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Daily Albany Argus
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073654/00006
 Material Information
Title: Daily Albany Argus
Alternate Title: Albany Argus
Daily city gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 62 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Croswell & Van Benthuysen
Place of Publication: Albany N.Y
Creation Date: August 12, 1839
Publication Date: 1827-1856
Frequency: daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Albany (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Albany County (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- Albany -- Albany
Coordinates: 42.652594 x -73.757314 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from the Micro Photo Div., Bell & Howell Co.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 3, no. 681 (Dec. 27, 1827)-v. 31, no. 9252 (Feb. 16, 1856).
General Note: Publishers: Edwin Croswell, Obadiah Romney Van Benthuysen & Thomas M. Burt, 1831-1834; E. Croswell, O.R. Van Benthuysen, Thos. M. Burt & Sherman Croswell, 1834-1840; Edwin Croswell, Henry H. Van Dyck & Sherman Croswell, 1840-1843; Edwin Croswell & Sherman Croswell, 1843-1848; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell & Samuel M. Shaw, 1849-1850; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell, Samuel M. Shaw & James I. Johnson, 1851; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell & James I. Johnson, 1851-<1853>; Sherman Croswell & Gideon Tucker, 1854; Calvert Comstock & James I. Johnson, <1855>-1856.
General Note: "Republican," 1827-1833; "Democratic," 1834-1856.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02260077
lccn - sn 83045590
System ID: UF00073654:00006
 Related Items
Related Items: Albany Argus & city gazette
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1828)
Related Items: Albany Argus & daily city gazette, extra
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1838)
Related Items: Campaign Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1848)
Related Items: Campaign Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1852)
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1832)
Related Items: Weekly Argus and rough-hewer
Related Items: Weekly Argus (Albany, N.Y.)
Preceded by: Albany Argus & daily city gazette
Succeeded by: Albany evening Atlas (Albany, N.Y. : 1843)
Succeeded by: Atlas & Argus (Albany, N.Y. : Daily)

Full Text







DAILY ALBANY ARGUS.

Z. CROW3 IELL, Pr*&4r to te. Stott.
.CROSWELL,
0. R. VAN BENTHUYSEN, 1Propr'#or.
THOSE. M. BURT,. -
SHERMAN CROSWELL, )
Ofice No. 370 South Market street, riTCounting
Room in tihe second story.


DAILY ALBANY ARGUS-Eight dollars per annum,
payable half yearly.
THE ALBANY ARGUS, saim-WutLY-Four dollars
per annum, payable in advance.
ALBANY ARGUS, WEEKLY-Two dollars per annum,
payable in advance, without which no paper will be sent;
no subscriptions received for less thaji six months.
No paper will be discontinued, (unless at the discretion
of the proprietors,) until all arrearages are paid.
Terms of advertising by the Square in Daily.
[Sixteen lines or less make a square.]


1 Square, 1 day,
2
4" 3"
4 we
*I 5 tt
*' 8 it
2 weeks,
4 3 it


$0 50 1 Square, I month, 83
0 75 6 weeks, 4
1 00 2 months, 5
1 13 3 6
1 25 6 10
1 38 9 15
2 13 1 year, 20
2 88 (Paper not included.)


87 Insolvent notices inserted six weeks for 81,67; ten
weeks for $2. Other legal notices are charged at the rate
of 50 cents per folio (of 100 words) for the first insertion,
and 20 eents per folio for each subsequent insertion. In
all eases, payment is required in advance.
All letters and communications must be post paid.

THE ETNA INSURANCE COMPANY
OF HARTFORD, Conn offers to insure buildings,
goods, merchandise, and personal property generally, a-
gainst loss or damage by fire, with the assurance to the
public, that all its transactions shall be conducted in a
manner worthy of their confidence.
THO3. K. BRACE, President.
8. L. Loomis. Secretary.
S .- COR'S TEN BROECK. Agent, Albany,
fe8-6m Office Atheneum Building.
AT 'a court of chancery held for the state of New-
York; at the city of New York, on the eighth day
of July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nin.--
Prrsent, William T, McCoun, vice chancellor of the first
circuit.
Mary Bokel, vs. Frederick Bokel.
It appearing by affidavit to the satisfaction of this court,
that the defendant in this cause is a non resident of the
state of New York, and a resident of the state ef New-
Jersey-on motion of MrgD. Graham, jr., solicitor and
of counsel for the complainant it is ordered, that the said
defendant cause his appearance in this cause to be en-
tered with the clerk of the first circuit, and file his an-
swer to the bill of complaint therein, and serve a copy
thereof on the complainant's solicitor within four months
from the date of this order, or that the said bill be taken
as confessed by sa d defendant: and it is further ordered,
that this order be published within twenty days, once in
eat h week for eight successive weeks, in the state pape-,
and also in the New York Daily Express, a pu' lie news-
paper printed in the city of New York, or that a copv of
this order be served on said non-resident defendant, per-
sonally, at least twenty d.iys before the expiration of said
four months, the time prescribed f(r the appearance of
uoch defendant as aforesaid. Copy.
jy25-Sw JOHN WALWORTH, Clerk.
AT court of chancery, held tfortlie state of New-
York, at the town of Saratoga Springs. on the six-
teenth day of July, In the year one thousand eight hun-
dred and thirty-nine-Present, Reuben H. Walworth,
chancellor.
Arthur Bronson, executor, &c., vs. Richard F. Biy-
denburgh
It appearing by affidavitto the satisfaction of this court
that thl defendant resides out of this state, but is a resi-
dent of one of the United States, to wit, of Mlichigan
city, in the state o( Indiana-on motion of Julius
Rhoades, of counsel in behalf of Richard E. Mount, jr.
the solicitor for the complainant, it is ordered, that
the said defendant cause his appearance to be entered,
and notice thereof to be served on the complainant's so-
licitor within four months from the date of this order, and
in case of his appearance, that he cause his answer to
the complainant's bill to be filed and a copy thereof to
be served on the complainant's solicitor within forty
days after service of a copy of the said bill, and in de-
fault thereof the said bill of complaint be taken as con-
fessed by him: and it is further ordered, that within
twenty days the complainant cause this order to be pub-
lished in the state paper and in the newspaper published
in the city of New york called the New York Times and
Commercial Intelilgencer, and that the said publication
be continued in each of said papers, at least once in each
week for eight weeks in succession, or that he cause a
copyofthis order to be personally served on the said de-
fendant at least twenty days before the time above pre-
se ibed for his appearance. Copy.
JOHN M. DAVISON, Register.
Rich'd E. Mount, jr., Compt's Sol. jy27-Sw
TEHE people of the state of N* w York, biy the grace of
SGod free and independent, to Eliza Griggs, the wid-
ow of Elijah Griggs, deceased, Polly Griggs, Sally
Griggs, Charles Griggs, Minerva Griggs, and others un-
known, children of Roswcll Griggs, deceased, Daniel
Origgsresidingin the state of Connecticut; Sat ah, wid-
ow of Ashbel Stanley, deceased, of Coventry, in said
itate of Connecticut; Maria Kellogg, and others, chil-
dren of Susan Kellogg, deceased, residing in parts un-
known; Laura, wife of Peleg B. Peckham. Sophronia
Boque,John Griggs, Julia Griggs. Edwin E. Griggs,
and Harriet, wife of-- Doty, reeidipgin different parts
of the state of New York, children of Joshua Griggs, de-
ceased; Willis m Grig-s, of Catskill, Greene county, son
of Charles Griggs, deceased; and Nancy, wife of -
Bump, residing in Providence in the state of Rhode Isl-
and, heirs and next of kin of said Elijah Griggs. late of
Sthe town of Rensselaerville in the county of Albany, de-
ceased, greeting:
Whereas Eliza Griggs, of the town of Rensselaer ille
in the county of Albany, has lately made application to
* orsarrogate of the county of Albany, to have a certain
instrument in writing relating to both real and personal
estate, duly proved as the last will and testament of said
Xlijah Griggs, deceased; you and each of you are hereby
lcited and required pers ally to be and anpear before our
said surrogate, at his office in the city of Albany, on the
twenty-third day of September next, at ten o'clock in
t,' forenoon of that day, then and there to attend to the
probate of said instrument, as the last will and testament
obfsaid deceased.
i testimony whereof, we have caused the seal of office
at our said surrogate to be hereunto affixed. Wit-
[L. 8LJ nes. Anthony Blanchard, surrogate of our said
county, at the city of Albany, the 26th day of
July A. D. 1839.
jy"9-4w A. BLANCHARD.
THE people of the state of New-York, to Sisan
THDehrsley and Elenor Fercherson, of Barbadoes, the
ext of kin and heirs at law of Thomaias Griffith, deceas-
ed. send greeting:
Whereas Susan Lloyd Griffith, ofthe city of New York,
has lately applied to our surrogate of the county of New-
York, to have a certain instrument in wrii ing,bearing date
the 17th day of May, 1839, purporting to dispose of both
real and personal estate, duly proved as the last will and
tstament of Thomas Griffi-h, late of the city of N. York:
tuarefore you and each of you are cited and required per-
nally to be and appear before our said surroga e, at his
otes tn the city of New York, on the elev nth day of
qf Sept9mber next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon of that
4gdhten and there to attend to the probate of the said
last will and testament.
(a witness whereof, the surrogate of said county his
hereunto affixed his seat of office, the twenty-
fL. 6.J seventh day of July, one thousand eight hundred
and thirty-nine, and of our independence the six-
ty-fourth.
jyaO-Bw "JAMES CAMPBELL. Surrogate.
.TrHE people of the state of New York, to Thomas
.3 Garniss, Eliza Baker, Leless Ferrier, Emma Gar-
[ss, ThomasaG. Caldwell, Caroline Caldwell, of the
(Ity of New York; John Garniss, John WV. Pickett, Cor-
-dnli Plsket, Albert Picket, and Ellen Ada PI ke;, of
pincinnwti, Ohio; and Catharine Beach, of Lexington,
WKentlcky, the next of kin and heirs at law of Thomas
Garniss, dJceased, send greeting.
Whereas, Ebenezer C.ldwell, of the city of New York,
.has lately applied to our surrogate of the county of New-
York, to have a certain instrument in writing, bearing
date the 31st day of Marci, 1839. purporting to dispose of
both re~l and personal estate, duly proved as the last will
.and testament of Thomas Garniss late of the'city of New
*ork: therefore you and each of you are cited and re-
qaired personally to be and appear before our said sur-
rogate, at-his office in the city of New-York, on the
twelfth day of September next, at ten o'clock in the fore-


..oOB of that day, then and there to attend to the pro-
bate of the said last will and testament.
Ina witness whereof, the surrogate of our said county
has hereunto affixed his seal of office, the twenty-
~, ,1fg l'fnth day of July, one thousand eight hun-
dyad and thirty nine, and of our independence
the sixty-f(oUrg.n
Jy 6w JAMEB CAMPBELL, Surrogate.
'TT X I MIHTT AM WILL PREVAIL."
TVO THE CITIZENS OPF ALBANY AND
I fTSVICINI T-That our object may be clearly
.,aderstood, we consider it due to ourselves thus publicly
to state that we have not fixed upon Albany as a tempo-
rary location, for the purpose of treating on excitement
Jy heaping a few goods upon our counters, giving out
$that we are giing to stay but at short time. clothing our-
selves in mystery, selling some descriptions of goods at
coat and less, that the unsuspecting public, seeing us as
thr ugh a glass darkly, may thus be humbugged and de-
ceived. No! W- have not been bred in the New York
Canal st. philosophy of retailing dry goods, but from tie
Gr- en banks of the Connecticut, the land o l'steady ha-
-l /u we come to establish ourselves upon the broad
ground of equal and exact justice to every individual, be-
E:assurd i iv the aunhaDnnv enerienee of some of our


VOL. XIV.


IN CHANCERY-Before the chancellor. John
Holme. Gerrit Peebles and Maria his wife, vs. Anna
Van Schaick and Catlisrine Van Schaick.
In pursuaiince and in virtue of a decretal order of this
court, made in the above entitled cause on the third day
of July, 1839, 1 the subscriber, one of the masters of said
court, shall expose for sale at public auction, at the Man-
sion House, in North Market street, in the city of Albany
on the 31st day of August next, at 1% o'clock at noon of
that day, the premises which arc described as follows,
viz:-Lot number forty-eight with the buildings thereon,
lying on the corner of Exchange street, late Mark Lane,
and Quay street, bounded on the north by Exchange st.,
east by Quay street, south partly by lot number forty-nine
and partly by ground now or late owned by Myndert Van
Schaick, and west by lot number six, owned by Henry L.
Webb, being in length along Exchange street fifty-six
feet, and along Quay street aforesaid twenty-six feet two
inches, and being in the form of an L.
Also, all that part of a water lot conveyed by the may-
or, aldermen, and commonalty of the city of Albany to
Gerrit WV. Van Schaick, in his life time, by indenture
bearing d(late the twenty-fifth day of April, one thou-
sand, seven hundred and ninety-three, which lays in front
of, and adjoining said lot number forty-eight afore-
said, and being of an cqualbreadth with it, with the right
of dockage and wharfage, subject to the covenants and
conditions contained in said indenture.
Also, lot number six, lying on the north side of Fox
street, in the city of Albany, bounded on the north by the
middle of Fox creek and on the south by Fox street, be-
ing thirty feet wide on Fox street, and Fox creek afore-
said.
Also, lot number seven, on the north side of Fox street
aforesaid, bounded as follows: on the north by Fox creek,
on thie south by Fox street, on the east by lot number six,
and on the west by lot number eight, as may more fully
appear by a map thereof made by Harnmanus P. Schuyler.
Also, all that certain lot si;uate in the city of Albany,
on the east side of Pearl street, and north side of Steu-
ben street, being a corner ot situate at the intersection
of Pearl and Steuben streets, I being about twenty-seven
feet on Pearl street, and about ane hundred and four feet
on Steuben street, excepting and reserving out of said
lot an alley or right of way across the east end thereof
seven feet wide andten feet high, which belongs to the lot
adjoining on the north-the owners of said corner lot hav-
ing the right to build over said alley at a height of at lest
ten feet from the surface of the walk, in front of said alley.
Also, all that certain lot near the village of Waterford,
known and distinguished on a map made by Evert
Van Alen as lot number eight, being a subdivision of a
lo of land in the half moon patent, known and distin-
guished on a map ihereof,nmade by Nanning Visschler and
Philip Van Renssel,.er, surveyors, as lot number two of
the yellow color on said map, ai may more fully and at
large appear by reference to the said map.
Also, a lot of land situate, lying and teing in the towns
of Orange and Watcrford, in the county of Saratoga,
known and distinguished on a map made by Nannlng
Visscher and Philip Van Rensselaer, as lot number one
hundred and thirteen of the white or parchment color, as
may more fully and at large appear by reference to said
map. This iot of land is under a perpetual lease, bearing
date the first day of September, 1743, to Derick Vander
Knarr, his heirs, &c., subject to an annual rent of six skip-
pies of wheat and three shillings in money.
Also, one other lot of land, situate in tle town of Half
Moon, and county of Saratoga, known on a certain map
of Half Moon patent, made by Nanning Visscher and
Philip Van Rensselaer, by lot number four of the white,
bounded on the south by lot number five, on the west by
lot number twenty-one, on the north by lot number three,
and of the white or parchment color on said map, and on
time east by the long line on said map, containing about
one hundred of acres land,subject to a lease for the term of
forty years from the 1st January, 1818, to John R. Smith
and the covenants in said lease contained, at an annual
rent of twelve dollars and fifty cents."
A credit lor a term of years will be given for a oart of
the purchase money; the payment to be secured by the
bonds and mortgages of the purchasers, upon the premises
purchased by them. Albany, July 9ih. 1839.
JULIUS RHOADES, Master in Chancery.
Peter Gansevoort, complainants sol. jy15-lawtd
B Y order of the hon. Michael Ulshoetter, first judge
of the court of common pleas for the city and coun-
ty of New York, notice is hereby given pursuant to the
provisions of the statute authorisingattachments against
non-resident debtors, that an attachment has issued
against the estate of TURBUTT R. BETTEN &
FISHER, residents of Tallahass.e in the territory of
Florida, and th itthe same will be sold for the pay-
ment of their debts, unless they appear and discharg(I
such attachment, according to law, within nine months
from the first publication of this notice; and that the
payment of any debts due to them by residents of this
state, andthe delivery to them or for their use, of any
property withinthis state belonging to them,andthe
transfer of any such property by them are forbidden by
law and are void. Datedthe21st dayof May, 1-39.
W. C. WETMORE,
my25-9m Attorney for attaching creditor.
SY ruier oi the hon. Jacob Lansing, first judge of the
court ofcommon pleas in and for the city and coun-
ty of Albany, notice is hlereby given, pursuant to tin
provisions oft'the statute authorising attachments against
absconding and ,onevalMd debtors, thatan attachment has
issued against the estate of ISRAEL M. REEVE, an in-
habitant of this state, a concealed or absconding debt-
or. residing in the city of Albany, that the samni will be
sold for the payment of his debts, unless he appear and
discharge such attachment according to law, within
three months from the first publication of ,this notice;
and tha! the payment of any debt, and the delivery o0
any property belonging to such debtor, to him or to his
use, and the transfer of any property by him for any pur-
pose whatever, are forbidden hv law And are void. Da-
ted the 1st August, 1839. WHELPLEY & HILL,
au3-3m Attorneys for attlaching creditor.
V order of the honorable William Inglis. associate
judge of the court of common pleas in and for the
city and county ol New York, notice is hereby given
put--t to the provisions ofthe statute authorisi#g at
tachimentt. against zon-resident debtors, that an attach-
ment hnas issued ag-inst the estate of CHARLES P.
SIBBALD, a resident of the state of Pennsylvania, and
that the same will be sold for the payment of his debts,
unless he appear and discharge such attachment accord-
ing to law, within nine months from the first publication
of this notice; and that the payment of any debts due
to him by residents of this state, and the delivery to him
or for his use of any property within this state belong-
ing to him, and the transfer of any such property by
him, are forbidden by law and are void. Dated thi
25th day of July, 1839. ...,, ,


jy-29 9m


Attorneys for attachin. creditor.


BY order of the hon. Michaei Ulshoeffer, first judge otf
the court of common pleas for the city and county
of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the pro-
visions of the statute authorising attachments against
non-resident debtors,that an attachment has issued a-
gainst the estate of HUGH BROWN, resident of Glen-
ary, in Ireland, and that the same will be sold for the
paymentof his debts, unless he appear and discharge such
attachment according to law, within nine months from
the first publication of this notice, and that the payment
of any debts due to him by residents of this state, and
the delivery to him or for his use of any property with-
in this state belonging to him, and the transfer of any
such property by him, are forbidden bylaw and are void.
Dated the 6th day of July, 1839.
HENRYE. DAVIES,
jyl0-9m Attorney for attaching creditors.
B order of thehon. Michael Ulshoeffer. lirstjuatac ol
the court ofcomnion pleas for the city and county(cf
N,-w York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provi-
sions of the statute authorising attachninernts against nor.
resident debtors, that an attatrhment has issued against
th'- estate of JAMES PAYNE, a resident of the
state of Louisiana, and that the same will be sold foi
the payment of his debts, unless he appear and dis-
charge sucr attachment, according to law, within nint
months Iroi. tie first publication ofthis notice, an th,-a
the payment of any debts due to him by residents of this
state, an( the delivery to him, or for his use, of an)
property within this state belonging to him, and the
transfer of any such property lby him. are forbidden b3
law and are void. Dated the 15th ilav of June, 1819.
ELIAS H. ELY,
jel7-9m Attorney for atllaf-ihinS rreditor.


B or,-r oui the hon. Michael Ulshoeifer, first judgj
oft! e court of common pleas for thIe city and coto.-
ty of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the
provisions of the statute authorising attachment? againsI
non-resident debtors, that an attachment has issued a
against thIe estate of JOAQUIM DE FREITAS ESME-
RALDO, a resident of thie island of Mlakeira, and tLat
the same will be sol' (or the payment of his debts, unless
he appear and discharge such attachment, a-cording to
law, within nimn months from the first publication of'
this notice; and that the payment of any debts due to
hnm by residents ofthiF state,and the delivery to himor
for his use of any property within this state belonging
to him, and the transfer ol any such property by him,
are forbidden by la% and are void. Dated the '27th day
o( April, 1839. F. R. TILLOU,
my7 9m Attorney for ;tttltring ci-rtdtor
BY order of the hon. Samuel Jones, chief justice of
the superior court of the city of New York, notice
is hereby given, pursuant to tha provisions of the stat-
ute authorizing attachments against absconding and con-
cealed debtors, that an attachment has issued againstthe
estate of FitEDERIC CLARK, now or lately an inhatb-
itantn of thisstate. an abseonding or concealed debtor.


