief. At the dix, 4t
d to, s--ch was the severity of the dis. Hist
.nable to attend to my business; my face collect
swollen, and I had been deprived of The
veral nights. By applying the Ano- Amerit
nmly, the pain, in a few minutes, en- Alcedo
led, thd swelling in my face came down,
not beeh'trbubled with the complaint Oi
A I ,A EL-P-lR ESOTT; April2
).a ,'.,. 1 7 4.

ni-Mdersiguned, having heard, the past east ae
I iii-cock's Electric Anodyne, as a cure dwarf,
a of the Tocthache and Ague, heieby
t we inade application of it some weeks Snuf
)und it an effectual, safe, and'immedi- Avenu,
; and that we have not since been P. S
h the complaint.' We therefore cheer- ing Sci
snend it to the public, as a valuable vines,
r the above disorders. Hoes,
REUBEN DAVIS, above.
JOHN HODBROOK,
HARRIET C. FAIRBANK, EA
ABIEL FISK,
SUSAN FISK. *
lovemiber, 1834. the cou
For sale by TODD & CO. German
T ington
NEAR'S PATENT TRUSS. and ot
T lil -H'. I OR SALE. The sub-. amine
S.r ii. i.i,Lle to attend to the call very
ument it Geoi getown and Alexandria, Gadsby
right 'of the Truss in -these cities, i Also
oimediaily. ply of
F J. F. CALLAN of barr

"SCRIP. are off
that th
aught and sold,; highest price always Ta heir

JOHN F. WEBB, Broker. leaving
om a distance (post paid) will be of im
ended to. Three thousand acres on Als
mr sale. Wanted VirginiasLand'War- b .to
Feb. 19. bythe s
est evei
Rb' PATENT TABLETS FOR rican Q
'ENING RAZORS.-The subscriber proved
ved an invoice of the above, which are mad
surpasses all other inventions for receipt
tullRazors, warr-anmedgenuine. and blr
LEWIS JOHNSON, black;
tobacco, and fancy store, Penn.'Av. April


ICHARD PENN SMITHiL
tress of Padua, and other Tales, the.
in two volumes, is just published,
received for sale by
F. TAYI.OR.

'D SIGN PAINTING, GLAZING
.- ,AND GILDING.
:)FFUTT having removed his shop to
i street, -(opposite Carusi's saloon, and
Washington Library,) being thankliIul
'are, continues still to solicit E share of
nage, which, by promptness and de-
opes to merit.
he above, in all its various branches,.
the best -possible manner, and at the
ce,
ro,t, April 27.-law3t
5iLK, SILW ORMS, &c.
Mandal'respecting the Mulberry Tree.
;e Culture of Siik, in three parts. 50

Amermican Silk, with directions for
.vorms, by Homerque and Duponceau.

n the art ofiaising Silkworms, 12mo.

-m James Mease, with a Treatise on the
lkwornms, by Mr. DeHazzie, of Mu-
lates, 8vo. 50 cents.
Treatise on Mulbeirry Trees and the
vo. $1.
1e by
e PISHEY THOMPSON.

iCAL PHIENOLOGY, by Silas Jones,
published, and this day received fbr
'AYLOR, in one volume, illustrated by
engravings of celebrated historical
awnul other scientific andl anatomical en-
ildsomdly printed- and bound. Price

'shai.'m Washington, cheap, price only
it at aand best edition, bound aid aprit-
it style, with an accompanying- Mi.irta),
al, and Historical Atlas, in three
lav). May 3
'UQ-IE I' GLASSES, &c.
ecived a few pairs of handsome Bou-
nds and OptTcal Glasses, with twenty
.WF, aut amusing article, suitable for a
' Or sale at Stationefs' Hall.
W. FISCHER.
(Tel.)


,OACHMAKER'S NOTICE.
KNOWLE-S & CO., formerly KNOWLES
& THAYER, of Amherst, Mass., inform
friends and the Public, that they have re-
made large addition. to their Manufacturing
-liiunnent, and will in future be able to manu-
e more extensively. No pains has been
to obtain the most exper enced workmen;
the materials are selected with great care,
e of the firm will attend personally to the
acturing.
lies, Chariots, Lundans, Barouches, Car-
Buggies, Giggs, and Pleasure Wagons, con-
on hand, for sale at the Shop, or made to
at bhort notice, of the best finish and
style.
, they intend to keep a supply of Carriages
e at the Philadelphia-Bazaar, No. 38 and 40,
street below Second, managed by T. BIRCH
CO.
JUVENILE CLASSICS.
FARNHAM & CO., No. 5 Varnum's
Row, have just receiveIt the Juvenile C/as.
i one hundred volumes-price $28. The
ng works are composed in these volumes.
Atlantic Tales; 3, Children's Friend; 11,
tures of Paul Pry, 12, The Value of Time;
ie Value of Money; 14, Sandford and Mer-
6, Stories Worth Telling; 17, Familiar Let-
19, Adelaide; 20,. Daughter of a Genius:
ner of Iceland; 22, Poetry without Fiction
ginal Poems; 24, Juvenile Plutarch; 26, El';
of Morality; -27, Trimmer's History of Eng-
29, The Beloved Sister; 30, The Parent's
rt; 26, The Y<,ung Cadet; 37, Stories from
ure; 39, lnfantine Stories; 40, Conversa-
on Massachussetts; 41, Conversations on
on Things; 43, Godfrey Hall; 44, The
* Naturalist; 45, First Letters of New Eng-
47, Roman Stories; 48, Edgeworth's Les-
parts 1 and 2; 49, Harriet and Lucy, parts
4; 50, Harriet and Lucy, concluded; 53,
ond; 57, Life of Linneus; 58, The Story
; 60, The Officer's Widow; 61, :Evening
; 63, Eugene and Lolotte; Leigh Richmond;
ie White Kitten, The Knapsack, Intellectual
ophy; 65, Bible Biography, Sunday School
s, Sabbath School Present; 66, The Faithful
Girl, Little Warbler of the Cottage; 67,
s of Education; 69, Tales for Ellen; 71,
Agnes, The Storm, Stories in Verse; 72,
*g Strings; 73, Nursery Fables; 74, Little
s Book; 76, Boy's Own Book; 78, Ameri-
ri's Book; 80, Child's Own Book; 83, Ro-
Grusoe; 85, Swiss Family Robinson; 87,
uld's Lessons; 90, Northern Regions; 92,
li in Egypt; 94, Portraits from Life, Poetic
Lessens from Scripture; 95 to 100, Parley's
ine.
il 21
'ORY OF THE UNITED STATES
LAWS, FINANCES, &c.
dERICAN State Papers and Public.Docu-
ments, from the adoption ofthe Federal Con-
in, to April, 1818, 12 vols., 8vo. $20.
lematic Correspondence of the American
ution, concerning the foreign relations of
united States, during the whole period of the
tion; edited by Jared Sparks, 10 vols, 8vo.