ALBANY, MONDAY, AUGUST 12, 1839


IN CHANCERY-Before the vice chancellor-Third
circuit. Firemen's Insurance Company of the city of
Albany, vs. Nelson Place, John Dimon, Lewis Wakeley,
Jared Mead and John D. Philips.
In pursuance and in virtue of a decretal order of this
court made in the above entitled cause, I, the subscriber,
one of the masters of said court, shall expose for sale at
public auction at the Mansion House in the city of Alba-
ny, on the tenth day of September next, at twelve o'clock
at noon, all that certain piece or parcel of land lying and
being in the Second ward of the city of Albany, bounded
as follows, to wit: Situate on the north side of the Al-
bany and Schenectidy turnpike road, known and distin-
guished by the name of lot number seventy-seven, and is
bounded as follows, to wit: On the east by lot number
seventy-six, on the west by lot number seventy-eight, and
on the north by Road street, and on the south by the said
turnpike road, being in bireadth in front and rear thirty-
three feet, and in length one hundred and sixty feet; sub-
ject nevertheless to an annual ren, of two dollars and
filfty cents. Also all that certain other lot of ground, 1
ing near the one mile stone in the city of Albany, distin-
guished on a map thereof a5 lot number seventy-five, on
the north side of the Albany and Schenectady turnpike
road, bounded on the north by a street, o i the south by
the said turnpike road, n the east by lot number seven-
ty-four, and on the west by lot number seventy-six, being
thirty-three feet wide in front and rear, and one hundred
and sixty-feet in length, subject nevertheless to the year-
ly rent oftwo dollars and filly cents. Also all that cer-
tain other lot of ground lying in the Second ward of the
city of Albany, near the one mile stone, and on the north
side ol the Albany and Schenectady turnpike road, dis-
tinguished on a map thereof as lot number seventy-six,
bounded on the north by a street, on the south by the said
turnpike road, on the east by lot number seventy-five.
and on the west by lot number seventy-seven, bing thir-
ty-three feet wide in front and rear. and one hundred and
sixty-feet in length, subject to the yearly rent of two
dollars and fifty cents. Also all those two certain lots,
number twenty- three and twenty-four, on the south side
ol the Albany and Schenectady turnpike road; lot num-
ber twenty-three is bounded on the north by said turn-
pike road, on the south by Bradford st eet, on the east by
lot number twenty-two, and on the west by lot number
twenty-four, containing in breadth in front and rear
thirty-three feet, and in length on each side one hundred
and sixty feet: lot number twenty-four is bounded on
the north by the Albany and Schenectady turnpike road,
on the south by Bradford street, on the east by lot num-
ber twenty-three, andt on the west by lot number twenty-
five, containing in front and rear thirty-three eet, and
in length on each side one hu dred and six y feet; excep-
ting out of lot number twenty-three, three feet in front
and rear oa the east side, re-erved for an alley. The
said lot is subject ta an annual rent of two dollars and
fifty cents. Dated Albany, July 25,1839.
JOHN I. BURTON, Master in chancery.
Peter Gansevoort, Sol. for compl'ts. jy29-6w
Ar T court orcuasc.ry lIeld lor the state ot Nw V ork
at the city of New York, on the second day of
July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine-
Present, William T. McCoun, vice chancellor of the first
circuit.
William Post, vs. William Raymond, et at.
It appearing by affidavits to the satisfaction of this court
that the defendants William Raymond and Jane E. his
wife. Josiah E. Challis,WilliamnHirdwick and Ssrah his
wife. John Aim, William Wilson, William B. Sloan,
Marshall Chapin, John Owen, George I. Galvin, reside
out of this state, and are residents, to wit: William
Raymond and Jane E. his wife of the state of Missouri;
Josiah E. Challis, William Hardwick and Sarah his wife
and William Wilson, of the state of Massachusetts;
Marshall Chapin and John Owen of the state of Michi-
gan; George I. Galvin of the state of Maine; William B.
Sloan and John Aim, of one of lthe western states: and it
also further appearing by said affidavits, that the def ant, The Citizen's Bank, is a corporation or body politic,
whose location or place of doing business is out of this
stat-, to wit: The Citizen's Bank at Worcester, in the
state of Massachusetts, and that none of the officers
thereof could be found in this state, upon whom process
of subpona to appear and answer could be legally served:
and it also further appearing by said affidavits, that the
defendant Moses B. James, is a resident ot this state, but
that process could not be served upon him by reason of
his absence therefrom, &c.-on reading and filing said
affidavits, and on motion of Mr. Charles Edwards, for
the complainant, it is ordered, that thesaid WVilliam Ray-
mond and Jane E. his wife, Josiah E. Challis, William
Hardwick and Sarah his wife, William Wilson, Mar-
shall Cthapin, John Owen, George I. Galvin, William
B. Sloan, The Citizen's Bank and Moses B. James cause
their appearance to be entered herein, and notice there-
of to be served on the complainant's solicitor within
four months from the date of this order, and in case of
the appearance of any of the above name.l non-resident
or absent defendants, that they cause their answer to the
complainant's bill to be filed, and a copy thereof to be
served on the complainants' solicitor within forty days
after service of a copy ofsaid bill, and notice of this or-
der, &c., and that in default thereof, said bill of com-
plaint may betaken as confessed by them: and it is fur-
ther ordered, that within twenty days from the date of
this order, the said complainant cause this order to be
published in the state paper, and in the New-York
Times and Commercial Intelligencer, printed in this
state, for eight weeks in succession and once at least in
each week, or that the said complainant cause a copy
of this order to be served on the said above named de-
fendants personally at least twenty days before the time
herein prescribed for their atipearance herein. Copy.
jy15-8w JOHN WALWORTH. Clerk.
A T a court ofchancery held for the state of New York
at the city of New York, on the eleventh day of July,
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine-Present,
William T. McCoun, vice chancellor of the first circuit.
William H. Robertson, vs. Ebenezer Jesup, junior,
et al.
It appearing by affidavitto the satisfaction of this court
that the defendants the Bank of Massillon and the Bank
of Michigan, are institutions situated out of this state,
but in two of the United States of America, to wit, in the
states of Michigan and Ohio, and the officers reside there-
in-on motion of Gerard WV. Morris, of counsel for the
complainant, it is ordered, that the sail the BDunk oiUMas-
-iloion and the Bank of Michigan cause their appearance
to be entered, and notice thereof to be served within
four months from the date of this order; and in case
of their appearance that they cause their answer to the
complainant's bill in the nature of a supplemental bill to
be filed, and a copy thereof to be served on the complain-
ant's solicitor within forty days after service of a copy
of said bill, and in default thereof, said bill of complaint
may betaken as confessed by them: and it is further
ordered, that within twenty days the said complainant
cause this order to be published in the state paper,
and in the New York Aalierican, and that the said publi-
cation becontinuedin each of the papers at least once in
each week for eight weeks in succession, or that he cause
a copy of this order to be personally served on the said
the Bank of Massillon and the Bank of Michigan, at least
twenty days before the time above prescribed for their
appearance. Copy.
jylS-8w JOHN -ALWORTHw Clerk.


B EFORE CHANCELLOR.-Catharine Burton, and
others, vs. Avaph Beebe, Nahum Rice, and others.
In pursuance and in virtue of the decree entered in
this cause. I, the subscriber, one of the masters of this
court, will expose for sale by public auction, at the Matn-
sion House in Norti Market street in the city of Albany,
on Tuesday the twenty-seventh day of August next, at
twelve o'clock at noon, the following premises: All that
certain farm or parcel of land, situate in the town of
Guilderland in the county of, Albany, being a northerly
part of lot number three, and bounded as follows: Be-
ginning at the most northwesterly point of the said lot
number three, and running from thence north forty de-
grees east thirty chains and sixty links, from t hence south
seventy degrees east twenty-seven chains, from thence
south thirty-nine degrees west nineteen chains and sixty
links, and from thence on a straight line to the place of
beginning, containing" sixty-five acres of land, be the
same more or less. The said lot number three being sit-
uated north of the Norman's Kill creek. Also, all that
other piece or parcel of land, lying north of the Norman's
Kill in the county of Albany, and known and distinguish-
ed as part of lot number three, beginning at a post set
for the southwest corner of the lot sold by James Hough-
ton to Ephraim Wheeler and Asa R. Allen, and runs
from thence south thirty degrees east forty-five chains
and forty-six links to a stake, easterly five chains and
forty-six links to a stake on thIe hill, acornerof Ben-
jaminn Holmnes's line, north thirty-six degrees fiMteen min-
utes east thirty chains and fifty-five links to a post near
a fence, north twenty-eight degrees west fourteen chains
arid sixty I.nks to a post, theince with a straight line
north eighty-six degrees west thirty-three chains and
sixty-five links, to the place of beginning, containing
eighty-four acres of land. Dated Albany. July 12th,
1S39. W.H. FONDEY,
jyl3-6v Master in chancery.
N OTICE-The undersigned having be n appomtea by
the hon. Michael Ulshoeffier, first judge ofthe New-
York common pleas, trustees of thie property, estate,
funds and effects of Samuel W. Skinker, a non-resident
debtor, do hereby require all persons indebted to such
non-resident debtor, on or before the fourth day of Au-
gu-t next, at the office of Henry E. Davies, No. 44 Wall
street in the city of New Vork, to render an account of
all debts and sums of money owin, by them respectively,
to said trustees, and to pay thIe same; and all persons ha-
ving in their possession any property or effects ot such
debtor, are required 1o deliver the .ame to the said trus-
tees by the day above named; and all the creditors of the
said non-re -ident debtor, are required to deliver their re-
spective accounts and demands to the said trustees, or


l RUGS, MEDICINES, DYE WOODS
R DYE 'STUFFS, &c.,--Te subscribers offer a
wholesale, at thelowest prices for cash or approved credit
an extensive assortment of genuine DRUGS, MEDI
CINES, DYE STUFFS, &C.; among which are the fol-
lowing:
Opium, Logwood,
Aloes, Nicaragua,
Camphor, Fustic,
Magnesia, Camwood,
Castor Oil, Copperas,
Brimstone, Blue Vitrool,
Sulphur, Oil do
Epsom Salts, White do
Glauber Salts, Madder,
Borax Crude, Indigo,
do Refined. Nutgalls,
Caltomel, Chrome Yellow,
Jalap, Cochineal,
Red Precipitate Annatto,
Liquorice Ball, Prussian Blue,
do Root, Drop Lake,
Salt Petre, Aqua Fortis,!
Pink Root, Red and WVhite Lead,
Cream Tartar, Rotten Stone,
Sulphate do Gum Copal,
Senna, do Mastic,
Rhubarb do Arabic,
Spirit Turpentiii, do Myrrh
Lamp Black, Russia Isinglass,
Silver Black Lead, American do
Also, a quantity of India and English Seine Twine.
Druggists, Merchants And others will find it for their in-
erest to call before they purchase elsewhere.
J. & J. WV. BAY,
my3 Cor. of State and South Market-sts.



PEES IL


PETERS' PILLS-THE TRUE RICHES OF
LIFE IS HEALTH!-The unparalleled reputation
which Peters' Pills have acquired as a Medical Restora-
tive is the most unquestionable proof that can be given
of their immense lmportane to the afflicted, in almost
every class of diseases. The number of letters received
from patients recovering through their means is really
prodigious, and the complaints which they have cured
are almost as varied as they are numerous. 1But still
there are some in which they-are more especially bene-
ficial than in others; and among those may be named the
too often fatal complaints of the stomach and bowels,
such as Cholic, Flatulence and Indigestions, for which
they are not only a certain but immediate cure.
It is well known that from the disarrangement of the
stomach and the bowels, arise nine-tenths of all the mal-
adies of an adult and declining life; that this is the foun-
dation of Flatulency, Spasmodic pains, Indigestion, loss
of appetite, &c., and that those in their turn give birth to
Dropsy, Liver Complaint, Consumption, and habitual
lowness of spirits: therefore, Peters' Pills being the very
best medicine which has ever been discovered for the in-
cipient diseases of the intestines, are necessarily the su-
rest preventive of these dreadful, and also those gene-
ral disorders, which embitter mature life and drag so ma-
ny millions to untimt ly graves.
In speaking thus, Dr. Peters arrogates nothing to him-
self that has not been conceded by the public. He is no
needy quack or unknown speculator, who comes before
the world as his own herald and witness, but is placed in
a responsibility of situation by the patronage which he
has enjoyed for six years, and which is increasing to an
extent unprecedented in the annals of minedicine, that
makes him careful to assert nothing which is not borne
out by the most infallible proof, and hence he does not
fear to be put to thIe test in any thing which he has pro-
mised respecting his Pills.
Dr. Peters is most happy to be able to state on the au-
thority of a great number of regular physicians, that
wherever his Vegetable Pills have been introduced, they
have almost superseded the adoption of mercurial exper-
iments, for their peculiar faculty in sweating the blood,
and stimulating it to expel all noxious juices, and in giv-
ing s rength and tone to the nerves, prevents disease
from acquiring that strength which must be got under, if
at all, by dangerous remedies. He does not pretend that
they are a positive cure, or even beneficial in every com-
plaint, but he most firmly believes that in all diseases
where a cathartic or aperient medicine is needed, they
will be found far superior to any of those drastic purga-
tive medicines which are so much puffed in the public
prints as purifiers of the blood. When taken according
to the directions accompanying them, they are highly ben-
eficial in the prevention and cure of bilious fevers, fever
and ague, dyspepsia, liver complaints, sick head-ache,
jaundice, asthma, dropsy, rheumatism, heart burn, nau-
sea, furred tongue, distension of the stomach and bowels,
incipient diarrhea, flatulence, habitual costiveness, loss
of appetite, blotched or sallow compl..xions, and all cases
of torpor of the bowels, where a cathartic or an aperient
is needed. They are exceedingly mild in their operation,
producing neither nausea, griping, nor debility.
The following highly flattering testimonials of the effi-
cacy of these celebrated Pils for the cure of liver com-
piaint, bilious diseases, sick head ache, costiveness, ner-
vous debility, &c. &c., have been voluntarily given by
medical men of tihe greatest celebrity at the North.
We, the undersigned, members of the Medical Faculty,
having examined the properties of Dr. Peters' Pills, and
used them in our practice, most cheerfully recommend
them as a family medicine, and consider them the best
Vegetable Pills we have ever used.
Doctor ELWELL, Doctor HARRIS,
RAMSEY. ATWATER,
ANDERSON, BERNARD.
JANUARY. 1, 1838.
Dear Sir-[ have made frequent use of your Pills in bil-
ious fever, costiveness, disease of the liver, sick head
ache, general debility, &c., and in all cases have found
them a valuable medicine. J. M. BOYD, M. D.
To Dr. Peters: F.BRCUARY 7, 1837.
Dear Sir-Having used your Vegetable Pills in My
practice for the last 12 months, I take pleasure in giving
my testimony of their goo4effects in cases of dyspepsia,
sick head ache, bilious cholic heartburn, nervous debili-
ty, QC, They --ra a ._,--,a ....A .I.Ud-uarttcand aperient.
being the best I hnve evel eei. .D.
GEO. C. SCOTT, M. D.
Price 25 and 50 cents per box, with directions.
For further particulars, inquire of Dr. Peters, at his
principal office No. 129, Liberty street, New York, or at
the office No. 70, Chesnut street. Philadelphia, or of the
agents in Albany.
0i The above pills are for sale in Albany by
R. M. MEIGS, Druggist.
388 South Market street.
J.&A.McCLURE Druggist,
74 State street.
HENRY RAWLS & Co, Druggists,
57 State street, and at their Branch Apothecaries Hall.
W. R. FORD & Co., Druggists,
32 Washington corner of Hawk street.
JOSEPH DAVIS, Druggist,
78 State street.
J. N. NORTHUP, Druggist,
Corner Division & Green street.
Also for sale by all the principal druggists throughout
the United Sates, the Canadas, Texas, Mexico, and the
West Indias. jy4-ly
A' a court of chancery held for the stateof New York
at the town of Saratoga Springs, on the sixteenth
day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and
thirty-nine-Present, Reuben H. Walworth, chancellor.
'I1 he New York Life Insurance and Trust Company,
vs. Jacob Lawrence, and others.
It appearing by affidavit to the satisfaction ofthiscourt,
that Jacob Lawrence and Burrett I. Pitcher, two of the
defendants in the above entitled cause,are non-residents of
this state, but are residents of one of the United States,
to wit, of the state of Michigan-on motion of Julius
Rhoadcs, of counsel for the complainants, it is ordered,
that the said Jacob Lawrence an l Burrett I. Pitcher,
cause their appearance to 'be entered, and notice thereof
to be served on the coinplainants' solicitor, within four
months from the date ofthis orier, and in case of their
appearance, that they cause their answer or answers to
the complainants' bill to be filed, and a copy or copies
thereof to be served on the complainants' solicitor with-
in forty days after service of a copy of said bill, and in
default thereof said bill of complaint may be taken as
confessed by them: and itis further ordered, that within
twenty days the said complainants cause this order to
be published in the state paper and in the Orleans Re-
publican, and that the said publication be continued in
each of the said papers, at least once in each week for
eight weeks in succession, or that they cause a copy of
this order to be personally served upon the said Jacob
Lawrence and Burrett I. Pitcher, at least twenty days be-
fore the time above prescribed for thei r appearance.
Copy. JOHN M. DAVISON, Register.
B. Robinson, Complts' sol'r. jya4-Sw
AT1r a court ot chancerv neto for the state of New-
York, at the town of Saratoga Springs, on the six-
teenth day of July, in the year one thousand sight hun-
dred and thirty-nine-Present, Reuben H. Walworth,
chancellor.
The New York Life Insurance and Trust Company,
vs. William Tuttle, and others.
It appearing by affidavit to the satisfaction of this court
that Heman Gaston, one of the defendants in the above
entitled cause, is a nonresident of this state, but is a
resident of one of the United States, to wit, of the
state of Ohio-on motion of Julius hihoades, of counsel


for the complainants, it is ordered, tha tlhe said He-
man Gaston, cause his appearance to be entered, and
notice thereof to be served on the complainants.' so-


A LBANY ACADCEMY-TheAcademy wihtopen
for instruction on Monday the 4th of September.
The students are arranged in departments correspond-
ing to the wishes of parents, for the instruction of their
children.
In the 4th or junior department, children are taken at
the age of 6 or 7 years, and instructed in reading and
spelling, the elements of Geography and Arithmetic, and
writing. In the more advanced classes these studies &re
pursued to the extent of a thorough English education.-
Mr. McDouell, Mr. Edwards and Mr. Robertson are the
teachers in this department.
The remaining departments, viz. the Classical, under
the Rev. Mr. Bullions; the Mathematical, under Dr. Ten
Eyck; and the English, tender Mr. Jolly, offer all the ad-
vantages of a complete and thorough course of instruc-
tion.
The French language is taught by Gen. Du Coudray
Holstein.
Students have for amny years been instructed in all
branches required by the Civil Engineer; and many of
the pupils of the institution are now in actual service on
the canals and railways of this and other states.
The elements of drawing are taught in connection with
the above, and other branches of study.
Classes in book keeping are also now in progress.
Mr. Bell continues as i.astructor in Penmanship.
The Principal will attend to the general superinten-
dence of the Institution, and instruct in various branches
ot Natural and Moral Science.
Prices of Tuition-In the junior department and ele-
mentary studies, $3 75 per quarter for the summer quar-
ters; 4 2S for the winter quarters. Total, $16 per an-
num.
In the higher studies of the 4th department, #1 75 and
#5 25. Total, 8$20 per annum.
English, Arithmetic and Algebra, $5 75 and $6 25.-
Total. 024 per annum.
Classical, and the higherbranches ofMathdmatics, in
c uding any of the above, $7 75 and $8 25. Total $3
per annuim.
For instruction in French, the price is $3 per quarterto
parents, to which the trustees add $2 for each scholar.
Boarding-The trustees have obtained references to se-
veral boarding houses, where students can, if it be desir-
ed, be under the care of one or other of the teachers, who
will board with them. Price for board, fuel, lights. &c.
from $2 50 to $3 per week.
Classes commencing Latin are formed on the first of
September and the first of March in each year.
T. ROMEYN BECK, Prninnal.
GIDEON HAWLEY,
TEUNIS VAN VECHTEN,
3NO>N. CAMPBELL,
JAME S STEVENSON,
WILLIAM B. SPRAGUE,
PETER GANSEVOORT,
ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL,
THOMAS E. VERMILYE,
VHOMAS WV. OLCOTT,
It[CHARD V. DE WITT,
'AILIP S. VAN RENSSELAER,
J AMES GOOLD,
WILLIAM C. MILLER,
au31-tr ISAAC N. WYCKOFF. Trustees.
N 6' Invidus Alterius Maceresit Rebus Opimus."
0 CURE, NO PAY!-Old Galen's Lock Dis-
pensary, established at i'o. 56 Beaver street, 2 doors a-
bove Pearl street, Albany, N. Y.-Dr. LOCKROW may
be confident ally consulted, and particularly upon those
diseases of the human frame of a private nature, viz: Sy-
philis, Gonorrhmea, Gleets, Lues Venerea, Impotency,
Seminal Weakness, with all the Venereal Complaints in
general, etc. etc. Dr. L. has for some yearTs given his es-
pecial attention to this branch of the practice, and has had
the gratification of giving general satisfaction to his pa-
tients. Dr. L. intends to devote himself to an office prac-
tice, and flatters himself that he will give entire satisfac-
tion to all who favor him, in those cases which have so
L.'ten baffled the skill of those less experienced in that
branch of the profession. Secrecy always observed, and
charges reasonable.
V. B. LOCKROW, M.D.,
Office No. 56 Beaver street, Albany.
P. S. Dr. L. has been regularly educated to the medi-
cal profession, and graduated at one of thie first Colleges
in the United States. Communications, post paid, direct-
ed Galen's Lock Dispensary, 56 Beaver st., Albany, N.
Y., stating case, &c. anrl enclosing a reasonable fee for
advice and medicine, will meet with prompt attention.
N. B. Separate apartments so arranged that patients
cannot observe each other.
Old Galen's Box is a neat small portable box, that can
be carried in the pocket, containing medicine, and print-
ed directions minutely detailing th- symptoms and treat-
ment of gonorrhea, in so plain and simple a manner that
no mistake can occur. To strangers and seamen it is of
the greatest importance, as they can pursue their journey
and continue in their respective avocations, and in the
mean time be their own physician, and thus avoid expo-
sure and supercede the necessity of any surgical advice,
fart' er than may he obtained from the concise and brief
description of the disease, and its cure contained in the
directions.
The above Box can be sent to any part of the Union,
and the medicine contained In it may be relied on, as a
positive cure.
Prepared and sold only at the GALEN'S LOCK DIS-
PENSARY, No. 56 Beaver street, 2 doors above South
Pearl street, Albany, N. Y. fe25

DR. COOKE.
The unfortunate are respectfully informed that the Al-
bany Lock Hospital, established and modelled afterthe
much celebrated European Lock Hospitals, has many
years since been founded at Head Quarters, No. 3 Nor-
ton street, Albany, N. Y. To those unacquainted with
this institution, it is necessary to mention that it has for
its object the cure of all such diseases as syphilis, scrofu-
la, strictures, diseases of the urethra, lumbago, flour al-
bus, impotency, diseases of the womb, seminal weak-
ness of both sexes, nodes, caries of the bones, gonorr-
lIe- Ai.lt_ with all venereal cnmolaints in snnerni_ pte


state, ibut is a r sident of one of the United States, to
wit, of the state of Vermont-on motion of D. L. Sey-
mour. of counsel for the complainants, it is ordered, that
the said Justin Jacobs cause his appearanceto be entered,
and notice thereofto be served on the complainants' solici-
tor within four months from the date of this order, and in
case of his appearance that he cause his answer to the
complainants' bill tobe filed, and a copy thereof to be
served on the complainants' solicitor within forty days
after service of a copy of said bill, and in default thereof
said bill of complaint may be taken as confessed by him:
and it is further ordered, that within twenty days tihe
said complainants cause this order to be published in the
state paper and in the Troy Budget, printed in the
counmtyof Rensselaer, and that the said publication be
continued in each of the said papers at least once in each
week for eight weeks in succession, or that they cause a
copy of this order to be pers finally served on the said
Justin Jacobs, at least twenty days before the time a-
bove prescribed for his appearance. Copy.
aul-8w JOHN M. DAVIiON, Clerk.
T liP' people of the state of New York, to Mary Van
Zandt, Sarah Ewen, Mathew T. Van Zandt, Sarah
Ann Green, of Esopus; Rebecca Van Zandt, George
Janeway, of Flushing, Long Island; Amelia Ann Kuy-
pers, Ann Eliza Hedley, William WV. Janeway and Ju-
lia Vredenburgh, of the city of New York; John Van
Zandt, of H-mnipstead, Long Island; Peter Van Zandt, of
New Brunswick New Jersey; Mary Ann Kendrick, o0
the town of Warren, New Hampshire; and William
Dawes, whose residence is unknown; ihe heirs at law
of Peter P. Van Zandt, deceased, send greeting:
Whereas Peter Van Zandt, of the ciiy of New York,
has lately applied to our surrogate of the county of
New-York, to have a certain instrument in writing,
bearing date the fifth day ofOctober, 1810, purporting to
dispose of both real anti personal estate, duly proved as
the last will and testament of Peter P. Van Zandt, late
of the city of New York, as to real estate only: therefore
you and each of you are cited and required personally
to be and appear before our said surrogate, at his office
in the city of New York, on the nineteenth day of Sep.
member next at ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day,
then and there to attend to the probate of said last will
and testament.
In witness whereof, the surrogate of our said county
has hereunto affixed his seal of office, the third
[L. S.] day ofAugust, one thousand eight hundred and
thirty-nine, and of our independence the sixty-
fourth.
au6-6w JAMES CAMPBELL, Surrogate.


ALBANY FEM ALE ACADEMY-Thenez
quarter will commence on Monday, the 3d of Sep.
tember next. Arrangements have been made to acconr
modate a larger number of scholars from abroad.
Thisinstitution (founded in theyearl814,andoccupyinlI
a spacious and elegant edifice.erected especially for its ac.
commodation)coniprises,exclusive oftheclassescompose(
of those pupils froin the imigher departments, pursuing tib
study of thle French and Latin languages, Natural Histo.
ry, Chemistry and Botany, six departments, three o
which are subdivided, and the whole under the charge o:
sixteen professorsand teachers,andsubject to monthlyvis.
itatious by committees of the board of trustees.
The course of instruction is designed to be useful amn
practical, and to embrace all the various branches of
complete female education.
The institution isfurnished with maps, charts, globes
mnodels,a superior chemical and philosophical apparatus
and an extensive library, containing about six thou.
sand volumes; in addition to which, in each of tihe
three lower departments, is asmallerlibrary,care-'full)
selected, with reference to the capacities and attainment
of the younger pupils instructed inm tiem.
Amp.e arrangements have been made, under such regu;
lations as the trustees feel confident will prove satisfPtcto-
ry to parents, in the establishment, connected with thn
families respectively of the Principal and Professor ol
Natural Philosophy, as well as in several private families,
for the accommodation of pupils from a distance. And
in view of the increased and increasing number of pupils
from distance, it is property add, that duringthe present
year these arrangements have been considerably extended.
Thbe expense incurred by avounglady for board and tuition,
including allthe studies taught in the Academy, will not
exceed 8'215 per annum ; and in these establishments the
best facilities areafflordedforacquiringa knowledge of mu-
sic, drawing, or any of the ornamentalbranchesof female
education, at a moderate additional charge.
The academical year commences on thile first of Septem-
ber and is divided into four terms.commencing respective-
ly on thie 1st .sf Septeinber,23d of November, 15th of Feb-
ruary, and the Stho( May; a vacation ofsix weeks follow
ingthe examination inJuly, and asecondof one week
the close ofthe quarter ending the 1st oa'May.
For terms of instruction, which have been placed on a
liberal Cooting, or for any other information which may be
required in relation tothe institution, reference may be had
to A, Crittenton, A. M., the principal, or to either of the
'Trustees.
For general information concerningthe character of the
institution, &c. the trustees beg leave to refer to Chancel-
lor Kentof'he city of New York, Rev. Dr. Ludlow, Pro
vost oftheUniversity of Pennsylvania, Rev. Dr. Ferris,
N'ew York, who, during their residence in Albany, have
successively presided over the institution; to Benjamin F.
Butler, Attorney General ofthe U. S., Washington City;
lion. Jacob Sutherland, Geneva, New York, and J. T.
Norton, esq,, Farmington, Conn., late trustees. By order
of the Board.
A.CRITTENTON, Secretary.
The Trustees are:
Rev. JOHN N. CAMPBELL,D.D.
GIDEON HAWLEY, LL. D.
RICH'D V. DE WITT, Esq.
RICH'D M3. MEIGS, "
EDWIN CROSWELL,"
ISRAEL SMITH, "'
Hon. JAMES VANDERPOEL.
PHILIP S. VAN RENSSELAER, Esq.
THOSE. WV. OLCOTT,
IRA HARRIS,
Hon. GREENE C. BRONSON.
ARCHIBALD McINTYRE, Esq.
au25 EZRA P. PRENTICE, Esq., Trustees.


'Zn


No. 5281.

t TATE OF NEW-YORK, ss.-IN CHANCERY-
- S Before the vice chancellor of the first circuit. Ben-
* jarnin W. Strong and William N.Chadwick,surviving ex-
ecutors and trustees of and under the last will and tes-
9 tament of Peter Remsen. deceased, vs. Peter R. Brinek-
* erheof, Aletta Strong, Henry S. Mulligan, Simeon Hen-
Sry Remsen, Aletta R. Lawrence, Julia Strong, James
e Henry Strons, Peter Rlemsen Strong, Elizabeth f. Strong,
- Edward Newion Strong, Benjamin W. Strong, Maria
f Lucretia Brilckerhoff, and Peter Remsen Brinqkerhoff.
1 Pursuant to the provisions of the statute in such ca-e
- made and provided, and of an order of this court made
in the above entitled cause, notice is hereby given to all
I persons having any general lien or incumbrance, by
a judgment or decree, on any undivided share or interest
of any of the parties to this suit, in the lands hereinaf-
, ter de-cribed, being part of the premises mentioned in the
, bill of complaint in this cause, or any part thereof; to pro-
* duce to me on or before thIe twelfth day of September
Next, at my office, number eighty-nine (89) Nassau street
F in the city of New York, proof respectively of all such
9 their liens or incumbrances. and the amounts due there-
on, and that they specify-the nature of said incumbran-
- ces and thedates thereof respectively; which said lands
Share as follows: All that certain lot, piece or parcel of
ground, situate, lying and being in the Fifteenth (late
Ninth ward) of the city of New York, with the dwelling
House and improvements thereon; beginning at a point
on thIe westerly side of Broadway, distant twenty-nike
feet northerly from the corner formed bI the intersec-
tion of the said westerly side of Broadway with the
northerly side of Waverley Place, and from tienee run-
ning westerly on a line parallel with the said northerly
sLde of Waverley Place, and along the northerly side
of a lot if ground granted and conveyed by Stephen
Reed and Maria his wife to James Strong, one hundred
feet and from thence running northerly on a line paral-
lel with the said westwardly side of Broadway twenty-
five feet, and froin thence eastwardly on a line parallel to
the said northerly side of Waverley Place one hundred
f.ettothessad westerly side of Broad.vay, and from
thence southerly along the said westerly side of Broad-
way twenty-five feet to the place of beginning; the said
ot of land being twenty-five feet in front on Broadway,
and the same in the r.ar, and in length on each side one
hundred feet.
All that certain farm, tract, piece or parcel of land, sit-
uate, 1,ing and being in the town of Newiown in Queens
county, butted and bounded as follows, that is to say: on
the northeast by Flushing bay, on the northwest by the
farm now or lately owned and occupied by Isaac Rapelye,
on the southwest by the farm now or lately owned and
occupied by John Rapelye, on the southeast by a road
running, or which formerly rat i in part through the farm
of John Rapelye, a part a public road, until it came to
the two gates, one opening into the farm formerly owned
by Jacob Hapelye, the other into the farm hereby descri-
bed, thence along the said farming as the fence now runs, or
formerly ran, of tne late Jacob Rapelye, to Flushing bay,
bounded on the said farm northeast and southeast, con-
taining one hundred and seventy acres, more or less.-
Also, a tract of turf meadow and upland, containing a-
bout thirty-five acres, more or less, lying in a tract of
meadow known by the name of Train's meadow. Also,
a tract of salt meadow and upland lying in Newtown
aforesaid, containing about twenty acres, more or less,
as the whole of the said premises were formerly occupied
by Simon Remsen, the father of the said Peter Remsen.
together with the hereditaments and appurtenances. Da-
ted New York, July 30,1839.
DAVID CODWISE,
jy3O 6w Master in chancery.
I N CHANCERY-Before the chancellor. Wilhitamn 1'.
SBrown and ,Sally his wife, vs. Peleg Cheesbro, Ebe-
nezer Cheesbro, Eliaki.n Cheesbro, Elias Cheesbro, Ni-
cholas G. Cheesbro, Daniel Gallup and Mary Gallup his
wife, Mary Cheesbro, Jameson Cheesbro, Nicholas
Cheesbro and Eli Cheesbro.
In pursuance of an order of the court of chancery in
the above entitled cause, and ol the statute in such case
made and provided, all persons having any general lien
or incumbirance, by judgment or decree, on any undivided
share or interest in the la.d and premises set forth and
described in the bill of complaint in this cause, and which
are h4ereinafter mentioned, are required to produce be-
fore me, the subscriber, o.ne of the masters of this court,
at my office in the city of Albany, on or before the
eleventh day of September next, at noon of that day,
proof of all such their liens and incuinbrances, together
with satisfactory evidence of the amount due thereon;
the premises referred tu are described in the bill of com-
plaint in this cause as follows: All that certain farm or
parcel of land situate in the town of Knox in tIhe county
of Albany, and within the manor of Rensselaerwyck, and
bounded as follows, to wit: known and distinguished on
a map thereof made by J. Winne, as lot number sixty-
four, which said lot begins at a hemlock sapling marked
63,64, and runs thence south five degrees east forty
chains to a stake marked 64, thence north eighty-five de-
grees east thirty chains to the southwest earner of lot
number forty-nine, thence along the west bounds of lot
number forty-nine north five degrees west forty chains
to the south east corner of lot number sixty-three, thence
along the south bounds of lot number sixty-three south
eighty-five degrees west thirty chains to the place of be-
ginning, containing one hundred and twenty acres of
land; subject to certain rents, &c. to Stephen Van Rens-
selaer. Albany, July 29, 1839.
JOHN V. L. PRUYN,
jy30-6w Master in chancery.
AT a surrogate court held for the county o0 Albany, at
the city f Albany, on the twenty-ninth day of July,
A. D. one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine-Pre-
sent, Anthony Blanchard, surrogate.
In the matter of the real estate of Elihu Phelps, de-
ceased.
Whereas on the petition of Sylvia Phelps, administra-
trix, and Martin I. Townsend, administrator, &c. ot
Eiihu Phelps, late of the town of Watervliet in the coun-
ty of Albany, dec.eased, it has bhen made satisfactorily to
appear to the said surrogate, that the personal estate of
the said decea-ed is insufficient to pay his debts, and an
inventory of his estate having been duly made and re-
turned according to law-it is therefore ordered, that all
persons intseested in the estate of said deceased, appear
before the said surrogate, at his office in the city of Al-
bany in saId county, on the sixteenth day of September
net,.i ten o-GSUK- ii Hile C..Ecasio twf Hit~fmtka ""<
show cause why authority should not be given to'the sauT
Sylvia Phelps and Martin I Townsendt as administra-
trix and administrator aforesaid, to miorgage, lease or
sell so much of the real estate of the said deceased, as
shall be necessary to pay his debts. Copy.
jy30-iw A. BLANCHARD. Surrogate.
AT a court of chancery held for the state of New
York at the city of Albany, on the thirteenth day of
July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine-Pre-
sent, John P. Cushman, vice chancellor of the third cir-
cuit.
The Mechanics' Mutual Insurance Company in the
city of Troy, vs. Giles S. Anable and Mary Ann his wrfe,
Abraham Schuyler, Noah Ripley, Edwin C. Litchfield,
Samuel E. Ford, Justin Jacobs, Ebenezer Wiswall,
WVilliam Nichols, Elisha F. Calkins, and Samuel Clank,
jr., and others.
It appearing by affidavit to the satisfaction ofthis court
that the defendant Justin Jacobs resides out of this


mrl2-3m


STOVES-The 'undersighed would inform their
friends and customers and the trade. generally, that
they are now prepared to offer for sale the'following lots
of stoves of the most elegant and approved patterns, and
manufactured from the best materiaS, on the most libe-
ral terms for cash or approved credit, viz:
2000 Hathaway's Patent Hot Air Cooking Stoves,
40100 Improved Drop Door Union do
3000 do do do Premium do
1500 do Rotary do
800 Six Plate StoVes,
1000 Corinthian Parlor Stove, the most splendid arti-
cle in market.
Also, Tin Plate, Sheet Iron, Copper, Iron Wire, Zinc,
Block Tin, English and Russia stove pipe, and stove fur-
niture of every description, &e. &c.
jets DE GROFF & SHEAR, 14 State st.
DELAWARE ACADEMY-DANIEL SHEP-
ARD, A. B., Principal. MISS ELIZABETH 110-
GAN, teacher of the Female Department. Thie next term
of this institution will commence on the 10th of Sept.
inst.
The Academy is pleasantly situated in the village of
Delhi, Delaware county, 67 miles west of Catskill, in the
midst of a delightful country, noted for the salubrity of
its climate. The course of instruction is intended to be
thorough and practical, embracing the Classics, Mlatlhe-
matics, and the ordinary and higher branches of English
education, and designed te prepare the student for admis-
sion into College, for the duties of common school in-
struction, or for the business of active life.
The classes in Mensuration and surveying are taught
practically as well as theoretically. French is taught in
both departments. The Academy is furnished with a li-
brary and philosophical apparatus.
Tuition-In eonsequenceot the fund with which the in-
stitution is endowed4he tuition, in either department, in
any or all the branches, has been fixed at 25 ctnts per
week.
Board and rooms for young ladies Or gentlemen can be
procured from 91,50 to $1,75 per week including washing
&c., and references to boarding places or any other in-
formation respecting the Academy will be given on appli-
cation to th* Presidentor Prineipal.
Instruction in Music, by a most competent teacher, will
be given to those who desire it. Sep I, 1838.
ERASTUS ROOT, President.
SAMUEL GonuDr, Secretary. selh-tf
IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENT--bTRAM
CONDUCTING COOKING S IOVE-T'he subscri-
bers invite the attention of the public to a new article
which they are now prepared to furnish to the city and
country trade. Having so often heard the objections
which hnmse-keeners brinr aefainst stoves heretofore in,


LBA EAGI PUN EANIVD
yCornin. Norton & Co.), manufactures to order
iRON CASTINGS FOR GEARING MILLS & FAC-
ORIes, ofeverydescri ti1 AIso, I MALT M ILLS,
MAIINGMACIINESS TEAM ENGLNES.and R AIL
ROAD CASTINGS efevery description. The oollec.
tioe of PATTERNS of MACHINERY is not eqqtdlled i
the UnitedStates.
Thefollowing articles will be kept constantly for sale
t theFurnace, and furnished at short notice, viz ,PO'T
.ASH..KET..LES, 'Ingle and double bottoms, from- 50 to
40galons,CA ULDR ONS from 1 tol3 barrelsjIA'TLTi" t,'1
and SOAP BOILERS, KETTLES, BARK MILLS, PA-
PER MILL and other SCREWS, PBESS PLATES 1
OVEN MOUTHS .and FURNACE DOORS HAND-
PUMPSv, sngle and double FORCING PUMPS, WAG(
QON, CAR and POST COACH BOXES, SAe s
SWEIGHTS,7,14 25,28,30 So 58 and 60 lb. WEI GHTS,
FORGE" HAMMR2S, SLEIGH SHOEs STOVElS,
HALL SCRAPER8, PORTABLE-FURNACES' IIAIV.
SER IRONS, MANDRILLS for Copper.smiths, BOOK
BINDERS' and NOTARIAL or E AL PRESSEa' .
W. V. M. having an extensive -assortment of Plough
Patterns, embracing almost every kind in euse, keps
constantly on hand the following Plough iCaltiots, viz;
Starbuck's No.1, & 3D Tice's No.A
Olure's No, 1 &2 1-3 WrightasNo I0, 1,' & 2i
Bryant's No.1, 2, 2j, 3, & 4. Hudson's No.N2, D
Gibson's No.2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. Russell's No. 2.
Wood's (or 2 3 Wood's C. S. 1.2&3old
Feobor1 B1, o, &4d ,A W
n 4 Chamberlain's. No.tf.o
Also-The celebsrated Side-Hill Plough, No. I -cad 2.
Country Founders can be su lied with PIG liRON,
FiRE BRICK, COAL,AMBOY WAND and CLAY.,
BoltiMg, Turning and Finishing, in all their various
branches, executed with neatness and despatch. u
Also-PATTERNS, made and SCREiVS cut to or
W. V. M. belpg a practical Millwright, will furnish
tealculationr, and any other informationin relation t m a
shinery.
COTTON MACHINISTS may obtain castings a his
Furnace made of Scotch Iron.
All articles ordered can be forwardedto any part 0fthbe
United States or the Canada. Orders may be addressed
to WILLIAM V. MANY, Eagle Air FurnaceNo. 84
Beaver-street, Albany, or to the care o nMeossrs. anxsduA
OoamNe & Co. "

IN' X1WE'1ENI LY' &
S OOTHOUt' make to order and keep const aIn-
ly on hand, the above instrtumnents onrf ahe
most approved construction. Th eey, dwtid
call the attention of surveyorsi b their IMPROVEt)
COMPASS, which Is almost equal to u Theodolite, i~nris-
muoh as angles can be taken without tmheneedle. i gt-es
ofelevation can be taken with precisely the same accu-
racy as horizontal angles It has two verniers, onie (or
thIe graduate Cirele, the other for the eedle, both oat which
aredivided to one minute ofea dereb. Their L-eveliig
Instruments they warrant to be equalto any that cau be
hand inthe United States or England, THE I)OLiI'ES
ofvariousprices, ro-m #75to 500. Town Clocks an I
Brass Eight Day Clocks for houses.
Ric They stillcontinueto ast CHURCH BELLS
p ofsuperior tone, with cast iron yokes, and
F c warranted to stand. AlsoSteamboat and nac-
IT tory Bells of all sizes, constuntly on lialid.
Coppermand BrassCastings of every deseriptioh.
P. S. Letters directed to MENEELY .& OOTIHOUT,
West Troy, Albany county, will meet with prompt at-
tention. sk ja2Djda
ANCY AND sTAPkN DRY GOODS.-
SJust opened at 319 North Market street, opposite the
pot office, a complete asortnent of fashionable fancy
and staple dry goods. Consisting i part of
Black and blue black figuredBroadeloths
silks Cassimeres
Light and dark cold do Satinetts ,
Rich black and Fue black Merino casusimeres
plain do Erminetts
Lighted dark eoPd do do Crape anblets
French printed mulls and India nankeens
muslins$ Linen drilling
White and black ribb'd slk Darkjeanse
hpe. Boys summer goods
Open work silk do Rouen cassimereso
Plain English do Blue nankeenj
French printedcambrles Irish linen
Embr'd tlhibet shawls Linen sheeting
Raw silk shawls Cotton do
French camels hair do Marseilles quilts "
Chalue do Counterpanes
Emor'dcrape do Fine summer spreads
HemB an b do Superfine counterpanes
French calicoes Cradle quilts
French ginghams Toilet covers
White merino shawls C radle blankets
Black do de Raose blankets,M'oren
Scarlet -do do Birdq eye diaper
Black bombazine Russia -do
Rik and blue blackthalle Damask inch table cloths
Mourning mushlins Colored table covers
Black and blue blk rape Coliored epunterpanes
White, pink, salmon do Table oil cloth
Black and blue black crape Moreens
leisse Furniture dimity
Linen cambric hdkfs Silkand gingam umbrela.4
Hem stitch do Parasols
Fancy shawls Cambrin dimnit
Mourning shawls Corded cambric
Blue bi'k ribbld e=tton hoe Swiss muslin
White open work cotton Scotch lawn
hose Medium muslin
Cold rib'd cotton hose Bishops lawn
Children's do Nansook muslin
Black and white cashmere Imitation linen cambri'
shawls Linen lawn
Black India satin Linen cambrie
Black silk camblet Thibet shawls
bMixed do do Light and dark calicoes w
White satin Merino cloths
Black nankin crap. Thlread laces
Black crape veils Worked edging and inser- p
Blue black do lag"
Corded skirts, India rubber aprons and table cloths,-ja-
conett and sarsnett cambriecs, black lac veils and shawls,
bead bags, Italian sewing silks, &c..&e., all of which will
be sold at the lowest current price, bc d do
Jy3O E IDWIN A. HARRIS.