Laws of the United States, from the com-
ment of the Government to the fourth of
, 1833, 8 vols. 8vo., with Birch's Index to
st seven volumes, handsomely bound. $35.
ret Journals of the acts and proceedings of
ess, from the first meeting thereof, to the
on of the Constitution, 4 vols.,*8vo., very
$15.
rnal of the Senate of the United States, from
urth March, 1789, to the fourth March, 1815,
, half bound.-, $20.
erican Annual Register, 6 vols.
Federalist, by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay,
s editions.
History and Topography of the United
edited by John Howard Hinton, with a
of fine Engravings, 2 vols. 4to. $14.
toirs of the American Academy of Arts and
aes, to the end of the year 1783, 4 vols. 4to,
are. $25.
cott's Journal for determining the boundary
United States, with six Maps and an Appen-
to. $5
orical Collections, consisting of State Papers,
ed by Ebenezer Hazard, 2 vols., 4to. $16.
Geographical and Historical Dictionary of
ca and the West Indies, from the Spanish of
u, 5 vols. 4to. $20.
[List to be continued,]
n sale by PISIlEY THOMPSON.

.RDEN SEEDS.-A small assortment for
retail, amongst which are some of the ear-
nd best kinds of peas, as Bishop's early
extra early, Dwarf Marrowfat, kc.
LEWIS JOHNSON.
i, tobacco, and fancy store, Pennsylvania
e.
. A few articles of Garden Tools, asPrun-
ssors,an excellent article for light shrubbery,
flowers, &c. ditto Knives and Saws; small
Rakes, &c., for sale at reduced prices, as
March 5
GLE QUILLS, SWAN QUILLS.
TALOR has just received a few hundred
EAGLE QILLS, the only ones for salein
.ntry, which have been just imported from
ny, the first that have been seen in Wash-
er in the United States. Public officers
hers are respectfully invited to call and ex
them, or send-for samples to the Wa.
Circulating Library, immediately east of
's Hotel.
imported by the same Packet, a large sup-
Swan Quills, of great length and strength
-el, and a very superior quality. These
ered for sale at prices materially cheaper
he same artic e has before been sold for.'
great durability renders them in the end
conomical than the Goose Qdill, even when
out of view the more important economy
and trouble.
a large supplyof German Goose Quills,
ame packet, some of the largest and fin-
rseen in Washington. English and Ame-
uills, in great variety; all of the most ap-
kind of Metallic Pens, to which additions
e of every new article immediately upon ias
in this country. Terry's British Ink, red
ick; Bertinguiot's French Ink, red and
and all the American kinds.
3.0.


COBB'S SERIES OF SCHOOL BOOKS.
SPELLING COURSE.--Cobb's First Book,
or Introduction to the Spelling Book.
Cobb's Spelling Book, containing the rudiments
of the English language, arranged in catechetical
order; an organization of the alphabet, a greater
number of spelling lessons than are generally
inserted in spelling books, many useful tables, and
the proper names in the New Testament.
Cobb's Expositor, a Sequel to the Spelling
Book; containing about twelve thousand of the
most common words in the language; in which
each word is accurately spelled, pro bounced, di-
vided, and-explained, and the primary and se-
cond-ary accent noted; to which are prefixed con-
cise principles of pronunciation, and rules for the
accentuation and division of words.
Cobb's Abridgment of Walker's Critical Pro-
nouncing Dictionary.
I Reading coursc.-Cobb's Juvenile Reader, No.
1, No. 2, and No. 3.
Cobb's Sequel to the Juvenile Readers, com-
prising a selection of lessons in prose and poetry,
from highly esteemed American and English
writers; designed for the use of higher classes in
schools and academies, and-to impress the minds
of youth with sentiments of virtue arid religion. '
Cobb's North American Reader, containing a
greater variety, and more extensive selection of
pieccs it, pro-e and poetry, than are contained in
the Sequel to the Juvende Readers, from very
highly esteemed American and English writers;
lo,s; observations ons good reading, the Declara-
tion of Independence, the Constitution of the
United States, political definitions, variable ortho-
graphy, concise principles of pronunciation, rules
for the division ofwords, and the rules for spelling
thIe plural'i of nouns, participles, present tense,
and preterit of verbs; and the compa alive and su-
perlative degrees of adjectives; designed for the
use (l the highest classes in schools and acade-
mies.
rilthimetical course.-Arithmetical Rules and Ta-
bles; Exp'anatury Arithmetic, No. 1; Explanatory
Arithmeutc, No. 2; Cobb's Ciphering Books, Nos.
1 and 2.
Also, all the SCHOOL BOOKS in general use
for sale, at the lowest prices, by
R. FARNHAM,
,No. 5, Varnum's Row,
Between 9th and 10th streets.
May 21 .
jUARD ANDi0 NECK CHAINS.-Jut re-
Sceived a good nassortmnnt of handsome
(,uard and Neck Chains, for sale at Stationers'
Ial1. W. FISCHER.
April 30 (Tel,)


DR. SIMPLE'S PATENT TRUSS,


FOR WHE RELIEF AND CURE OF HERNIA.
HTF E subscriber has just received an addition-
al supply of the above Truss, and can now
adapt it to any sized patient, and every variety of
rupture.
The most satisfactory references can be given
to persons in this District, who have used this
instrument. For sale at the Drug store of
G. S. FARQUHAR,
Agent for the proprietor, corner between
Brown's and Gad.by's.
April 20

STAGNER'S PATENT TRUSS,
For the radical cure of Hm Oa, or Rvupture
f'aIHIS instrument has been found to effect
S- permanent cures in all cases, even in ..old
and inveterate ruptures, and is better calculated
to restrain obstinate protrusions than any other
truss known to the profession.
The subscriber being so filly convinced of the
importance of this invention, has purchased from
thie proprietor the privilege of introducing it'into
the practice of Surgery in the District of Colum-
bia, and invites those who sa'e subjects of Her-
nia to make trial of Stagner's Truss. HIe has per-
mission to refer to all the Physicians in the Dis-
trict of Columbia, and to many of the most emi-
nent and respectable Physicians in the United
States whose certificates are in his possession.
J. F. CALLAN,
opposite the Post Office.
The following testimonials are selected from among
a large. number which have been spontaneously
offered by distinguished members of the pro-
fession.
WILLIAM GIBSON, M. D. the able and dis-
tinguished Professor of Surgery in the University
of Pennsylvania, has spoken ofthis Truss in the
most favorable manner in a clinical lecture to his
pupils. After having spoken of the ordinary
Trusses now in use, which he observed, merely
palliated or prevented the further extension of the
disease, with the exception of some few cures
wnich had been effected in children, lie went on
to say, that although he was favorably impressed
with the invention, as he had said in a previous
lecture, he could not at that time form any certain
conclusion as to its merits, not having then ex-
amined any cases in which the instrument had
been applied; but since then he had examined
three cases, in which the most perfect cures had
been effected. He said one was a case of a gen-
tleman aged upwards of 60 years, who had been
laboring under Scotal Hernia nine years, on one
side as large as a cocoa nut; he had never obtained
any radical relief until Stagner's Truss was ap-
plied, which has to all- appearances, effected a
perfect cure. Another not so far advanced int
age, but whose case was equally intractable, who
had tried every species of Truss heretofore in use,
without even a palliation of the symptoms, as lie
found it impossible with them to keep his bowels
in their proper situation, who, by the application
of Stagner's Truss, has been radically cured, a
perfect cicatrization of the part having taken
place' And the third was that of a young man
who had been cured of Inguinal Hernia by the
same instrument.
Dr. Gibson then said: From these cases, from
the testimony of other gentlemen entitled to the
most profound respect, who have had ample op-
portunity of witnessing the cures effected by this
Truss; and from his former impressions with re-
spect to theindieations to be fulfiled in the treat-
ment of this terrible malady, he had the most fa-
vorable impression towards it, and had great
hopes that it will cause an entire revolution in
this department of Surgery."
Dr. McGLELLAN, Professor of Surgery in the
Jefferson Medical College, stated, in one of .s
lectures on Hernia, delivered the pre.;ent session,
that he considered the improvement of Stagner to
be an important contribution to the interests of hu-
manity. Several students in that College have
offered extracts from their note books, in which
they represent the Professor as saying, that he
considered this Truss to be the only one on which
he could depend in the way for a radical cure. He
stated that he had seen it effect speedy cures in
several cases, where every other conti-,vance hadt
tIai. etc.ui iff retratningtfthe-fleraiti teetit. lie
particularly mentioned the case of a gentleman
who had been for a long time troubled with an ob-
stinate Femtural Rupture, which he had never been
able to keep from descending, until he resorted to
Stagner's Trum.s; and although he was sa carele, s
as to lay aside the instrument in eight or nine days,
in const quence of an ulceration of the skin, tihe
Hernia never returned, and a firm inlduration and
closure was established in the course of the pas-
sage, under Poupart's Ligament.
Dec. 22-dtf

FOR RENT,
i A new brick house, two stories and
e' basement, pleasantly situated on 13,1
i.iiS street, between B and C street south, cont.
taiinig mine rooms, a large lot for a garden, stable
and carriage-house, a pump of fine water opposite
the door. To a good tenant the rent will be mo-
ilerate.
Inquire of Mr. W. H. GUNNEL, living next
door, or to the proprietor,
WM. A. McCAULEY.
N. B. The subscriber has removed his Copper
and Tin establishment to the house late occu-
pied by Mr. Kenedy as a book store, between 11th
and 12th street, north side Pennsylvania Avenue.
March 9-tf WM. A. McCAULEY.

AMERICAN HISTORY, &c.
L IFE of Alexander Hamilton, by his son J. C.
Hamilton, vol. 1. $2.
Hazard's Pennsylvania Register, 16 vols., quarto.
$48.
Life of the Rev. Hotace Holley,L. L. D., 8vo.
$1 50.
transactions of the American Philosophical So-
ciety, held at Philadelphia, vol. 1. $2 75.
Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts, third edi-
tion, 2 vols. $5.
Annual Messages, Veto Messages, Proclama-
tions, &c. of Andrew Jackson, 8vo. $1.
Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellanies of
Thomas Jefferson, 4 vols., 8vo. $9. %
Lee's Memoirs ot thIe war in the southern de-
partment of the .United States, new edition; 1827.
$1 75.
Observations on the writings of Thomas Jeffer.-
son, by H. Lee. $1 50.
Memoir of the Life of William Livingston, by
Theodore Sedgwick, jr., 8vo. $2.
Indian wars in New England in 1675-four-
very rare pamphlets relating thereto, 1 vol., folio.
$12.
Inldian Treaties, and Laws and Regulations rela-
ting to Indian Af'aits, with thie Appendix. Very
few copies left. $4.
Laws of the Colonial and State Governmentsre-
lating to Indians and Indian Affairs, from 1633 to
1831. $1 25.
Memoirs of Clay, Webster, Van Buren, &c.
Marbo:s' History of Louisiana, its cession, &e.
$2.
McMahon's Historical View of the Government
of Maryland, vol. 1. S3 25.
Minott's History of the Insurrection in Massa-
chusetts, 8vo. $1.
Debate on the Mississippi Question, 8vo. $1.
On Sale by
PISHEY THOMPSON.


NEW COPY BOOKS.
UST received at Stationers' Hall, from IB-.:-
ton, by the Brig Casket, Foster's Elementary
Copy Books, Nous. 1, 2, 3, and 4, designed to lead
the learner, upon simple principles, from the.first
rudiments of'Pennman.amhip to a perfect knowledge
of the art; being a new and improved plan of
leaching. Also, a large supply of 13ascom's Copy
Books, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, ruled with the lines
about one-seventh ofan inch apart; which style of
ruling is adapted to coarse hand, medium hand,
fine hand, capitals, &c., with engraved copies
in each book, and general directions on the cov,
ers; being an improvement on the author's "Sys-
tem of Penmanship and Writing-Book combin-
ed." Also, every other kind of copy, cyphering,
and composition books, constantly on hand at the
lowest prices, wholesail and retail, by
W. FISCHER.
April 27 (Tel.)