5.. Green street, keep con-
ash oostanltly on hand th fol-
lowing articles, at wholesale and .retai or ~mido to order
in the best possible-manner; theii friends and the public
generally are invited toueali and examine for tbemsehves.
All orders thankfully received and punctually attentien to.
Whitewash- Brushes, do fneads. r
Fine ground paint Brushes, comnrsoi do do
Bash rools, scrubbing Brmsshom '
Fine asie brushes, common do -
Dusters and hearth brushes. ,- .-
G i- ri5 -rmjT'a-A m" ...r-. .l


Ornamental ht'e briushies
Common hair brushes; fancy hair do
Ornamental hair brushes
Shaving brushes, common anW fine
Broom brushes
Clamps and stove brushes, marking dc
Horse brushes, common and fine
Penetrating do, hatters' do
Soft finishing brushes, hard do do
Curriers' scouring brushes
Blacking brushes, paste do
Wheel brushes, popes headsal
Window brushes, dyers' do, lyI do
Machine brushes made to order.
Cash paid for Bristles.









MISCELLANY.

"JOTTINGS DOWN IN LONDON."
[WILLIs's Letters in thie Corsair.]
I was at Almack's on Wednesday. Remember-
ing the former earliness of its hours, compared
with other London balls, I lost my coffee at a most
agreeable -dinner, to be there at eleven. No long
queue of carriages in King street, no lines of foot.
men from perron to staircase I showed my tick-
et, paid my half guinea, mounted to the ante-
room, and entered the blazing hall-solitary as a
ruin in Persepolis. I turned aside to the tea-
room. The maids all stood silent behind their
black and green;" and, stretched out upon one
of the red solfas, lay one unhappy French dandy,
contemplating his patent-leather shoe with tihe
fixedness of a statue. I stepped up to the near-
est table. Black or green, sir," said the maid.
Did you mean that emphasis upon the green,"
thought I.
I drank my tea; and, re-entering the hall, was
struck with its alterations since I had last seen
it. The old-fashioned and cracked blue relieves
were replaced by gilding and mirrors, frescos and
painted wreaths; the orchestra hadbeen embellish-
ed. and the longL settees covered with a showy
chintz. The candelabras against the walls seemed
to have increased from hundreds to thousands,
and the hall altogether appeared to have been made
more worthy than it used to be of the flowering-
place of birth and beauty.
All at once, at a quarter to 12, the carriages
began to pour into King street; the let-down-
steps rat-tat- tat-ed, the "all right" from the foot-
man followed, like the answers to a roll-call, and
up the broad staircase, in a long and steady proces-
sion, came the shawled and flowered advent of
aristocratic girlhood. Five hundred belles, beaux
and chaperons entered the dazzling hall within fif-
teen minutes, and within twenty minutes from the
hushed and complete desertion I have described,
Wieppert's band was pouring forth its intoxicating
music, and the five hundred "brave and beauti-
ful" whirling ia the waltz.
Describing a ball is like describing a spot of
green sward, or a hand's breadth of sky on a star-
ry night. How to get you behind me that you
may see through my eyes? My first thought at
Almack's was to discover my old friends-those
who had shone in my time-the newly "come
outs" of four years ago. I bforgetfully looked for
them in the waltz-under white roses-those who
had buds in their hair-who could afford to dress
with a severe simplicity. Scarce one to be seen!
On the floor I had no acquaintances. But, on
the long banquettes, more gaily dressed, with full.
blown red flowers tfor the white buds, and with
pearls, emeralds, and rouge tbfor lilies of the valley,
blue riband, and blushes-there I found them,
with their eyes upon younger and fairer likenesses
of themselves-the sisters who had replaced them
in the hollow of the waltzer's arml Growing
old! Growing old!
I sat down by one of the most beautiful debut-
antes of 1835-a magnificent woman still, but the
mother of three or lour heirs and heiresses of' a
great fortune and a great name-whom I never re-
member to have seen sitting in a ball-room betbfore.
Is it a good or a bad thing?" I asked, that
there is no progression in one's memory of peo-
ple?"
Howl"
Why, I remember you, slight as Psyche, in
white muslin and with a single japonica on your
temple-never more dressed. For five years, up
to this moment, that is my memory of Lady --
And here, in a single minute, I must replace this
long familiar picture by a turban and diamonds
-the slight form of dancing seventeen, for-"-
This was not very flattering, but I was talking
to a sensible women, who was quite willing to
speculate with me either upon the changes in her-
self or others. I could not go on, however, with-
out saying what would have been complimentary;
for, as a young mother, she was of that style of
beauty seldom -seen out of England-the beauty
of mature form inj- higher health and bloom even
than in girlhood.
"How is it," she asked, "thafe all the young
men come back from America so desperately in
love? Are the American girls so much prettier
than ours?"
It was a question for which I was prepared, for
I had insensibly drawn a comparison between our
ladies and those of England at every party and
every drive since my arrival. When I was in this
country before, my comparisons were between the
English and Continental women. Between these
and ours the contrast was, to my eye, entirely
new.
The bust and neck of almost every lady within
reach of our eyes might have served as models
for sculpture. From the zone to the chin, Eng-
lish women from seventeen to thirty are almost
invariably superb. We look' in vain for a hollow
chest or a bent back, or what is sometimes called
a "thread paper looking girl." The shoulders
full were dazzling, and of the healthiest tint of
white, and the carriage of thlr whole bust grace-
ful and stately. Within these limits I think (and
my friends thought with me) lie all the perfec-
tions of the English Venus. We look at tea
tures. There was scarce a classic forehead or
ias ope in the room.- At the Le.-they were rather
of useful than of ornamental propoe.teon to the fig-
ure. At the grace of the dancers-you could not
find in all France so indifferent a dancer as the
best at Almack's. At the complhxion--ruddy and
coarse; though for tbe best of reasons, that prob-
ably every lady on the floor had been on horse-
back three or tour hours every day in the season,


exposed to the tender-mercies ot a riding nat, and
such sun and wind as pleases the clerk of English
weather. I
We busied ourselves composing a Venus from
the national beauties. The French furnished the
limbs and grace of movement; the Greeks and
Asiatics the nose and forehead; the English, hair,
throat, neck, and bust; the American, complex-
ion, feet, and eyes. The mouth was still to be
provided, but we agreed to share the honors of
that feature between us. All this of course might
be disputed on individual exceptions, but it is cu-
rious how nearly universal are these perfections
to the nations to which" we name them.
In the course of" the evening I found myself
vis-a-vs in the quadrille to the Queen's most beau-
tiful Maid of Honor. She is a daughter of Lord
Rivers, rather tall, and combining a most majestic
embonpoint of figure with a slightness of limb and
a slenderness and stateliness of neck seldom seen
in such graceful proportion. To the 300 a year
which Maids of Honor receive for dress, the Queen,
my partner informed me, has added another hun-
dred, thinking the sum insufficient. You know,
probably, that on their marriage they receive also
i dowry of 1000. Then there are the Ladies in
Waiting, who are of the highest rtnk of nobility,
and the Bedchamber women, who receive also
300 a year, and are generally ladies of good birth
in reduced circumstances. These all take their
turns of service for two months together.
My pretty and noble informant- gave me these
household statistics very good naturedly between
pastorale and dos a dos; andas she was closely con-
nected with those who had the best opportunity
of knowing, I asked her a question or two touch-
ing the personal qualities of her Majesty. She
thought Victoria fancied herself' very beautiful,
which she was not," and a very good horseman,
Which she was not decidedly,' and that she was
very impatient of a difference of opinion when in
private with her ladies. She admitted, however,
that she was generous, forgiving, and cleverer
than most girls of her age. When alone with
two or three otf her maids, she said, the Queen
was "no more like a Queen than any body else,"
and was very fond of a bit of' fun or a bit of
sbandaaL or anv thing that would not have done il


THE PRESIDENT.
[From the Globe.1
PRESIDENT'S WELCOME AT ALBANY.-We gave
yesterday, from the Albany Argus, an account.of
the public honors paid to the Chief Magistrate at
the capital of the state, the, scene of his early
services in the cause of the union, and in the re-
formation of the state government.
Mr. MARCY, in tendering him the welcome of
his fellow citizens, most appropriately and happi-
ly alludes to the circumstances which first called
the faculties of the President into the public ser-
vice, and which gathered round him the popular
confidence and aflections-a tide that rose gradu-
ally and continually, until it elevated him to the
distinction which they then honored in his per-
son. The PRESIDENT'S reply is perfectly charac-
teristic. Without a tincture of egotism, it opens
up to the view, like a clear fountain, the source
of the pure and full current on which he has been
borne to the highest and noblest destiny. No man
can read the modest remarks made in reply to Gov.
MARCY, without perceiving that an honest patriot-
ism, guided by a thorough philosophical apprecia-
tion of the principles of our institutions-a devo-
tion to them, and a faith in them as the truth, on
which the virtue, liberty, and happiness of the
people were founded, and a wise, moderate, but
firm energetic, untiring advocacy and support of
them, constitute the sum of the political arts of
the Great Magician.
[From the Rochester Daily Advertiser.]
The address of Gov. MARCY, welcoming Pres-
ident VAN BURiN to the city of Albany, and the
President's reply thereto, are given in this morn-
ing's paper. Gov. MARCY very happily recalls
the stirring incidents connected with the event-
ful history of the President's career for a number
of years past, and very delicately alludes to the
many important measures which their distinguish-
ed guest has been.instrumental in bringing forward
and advocating, and whose adoption and opera-
tion have satisfied the people of their utility and
importance, and caused them to hold in grateful
remembrance the services and character of their
able advocate and champion. Mr. Van Buren's
reply is worthy the Chief Magistrate of a demo-
cratic people. It shows that he partakes of the
feelings and enters into the interests and sympa-
thies of the great body of the people. It forms a
happy contrast to the blustering outbreaks of per-
sonal spleen and party malevolence which char-
acterize the electioneering harangues of Mr. Clay.
[From the Cayuga Tocsin.]
In our paper of to-day will be found the ad-
Sdress of Gov. MARCY to the PRESIDENT, in behalf
of the citizens of Albany; also, Mr. VAN BuREN'S
Answer. We would particularly call the atten-
I tion of our readers to the remarks of the Presi.
- dent. Let them compare these remarks with
1 those of Mr. Clay on similar occasions, and then
I say which is the demagogue-which is on an elec-
! tioneering tour.

[From the Mohawk Courier.]
TH& PRESIDENT.-In another part of our paper
will be found interesting notices of his visits to
Hudson, Kmderhook and Albany. Are the fide-
ralists now satisfied with the success of their ef-
forts to keep down the enthusiasm of the people,
and to induce them to treat with disrespect their
Chief Magistrate?
We point to these proceedings with honest
pride. The federalists stand rebuked by them.-
The people have shown that unprincipled politi.
cians cannot control any but their own narrow
circle.
Nothing can exceed the mortification of the
federalists at the reception in Albany. From this
city the command first went forth for the whigs
to stand aloof from every mark of respect to the
President; and there all that party malignity and
personal hatred could do was done to awe the
people into acquiescence to the insolent decree.
Well, the President came, and the great body of
the citizens welcomed him. Disappointed, morti-
fied, maddened at the spontaneous and most grati-
fying welcome, Weed said, "His Democratic Ma-
jesty has been ushered into the city, with all the
pomp and circumstance that cannon, soldiery,
music and office holders could impart to the pa-
geant. Queen Victoria herself could scarcely
have rivalled His Republican Majesty in the gor.
geousness of his reception." He denounced the
hundreds of freemen who joined in the reception,
as "AN ABJECT AND CRAVEN POPU-
LACE AT THE HEELS OF A WOULD-BE
MONARCH." The next day the tune was
changed. The reception was not so "gorgeous"
after all; for the "military, most of whom are
whigs, made the display-and but for them, the
whole affair would have been as miserable in ap.
pearance as it was MEAGRE IN NUMBERS."
Such are the contradictions of the man who as-
oires to control the political and social conduct of
the whig party.

MR. CLAY.
[From the Globe.]
This gentleman seems .to hsve ben admonish-
.d by the alarum of the Federal proes in New-
York, before the PRESIDENT left Washington, that
there was great danger in permitting him to re.
turn among the people of his native State with-
out rousing the spirit of partisan phrensy to assail
him. Accordingly Mr. VAN BUREN had not


reached his home before Mr. CLAY made his ap-
pearance on the Lake shores. Acting in concert
with him, the journals of the city warned the
State against the visit of its own citizen-one
who had passed through all its public stations to
the highest in the Union, uniformly receiving
throughout his litbfe the highest popular vote over
all competitors-as if he were a foreign invader.
Whigery, especially, was conjured not to show
him the least civility ; and no sooner had he
reached the city, than an outcry was raised
against the city authorities, and contemptuous
paragraphs were hurled at the people, who yield-
ed to the natural impulse of tendering to the most
hospitable and courtweous man of the country-
one eminent for public services-the attentions
and honors which they itlt he deserved. He re-
plied to an address delivered by a committee re-
presenting a meeting of Democrats, as proceed-
ing from his "Democratic fellow citizens;" and
this was at once branded as a downright insult to
the Whigs. It was insisted that no Whig ought
to be civil to the PRESIDENT, because he treated
with respect such bodies of his constituents as
chose, under political designations, to make them-
selves and their principles known to him. This
was recognisiug them as they wished ; and re-
sponding to them under such circumstances, and
explaining his sentiments on such topics as were
pressed upon him, was a violation of. that non-
committalism which the Federal party had a right
td cxpeqt of him, to make good their standing
imputation. For this, the Whigs were called up-
on to make active efforts to put down all disposi-
tion in every man of the Federal faith to extend
the rights of hospitality to a native New.Yorker,
returning, after a long absence, to his home; and
as it regarded the respect due to a high functiona-
ry, the doctrine was that of the RITNER and BUR-
ROWES school-"to treat him as if he had never
been elected."
Accordingly, in Hudson, where the Federalists
have- a majority of the city councils, the party
board were summoned together, and solemnly de
creed by their corporate authority, and in a for.
mally recorded preamble and resolutions, equiva-
lent to a by-law of the municipality, that the
PRESIDENT was a party President, and therefore
not entitled to civic honors. This being in the
native county of the PRESIDENT, it was supposed


COMMUNICATION.


To the Editors of the Argus.
SGentlemen-In your paper of the 12th instant,
you Were pleased to publish my general denial of'
the truth .ot certain statements in the Wayne Sen-
tinel, reflecting on the Wayne.County Bank, my.
sell and others, as connected with the operations
of the Essex Bank, etc.
To show the good ground of such denial, and
the utter falsity of those statements in every ma-
terial point, and in all therespective articles refer-
red to, I have to request that you will give the
following communication and affidavits subjoined
an early insertion in your paper.
I deem it proper to state distinctly, that had
these several articles concerned me as an individu-
al only and unconnected with the bank of which
I am cashier, however malignant and abusive they
are or might have been, I should n-vertheless have
observed silence, and relied upon a reputation I
trust as yet unsullied, as a sufficient shield against
all attacks, whether of cowardly intrigue, of vici-
ous design, or of private malice.
I also deem it proper t0 state, that I do not feel
called upon in this public manner to give my rea-
sons for granting or withholding my patronage
from any newspaper; or to favor the community
(at this late day at least) with my views of the re
peal of the small bill law. These are all private
matters, and whether my reasons and motives of
conduct are right or wrong in these respects, they
are not necessarily a subject of reproachful accusa-
tion. Still, Messrs. Editors, as I feel it a duty to
disabuse the public mind in relation to the Wayne
County Bank, of improper conduct of its officers,
as such, before doing so, I state, and that without
fear of contradiction, that I have never aided or
abetted any device or design, bargain or transac-
tion, in or out of the bank, knowingly to deceive
or defraud any individual, or the community at
large; and I must therefore be permitted to give
the LIE DIRECT to any assertion or insinuation of
the kind, and to treat them alike as the offspring
of petty malice and private resentment.
In regard to the Wayne County Bank, or its
connection through me as cashier, or my own con-
nection as an individual, with the Essex Bank of
Guildhall, Vt., or the Utica Bank of Michigan,
or a transaction called the Ox Mill," alluded to
in the Sentinel, I might simply refer to the affida-
vits below, and leave the matter to a candid pub-
lic) without further comment. A few brief particu-
lars on them separately may therefore suffice.
First, As to the Utica Bank of Michigan. 1
never owned a particle of its stock, nor was lever
directly or indirectly interested in it in any man-
ner or form whatever. On this subject the reader is
referred to the affidavit of George Beckwith, esq.
The notes of that Bank I treated as I did other
Michigan notes in good credit. I received them
when in good credit, in the ordinary course of busi-
ness, and when loaned out, if at all, they were in
the like credit as when received; and I have yet to
learn that any one has suffered by such loans.
As to the Ox Mill" transaction, I make the
same positive denial of any interest of the Bank
or myself in the matter, directly or indirectly. It
will be seen by the affidavit of Gen. Rogers that
such is the fact. The funds referred to were east-
ein funds and subject to his check. Upon those
checks we paid out Wayne County Bank bills of
course, and I need not say to business men that
this was a legitimate transaction. That I ever re
fused accommodations to our customers, when it
was in the power of the bank to grant it, and that
to aid the loaning of monies in thie manner refer-
red to in said affidavit, as has been insinuated in
one of the articles of the Sentinel, is a base and
shameless falsehood.
In relation to the "Essex Bank," I again repeat,
that I am not, nor have I ever been in any
way interested in its stock or any of its operations,
nor has the Wayne County Bank. In our busi-
ness I have made no distinction between the notes
of the Essex Bank and other eastern notes when
they were similarly quoted in the city ofN. Y. Nor
have I ever in any instance attempted to give
them a circulation by any recommendation of
them different from their value as quoted at the
time in New-York. It will appear, therefore,
that neither the Wayne County Bank nor myself
have any interest or concern whatever in these
matters.
One further remark, and that is, that I have
had no interest or wish to aid the circulation of
Essex or Utica Bank notes at any time above the
notes of other institutions. Applying therefore,
the proper rule of evidence in such cases, namely,
the adequacy of motive, I leave the community to
judge of the true character of the frauds and im-
proprieties, so lavishly imputed to me in the Sen-
tinel; and I trust they will be able to appreciate
the motive of the accuser, however artfully dis.
guised under the flimsy pretext of doing public
service. Yours, very respectfully,
J. S. FENTON.
Palmyra, July 6th, 1839.
P. S. The affidavits referred to are enclosed
herewith.
Wayne County, ss.-E. S. Townsend of Palmyra be-
ing affirmed says, "that some 12 months ago I bought
stock in the Essex Bank, Guildhall, Vt..that ilhe amount,
Was leSs then a --tnlrt~th or tnP '". .,-' ,t r ,n. .r
LIOML ime I loaned from said bank fifteen thousand dol-
lars, which was principally used for the purchase of pro-
duce; that 1 placed funds from time to time in New X omk
for the redemption of the notes of said bank, to a much
larger amount than I ever owed the bank; that I have
paid out a portion of the notes of said bank so redeemed
by me, from time to time, as I have had occasion That
I am in advance and responsible for a much larger amount
of the notes of said bank than I received of them ; that
the notes of said bank were uniformly redeemed in New
York city, at one per cent. discount, from the time I be-
came a stockholder, until the attack upon it by the Wayne
Sentinel, and other papers. Nor since the depreciation