EST PLAYING CARDS.-The subscriber
has on hand for sale by the gross, dozen or
pack, 30 gLross best American 1Hot-pressed Playing
Cards, from dthe manufhactories of Bartlelt, Cre/hore,
Humphries, &c.; also German and French, at
factory prices.
Ma 1 LEWIS JOHNSON,
May 13 Pen, Ay,


-. T-. -. .

S)UTFIVESI'RN OR UPPER LtiAlL
ROUTE.
Washington City and Milledgeville, Geo., thence
to New Orleans. New arrangement, Jan. 1835.
Southwestern and Piedmont Lines Consolidated.
S"-. ECK, WELLFORD, & Co., now owning the
intersecting Lines, which formerly render-
ed an uninterrupted passage through this route,
uncertain, promise travellers a passage through
the whole route, "secure from all interruption
from conflicting interests."
TWO STEAMBOATS daily leave Washington
for Fredericksburg, Virginia; where, on Tues-
days, Thursdays, and Saturdays, coaches are in
waiting to take passengers on to Cartersville,
Farmville, Prince Edward Court-house, Halifax
Court.h:use, Virginia; Mihon, Greensboro', Lex-
ington, Salisbury, Charlotta, &c., North Carolina;
Yorkvi Ie, Uninnville, Abboville, &c., South Caro-
lina; Washington, Greensboro', Eatonton, 8,c., to
Milledgevill-, Georgia; where this line unites with
the Metropolitan line to New Orleans: distant from
Washington City, by this route, 1,217 miles only.
Intersec'ing lines to Columbia, Augusla, Knox.
ville, Tallahasse, &c.
The Southwestern line leaves Milledgeville for
Washington City, Tuesdays, Fridays, and Sun-
dlays; d stance 658 miles; through in eight and a
lialf days, allowing full time for sleep and refresh.
ment. Speed as great as is consistent with health
and safety. A superior natural road, neither
mountainous nor sandy, passing through the famed
gold region of North Carolina.
Good water, healthy country, excellent taverns,
with low charges, temperate drivers, and supe-
rior horses and coaches.
The proprietors solicit passengers to oblige
them, by giving this line one trial; feeling confi-
dent they will travel it afterwards to oblige them-
selves. It is their anxious wish to make this a
popular line, and worthy of patronage. They
therefore beg to be informed of any misconduct
of persons in their service.
V- We are now- arriving at Fredericksburg,
Virginia, from the South, the night previous to
the time above stated, to sopp -r, which gives pa5-
sengers a full night's rest at Fredericksburg;
also, making seven and a half days only from Mil-
ledgeville. This arrangement will continue from
1st April to 1st December.
May 25, 1835.
CAUTIO.--Travellers south of Milledgeville,
going north, should be careful to enter to MVilledge-
ville only.
PECK, WELLFORD, & CO.
Fredericksburg and Danville, Va.
May 30-dly
CLARK'S OLD ESTABLS11ED
LUCKY OFFICE,
WTV. Corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets,
(Under the Museum.)
Where have been sold PRIZES! PRIZES! in
Dollars, Millions of Millions!!
Baltimore, 1836.
NoTI CE.-Any person or persons throughout
the Union, who may desire to try their luck, either
in the MARYLAND STATE LOTTERIES, or
in authorized Lotteries of other States, some one
of which is drawn daily, tickets from one to ten
Dollars, shares in proportion, are respectfully re-
quested to forward their orders by mail (post
paid) or otherwise, enclosing Cash or Prize
1 tickets, which will be thankfully received, and
executed by return mail, with the same prompt
attention, as if on personal application, and the
result given (when requested) immediately after
the drawing. Please address
JOHN CLARK,
N. W. Corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets,
NoV-dly under the Museum.

AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE AND
TRUST COMPANY.
OrvicES. No. 136, Baltimore street, Baltimore,
and corner of Wall and Broad streets, New
York.
AiE.CY, At Elliott's Buildings, Pennsylvania
Avenue, near 41 street, Washington City.
Established by act of the Legislature. Capital
$1,000,000.
This company from its lau'ge capital, and various
means of accommodation, affords ample security
and great facility to parties who transact their
business with it, The terms are as low as any of-
fice iu the Union..
They make
1. I..J1unA. -l Ai iS;- ---- -
2. GRANT ANNUITIES.
3. EXCUT-r TRUSTS.
4, SaELL ENDOWMENTS.
The Legislature having directed the manner in
which the capital of this company must be secur-
ed, and the whole being- under the immediate su-
pervision of the Chancellor, to whom stated re-
turns will be made, it becomes the secure deposi-
tory for the moneys, property, and estates of all
such asr may desire thle otervention of a permia-
-nnt Trustee or Guardian; to such as require punc
lual payment of interest upon sums deposited; or
such as may make deposits for the benefit pf ac-
cumulation. Under the charter, real or personal
property can be conveyed or devised to the com-
pany in trust, and they may execute any trust in
the same manner, and to the same extent, as any
trustee-they may make all contracts in which
the casualties of life or interest of money are in
evolved.
Money will be received in Deposite by the com-
pany and held in trust, upon which interest will be
allowed, payable semi-annually.
Rates of Insurance for $100, on a single life.
Age. One year. Seven years For life.
25, 1,00 1,12 2.04
30, 1,31 1,?6 2,36
35, 1,35 1,53 2,75
40, 1,69 1,83 3,20
50, 1,96 2,09 5,60
TRUSTEES.
Patrick Macaulay, Josephl L. Joseph,
Morris Robinson, Gorhliam Brooks,
James Boorman, 4 Samuel Wetmore,
Charles Av.Davis, Philip T. Dawson,
William E. Mayhew, Matthew L. Bevan,
Frederick W. Brtune, Samuel B. Ruggles.
Applications, post paid, may be addressed to
PATRICK MACAULAY, Esq. President, Ballhi-
more; or MORRIS ROBINSON, Esq. Vice Presi-
dent, New York; to which immediate attention
will be paid. Oct 23-y
Applications may also be made personally, or by
letter, post paid, to FiANCSes A. DicaKINS, Agent
for the Company in the City of WAsnIreTOa .
lti ,,It.. .- is in Elliott's Row, Pennsylvania Ave-
nile, near 44 street.
PATENT RIGHlT' SECU ItEl).
lciRnedy Jfo Asiatic C'holeru, Cholera ilior-
bus, )Diarrhaa, i'c.
UN consequenceof the very great and increasing
demand I or thlsi valuable preparation,induced
by the many cures whliclh have been effected by
the use of it in cases of Asiatic Cholera and com-
mon Cholera Morbos in children, and disorders of
the bowels generally, the proprietor hias prepared
and will continue to keep on hand, large supply.
Read and believe! This remedy has been used
by many eminent Physicians, some of whom bave
charge of tlhe largest hospitals in the United States,
where the cholera has prevailed to a great extent,
and been fthtal to intemperate, aged, and lunatic
persons. Their confidence in this medicine is such


that they say they are not afraid of the most inve-
terate cases of Asiatic cholera, when taken in
time.
Those opposed to Quackery, will at once see
this is nothing of the kind-for those persons
who have subscribed their names to the certificates
live among us, anid are known to be men of the
first standing, and upon whose iords time utmost
*reliance can be placed.
I have appointed G. S. FARQUIHAR Druggist,
Washington City, my general Agent for the 1). C.,
where the genuine article may at all times be ob-
tained.


A large supply of the above is this day received
by the subscriber; and so confident is the proprie-
tor of its efficacy and certainty in relieving diseas-
es of the stomach and towels, that he has unhesi-
tatingly authorized me, in all cases where on trial,
the purchaser is not entirely satisfied with it, to
return them the full amount paid by them for it.
G. S. FARQUHAR,
Corner between Brown's and Gadsby's.
Sept. 14.
pi'UT SET BEAD BAGS.-TIhe subscriber
-.' _has just received trom New York a small in-
voice beet quality, for retail at New York prices
for cash. LEWIS JOHNSON,
Snuff, Tobacco and Fancy Store, Pa. Av
April 23


AMERICAN HISTORY, LAWS, &c.
r EPORTS of the Convention on the Constitu-
tion of the State of New York, 1821.
$3 50.
New England's Memorial, by Nathaniel Mor-
ton, 5sh edition. $2.
Adams (J. Q.) on Weights and Measures.
$1 25.
Adams's (J. Q.) Duplicate Letters, the Fishe-
ries, and the Mississippi, 8vo. $2 25.
Life of James Otis, of Massachusetts, by W.
Tudor. $2 25.
Review of the Constitution &c. of Pennsylvania,
from its origin, by Dr. Franklin, London, 1759.
$5.
National Calendar, by P. Force, for 1836.
$1 50.
Moses's Digest of the Commercial Regulations
of the Uniti d States.
Atkins's Statistics of the United States, Com-
merce, &c., second edition, just published. $3 50.
Life, Writings, and Speeches of William Pink-
ney, by H. Wheaton. $2.
Speeches, Addresses, and Messages of the Pre-
sidents of the United Statas, bvo. $3.
Prince's Chronological History ofNew England.
$2 50.
Proud's History of Pennsylvania, from 1681 to
1742, two volumes, 8vo. $5.
History of the great Indian war under King
Phihip, in 1675 and 1676, by Thomas Church
second edition; plates. $1 50.
The Pol.tician's Register, containing the Consti-
tut;on%, &c. 50 cents.
Memoir of Josiah Quincyjr., by his son. $2.
Letters of John Randolph to a young relative.
$1 25.
Ramsay's Life of George Washington, 8vo. $3.
Raguet's Principles of Free Trade, 8vo. $2 50.
Sketch of the Internal condition of the United
States of America, and of their political relations
with Europe, by a Russian, M. Poletica. $1.
On sale by
PISHEY THOMPSON.
May 12
]? IlaME YELLOW LEAF CHEWING TO-
BACCO.-Thec subscriber lias on hand for
retail a few boxes very superior yellow leaf chew-
ing tobacco, believed to be unequalled in this Dis-
trict, at 75 cts.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Snuff, tobacco, and fancy store,
April 1. Pennsylvania avenue.
LIVE OAK OF LARGE DIMENSIONS
FOR' SALE.
T-HIS grove of Live Oak, is situated on St.
Rosa Bay, distant 45 miles from Pensacola,
and 6 from East-pass inlet, into the Gulf of Mexi-.
co, the dimensions range from 2 to 6 feet and over
in diameter, sound healthy growing timber, which,
by a survey made in 1829, by the surveyor of
the Navy Departmen, vwas reported to contain
70 thousand cubic feet, exclusive of smaller sizes;
none of this timber lays farther than 100 yards
from the shore of the Bay, where convenient
landings are reached over a level and hard soil,
rendering transportation to the water edge as easy
as can be found anywhere.
For terms and particulars, apply to CHARLES
L. GARNIER, at New Orleans; or to JOHN GAR-
NIER, at Pensacola, West Florida.
Dec. 28-

ALEXANDRIA FOUNDRY AND
STEAM ENGINE FACTORYi
"-'T0IGH and Low Pressure Steam Engines
Machinery of every description, hearv
Castings of Iron, Brass, and Composition, include
ing Church Bells of any weight made of goo
quality and on the usual terms, 1by
THOSE. W. SMuTH & CO.
Alexandria, D. C. August 6. dly