of the paper in the city of New York, have I been bene-
fitted by the purchase of their notes other than at one
per cent., interest; nor do I believe that the bank has.-
In this transaction, J. S. Fenton, esq., cashier of Wayne
County Batik, either as an officer in the Wayne County
Bank or as a priva; e individual, has had nothing to do.-
it was my own private matter, unconnected in any way
with J. S. Fenton or the Wayne County Bank; nor am I
aware that he has received ii at his bank only when cur-
rent in the city of New York; nor that he has endeavor-
ed to give it an undue currency, and the charges made in
the Sentinel against him as to said bank, I believe ate
untrue. Nor do I know of any just reason for connect-
ing him with tihe affairs of said bank, as he is neither
borrower or stockholder, or ever has been at the same,
as ever I knew," and further the deponent saith not.
E. S. TOWNSEND.
Subscribed and affirmed to this 8th day of July, 1839, be-
"fore me. V. F. ALDRICH, com'r of deeds, Wayne county.
Wayne County, so.-George Beckwith, being duly
sworn. doth depose and say, that he is well acquainted
with the sons-in-law oi J. S. Fenton, esq., referred to in
one of ti e articles of the Wayne Senlincqi; that from in-
formation derived from persons residing in Utica, who
are stockholders in the Utica B ink, Mich.gan, and which
he believes to be true, that thI ,said sons-in law of J. 6.
Fenton, esq., or either of them, have not at any time
been interested in the stock of said Bank, nor were they
directly or indirectly engaged in getting up said Bank;
that he has good reason to believe that said Bank is fully
able and does pay its liabilities.
GEORGE BECKWITH.
Sulscribed and sworn to this 8th day of July, 1839, be-
fore me, WV. F. ALDRICH, com'r of deeds, Wayne county.
Wayne County, as--Thomas Rogers, of Palmyra, in
said county, being duly affirmed, says that in 1831 or 32,
hlie received betwixt nine and ten thousand dollars of a
gentleman residing in Vermont, tbr the purpose of loan-
ing same in this vicinity; said money was received by
certificates of deposit, mostly of Banks in the city of
Troy, which certificates were collected by the Wayne
County Bank. and the amount thereof when collected was
placed to my credit in said bank, and was drawn therefrom
on my check,as the same was wanted. This affidavit furth-
ar says, that Joseph S.Fenton was not interested,-direcily
or indirectly, in the loaning or use of said money, nor did
he participate in any profit or loss arising therefrom; nor
was the Wayne County Bank in any way interested or
con -erned therewith, except as above set forth. This af-
frimant further says, that he is informed and believes
.that the loaning of said money was characterized by cer-
tain individuals as "The Ox Mill."
THOSE. ROGERS.
Subscribed and affirmed to this 6th day of July, 1839, be-
fore me, WV. F. ALDRICH, coni'r of deeds in said county.
Reota.--6 It ia chiefly thrnuorh hnnks that wo


ALBANY ARGUS.
MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 12.

For an Independent Treasur-Against a National
Bank.

THE PRESIDENT AT TROY.
We have verbal accounts of the reception of
the PRESIDENT at Troy on Saturday. All eon-
cur in representing it as enthusiastic and cor-
dial in the highest degree, and as signalized by
one of the greatest turnouts, civic and milita-
ry, that he has met with this side New-York.
The admirable arrangements of the Commit-
tee, were handsomely carried out, under the
efficient supervision of Brigadier Gen. GENET,
who acted as Marshal, and his assistants, and
in addition to the military companies which
formed the escort, and which were out in full
strength, the procession of citizens was swol-
len to a very great length by multitudes from
the adjoining agricultural districts, in wagons
and other vehicles. No doubt, there, as here,
and wherever the more vindictive of the politi-
cal opponents of the President have found a
miserable satisfaction in efforts to discourage
these exhibitions of respect and courtesy to the
Chief Magistrate, they have met with a signifi-
cant and emphatic rebuke.
"THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC INSTRUC-
TION."
"Sidney" of the New-York Commercial
Adv. was first among the foremost to sanction
the Evening Journal's assumption of the title
of "MINISTER of Public Instruction," for the
Secretary of State. Some days ago it gave
out, authoritatively enough, that the old
fashioned appellative of "Superintendent of
Common Schools,"--the legal and significant
title borne by former incumbents of the office,
was not the thing for the present Secretary,
Mr. Spencer; but that in justice to his "en-
larged views, sound judgment, and liberal feel-
ings," as exhibited in his recent official inspec-
tion of the Deaf and Dumb Institution in the
city of New-York, "he should be styled the
" MINISTER of Public Instruction." We are
not sure, upon second thought, that the disci-
ple of "Sidney" acted a secondary part in this
matter to him of the Evening Journal, or
whether the bestowment of the new title was
made in both papers simultaneously or nearly
so; but it is enough that the Corn. Adv. was
quite clear about the propriety of the "Minis-
terial" title as applicable to Mr. Spencer, and
spake out as we have stated above-whether
upon advisement, and as per arrangement, with
"the well known editor of the Albany Eve-
ning Journal," who the Corn. Adv. said at the
time, was among the "gentlemen of distinc-
tion" present at the examination of the Mutes,
we, of course cannot say.
But now, under the exposures of this new
development of the old federal hankering after
high sounding and new tangled titles of distinc-
tion, or for want of the expected countenance
of the rank and file of the federal press, the
Comn. Adv. is the first to discard the appella-
tion which a few days ago it insisted was alone
fit to express the "enlarged views, &c., of our
excellent Secretary of State, and to nickname
this officer anew. Admonished, perhaps, that
the assumption of the dignity of "Minister" in
this state, to be successfully attempted must be
gradual and insidious, the disciple of" Sidney"
retraces its steps, and beginning a long way
back, contents itself for the present, with patch-
ing up the old title, expunging in the first place
every thing "common" about it, or offensive to
"ears polite," taking care however not to car-
ry the pruning operation so far as to alarm the
fears of such good people asare absurd enough
still to eschew stars and garters and all other
"trappings of nobility." Hence, no doubt,
the Corn. Adv. now speaks of the Secretary of
State as ",Superintendent of Schools"-taking
the hint, it would seem, from its adjunct here,
which it will be recollected, undertook to justi-
fy the assumption of the "Ministerial" title for
the Superiatendeht,4lrder the pretea,-t safhe-
old one was not broad enough to designate all
the duties, "common" and uncommon, which
the law had thrown upon that functionary, and
that, therefore, the title which the law had
given to him might be changed with a single
dash of the Dictator's pen!
We are aware that these are small matters;


but it must be borne in mind that it is in such
trifles that the old federal leaven always de.
velopes itself. As such, and as illustrations of
the true character of the men who now control
the destinies of this great state, they are not to
be overlooked among the higher and more sub-
stantial assumptions of power and patronage
which have signalized the career of the present
Executive, under the tutelage of the Dictator,
but will be noted and remembered by a people
who have been taught to look with jealousy
upon any, the slightest, encroachment upon the
safe limits by which they have chosen to cir-
cumscribe their public servants.
NORTIHL CAROLINA ELECTIONS.
We have returns from two only of the sev-
en counties in the 1lt district (Sawyer's,) as
follows :-


Currituck,
Camden,


Sawyer, dan.
552
134
686


Rayner,fed. .
114
475

589


Democratic majority in the two counties 97,
which is less by 23, than it was in the same
counties in 1837, when 8. ran as "whig."-
The remaining counties gave him in 1837, a
majority of 525, and hiamaj. in the district was
505. An Elizabeth city correspondent of the
Norfolk Herald now predicts confidently the
election of Rayner by at least 500.
Nothing further from the 6th district (Haw-
kins') beyond the following, which we find in
the N. Y. Jour. of Commerce of Saturday,
P. M. :-
NORTH CAROLINA.-The Petersburgh (Va.)
Intelligence brings a report that Hilliard is elect-
ed to Congress in the 6th district, over Hawkins,


Martin Van Buren.
This passage occurs in a speech delivered
at a political meeting in Alabama by a Mr.
Rittenhouse:
Another name yet remains to mention: one
that will occupy no undistinguished position in
his country's calendar. Let vulgar prejudice and
unreasoning antipathy smile when 1 repeat it-
Martin Van Buren I Gentlemen, it is known to
many, to most of you here, that I once and most
zealously opposed the elevation of this individual.
I had been led to believe him a treacherous, non-
committal and timid politician. 'Tis true, I was
pointed to his Congressional speeches, his Shocco
Springs letter, and numerous other declarations
of his opinions, favorable to southern and state
rights politics. But these were, after all, mere
words, and I did not trust them. Yet, when the
time came to redeem these pledges, and I found
them, one and all, to the letter fulfilled, what
course, I pray you, was left for me to pursue 1
Could I longer deem him treacherous, whose year-
ly messages repeated that hostility to a National
Bank, which I had been formerly assured was
only directed against the Pennsylvania institution,
and would in the end give place to one established
in New York ? Could I consider him non.comn
mnittal, who so frankly and early proclaimed him.
self on the new and denounced Sub-Treasury ?
Could I hold him timid, who, assaulted by more
en-mies, placed in more difficulties and submitted
to a fiercer ordeal than any Administration ever
yet encountered, has calmly and firmly carried
out his policy, and smiled at the vindictiveness of
his foes ? Though threatened with committees
of ten thousand armed enemies, though perceiv-
ing, in the hour of his necessities, squadrons of
his early friends wheeling by States from his
ranks-he dared hold on the march, which both
consistency and country enjoined. Sir, fate and
malignity had scattered, like the savage ordeals of
the olden superstition, burning ploughshares in
his path, that the darkness of our calamities had
obscured. He had sailed, it was said, this sun-
shine pilot, "these many summers on a sea of
glory ;" and when the vessel of State was
"weathering its stormiest capes," loudly was it'
prophesied that he would blanch and tremble in
the wild latitudes he had reached. But did he
tremble? I, sir, with no friendly view, curious-
ly watched that solitary man at the helm, solii
tary from his own vast and unshared resposibili-
ties;) and when I beheld him amidst the uproar of
the elements, and the noise and the menaces of a
distracted crew, calmly gazing at the card, and
firmly directing the wheel-I could not withhold
from him the tribute of my admiration, my es-
teem and my applause.' Of humble parentage,
endowed with no transcendent eloquence, wear-
ing no soldier's laurels-he has nothing where-
withal to dazzle the multitude from their proprie-
ty : and the sustained confidence of his country-
men, is no feeble evidence of the justice of his
cause. I do not exaggerate his claims, therefore,
when I pronounce him, the firm, courteous and
able statesman ; the very man for the times ; the
pure impersonation of principle.
To be Remembered.
One of our federal neighbors referring to the
pretended benefits of the U. S. Bank, says that
when we had such an institution, "it was rare
that a poor man suffered the loss a dollar from a
broken bank." Does he forget, or does he sup-
pose the people have forgotten, that the only banks
that ever broke in this state, were the Eagle Bank
and the Derby Bank, both of which exploded du-
ring the reign of the great regulator, the United
States Bank? The cool impudence of those fed-
eral politicians is amazing.-[New Haven Col. Re.
gister.
DESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT CINCINNATI.-One of the
most disastrous fires that has occurred at Cincin-
nati for many years, broke out on the morning of
Saturday the 3d inst., in an oil mill on Light at.,
between Broadway and the canal, the progress of
which was not arrested until between 40 and $50,.
000 worth of' property was consumed. The prin.
cipal losers are Mr. C. S. Bradbury, whose mills
were destroyed, with 700 bushels of flour and
wheat-mill insured; Mr. Kendall, saddle-tree ma-
ker-no insurance; Mr. Bryan, whose oil mill was
destroyed, had no insurance. It was in this mill
that the fire commenced; and we have the melan-
choly relation to give, that Mr. B's son, a young
man of 17 years of age, was burut in the building!
Messrs. E. Morgan and Co's extensive stereotype
printing office was consumed; insured on buTld
ing but not on stock-loss $4000. The fire, it is
supposed, was the work of an incendiary.--[N. Y.
American.

CLEAR CHEAT -We saw yesterday a $10 of
the Bank of Manchester, Miss., which rather out-
goes any other we have seen, in cheating as to
the time of payment. The note is payable in the
usual form, on demand; but on the large vignette
in the centre are stamped in small letters, which
nobody would see without being pointed to them,
and which nobody can certainly decypher on the
closest examination, something about "Post
Note," and "payable in one year." Would an in-
dividual have halt his credit left, who should com-
mit such a fraud in the case of his own note. The
thing is detestable altogether; and if permitted ex-
tensively, would fill the country with cheating.-
[N. Y. Jour. Corn.


RECENT COUNTERFEITS.-Steuben County Bank,
Bath, N Y.-3's, letter H; payable to P. Cook,
Dated Aug. 24, 1838, signed B Stown, cashier;
John Magee, president; engraved coarse; purpor-
*.,I t hav ho.-- anevravo__-,. k.. Pta.r UJT~a.>:Lr


YOUNG MEN'S CONVENTION.
Third Senate District.
A Convention of the Democratic Young Men from the
several counties composing the Third Senate District,
will be held at the Catskill House, in the village of Cats-
kill, County of Greene, on Tuesday, the 10th day of Sep-
tember next, at 11 o'clock, A. M., of that day. Tne seve-
ral counties will send such number of Delegates as shall
be agreed upon in County Convention, not less however
than one from each town. CALEB CROSWELL,
SAMUEL ROWLEY,
MARTIN J. TOWSSED,
P. CAGGER,
JAMES M. BoucK.
State Corresponding Committee
for the Third senate District.
August 6. 1839.

MARRIED,
In Ogdensburgh,on the 1st. inst. by the Rev. J. A. Savage,
Louis HASDROUCK, Attorney and Counsellor at Law, to
Miss LOUISA SEYMOUR, daughter of E. B. Allen, esq., all
of that place.
At New York, on the morning of the .31st ultimo, at
the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, by ihe Rev. Dr.
Milnor, Mr. J. R. BURErrT. of Livingston, N. J.. to
Miss PHEBK OSBORNE, of Castile, Genesee county, N.Y.,
(a pupil uf the Institution.)
DIED,
On Friday evening, after a lingering illness, CATALINA
GiBBsoNs, daughter of Sanford Cobb, aged 20 years.
The relatives, friends antd acq uaintances of William
Forbey, and those of his father-in-law, James Sickles,
are respectfully requested to attend the funeral of his de-
ceased child, this afternoon, at 5 o'clock, from his
residence, 45 Colonie-street, without further notice.


COMMERCIAL.
NEW-YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
Saturday, Aug. 10.
15shares Bank of Commerce............99
625..do.. Delaware& Hudson........67ka672
30..do..Seventh Ward Bank ............93
12..do..State Bank........... ....1041
45..do..Nor. Am. T'st. & B'gCo...73ja731
100.. do.. Mechanic's Bank Asso..........81
148. .do.. American Ex Bank-........-..81ka81
45..do. .Canion Co ................. 34ja34
35..do..Mohawk R R.............58 58
75..do.. Boston & Providence......l00al00O
45..do..N.Y. Prov. & Boos...........23a23j
25..do..Harlem R. R..... ............47


ton is withotit change. Money Stocks steady.


I I


THE VARIETY STORF,
392 South MLrkqltA.%-


SILVER FRUIT KNIVES fo, sale at
THE VARIETVy STORE"
au9 3A Sniutb Market Stu
INDIA RUBBER SADDLE BAG-I-da.-
Sted India rubber chair cusniuns and pillars, 10to al
at the U. 8. BAZAAV .
au9 324 North Market. str .
CAPT. MARRYATT IN AMERICA--DI
ry in America, by Capt. Mlarryatt.
The British Magazines, for July. for sale by
au9 W. C. LITTLE, cor. State t,.
N OTICE-The office of the subscriber is reioiv4
to Nu. 3 (first story) of ihe Mler hanta' EKchaa&&
au8-3t ARTHUR H. R.'.-#T.
PLEASE TO READI) TIUi-At this u
When c ses cf diarrriea. dysen ery, cholera mobua,
cramps, cholics, or summer coin plaint exist In almost ar,
cry family, a medicine which will give immediate slie(
is invaluable. Such it is believed is Dr. Jaynes's Car.-
minative Balsam. and indeed the bubscribez knows ofr#'-
ses where it has been tried and found eleitual.
therefore recommends it with ofidenee. Price *.<.,
Sold genuine only at the Variety Store, 3q, Sout MaJp.
ket street, by
aus8 8. VAN SeHAACK.
PORTABLE SHAVING CA8ES-e-me etf
the most complete leather travella ig dressing cass
containing all the requisite apparatus, ever offered at,
ibthis establishment, just received at the
au8 V. S. BAZAAR, 324 N. Market st.
ELEGANT SEWING BASKETOir-EaIrAs
w.illOw work baskets, ,o an extra fine qualityal,4
new patterns, of German nmnufaeture, )uat recd at thA
au8 U. S. BAZAAR, 34 N. Market u


N OTICE]-Sealed proposals wlll'be receivedA b
either ,f the undersigned, commissioners for er i.
ing the public buildings at the Sat of Governuat fer
the Territory of Iowa, until the fourth day of Novem-
ber next, for furniabhing materials for building ofiMli
following dinrenaions:


THE FLORIDA WAR.
Office of the News,
St. Augustine, E. F. Aug. 3, 10, A. M.
THE WAR RENEwEDI-The following account
of the treacherous surprise of Col. Harney's corn
mand, reached here this morning by express. Col.
Gates, commanding east of St. John's, has trans-
mitted orders for the immediate defence of the
posts South.
Ass't Adj't General's Office.
Army of the South.
Fort Brooke, (E. F) July 29.
Sir-It becomes my painful duty to inform you
of the assassination of the greater part of Lt. Col.
Harney's detachment by the Indians, on the morn-
ing of the 23J inst. on the Coleosahatchie river,
where they had gone according to the treaty at
Fort King, to establish a trading house. The
party consisted of about 28 men, armed with
Colt's rifle; they were encamped on the river, but
unprotected by defences of any kind, and it is said
without sentinels. The Indians in large force
made the attack before the dawn of day, and be-
fore reveille, and it is supposed that 13 of the men
were killed, among whom was Major Dallam, and
Mr. Morgan, sutlers. The remainder, with Col.
Harney, escaped; several of them severely wound-
ed. It was a complete surprise.
The commanding general therefore directs that
you instantly take measures to place the defences
at Fort Mellon in the most complete state of re-
pair, and be ready at all times to repel an attack,
should one be made. No portion of your com-
mand will, in future, be suffered to leave the gar-
rison, except under a strong escort. The detach-
ment at Fort Maitland will be immediately with-
drawn.
Should Fort Mellon prove unhealthy, and the
surgeon recommend its abandonment, you are au-
thorised to transfer the garrison, and reinforce
some of the neighboring posts.
I am, sir, GEO. H. GRIFFIN,
Ass't Adjt. General.
Lt. WV. E. Hanson, Commander of Fort Mellon.