UNIVERSAL ATLAS.-A new and Univer-
sal Atlas, comprising separate maps of all
the principal Empires, Kingdoms, and States
throughout the world, and forming a distinct atlas
of the United Statos, carefully compiled from the
best authorities extant, by David H. Burr; just
published and received by
R. FARNHAM & CO.
April 27 No. 5, Varnum's Row, Pa. Av.
ULDING'S LIFE OF WASHINGTON
in 2 vols., with four beautiful engravings,
pr ce $1 25, is just published and this day receiv-
ed for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Also, Random Recollections of the House of
Commons, from 1830 to 1835, including personal
sketches of the leading members of tll parties;
-one- matll- volume. -
T :e second series of the "Naval Sketch
Book," two volumes.
Notices of the war of 1812, by General John
Armstrong, Secretary of War at that period, one
volume.
April 4
rI itU lIR'S RIOMI, &c.--the History of
R Rime by G B Niebnuh,-, translated by). C.
I are and C. 'I'Thrlwall, 2 vols, 8vo. $4 50. The
Alcrican Diplomatic Code, embracing a collec-
tiin of treaties and conventions between the Unit-
ed States and foreign powers from 1778 to 1834,
with important judicial decisions on points con-
nected N ithi our foreign relations; also a concise
diplomatic Minual, containing, a summary of the
law of nations, from Vattell, Wicqutfort, Martens,
&c., by Jonathan Elliot, 2 vols, 8vo, handsomely
bound in calf, $12,00. On sale by
April 29. PISHEY THOMPSON.
FARRIERY-THE HORSE, &c. &e.
W ATELY published, and for sale by F. TAY
-_ LOR, at the Waverley Circulating Library,
immediately east of Gad-by's hotel.
Hind's Groom's Oracle; Lawrence on the
Horse; Lebaud's Principles of Horsemanship for
Ladies and Gentleman. "The Horse," as pub-
I1shed by the British Society for the diffusion of
useful knowledge; Barnum's American Farrier;
Farmers' and Graziers' Guide, by Lawrence; New
England Farrier and Farmers' Cattle Book; Mow-
bray on Poultry, Sheep, Cows, Swine, and other
domestic animals; their breeding, rearing, fatten-
ing, and management. Farriery and Veterinary
Mcd-cine, by J. White, Veterinary Surgeon to the
Royal D)ragoons; Hind's Veterinary Surgeon; Gib-
son's Farrier's Dispensatory; the Farrier's and
HoCrsemians' complete Dictionary; Bartlett's Gen-
tlemens' Farrier; The Gentleman's Jockey. or Far-
rier's approved Guide; Allen's Essay on Horses;
Claten's Cattle Doctor; Salters' Angler's Guide;
Walton's and Cotton's complete Angler, together
uhill many other valuable works of the same class
aml description, all at the lowest prices.
My 12
EW BOOKS -Paris and the Parisians, by
Mrs. Trollope.
The Self-condeimned, a nivel, in one volume.
Salhluist, a new edition, with commentary and
other additions, by Professor Anthlion.
Marryatt's complete works, handsomely printed
and bound, with portrait; the whole eight novels,
complete, for $3 50. F. TAYLOR.
May 5
SPAIN RH VISITE)D, by "A youni'ig Amirican,'
author of A Year in Spain-in two vohtlumes,
with engravings-is just published and this day
received for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Alsa, a new edition of Ovid, translated by Dry-
den, Pope, Congreve, Addison, and others; two
volumes, bound, wili portrait; price only $1 25.
Harry Caierly, by the author of Cecil Hyde.
May 17


,NIALVIN'S SERNMONS--LUTHEIt'S SER-
U MONS.-Just published and for sale by F.
TAYLOR, in 1 volume, price 62i cents, the most
celebrated Sermons of John Calvin, (never before
published in the United States) within a biography.
Also, a selection of the best sermons of Martin
Luther, in 1 volume, bound, price 62A cents, con-
taining also also a memoir of his life.
Twenty discourses by Archbishop Tilleotson, se-
lected fi'rom his works, in 1 volume, English edi-
tio, price 874 cents-at the Waverley Circulating
Library, immediately east of Gadsby's hotel.
May 18

yiNE ENG ISH POCK-ET PISTOLS.
A IHij subscriber has for sale, at reduced prices,
a large assortment of fine London Pocket
Pistols. Those wanting thle article, would do well
to call and examine them.
LEWIS JOHNSON.
P. S Superior Havana Segars, and very best
yellow leaf James River Chewing Tobacco, al-
ways on hand as above, at the lowest prices.
April 25 L. J.
CASH FOR THREE HUNDREKID) NE-
GROEiS.
" 7.-IE highest cash prince will be given by the
Subscriber for Negroes of bothli sexes, tifrom
tha! age of 12 to 28. 1I hose wishing to sell will
do well to give me a call at my residence, or, at
A. LEI 's Lottery office, live doors east of Gads-
by's IHotel. Letters addressed to me, through the
post office, shall receive the earliest attention.
WM., H. WILLIAMS.
Feb. 25 dtf


Zi87~mrr~rmrs~cr~Rnn~Q~c-~n~rr~-~-AC~L


adapted, as far as possible, to the state of the art
in this country, and to the wants, f the American
public.
"The deiCartment of instrume music will be
conducted principally with reference to the piano
forte.
"The department of vocal music will probably
occupy about three fourths of the work, and will
embrace both secular and sacred music, consast-
ing of songs, duetts, glees, anthem, &c., arrange d
for all the different varieties of the human volce,and
furnished with a separate accompaniment for the
piano forte or organ.
"In each department of the work, the wants of
teachers will be con-ilantly kept in view, and such
music will be introduced as shall be calculated to
advance the pupil, aid the teacher, and thus pro-
mote the cause of musical education."
The first six parts are received and ready for
delivery.
Subscriptions received by
1. FARNHAM & CO.
No. 5 Varnum's row,
April 7 Pennsylvania Avenue.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY OF
J DISTINGUISHED AMERICANS.-Num.
bers 25 to 30 inclusive, are this day received by
F. TAYLOR, containing portraits and biography
of General Morgan, Marion, Decaitur, lainbridge,
telix Grundy, Van Rensselacr, Lindley Murray,
benjamin Rush, Fulton, Rufus King, Munroe,
Judge Story, and ninny others.. For sale by the
set or single number, at the publisher's lowest
prices, at thle Waverley Circulaiing Library, immer
dittely cast of Gadsby's Hotel, where the public
are invited to call and examine into the characte.
aFnd execution of the work
May 30-3t


ARTRIDGE'S ORIGINAL LEATHER PRE-
RERVATIVE, or OIL BLACKING-a pa-
tent composition, or cleaning, nourishing, and
preserving weather; renewing; the color, rendering'
it soft, pliable, and elastic, and .when conipetely
filled, impenetrable by water, or water proof.
This composition is not only the best, but the
most convenient and cheapest article ever known,
for cleaning and preserving Chaise and Carriage
Tops, Thorough-Braces, and Harness. It reno-
vates and nourishes the leather, renders it soft and
elastic, renews the color and strength, and pre-
vents it from drying and cracking.
For boots and shoes it is invaluable. When al-
lowed to dry, it closes the pores of the leather,
renders them impenetrable by the wet, and keeps
them soft and comfortable to the feet.
For Factory Bands, it is peculiarly beneficial,
giving them an adhesiveness and elasticity that no
other substance will give.
It is also applicable to Engine Hose, Forge Bel-
lows, Travelling Trunks, and to all leather expos-
ed to the action of heat, cohl, or wet, and en-
tirely supersedes the use of oil.
-'EGCOMMSiNDATIONS.
Having made use of this composition for the
purposes above named, and finding it superior to
ax'y other article we have ever used, in its belig
not only more economical, but more beneficial in
its effects upon leather, we recommend it to the
public as a highly useful and important discovery.
Galen Holmes, Boston; E. G. House, Boston;
Ph. Adams, LDunstable; Samuel Watson, Leicester,
Caleb Cushing, ltoxbury; John Cook, Cambridge-
port; Edgar W. Davis, New York; who use thear-
ticle on Boots, Shoes, Harness, Carriage-Tops, &c.
Carlton & Balch, Medway; who use the preserva-
tive in their Shoe Manufactory. J. Mellen, West-
borough-having experienced its beneficial effects
on Forge Bellows. Niles & Whiting, and W. J.
Niles, who use the article on Chaise-tops and Har-
ness, at their extensive Livery Establishments,
Boston.
The following new certificates have been volun
tarily offered for publication. Among the num-
ber are those who are the proprietors of Stages
and Livery Stables, and some who have long been
drivers of Stages.
The undersigned having made use of Par-
ti dge's Original Leather Preservative, and fully
tested its effects, cheerfully certify to the fact
that we have found itall that it purports to be.
We find one of its most essential and most de-
sirable properties to consist in its preserving Har-
ness, Chaise-Tops, &c. &c. exposed to wet and
muddy weather, from becoming hard and stiff,
and from tarnishing or changing their color; and
the circumstance that its effect is more durable
than oil, requiring also a less quantity and less fre-
quent application, renders it a much cheaper arti
cle. (Signed) Reuben Davis, Joseph Stone, Wil-
liam Munroe, Charles Field, Z. Wyman, Jr. A.
Dummer, S. H. G. Rowley, Job Brooks.
For a further recommendation of Partridge's
Leather Preservative, the proprietor refers to eve-
ry person who makes use of it. By many it is
said that "Leather will last nearly twice as long
by sing this composition, as it will without"
Neatly put up in half pint tin canisters with
printed directions for its use; and- packed in boxes
of one dozen each. Also in canisters of one gal.
lon and a half each.
A constant supply'of this valuable article will
hereafter be kept by TODD & CO.
Nov 10 Agents for the Proprietor.
ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY OF VIR-
GINIA.-Contributions to the Ecclesiastical
History of the United States of America; by F.
L. Hawks, Rector of St. Thomas's Church, New
York. This volume contains a narrative of events
connected with the rise and progress of the Pro-
testant Episcopal Church in Virginia; to which is
added an appendix, containing the Journals of the
Conventions in Virginia from the commencement
to the present time. One large volume, 8vo.
$2 50. For sale by
March 16 PISTIEY THOMPSON.
1 OR SALE, for a term of years, a likely
j colored Boy, now about 15 years of~agce.
The boy is not to be sold for any fault, but can
be recommended as equal to any in the District,
of his age, for integrity and capacity.
Inquire of E. DYER.
Dec 17-ttf
MEXICAN REVOLUTION.
UST received and for sale byF
F. TAYLOR,
MEMOIRS OF THE MEXICAN REVOLU-
TION, including a narrative of the expedition of
G~nneral Mina,with.observations on ahe pracnie/bil-
ty of opening a commerce between the Pacific and
Atlantic through the Isthmus, and the Lake Mica-
.r.ius, and on the importance (present and pros-
pective) of such a communication to the civilized
world, and especially to the United S tates;one vol.
octavo; 396 printed pages-price only$1 25.
May 27.
J'tE:CAMEttON OF BOCCACCIO, cieap edi-
Stion, in 2 vols. English edition, well bound,
and printed with portrait, containing also all his
suppressed novels, juot received and for sale by
F. TAYLOR; price only $2, the usual cost being
$4. May 27
INAUGURAL ADDRESS OF GEN.
ANDREW JACKSON,
NGRAVED in a beautiful style, on an ena-
E melled tablet, with a border of Hickory and
Laurel leaves, containing also an excellent Portrait
Autograph and Chronological Table of the circum-
stances and dates of his life-price only 25 cents.
for sale by F. TAYLOR,
at the Waverlv Circulating Library, immediately
east of Gadsby's Hotel.
Ppril 24.
-THATMAN'S ENGLISH ANTIQUARIAN
W' DRAWING PAPER -A supply (war-
ranteJ genuine) is this day opened by F. TAY-
Lol, at the Waverley Circulating Library, imme-
diately east of Gadshy's Hotel; where Drawing
Materials of a'l kinds, Paints, Mathemratical and
Drawing Instruments, French Vegetable Tracing
Paper, Drawing Books, &c. &c. may always be
had in great variety. April 21
THE MUSICAL LIBRARY;
Published under the superintendence of the Boston
academy y of Musie.
LowELmL MAson ane Go. J. Wan, EarTons.
A part, containing '16 superroyal quarto
pages of music, and four pages of letter press,
neatly done up in an ornamental cover, will be
published each month. Price four dollars per
annum.
Extract from the Editors' Jhidress.
"The design ol rhe Mlsica. LiBUAsr is to fiur-
nish monthly a choice collection of music, both
vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular, pre-
sented in such a form as will render it a desirable
companion in tt.e parlor, the social circle, and in
private instruction. Pieces will be occasionally
inserted suitable for the private practice, or public
performances, of choirs or singing societies. The
music will be selelected from the works of the best
composers, ancient and modern. Original com-
positions'may occasionally appear. The editors
will constantly aim to select such music, and such
only, as possesses an elevated character, an.l is
really good and worthy of preservation-music
that shall interest and educate; and while it plea-
ses, shall cultivate and refine the taste, and pro-
mote a correct and accomplished style of perfobrm-
ance. Care will also be taken that it shall be


TAGNER'S ORIGINAL PATENT TRUSS,
9 for the radical cure Hernia.-This is the
instrument approved of by nearly all the medical
and scientific gentlemen of the United States, and
particularly recommended by Drs. Gibson, Mc-
Clellan, and Pattison, of Philadelphia, and all the
physicians of the District of Columbia.
The committee of physicians appointed by the
Medical Society of Philadelphia to examine all
the Trusses now before the public, and to report
upon their pretensions in the radical cure of Her-
nia, have given Stagner's Truss the decided pre-
ference to all others.
The subscriber having purchased, at a great
price, the privilege of introducing it into the
practice of Surgery in the District of Columbia.
invites all those who are subjects of Hernia, to make
trial of Stagner's Truss. J. F. CALLAN,
March 9 Opposite the Post Office.
F-N HE subscriber has constantly for lease, fo
1- perpetuity, or for any term of years, with o
without the privilege to purchine, Squares, Lots
Houses, and Tenements, of almost every variety
and in every ward of the city.
J MES HOBAN,
Attorney at Law.
Louisiana Av May 26--lawv f
OTI'E TO BOARDING SCHOOLS-or,
a Private Family, wishing to employ a
French Teacher.
k. middle aged French Lady, accustomed for
several years to teach her language, on Grammati-
cal principles, in School or in a Private Family,
is desirous to find employment. Letters of 'e-
commendation, showing her qualifications will be
produced, when required. Attention will'be given
to any letters, post paid, addressed to
A. M. D.
Reference, Rev. Mr. HIaonr,
Rev. Mr. POSTED,
Washington City.
Dec. 23-
--- NEW PEN-HOLDERS.
If- I received, at Stationers' Hall, a great va-
6_ a ..rty of Silver, Ivoty and Cocoa Wood Pen-
holders; some of them constructed upon a new
print ciple, suitable for every kind of metallic pens,
and which can be worn in thle pocket with the
pen attached; being the neatest and most conven-
ient article that has ever been offered to the public.
W. FISCHER.