THE MIDDLING INTEREST BANK.
[From the Boston Times.J
Since the publication of the stoppage of the
bank, there have been a thousand rumors current,
very lew of which are in any way true. Pretty
near direct from one who ought to know, we learn
that the bank has been in a precarious condition tbfor
some months. It issome time since the Commis.
sioners thought of interfering to wind up its con-
cerns, but the officers of the bank thought they
could get along if they were allowed an opportu-
nity. This opportunity was granted under a vigi-
lant survei.ance of the commissioners, who be-
came satisfied, at last, that the bank could not
sustain itself, and yesterday closed its doors. It
is said to be in a rather worse condition than it has
been in for six months past, having extended
its circulation; that it might have struggled on
still longer, but that it was useless to expect that
its emissions and business would be safe and profi-
table.
It is also stated, from the same source, that the
bills will all be redeemed, and that the public will
not be sufferers, unless they bfoolishly sell the mo-
ney at a large discount and thus become voluntary"
losers through fear, or haste to obtain a perfectly
current money. The losses will come upon the
stockholders. Their capital stock is $150,000-
one of the smallest, if not the very smallest, bank
capital in the city. It is said that the whole in-
debtedness will not exceed $100,000; and, there-
fore all persons holding their bills need not tear
ultimate redemption. The card ot the President
says that all their bills will be paid; but there is a
manifest temper in his note, which is somewhat
surprising, considering they have lived on suffer-
ance for a considerable time, without evincing any
power to get up hill.
There have been other rumors touching some
other banks, which, so far as we can learn, are
without foundation; and the account we have
above given, we doubt not is true of the Middling
Interest Bank, unless, as some rumors say, they
have surreptitiously extended their circulation be-
yond the representations of their books and the
knowledge of the commissioners. We do not be-
lieve this; but if it be true, we say open the State
Prison for the responsible officers.
[From the Boston Atlas.]
This injunction was granted upon the applica-
tion of the bank commissioners, who set out in
their application, that from an examination into
the affairs of the bank, they are of opinion that it
cannot be allowed to continue its business, with-
out hazard to the public, and danger to those whose
funds are in its custody. The application also
states that the bank has violated the statute for
the regulation of banking, and particularly speci-
fies the facts, that the bank commenced business
before its capital was paid in, according to law,
and that it granted loans to certain of its stock-
holders, before they had paid in the full amount
of the shares by them respectively held.
A hearing is to be had on Saturday next, when
it will be decided whether or not the injunction
shall be made absolute.
The directors are John M. Fiske, president;
William S. Bridge, Benjamin Smith, Jonn Winn,
John Snelling, Samuel Prince, Win. Munroe, G.
Munroe and Jas. Steele, cashier.
THE STEAMERS AGAIN-The brig Padang,'Pinck-
ney, reports having, on the 3d inst. lat. 50 10,
Ion. 64, at 7 o'clock, P.M., exchanged signals
with the steam ship Great Western. In the same
latitude and longitude, at 10 o'clock P. M., ex-
changed signals with the steam ship British
Queen, 30 miles behind.
The bark Bevis, Scudder, from Bordeaux, re-
ports having, on the 3d inst. in lat. 40 40, Ion.
66, seen two large steam ships, one 40 miles a-
head of the other, and 400 miles from Sandy Hook.
-[N. Y. Jour. of Corn.
A CAsE OF ABANDONMENT.-Yesterday after-
noon a young Irish woman went to the millinery
store No. 140 Bowery, with a handsome female
infant, about six weeks old, in her arms, and
wished to purchase a bonnet. To enable her to
examine it and judge of it the better, she request-
ed the respectable middle aged lady to hold the in-
fant until she called in her friend Irom the street
Sto look at it, and who wanted to purchase one
like it. The lady milliner took the child, and
held it while its mother went out to call in her
friend, but alter waiting two hours, no mother or
any one else came, and she took the infant down
to the Alms House, in the Park, where it was put
out to nurse, thus relieving the lady of an heiress
she was not legally entitled to.-[[N. V. Sun.
FRESHET.-This region was visited with a
freshet on Thursday last, which caused consider-
able damage. The streams raised to an unusual
height-bridges were carried away, the roads badly
cut up, and crops destroyed. Mr. McCammon, of
Danube, will lose $1000; his crops being wholly
swept away. The rail road, five miles east of this
village, was so much damaged that the train
which usually arrives here at 2 P. M., was de-
tained until late in the evening. Many of the
passengers were on their way to Syracuse, to see
Henry Clay ; but lost the sight for that' night,
and were compelled to tarry among the Herkimner
Loco Focos until the next morning, when they
were sent on, very much refreshed with a night's
rest in Old Democratic Herkimer.-[Mohawk
Courier, August 1.


ton is without change. Money Stocks steady.
The U. S. Bank has reduced its rate ford lulis to
9 prem and on France to 5. 20. The packet
for London to-day takes no specie.
-I
PORT OF ALBANY.-August 12.

ARRIVED ON SATURDAY.
Schr. Columbia, IStevens, Richmond, with coal to Nail
Factory.
Win. Benton, Cutter, Newark, coal to C. Living-
sion.
Vintage, Bearse, Boston, merchandise to Gay &
Willard.
iSloop Empress, Lewis, Boston.
S Hero, Butker, Nantucket.
Margaret Jane, Huffman, Newark.
CLEARED.
Schr. Jane Ann Maria, Ennis, Newark.

ANSWER TO REV. C. SPARRY8'RO-
MANISM'--Two discourses will be delivered by
me Rev. J. Mi'CLUSKEY, of Schenectada, and by the Rev.
J. A. SCIHNELLER, of this city, in St. Mary's church, THIS
EVENING, at 7j o'clock. aul2-tt
G 1UERLAIN's$ SHAVING CREAM-This
v admirable preparation is solid genuine at ihe
nul2 U. S. BAHAARI, 324 N. Market st.
DOUBLE DAMASK LINEN TABLE
CULOT'S-, ne pack-ge 10-4 long, of superior
damnask, believe, d to be cheaper at $7 than the article is
usually sold at $5 each.
Also, an assortment of smaller sizes, a;l warranted
pure liten and strong fabric. Also damask napkins,
some very fine, and damask dorlies.
Purchasers wish-ng the above goods at unusually low
pieces, are respectfully invited to examine them, us they
were bought at auction with cash, and are offered at
about the same advances charged on goods of .Americean
manufacture.,
aul2 TALCOTT & CO.
DR. JAYNE8'S CARMINATIVE BAL-
SAM ftor diarrhea, dysentery, cholera morbus. Ac.
&c. The sale of this medicine is daily increasing,. and
the subscriber does not Lesitate to recommend it In all
cases of the above complaints, and those of a similar na-
ture. The genuine for sale only at the Variety Store,
392 South Market street, by
aul2 S. VAN SCHAACK.
BLUE BLK GRO DE ROYAL, grodemwism,
gro de paris, puult de sole, Englisb lustring, and
fig'd repse satin silks, comprising one of the most splen-
did ass,,rinmens of idue hik silks ever offered in this mar-
ket, at the cheap store of
au It2 TALCOTT & 00.
UTCH HERRING, from Holland, a superior
article in kegs, for sale by
E. it. E. SATTERLEE,
aul 12 Ol6State st.
WANTED-A Woman to do house work. An Eang.
lish or American woman will be preferred. Ap-
ply at No. 7 Green st. ault
FOR THiE MOUCHlOIR-Lubin's Geranium
Extract. This delightful perfume is sold at the
aul2 U. S. BAZAAR, 324 N. Market st.
LEACHED SHEETING MUSLINS-One
case 4-4 sheeting received this morning, of a better
quality than any hitherto offered at the same price by the
subscribers, and which are certainly a bargain at Is. a yd.
aul2 TALCOTT& CO.
l^TEW BOOKS received at W. C. LITTLE'S
1 Bookstore-
Lord Brougham's Statesmen of times of George q3,
second series.
The Tourist, for 1839.
The Family Visitor and Silk Cultivator, for June.
Combe on the Constitution of Man, new edition.
Delafield's Antquities of America, with plates, au.it
JUST PUBLISHED-Fanny with other poems,
by Fitz Greene Hulleck. a new improved edition.
The Tourist, or packet manual for travellers, 18,.
A Manual of Useful Studies, for the use of families and
schools, by Noah Webster, .LL. D.
Wedgewood's Science of Numbers.
Statesmen time George 3d, second edition, 2 vols., by
Lord Brougham.
Jack Sheppard, part 4. For sale at
aul2 0. STEELE'S Bookstore.
CII)ER VINEGAR-20 barrels of excellent Ci-
der Vinegar for sale at 133 Green at., by
aulU-3t DANIEL POWERS.
STOLEN-From under the shied of Holt's tavern, at
the aqueduct, 4 mile' below Schenectady, a large
GREY HORSE, 16 hands high, 6 or years old thelast
spring. Tue said horse is of a reddish grey, has P mark
on the left leg above the knee. of a white ring, which has
been caused by having been knee-banded, lie has a
blemish on the left hind leg, on the upper and back part
of the hock, owing to a thickening of the skin. Hehas
a Square tail. and carries a little to the left. He is gay, a
fleet traveller, and a fine walker.
Whoever will return said horse and thief, or horse
alone, shall be suitably rewarded by calling at Van Du-
zen & Segue's Utica House. Albany, August 9,1839.
aulO-daclt
TIHE appointment of WATTS C LIVINGSTON,
as Agent and Surveyor of the Herkimer County 1Y.u-
tual Insurance Company, was revoked on the 3dAugut
instant. August 5,1839.
HIRAM NOLTON, President,
WM. BROOKS, Ass't Sec'ry. aul-3w
MIOUSSELINE DE LAINES-Superfine blk
and blue bik M. de Laines, all wool, at 331 North
Market street.
aulO E. A. HARRIS. .
MICHAUX'S FRECKLE WASH-Tbhis ia
certain remedy aot only for freckles, bat;ior tan
sunburn, pimples, redness of the skin, Ac., sold genuiaq
at the U S. BAZAAR,
aulO 324 North Market street
pARiSIAN GLOVES-Elegantly wrought I<
dies' gloves, with satin wrists, for sale at the
autO U. 8. BAZAAR 3t4 N. Marketat,
FITZ GREENE HALLECK'S POEmSka
new edition.
Nicholas Nickleby, No. 16, with plates.
The American Annals of Education.
And the late novels, for sale by
aulO W. C. LITTLE, cor. 8tate~tt.


NEW-YORK AND ERIE RAILROAD
STATE -TOCK-Notice is hereby given, that the
New-York and Eric Rav-road Conim.any will eel) at pulp-
lic auction, at ihe Merchants' changee in the city o
New-York. on Saturday. the 31st day of August ist,
at one o'clock P. M.. under the direction of the Comrp-
troller One Hundred Thousand Dollars of New York
State Stock, bearing interest at the rate of four and a
half per cent. per alinum. from the first day of October,
18-19, inclusively, payable quarterly, on the first days oa
January, April, July anrid October1 being 8tok issued ta
pursuance of chapter 22d of the laws of said state oftab
year 1838, and is reimbursable at the pleasure of the
state.
The office of the Manhattan Company in the city of
New York, is designated as the pluoe for the registry aad
transfer of said stock, and will be the place foir payment
of interest thereupon.
The stock will be sold in certificates of 81000 eahb, and
the buyers will be required to pay the amount of thelr
purchases respectively immediately after the sale, wkea
transfers will be made accordingly. New York, Antut
8th, 1839. By order.
aul6-]d3w T. J. WATERS, Seretary..
S U PERFLUOUS HAIR instantaneously rsaov
e l by the genuine Depilatory Powder sold at the.
aU9 U. S. BAZAAR, 324 N. Market st.
WILLOW CRADLES AND CHAIKN$
manufactured of the best imported willow, lu
received and for sale at









ALBANY MUSEUM.

NE-ENGAGEMENTAFOR ONE WEEK.
The proprietor tales pleasure to announce to the citi-
zens of Albany and its vicinity, that he has at great ex-
pense affected ax engagement ith MIONS ADDIi IEN I',
the celebrated Magician, who will go through his extra-
ordinary performance on this evening, and every eve-
ning this week.
AdImittance to the whole, 25 center.

N EW PUBLICATIONS-The Metropolitan,
JLIfor July.. _.
Blaekwooo's Edinburgh Magazine fo r July.
Bentley's Misceliany, tor July:. ,-
Dunvlison's Medical Library ani jtol for Aug.
New supplies o0 Capt. Marryat, W.alker on Intermar-
riage, James's Genth man of the ,ld 'School and Chad.
Tyrrelt, Sidney Clifton and Chas. Vincent,' for sale by
aul W..X. .ITTL,., cor. State st.
F FRIENDS OF COLQXJZATION-Please
tosend your Fourth o, July collections without de-
lay to the Rev. I. N. Wyckoff, 34 Beaver st., Albany.-
Remember that promptitude is the prime minister of be-
nevolence. "Say not to-morrow," whime voo delay.
I N. WYCKOFF,
au8-daclw Sec'ry and Treas'r p. t.
OTICE-The friends of Theological learning and
of the ministry, will find a valuable sermon, enti-
tled "The School of the Prophets," preached before the
Board of Superintendents of the Theological Seminary,
in the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, and publish-
ed by their request, a. the principal bookstores in the
city of Albany. The sermon presents a lucid argument
on the claims of the Gospel Ministry, and a great body
6f statistical facts, particularly interesting to the minis-
ters and members of the Dutch church. It deserves ex-
tensive circulation. [au8-3t] I N. W.
ALBANY WATER WORKS-NO'rTICE-A
diviur.nd of Four per cent. on the capital stock of
this co, pany has been decl.ired, payable to tie stock-
-holders at the Comme cial Rank on and after the lO
inst. Albany, August 7, 1839.
auB-lw 0. MEADS, Treasurer.
THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, for
August, published moathiy. Sterns $3 p-r annum.
Subscriptions received by WV. C. LITTLE,
an8 cor. State st.
PIANO FORTES-The subscriber having been
Sfor ninny years engaged in the manufacture of Piano
Fortes, ventures to say that he can produce instruments
equal in tone, touch and finish to any made in this city
.or elsewhere. He would invite citizens and strangers
who intend to purchase, to call at his store and examine
forteiselves. All instruments warranted for one year.
FRANCI P. BURNS,
95 State street. Albany,
jylO-6m 2d door below St. Peter's church.
COAL AT SUMMER PRICES-The subscri-
bers being their ummnier supply offer their coal at
unusually low prices. J. & A. GROESBECK,
au7 .45 C'olumliai st
TREAD-MarshIall's linen thread f.r sale loW at
364 S. Market st., Commercial Buildings, by
< u7 MOSELEY & VAN GAASBEEK.
RO DE PARIS-B1k and blue blk Gro de Paris,
for sale-at 3r4 a. Market st., Coin. Bildiintrs, by
au7 MOSELEY & VAN GAASBEEK.
CHINA MUGS WITH NAMES-The largest
assortment of names ever offered may be found at
; THE VARIETY STORE,
au7 392 South Market St.
LIBEAU CANE GUNS-Also Pistol Riding
f Whips and Chairs in Walking canes, for travellers,
for sale at the U. S. BAZAAR.
au7 324 North M:'rkct st.
TRENCH LI0% PRESERVEtS-An im-
Y.U proved style of French life preservers, for sale atthe
au7 U. S. BAZAAR, 324 North Marketst.
W BOOKS at 0. STEELE'S Bookstore.
NJ Bentley's Miscellitny, No. 31, for July.
; The Stenographer, or self-instructor in short hand, by
Charles 0. Counsel.
Desultory Reminisc nces of a tour through France,
Germany and Switzerland, by an American.
A Treatise on Roadsf, their history, character and utili-
ty, by a. De WVitt Bloodgood au7
SHAWLS- elegantt 7-4 and -4 embroidered and da-
mask silk shawls, with long net fringes, entirely
new, just opened at 331 North Market street, second
door south of the Mansion House, by
j..15 E. A. HARRIS.
"IFLES AND SHOT GUNS-Made by Fair-
-.1.1 banks, Boston-a neat,cheap and perfect article, for
sale by GEO. WARREN,
Je2w 372 South Market street.
ALBANY MEDICAL COLLEGE-The en
suing session will commence on Tuesday, Oct. 1st.,
1839, and continue sixteen weeks.
FACULTY.
Alden March, M. D., President and Professor of Sur-
gery.
David M. Reose, M. D., Professor of the Theory and
Practice of Medicine.
fTbenezer Emmons, M. D., Professor of Chemistry and
Natural History.
James H. Armsby, M. D., Profehsor of Anatomy.
David M. M'Lachlan, M. D., Professor of Materia Me-
dica and Therapeutics.
Gunning S. Bedford, M. D. Professor of Obstetrics.
Thomas Hun, M. D., Professor of the Institutes of Me-
dicinei
Amos Dean, esq. Professor of Medical Jurisprudence.
The fee for the whole course is 070.
SMatriculation fee, 85; Graduation fee, $20. Boarding
may be obtained at from $2 50 to 84 59 per week.
au6-td J. H. ARMSBY. Registrar.
i TO LET-Store and dwelling No. 39u S.
11! Market st., at present occupied by Mr. George
,IiL Guardinier. Possession given immediately.-
j E nquire of Mr. Guardinier, or *
mz6-tf SAML. S. FOWLER.
T'PUE MOHAWK AND HUDSON RAIL-
, --. ROAD COMPANY have declar,-d a regular semi-
annual dividend of two and a hal' per cent. on their capi-
tal stock, payable on the 20th of August instant, at the
Pry Dock Bank. The transfer books will be closed from
;te 15th to the 90th inst. 5th August, 1S39.
aay-td THOMAS PALMER, Secretary.
flG subscriber has removed his office to No. 1, sec-
ond story, in the Albany Exchange.
5t,2 ERASTUS PERRY.
CBDAR PAILS just received and for sale at
~~Td E VARIETY" S'IORE,
'.- u392 South Market st.
EXTRA POCKET BOOKS-The best article
manufactured can be obtained at the
.,-l-tf U. S. BAZ AAR, 324 North Market st.


N'OriCE--ALBANY EXCHANGE BANK-An
election for fifteen directors and three inspectors of
ejection, or he Albany Exehainge Bank, will be held at
SNo. It in the Exchange Building, on Tuesday the 3rd day
of September next. The poll will be open from 10 to 12
*o'clock A. M. By order of the Board of Directors. Al-
bany, Auig. 1, 13M.
AW-td G.W 0 STANTON, V. Prest.
PEARL PURSE RINGS AND TIPS for
Ro;leat THE VARIETY STORE,
Y38 392 South Market st.
R1 ICE, of the last crop, just received and for sale by
... R. & E. SATTERLEE.
. Jy18 1Al State street.
(OPARTNERSHIP-S. J. PEN\IMAN hav-
Sing united with him in the Oil trade. ELIPHALET
WICK&ELS Jr. the business of the establishment will be
foaktwced under the firm of PENNIMAN -& WICKES.
aug-4acl w
)jTj1W SATCHELS, or Reticules, for sale at
Sf X THE VARIETY STORE,
; ~393 South Market st.
IO TT]T[~~ ~tINTS, for sale by the gross, dtzen
OTr ingle, at THE VARIETY STORE,
us 392 South Market st.
1i" RS9SCR WW'i-AsMrall assortment for sae
GEO. WARRE 1W,
S ~372 Suth Market street.
S.ATTITJBT WARPS--1 000 yards/for sale by
jy d-SEYMOUR & WOOD,
gu No. 6 Stats street.
pERCUSSION CA.p@-Rihbed._plit and com-
mon, for sale by tGEO. 'WARREN,
aiu3 372 South Market street.
'IiNGLISH FISHING TACKLE-Gentlemen
Sonsporting excursions will find a!l the necessary
"par6tuM at the UNITED STATES BAZAAR.
a*3 324 N. Market st, near the. Post office.
WA1KING CANE FISHING RODS-Ad-
SW Wmmrahly adapted for trout fishing, sold at the
43 *VU. S. BAZAAR. 324 N. Market st.
O" T PU B13 LISHR D-A Diary in America, with
tF marks on its institutions, by Capt. Marryatt, au-
tbr of Japhet, Peter Simmple, &e., for sale at
S- "0. 8 rEELE'S Bookstore.
09&G WHIPS for ale at the Variety Store, 32 S.
i Market st. u P i

DABRIS'S SOOTHING SYRUP-This ar-
p. 14c1-e almost invarl:ibly gives relief to chilmlren when
"eotbing. Sit is otten effectual when children a e threAt-
*ftA wd =onvulsions. The genuine can be bought only
#t tb) Variety Store, 392 South Market st., of
9 ,'. S. VAN SCHAACK.
E 6],0TX40- WATCH GUARDI S-India rubber
wtc gitards for aale ai the
Au6 U. S BZ+AR, 24 N. Market at.
FOUR SIDED STROP-Old Saunder's origin-
Si RlazfOi trop, with ibthe ',ablet, is sold at the
W ", .IU. S. BAZAAR,324 N. Market st.
1WANTED-A Cook and Chambermaid, who v iil
come well recommended, and fully competent to
-tiwfnrm tIre. ditties of their respective empioymients. to