April 28.


(Tel)


CREAP MEDICAL BOOKS.
'* OR sale by F. TAYLOR, just received,
i Parish's Practical Surgical Observations on
Strangulated Hernia, one volume, octavo, (1836 ,
with engraved illustrations. $2 25.
Paxton's Anatomy, new edition, two large vol-
um(s, very numerous engravings. $4 25.
Gibsomn's Surgery, new edition. $5 50.
Dewee's Pacutice, last edition, two volumes in
one. Price $3 50.
Meckel's Anatomy, last edition, three lae large vol-
unmes. Prt ce $6.
Bell on the Nerves, with large quarto-sized en-
gravings. $2 2'5.
Bell on thIe Arteries, with very numerous engra.
vings, beautifully colored, onie volume, boundJ
$2 50.
Thlie above, together with a supply of Medical
ad Surgical works, (too argo la to e enuumerated,
are just received from the recent northern trade
-, ( dl ofthe latest and be-st editions,) the whole
,1 a h are tor sale at prices corresponding tothe
above, from which a liberal deduction will be
made to those purchasing several works to-
gether.
Purchasers are invited to call and examine for
themselves, before sending their orders to the
North.
Waverley Circulating- Library, immediately east
of Gadsby's Hotel. May 9
PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHY OF FELIX
GRUNDV,
S this day published in the 27th number of the
National Portrait\iallery. This day received
and for sale by F. TA\ LLOl, at thei Waverley Cir-
culating Library, imnmedl-atteh---st of Gadsby's
Hotel, Price 75 cents, May 21


,ER\ ,t-1-''T tOMAN WANTED, for the
J. gerCi.,IM Lik u 1 i n. ,.r ii f.iI; I. G-.od re
commendations required; and to such good wages
and prompt payment. Apply to
L. JOHNSON, "- 5
April 4 Pa. Avenue. '
S VOW IS THE TIME.-From the flatteringen-
couragement the proprietors have met with,
in the sale of their tickets, they have soine assur-
rances that they may have it in their power to
draw their lottery on the 15th day of August next.
VALUABLE REAL AND PERSONAL PRO.
PEr'tTY BY LOT TERY, :to be disposed of under
the superintendence of the Trustees appointed by
an act of the General Assemby of Maryland;
passed at December session 1834; to authorize
Henry Shafer George Shafer, and Henry I, S/a.
fer, to distribute their estate by lot.
This property is situated in the village of Funks.
town in Washington county, on the National Turn.*
pike Road leading tram Baltimore to Wheeling,
and distance two miles from Hagerstown, being in
the centre of one of the most populous, wealthy
and thriving counties in the State of Maryland.
TI he mills are upon the waters of the Antietam
and driven by said stream with ample water pow.
er, and which is very constant and uiever failing.
The advantages attached to the mills are number.
ous, being in one of the most productive counties
6f the State for wheat, and all kinds of grain, wool,
&c. &c. being distant only six miles from Wil-
liainsport on the Chesapeake and Ohio canal, and
near Hagerstown, (.with a turnpike, leading to
both places,) one of the best wh at markets in the
State ,where large quantities of grain finds its
market from Pennsylvania, &c. The proposed '
railroad contemplated from Chambersburgh, and
passing through Hagerstown to intersect the Bal-
timore and Ohio railroad at Weverton on the Po.
tomac, will pass very near to this place. There
is not much doubt but that the Antietam will be
mede navigable, so as to intersect the Chesapeake
and Ohio canal at the Antietam iron works; as
there is now a lock at this place, built by the Po-
tomac company, which will pa-s a boat from the
waters of the dam, to the wa'ers below.
The lots of ground are situated in and adjoining
Funkstown, being many of them valuable building
lots, and in a very high state' of cultivation.
The Mansion house is a large and commodious
dwelling house, celebrated for the flower and fruit
garden attached to it.
This property was valued by commissioners ap-
pointed by the Legislature. The. prizes in this
lottery are subject to no discount; the prizes that
may be drawn will be delivered after forty days
subsequent to the drawing, if demanded within
twelve months from its date.
The title to this property is unquestionable. A
plot of the real estate is deposited with the Trus-
te es.
The price of a ticket is but Ten Dollars.
SCHEME ,
Arranged and valued by the Commissioners ap-
pointed by the Legislature of Maryland.
1 prize valued at $33,333
1 do 16,000
1 do 6,667
1 do 2,637
1 do 1,067
2 do 6 7 each, 1,334
1 do 690
1 do 400
6 do 300 each,jl,800
1 do 336
3 do at 267 each. 801
1 do 250
1 do 234
1 do 187
1 do 167
13 do at 134 each, 1,742
1 do "'. 113
2 do at 100 each, 200
Together with other prizes, making in the
whole 408 prizes, amounting to $80,310.
This Lottery will be drawn upon the plan of
the old Maryland Lotteries, under the direction of
the Trustees appointed by the Legislature.
In this Lottery, any one disposed to risk the
small sum of $10, may venture withoutt any scru-
ples. It is not a scheme of speculation, but sim-
ply to relieve the proprietors of the late Antietam
Wool n Factory which was destroyed by fire; and
the chances are as good if not better than in mo-
neyed Lotteries.
Who would not r'sk the sum of 10 for such val-
uable property? Nothing venture, nothing win-
delays are dangerous-send on the cash and you
shall have the prizes.
For tickets address
GEORGE SHAFER, Agent,
FiTvnaSTOW9 Md., March, 2.