ALBANY EXCHANGE BANK-A call of
, Ten per cent., on tle capital stock of ttMe Albany
Exchange Bank is hereby made; payaile on Satttrdiay,
the 24th day ofAugust next, and a further call of Ten
per centit on Tuesday, the 24th day of September next.-
The first payable to the subscribers, at .\o. 12 in the low-
er story of tte. Exch.tnge, on State st., and the Ilast at
their banking room in Albany. By order of the Board
of Directors. Dated July 23, 1839.
G. V. STANTON,
SAML. STEVENS,
jy24-td JOHN M. NEWTON.
CHICAGO LAW NOTICE-The subscribers
have formed a co-partnership in the practice oflaw,
at Cnicago, Illinois, and will faithfully attend to all busi-
ness entrusted to them. ISAAC N. ARNOLD,
MAHILON D. OGDEN.
Refer to--
WVm. B. Ogden, esq.. Chicago,
John A. Dix, esq., Albany.
Amos Dean, esq., do
Edwin Croswell, esq., do
Mess. Seymour & Wood, do
Charles Butler, esq. No. 20 Nassau-st. New-York city.
Camhp.ll Rnshnsll. e-sq.. ,to defli-tf
1)IG 1RON-74 tons best No. 1 Scotch Pig Iron,
jC10 tios Bennington hoi blast do
200 do Dover and Fishkill hot blast do
50 do -outhern do do
50 do Jersey No. 2 do
jy20 For sale by JOEL RATHBONE.
AUBURN AND ROCHESTER RAIL-
ROAD COIM PAN Y-Notice is hereby given to the
stockholders of the Auburn andi Rochester Rail-road
Company, that pursuant to a resolution of the directors
thereof, they are required to pay to the treasurer an in-
stalmnent of Two Dollars and Fifty Cents on each share.
on or before thetwentiethday of July next, ond a fur-
ther instalment of Two Dollars and Fifty Cents on each
share, on or before the twentieth day of August next, un-
der the penalty of a forfeiture of their sock and of
previous payments
SPayments may be made by deposits to the credit of the
Treasurer. In either of the banks in the city of Roches-
ter. or in the villages on the line of said road, or at the
Ontario Savings Bank, in Canandaigua. Canandaigua,
June, 1839. CHA. SEYMOUR.
jel4-dlwilawtd Treasurer A. & R. Rail-road Co.
STRAYED ORt STOLEN-A small back DOG
;4 of the grey hound breed. For his return to the own-
r, or information given to this office where he may be
found, a liberal reward will be paid. je22-tf


25 0.Ji0 MORUS MULTICAULIS
U.U U T1 'REES, AT I-UBLIC SALE-
Will be sofd a* public sale on Wednesday, 18lth Septem-
ber, l-39, at 10j o'clock in the f renoon, at the Highfield
Cocoonery, Germantown, about 6 miles from the city of
Philadelphia, TWO H NDRED AND FIFTY THOU-
SAND genuine Morus Multicaulis Trees, now growing
most luxuriantly, and pronounced. by judges to be equal,
if not superior, to any trees now growing in this state.
TzaMs-S500 and under, cash; #500 to 1000. cash, 5 per
cent. discount, 1000 to W2000, two years credit; 2000 to
$4000, four years credit; over $4000, six years credit.-
The credit payments to be secured by bond and mortgage
on unencumbered real estate, or other approved securi-
ty, with interest at 6 per cent. payable half yearly; or a
discount of 5 per cent. for cash on all bills over $1000.
Catalogues, with particulars, will be ready for delive-
ry at time Auction mart, one week previous to sale-the
Trees may remain on the ground until December next.
N. B. The Highfield Cocoonery now in full operation,
and believed to be one of the largest in the world is sittu-
ate at Germantown, about' of a mile from the Rail-road
dep,,t.
aut-7t C. J. WOLBERT, Auctioneer.
NOTICE is hereby given, that subscription to the
capital stock of the Buffalo and Batavia Railroad
Company will be received by the Commissioners at the
Eagle Tavern in the village of Bat-ivia, on the 26th day
of August next, between time hours of 3 and 6 o'clock P.
M.
At the tavern of L. Dewolf, in the village of Attica, on
the 27th day of August next, between the hours of 10 and
11 o'clock A. M.
And at 308 Main st., Buffalo, on the 28th day of Au-
gust next, between the hours of 2 and 6 o'clock P. M.-
DaledJuly 12th, 1839. DAVID E. EVANS,
G.HOLDEN,
CH: TOWNSEND,
H.B.POTTER,
H. PRATT,
jy23-dtd BELA D. COE.
UNITED STATES BAZAAR, Albany, 1st
August, 1839-Tee undersigned having associated
with him Jacob H. Groesbeeck, the business of the es-
tablishment will hereafter ble transacted under the firm of
W. W. GROESBEECK & CO.
W. V. GROESBEECK.
NOTICE-All persons indebted to the subscriber will
please make Immediate payment, and those having de-
mands will present them.
aul-tt WV. WV. GROESBEECK.
pATENT WHEEL HEADS-Just received
one gross best patent wheel heads, having cast steel
spindles, which are for sale at the Variety Store, 392 S.
Market street, by
jy25 S. VAN SCHAACK.
BIANO FORTES-Several splendid instrument
From the unrivalled establishments of J. Chicker-
Ing & Co., Boston, Nunns & Clark, and Stodart, Wor-
cester & Dunham, New York, which for durability, rich-
ness of tone. and beauty of finish, are unsurpassed by
any Piano Fortes made in the United States. All in-
struments sold at this establishment are warranted per-
fect in every respect, and to remain so; are sold at the
manufacturers' prices, and second hand instruments will
be taken in exchange at fair prices.
PHILIP A. MAYER,
Piano Fort5 and Music Depot,
t90 North Market st.
N. B. Catalogues of my choice stock of Music are now
ready for delivery. jy27
FRENCH ACCORDIONS--Anotiher lot of
brilliant toned French Ac,-ordions just rec'd at the
au2-tf U. S. BAZAAR. 3-24 North Market st.
W ILLOW CRADLES just received and for sale
at the VARIETY STORE,
au2 392 South Market st.


AT a court of chancery held for the state of New York,
at Saratoga Aprings, on the third day of August,
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine-Present,
John Willard, vice chan, ellor of the fourth circuit.
It is ordered, that a special tertr of the court of chan-
cery of the state of New York, for the fourth circuit, be
held at the court house in Ballston Sja, on tne first Tues-
day in September nex ; and that all causes and motions
noticed for argument for the next stated term of said
court, stand over to the said special term, and that the
same may be then brought on without further notice.
au9-lw A copy. G. M. DAViSON, Clerk.
VELVETS-A superior article (for tailors) can be
had at 384 S. Market st., Commercial Buildings.
jy23 MOSELEY & VAN GAASBEEK.
AELIBRT'S HAIR TONIC, for the pr,.-serva-
tion, growth and restoration of the human hair, for
sale at THE VARIETY STORE,
jy23 '39-t South Market st.
CLOCKS, WATCHES, &C.-The public pa-
tronage is solicited by the subscriber to his exten-
sive assortment of fins French, American and German-
Clocks, gold arid silver watches, do Pencil Cases, Jewel-
ry, Music boxes, fancy goods, toys, &c., at moderate
prices. J. BERINGER, 82 State st.
N. B. WVarranted all new goods, and not damaged.
je3
LEGHORN HATS-A laree assortment nf the
above named article is now offered for sale at whole-
sale or retail, at the store of JOHN MA. YELL, No. 371
South Market st., The assortment consists of Gentle-
men's, Boys' and Clhiltren's Hats, of both tea and straw
colors, of different quaihities, single and double brims,
&e. A good supply also of Palm Leaf Hats, for men,
boys and children, jel5
DIARRHO6EA, CHOLERA MORBUS,
cramp Cholic, Vomiting. pains it the stomach and.
bowels, sick or nervous headache, and taat frequent and
fatal malady among children, termed cholcra infantum,
or summer complaint. can be cured hy the use of Dr.
Jayne's Carminotive Balsam. For sale genuine at the
Variety Store, 392 S Market st., by
jy2't S. VAN SCHA CK.
PAYSON'S INDELIBLE INK, to be usei
without a preparation The article, sold at the Va
riety Store, is warranted good and genuine.
S. VAN SCHAACK,
jyl9 392 South Market st.
PICTOU COAL AFLOAT-The snbscriber t is
now discharging a cargo of very fine Pictou Coal,
which will be sold unusually low. if taken from the ves-
sel. C. LIVINUGTON,
jyl9 599 South Market street.
E VANS'S CAMOMILE PILLS-The original
l and genuine camomile pills are sold only at the
Variety Store, 392 South Market st. Beware of coun-
terfeits. STEPHEN VAN SCHAAt'K,
jyll only agentfor Albany
O2 CASKS CANNON POWDER for sale
by GEO. WAR'.EN,
jy2 372 South Market street.
UMBRELLAS-Blk gingham umbrellas for sale
cheap by the dozen at 394 South Market street, Corn
mercial Buildings, hy
aul MOSELEY & VAN GAASBEEK.


ing in operations; tierefore baking, roasting, UUbiingy. &1c.,
will be done with them. for thle pulilic notice, during the
first Monday and Tuesday in ach -month, at No. 35 I.
Pearl .t, Alba.ny. Other stoves will be fieely admitted
for trial andi comparison, -having the fuel weighed tor
ea, h, and all things properly rioted and adjudged. Tiie
premium stoves should ite thus tested. The chlitef mana-
ger of the American Institute, gives little premiums, for
cooking stovt-s that never had tire in themn,and thus induces
the people to buy thiemn, though he knows not that they
ire worth the trouble of carrying home. If the chief man-
ager shares in the profits of Ihis premiums, he is certainly
a cunning, if riot an honest man.
Two sizes of Douglas's stoves, lately made more per-
rect, burn wood and coal finely, without change in the
furtnae jy31-dacJ BERIAH DOUt,LAS
H OSIERY-A fine assortment just received at the
new store of H. Ht. BABCOCK,
424 South Markut. st., east side,
jy23-dac corner of Division st.
DEAF AND DUMB-STATE OK NEW-
YOKK--Otfice of Superintendent of Common
Schools, Albany, August 2d, 1839.
Notice is hereby given, that at the commencement of
the next term of the New York Institution for the In-
struction ot the Deaf and Dumb, on the. 15th day of Sep-
tenmbrr next. it is expected there will be twenty or twen-
ty-five vacancies in the list ol'pupils supported at the ex-
p-nse of the state. Applications for the admission of
indigent pupils to supply those vacancies, may be mtiace
at once to the Superintendent of Comnion School,; and
it is desirable that they should lie presented as soon as
practicable, that the necessary arrangermenits may he
made to enable those who shall besehlcted to join their
respective classes at the commencement of the iew term.
Such applications must le accompanied by a certificate
of the overseers of the poor of the town, stating the
name and age of the proposed pupil, (who must be over
twelve and under twenty-five years of age,) and the in-
ability of his parents or guardians to maintain hiun atthe
Institution; and if there be also an inability to clothetlhe
pupils, that fact should be stated, tor in such case the
county is required by law to raise the sum of twenty dol-
lars annually for the purpose.
Each Senate district is entitled to send fifteen pupils;
but in case of their neglect to furnish their full number,
within two months after notice given, the deficiency
may be made up from other districts. This has been done
for several years, so thai there is now a great dispropor-
tion in the numbers taken from the respective districts.
From the 7th there is but one; from the 8tih, twelve; irom
the 5th, twenty-three &c.. Applications may ther,.fre
be made from any part of the state, and if twcy are more
numerous than the vacancies, preference will be givt n in
the selection to those senate districts which have the
smallest number of pupils. JOHN C. SPENCER,
au5-d2wc3w Superintendent.
TIN PLATE, COPPER, &c.-200 boxes Tin
iPlate.
8 eases sheathing Copper.
l'0 sheets braziers' do
000 lbs. Block Tin. Just received and for sale by
jyl2 JOEL RATHBONE.
WM. & A. GOULD & CO., Law Booksellers,
No. 104 State street, Albany, have just published
and for sale-
A new and revised edition of the Chancery Court
Rules, 1839.
Also, Session Laws, New York, 1839. je20-dae


REMOVAL OF SOUTH ICKS PRINT-
ING AND FAMILY NEWSPAPER OFFICE to
time Law Buildings, corner of South Market and Beaver-
streets, directly opposite the Argus office.
Alfred Southwick neatly and expeditiously executes
all kinds of PLAIN AND FANCY JOB PRINTING,
in the best and most expeditious style and manner, at
tair prices-, neither too low for the printer to live by,
nor high enough for any Monest employer to find fault
with. His orce is furnished with a large and extensive
assortment of Book, Job and Card Type of every descrip-
tion.
SOUTH WVICK'S FAMILY NEWSPAPER, edited
by Solomon Southwick, is published at the same place,
weekly. It is devoted entirely to literature, science and
matters of fact, having no connexion with any political
party or faction, or any religious sect, any further than
correct abstract principles are concerned; being adapted
saikctly-speaking, to the family circle of every lire-side.-
It has reached a second volume, with a steady increase
of subscribers, and has thus far given general satisfac-
tion; so much so, that the most respectable editors of all
parties have generously united in recommending it to the
patronage of the public. The public may rest assured,that
it shall be con inu-id, as the authenticand impartial jour-
nal or record of all facts worthy of notice in the passing
history of the times, both of foreign and domestic origin;
the steady advocate of pure literature, sound science,
and the christian religion; and the unflinching opponent
of all that is subversive of these only true foundations of
civilized society, and free government. Elm-Tree Press,
Law Buildings, June 1839. je21-dac6w
WE, HENRY CASSIDY & FRANCIS
McGUIGAN, formerly of the firm of Cassidy &
MAcGuigan, of the ity of Albany, having dissolved the
partnership aforesaid, have appointed ERASTUS PER-
RY, of the city of Alibany, our attorney and agent, who
is exclusively commissioned and authorised to settle up
all out-standing accounts of the aforesaid partnership,
and receive the amounts due to the aforesaid firm, and
give suitable and proper releases and discharges therefore;
and we, the said Henry Cassidy and Francis MeGuigan,
do hereby covenant and agree to ratify and affirm what-
ever our said attorney and agent may awfully do in the
premises.
In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands
:and seals, this 28th day of J une, 1&39.
HKNRY CASSIDY,
FRANCIs McGUIGAN.
In presence of John Fredenrica,
Peter Curry. jy4-dac
A CARD-GEORGE WARREN, importer and
dealer in Guns, Pistols, Gun Locks and furniture,
Files, Screws, Plated und Germnan Silver Ware, Cutle-
ry and domestic hardware, continues business at No 372
South Market st. He ten lers his thanks for business fa-
vors received, and respectfully solicits tie continued pa-
tronage of his f'rien !a and the public.
His goods are purchased on tile best term%, and in the
best to. eign and domestic markets, and are offered at a
small advance from cost for cash. jy19-dac
HIDES-2000 Buenos Ayres
1500 Rio Grand
1000 Santa Martha
1200 Tampico
1500 other salted and dry sole and upper
leather hides. African kip and salted and dry Patnas
Just received and for sale by
apl-dac SEYMOUR & WOOD.
W OOL, WARPS, SUMAC, &c.-2000 pounds
superfine Merino fleece wool.
1500 Ibs, clean pulled Lambs' No. 1, do.
12 beamIs; 800o yards suttinet warps.
5 tons Sicily Sumac.
600 dozen Sumac tanned Sheep skins.
500 do bark do do do
2000 gallons winter strained Sperm Oil.
200 barrels Liver do (to,
30 bales green salted and dry Patna bides.
Hides, Spanish and slaughtered
Horse and Seal Skins, for trunk covering.
Sole, Upper Leather and Calf Skins.
For sale at No. 6 State street, Albany, by
ocIS-dac SEYMOUR & WOODi
_IRD SEED-Canary, hemp,-rape, millet and
Sminized seed for sale at
THE VARIETY STORE,
jelli 39-2 South Market st.
M VINIATURE IVORY-Various siz(s for sale
at THE VARIlNTY STORE,
je22 392- South Market st.
AUBURN HYDRAULIC ASSOCIATION
u-BAn election of one or more directors of the Au-
burn Hydraulic Association, pursuant to the charter and
by-laws of the company, will be held at the office of M.
S. Myers, esq., in Aubiurn, the 14th day of August next,
at 10 o'clock A. M. By order of the Board of Directors.
Auburn, t61h July, 1839.
jyt7-law4w RICHARD STEEL, Secretary.
PHILLIPS' LAW OF EVIDENCE-The sub-
subscribers,publishtrs of thIe edition ofPhilllps' Trea-
tise on the Law ofEvid, nee, edited by the hon. Esek Cow-
en, one of the Judges of tihe Sup. CouJit of the State of N.
York, are much ,leased to be able to inform the public
and the profession olfthe law. that the work will be pub-
lished in about six weeRs. Judge Cowen has had it in
hand more than five years; his notes and references
alone will make about two thousand octavo page. of sol
id matter. This work will no doubt be the most lull arnd
complete treatise on the subject of Evidence of any ex-
tant, and embraces all the matter contained in the 7th
and 8th London editions of Phillips' Evidence, and the
subsequent ca-es decided in England, and also the whole
body of American law o0 the subject, as settled by the
several courts of this country. This ecition will be the
fourth American, from the last London editions, and wili
make four royal octavo volumes.
jy20 WM. & A. GOULD & CO.
D RY GOODS-Just opened a quantity ofdesira-
blegoods, among which are 8-4 net shawls, net
veils, net scarfs and gloves, new styles mousseline de
laihes, French, English and home calicoes, fine Frenchi
collars, fine trimmed do, 1Ut doz unbleached bik, slate,
and white cotton hose, silk do, worked and ribbed gents
manilla coats, silk and linen gloves, cravats and stock
ings. Also a variety of ladies' and children's wear, on
reasonable terms, at VAN BENTHUYSEN'S,
jy26 288 North Market st.
iALIsUItY IRON-Hot blast Salisbury iron
> for sale by J. & A. GROESBECK,
je27 84 Pier.


my6


PEOPLE'S LINE FOR NEW-YORK.
NEW ARRANGEMENT.
Through by daylight-From the foot of Hamilton street,
at7 o'cloeK A. M.
The splendid steamboat ROCHES-
sTER, Captain A. P. St. John, will
leave Albany for New York, on
Wednesday, June 12th, Friday, 14th,
and Sunday, 16th, at 7 o'clock A. M., touching at the in-
termediate landings.
Fur further particulars, enquire of the Captain on
board, or at the office No. 122 on the Pier, near the foot
of Hamilton sL, Albany. F. KELLY. Aent.
jeS EHF EL.Aet


S FOR HUDSON--REIGULAR
LINE-Steamnboat ROCKLAND,
Capt. Elam Nichols, will
mmmmm Leave Albany daily at 3 P. M.
do Hudlson do 7 A. M.
For freight or passage apply or board, or to
CHAS. A. KEELER, No. 12OPier, Albany,
apll JEREMIAH BAME, Hudson.


TROY AND ALBANY-FARE 12i CTS.
-The steamboats JOHN MASON,
Captain V. Truesdell, JONAS C.
tHEARTT. Capt W. W. Tupper,
40WuS SaS will run daily (Sundays excepted,)
between Troy and Albany, and as tenders to the morn-
ing and evening boats.
Leave Troy- I Leave Albany-
6 o'clock A M, to day boat. 6 o'clock A M. fkn night bt.
8N do- do 8 do do
10 do do 10 do do
12 do M Ii do do
1 do PM Ij do PM
3 do do 21 do do
4 do do to night bt. 6 do do, or fm day bt.
On Sunday, leave Albany on arrival of night Boat
from New York; and leave Troy at 4 o'clock to night
boat.
For passage, apply at the office 199 River st., Troy, and
foot of State st., Albany.
Baggage waggons always in readiness to carry bag-
gage to any part of the city-charge, 6 cents a trunk or
package. Freight and baggage at the risk of the owners
thereof. Troy, June, 1839. je5
ASSOCIATION LINE--NO MONOPOLY
REGULAR OPPOSITION FOR NEWV-YQRK.
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday evening, at 5
o'clock, from the foot of Lydius-st., Albany.
*The large and splendid low pres-
sure steam-boat WASHINGTON,
la- ^Capt. A. D. Groat, landing at inter-
mediate places.
Fare through to New-York, ONE DOLLAR.
To Pouglikeepsie, FIFTY CENTS.
Freight taken at moderate prices.
The public is assured that no pains will be spared by
the Captain or owners to accommodate passengers.
N. B. All persons are forbid trusting any person on
account of said boat and owners. jy25-lm
.iwemna PEOPLE'S LINE STEAM-
f .BOATS FOR NEWYORK-AR-
RANGEMENT FOR AUGUST-
m ~The splendid steamboat ROCHES-
TER, Capt. A. P. St. John, will leave the foot of Ham-
ilton street for New York, during the present month, as
follows:
On Thursday afternoon, Aug. 8, at 5 o'clock.
Sunday do do 11, at 5 do
Wednesday do do 14, at 5 do
Saturday do do 17, at 5 do
Tuesday do do 20, at 5 do
Friday do do 23, at 5 do
Monday do do 26, at 5 do
Thursday do do 29, at 5 do
For further particulars enquire on board the boat, or
at the office foot of Hamilton st.
N. B. All goods or property of any description put on
board of this boat, must be at the risk of the owners
thereof.
au6 SETH F. KFLLY, Agent.
LAKE ONTARIO--1839.
DAILY STEAMBOAT LINE-(EXCEPT SUNDAYS.)


The steamboats UNITED STATES, GREAT BRI-
TAIN and the new boat Sr. LAWRENCE, will leave
OSWEGO every day (except Sundays) utter the arrival
of tiWe Packets, at 3 o'clock P. M. as follows:
UPWARDS.
United States, Monidays and Thursdays,
St. Lawrence, 'Tuesdays and Fridays,
Great Britain, Wednesdays and Saturdays,
and arrive at Lewiston at 5 o'clock tIme next morning, af-
fording, in connexion With the Lewiston rail-road and
stages, and Oswego stages and packet lines, the most et-
peditious and pleasant route between Buffalo and Alba-
ny, passing in view of Niagara Falls.
DOWNWARDS.
The same boats will leave LEWISTON daily (except
Suncays) at 4 o'clock P. M., as follows:
Great Britain, Mondays and Thursdays,
United States, Tuesdays and Fridays,
St. Lawrence,. Wednesday and Saturdays,
and arrive at Ozwego at 6 o'clock next morning, in time
lor the packet boats from Oswego to Utica. From Os-
wego the Great Britain will run to Kingston direct, and
the United States and St. Lawrence to Ogdensburglj, via
Sackets Harbor, on Sunday, Thursday and Saturday
mornings, touching at the ports on the south side of tihe
St. Lawrence.
11W Packet Boats and Stages leave Utica every after-
noon for Oswego.
[13 Packet Boats leave Syracuse for Oswego every
morning and evening. Travellers who wish to take the
route by Oswego, should be careful not to pay their fare
on the rail-road farther than Syracuse. je-28-tNl


FOR PHIL ADELPHIA, DIRECT,
via Delaware and Raritan Canal-Union Line-
Trhe Line will consist of the followilig new and
substantial barges:
ALBANY, Captain Burns,
A.MiCHI[GAN, do Allen,
CAYUGA, do Torborn,
MIDDLESEX, do Knight,
E One of which will leave Albany every week for the
above port. For freight apply to
CHAS. A. KEELER,
No. 120 Pier, Albany.
CHAS, KING & CO.,
my27 No. 19 South Wharves, Philadelphia.
SNEW ENGLAND TAVERN, 491 South
Market street, opposite the Market. The sub-
scriber has the pleasure of informing his friends
Sand the travelling public generally, that his house
has been rebuilt and newly furnished. All those who
may favor him with their patronage may rest assured
that it will be thankfully received and gratefully acknow-
ledged. A good stable is close at hand, where tlhosetrav-
elling can be we!l accommodated with their teams. The
house is in the immediate vicinity of the steamboat aid
canal landings, and within ten minutes' walk of the rail-
road. His terms will be as heretofore. Single meals 25
cents. Lodging 12J cents.
mr29-deodae6m A. W. STARKS.
e FOR SALE-A Farm containing fifty-two
I acres of land, with a house and barn, situate in
ilthe town of Bethlehem, about four miles from
I the city of Albany, near Babcock's tavern.
Also thirty-two acres near tie above farm.
Also twenty-four acres near the first gate on the West-
ern turnpike. Immediate possession can be given. En-
quire of the subscriber, No. 44 State street, over the Bank
of Albany.
mr27-dactf TEUNIS VAN VECHTEN.
B PETTET'S BATTERY HO1rEL,
BATTERY PLACE, NEW YORK--The
subscriber returns his grateful thanks to his
friends and the public, for the support hlie has
experienced for the last six years, and begs leave to in-
form them that he has opened an extensive hotel for the
accommodation of travellers from every section of the
union.
TIhe Battery Hotel is situated on Battery Place, front-
ing the bay of New York, one of the most desirable and
commandingsituations in the city, and as regards loca-
tion, is unrivaled.
The landings are but a short distance'from the hotel,
where arrive daily, the steamboats trom Philadelphia,
Providence, Stonington and Albany. Passengers have,
therefore, every ffacility in starting for any of the great
northern, eastern, western or southern routes.
The interior arrangements of tie house are calculated
to afford satisfaction to all. The parlors are spacioHs,
- A .... -- ..... :-_. i- -. .. ir A i -l -...... .


A. WHITNEY. Supt.


UTICA AND SCHENECTADA RAIL-
ROAD-SUMMER ARRANGEMENT.
Cars will leave Albany for Utica,
At 84 o'clock A. M. and at 7 o'clock P. M.
Returning, cars will leave Utica for Schenectady and
Albany,
At 9 o'clock A. M. and at 91 o'clock P. M.
All baggage mustbe marked and deposited in the bag-
gage wagonby its owner or person having chargethereof.
No charge for extra baggage,and all baggage positively
at the risk of the owner.
Way passengers will attend personally to the disposi-
tion of their baggage at Schencctada.
WM. C. YOUNG,
apl0 Superintendent and Engineer.


SARATOGA & SCHENECTADY RAIL-
ROAD--5PRING ARRANGEMENT-lS39.
On and atter Monday, April first, and until further no-
tice, there will be Two daily departures and arrivals by
steam p wer, viz:
Leave Albany at 6 o'clock A. M.
9 do
2 P.M.
Leave Saratoga at 6 A.M.
11 do
4i P.M.
N.B. The same coaches, baggage and freight cars will
run through the whole distance, without any change or
detention at Schenectady.
There are daily lines of stages, In connexion with the
railroad, between Saratoga Springs and Whitehall, on
Lake Champlain. Passengers goingnorth ofthe Springs
should take the morning train from Albany,
A stage will start from Saratoga Springs daily at 5 o'-
clock A. M., to convey passengers to Whitehall in time
to take the Champlain steamboat the same day. Travel-
lers to the eastward, by-selecting this line, will arrive at
Rutland, Vt., early in the evening.
All baggage positively at the risk of the owner thereof.
ap26 JOHN COSTIGAN.Sup't.
TROY, BALLSTON AND SARATOGA
RAILROAD.
Until further notice, Cars will leave by steam power
as follows:
From Troy at 7j o'clock A. M.
10 do do
3 do P.M.
From Saratoga at 6 do A. M.
11 do do
4J do P.M.
Daily lines of stages, in connexion with the Rail-road,
leave Saratoga for Lake George and Whiteh4ll, and in-
termediate places, connecting with all the principal nor-
thern atnd eastern routes. A stage will leave Saratoga
daily at 5 o'clock A. M. to tke passengers to Whitehall
in time fQr the Lake Champlain steamboat of the same
day. All baggage positively at the risk of the owner.
L. R. SARGENT, Supt.
jyl H. G. GOODNO, Agent, Albany.
AUBURN AND SYRACUSE RAILROAD.
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT.
The Cars upon this road will run in connexion with
the Utica and Schenectady, and Syracuse and Utica Rail
roads.
Leave Auburn for Syracuse, at 3 o'clock A. M., and 2
o'clock P. M.
Leave Syracuse for Auburn, at 9 o'clock A. M., and 8
o'clock P. M.. on the arrival of the cars from the east.
All baggage at the risk of ihe owner.
LEVI LEWIS, Superintendent.
Coaches, carrying the United States Mail, will leave
Auburn for Geneva, Canandaigua, Rochester, Buffalo
and Niagara Falls, immediately on the arrival of the
cars at Aubnrn; and also at 6 o'clock A. M., arriving at
Rochester in 12 hours, and at Buffalo and Niagara Falls
in 24 hours.
The Swiftsure Coach, for Rochester, via Vienna and
Palmyra, will leave Auburn at iI o'clock A. M., and ar-
rive at Rochester by 10 o'clock P. M.
GTExtras furnished at all times. July, 1839.
J. M. SHERWOOD & CO.,
jyl7 And others, proprietors.
LEBANON SPRINGS BY THE HUD-
SON AND BERKSHIRE RAIL-ROAD.
This road is Bow in complete operation, with two trains
leaving each end daily, Sundayy excepted) at 8 o'clock
A. MAl., and at 4J o'clock P. MAl., andi will be found to be
much the easiest and pleasantest route to Lebanon
Springs, Pittsfield. Stoekbridge and Lee.
Passengers trom Albany or Troy for Massachusetts,
may come down to Hudson in the morning boats and go
out in the afternoon train, or come down in the evening
boats, enjoy a good night's rest, and go out in ths morn-
ing train.
Passengers for Lebanon Springs will blie delivered by
Rail-road at a point about seven miles from the Springs,
where coaches will be in readiness to take them to the
Springs.
Fare from Hudson to West Stockbridge, $1, Old :Stock-
bridge, 81 25; Lee, $1 50; Pittsfield, t 75.
je25-6w C. E. TAYLOR, Agent.


SYRACUSE AND UTICA RAIL-ROAD.
This road is now open for public travel, and during the
summer will be run as follows:
Cars will leave Utica for Syracuse at 5 o'clock A. M.,
and at 4 P. M.
Returning, cars will leave Syracuse for Utica at 5 o'-
clock A. M. and 4 P. AlM.
All baggag'- must be marked and deposited in the bag-
gage car by its owner or the person having charge of it.
All baggage at the risk of the owner. Syracuse, July
1, 1,39.
jy8 JOHN WILKINSON, President.


Jf TO LET-The large and commodious store.
I E with a beautiful counting room attached, No. 66
11 State street Apply to
Ilf jel2 1. 0. DAVIS & CO.


TO LET, and immediate possession given-
e The store 67 State street.
2 Apply on the premises, to
m 1I ap25 J. I. JONES.


TO LET-The premises formerly occupied
by William Kline.
Apply to
ap27 BELKNAP & GROESBECK.
TO LET-Stores on Pier lot No. 86. Also
house No. 290 Washington street.
G. HAWLEY.
fe2S A. JAMES.
A TO LET-A fine office at the foot of State
tostreet. Also three offices on the Pier, near State
11street bridge. For particulars enquire (of
fIel8 G. WV. STANTON & SON.
STO LET-From the first of May next, lofts
i in store 63 State, corner of Middle Lane.
EilH Enquire of
8j fel3 COOK & WHITNEY.
STO LET-Two offices on i he Pier, suitable
u for Forwarding Offices, in the building adjoining
i the Statestreet Bridge, north side Apply to
i e9 G. W. STANTON & SON.
TO LET-Three Lofts in the brick store
s No. 5 Middle Lane. Apply to
IllE. R. & E. SATTERLEE,
ap12 61 State st.
g TO LET-From the first day of May next, the
two story brick dw Iling house No. 43 Columbia
s-treet. Enquire of
aplO-tf BELKNAP & GROESBECK.


STATE PRISON, Auburn, July 5, 1639-Notice-
Sealed proposals will be received by the Agent until
the 10th day of September next, at 9 o'clock A. M., to


SALE OF CALCUTTA GOODS.
On Thursday, 15th inst., at 11 o'clock,
At Union Wharf, the entire cargo of bark Eugene,'
now landing, from Calcutta, viz:
1497 bags salt petre,
201 bales heavy green and dry cow and Buffalo hides,
33 do Madras, Patna and Cawnpore Goat skins,
50 cases Campbell's best orange shellac,
50 do Shellac,
300 bags Teel seed,
1000 bags Linseed, cleaned,
300 bags Ginger,
3' 0 bundles 2 and 3 thread twine,
7500 smtll gurnsey bags,
87 bales gurnsey cloth, 45 to 46 inches,
31 cases Lac Dye,
32 do Indigo.
auI2 JOIN TYLER, Auctioneer.
E ,W ESTABLISHMENT-DRAPERS AND
N P TAILORS-The subscribers having formed a co-
partnership under the firm of H. BLACKMAN & CO.,
have just received from New York ai entire new stock
of goodsof the latest style and best quality, which they
are prepared to sell and make to order on reasonable
terms. A hare of patronage is respectfully solicited.-
No. 4 Exchange, corner of Exchange and Market sts.
Albany, May 18, 1839. HOMER BLACKMAN,
my21-3m LELAND FAIRBANK.
THE FIRST PREMIUM
PARMELEE'S PATENT COOKING STOVE.
The Mechanics' Fair, held at Castle Garden, N. York,
1838, awarded ihe First Premium, a Silver Medal and a
Diploma, to Hawes & Baker, proprietors of Parmelee's
Unrivalled Cooking Stoves. The public generally, and
stove dealers in particular, are invited to call and exam-
ine these stoves, as they are pronounced by all competent
judges to be the best article for culinary purposesever ex-
hibited in this country. The unparallelled patronage
from every section of the United States where they have
been in use, is the best evidence of their approval, having
been but 18 months in the market and tested by upwards
ef FIVE THOUSAND persons, who have used the Ro-
tary, Premium, Union, and various other patterns; all of
whom now concur in the opinion that Parmelee's Patent
Cooking Stove excels every description heretofore offer-
ed to the public. In corroboration of the above, we an-
nex the report of the Committee of the Mechanics' Fair,
held at Castle Garden in 1838.
The following is the Judges' Report:-" Apatent Cook
ing Stove, on a superior plan, and calculated in the best
manner to ecoxomise heat-charge and discharge fuel, and
perform all culinary operations. The fuel is in two sepa-
rate chambers. Its excellence rests in the ability to use one
or two fires at a time, and inthe simplicity of its arrange-
ments for discharging, and for shifting the apparatus.-
Hawes & Baker, Albany. SILVEaR MEDAL."
For sale, wholesale und retail, at No. 5 Green street,
Albany. Also Union and Premium Stoves at very re-
duced prices, together with Copper. Tin and Sheet Iron
Ware. HAWES & BAKER,
my4 No. 5 Green st.
IMPROVED DURHAM SHORT HORNS
-Mr. WHI IAKER'S third sale of high bred impro-
ved Short Horns, by the ship Napier, will be held at
Powelton, near Philadelphia, on Friday the 20th Sep-
tember, 1839. at 10 o'clock A. M.
The subscriber is authorised by Col. Powell to state,
that all the best cattle which he has at any time imported,
and the improved Short Horns which he considered the
best in England, were either in Mr. Whitaker's posses-
sion, or were derived from his fold. Col. Powell has not
the slightest interest in Mr. Whitaker's sales. Philadel-
phia, July 15th, 1839.
jy18 19t C. J. WOLBERT, Auctioneer.
TICA AND SCHENECTADA RAIL
ROAD COMPANY--,ixth Dividend Declared-No-
tice is hereby given to the stockholders of the above named
company, that a semi-annual dividend or five dollars on
each share of stock held by them has been declared, and
made payable on or after the first day of August next.
Stockholders whose stock is registered in the city of
New York will apply for their dividend at the office for
the registry and transfer of the company's stock, at the
Phenix Bank in said city; and stockholders whose stock
is registered in the city ot Albany will apply for their di-
vidends at the Albany City Bank, in said city. Albany,
July 8th, 1839. By order of the Directors
GIDEON HAWLEY, Treasurer, &c.
tl" To be published in the Albany Argus, Albany Eve-
ning Journal, Atbany Daily Advertiser, New York Contm-
mercial Advertiser, New York evening Post, daily, and
in the Oneida Whig, Utica Observer, Schenectada Demo-
crat, Freedom's Sentinel, Fonda Herald and Mohawk
Courier, once iu each week until the 10th day of August
uext; the bills to be sent to the Treasurer of the compa-
ny at Albany, for payment. jy9-td


LOAN OF $500,000 FOR THE ENLARGE-
MAIENT OF THE ERIE CANAL-The Commis-
sioners of the Canal Fund. by virtue of an act entitteJ
an act to provide for the more speedy enlargement of
the Erie Canal," passed April 18, 1838, hereby give no-
tice, that sealed proposals will be received until Satur-
day the 17th day of August next, at 4 o'clock in the af-
ternoon of that day, for a loan of five hundred thousand
dollars, for which transferable certificates of stock will
be issued in the name of the People of the state of New-
York, bearing interest at the rate of five per cent. per an-
num, payable quarterly, and the principal reimbursable
at the pleasure ofthm Commissioners of the Canal Fund,
after the year 1855.
It is to be understood that the Commissioners are to be
at liberty to take a less sum, if the offers are not such as
in their opinion are advantageous ta the interests ot the
state.
The proposals may be for the whole or any part of said
loan not less than $10,000; all proposals to be sealed up
and endorsed "Loan for the Enlargement of the Erie Ca-
nal," and enclosed in an envelope directed to the Comp-
troller at Albany.
The money will be required to be paid on the accep-
tance of the proposals, and is to be deposited to the cre
dit of the Commissioners of the Canal Fund, in the New
York State Bank at Albany, or in the Bank of the Man-
hattan Company in the city of New York.
Time Commissioners of the Canal Fund have now on
hand more than a million of dollars set apart for tmhe pay.
meant of the stock issued for the construction of the Erie
and Champlain Canals, which falls due on the 1st day of
July, 1845. With a view to redeem that stock, they will
eccive in lieu of money, any portion of the amount here-
by proposed to be borrowed, in certificates of the Erie
andChampla.n stock, payable in 1845, bearing an inter-
est of five per cent at par, and that bearing an interest of
six per cent, at-such rates as may be agreed on. Tie pro-
posals should specify whether stock or money will be
loaned.
The stockholders residing in the 1st and 2d Senate Dis-
tricts, and those residing out of the state, will receive tne
interest on the stock held by them, quarterly, at the Bank
of the Manhattan Company, in the city of New-York; all
other stockholders at the New York State Bank in the
city of Albany. Dated Albany, June 12th, 1839.
L. BRADISH, Lt. Governor,
BATES COOKE, Comptroller,
J. C. SPENCER, Secretary of State.
0. L. HOI-LEY, Surveyor General,
J. HAIGHT, Treasurer,
WILLIS HALL, Attorney General,
je22-d3tawtd Commissioners of the Canal Fund.
N OTICE-All persons indebted to the estate of the
late Stephen Van Rensselaer deceased, are request-
ed to make payment, at the office of the estate in the town
of Vatervliet; and all persons having demands against
said estate are requested to present them at the same
place for settlement. Watervliet. April 25th, 1839.
S. VAN RENSSELAER,
WM. P. VAN RENSSELAER.
P. S. VAN RENSSELAER,
HENRY VAN RENSSELAER,
ALEXANDER VAN RENSSELAER,
ap26-tf Executors.
CHILDRENWS BELTS-A new supply of pat-
ent leather belts just received, and for sale at
THE VARIETY STORE,
jyll 392 south Market st.
LADIES' HATS-Now in store 6 cases leghorn,
Ship, straw, English and Shaker hats, which will be
sold at very low prices by tile case or less, from 50 cts
to $20 each. at VAN BENTHUYSEN'S,
a few doors above Stanwix Hall,
jy8 North Market st.
RASPBERRY AND LEMON SYRUP for
sale by k. R. & E. SATTERLEE,
i r6 1l SMtateptreet.t


,INIM business carried on bythe late firmofGEuli E
IUU-SELL *& BROTHIER, will be continued at tihe
Mill, No. 57 Water-st. Albany May 21st, 1839.
my22-tf ARTHUR C. SOUTH WICK.
A LL persons having demands against the firm"of
GEORGE RUSSELL & BROTHER, will please
present the same, and those indebted to the said firm will
make payment to the subscriber. Albany, May 20, 1839.
my2l-tf ARTHUR C. SOUTH WiCK.
TO0 CARPENTERS AND BUILDkERS-
The subscriber having set in operation, uat the ,iatn-
sion House in North Maiket street, one of his :Patent
Premium MORTICING MACHINES, requests the favor
of builders generally of calling, and witnessing for them-
selves, the neatness, ease and despatch of performing the
work. J, McCLINTIC, Patentee
N. B. The patentee challenges competition. J. lM.
ap29
MOSEL Y& VAN AASBIEK, DEAL.
IRb IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, INDIA AND
DOMESTIC DRY GuOD;, at the old stand of Vilitaimn
Baglev, No. 384 S. Market, corner or Hudson street,
B. F. Moseley. Albany.
A. B. Van Gaasbeek. 5
N. B.-Merino Shawls, Cloths and Cassimeres. ap3
A CARD-rhe subscriber would inform his friends
and the public, that he has taken the splendid store,
No. 46 State street, (opposite the Museum,) where he is
receiving a general assortment of French, English and
American fancy mnd staple dry goods, ot the latest impor
station and manufacture. Among which may be fouunid-
Rich Broehe Shawls Broadcloths and casiiutres
Elmbr'd Thibet do Sattinets and vesting
Raw silk do Irish hnens*
Crape do Linen sheetings
Chaily do Damask cloths and napkins
Dress hdkfs of every style Brown linen cloUis
Scarfs Col'd damask do,"
Ladies' cravats Russia diapers
BJk Italian do Linen sambrics -
Cotton do Linen cambric hdkfs
Blue bIk silks, fig'd & plain Silk pocket do
RItich cold P D Soie Jaconetand cambriecmuslins
Striped glassia silks Swiss and book do
Fig'd silks Laces, edgings and insert'gs
Light cold satins, for hats Italian sewings
do uo silks do Shirt'gs & shigs, bro & bl'd
Bik bombazines Cotton threads
Mousseline de lanes Knitting cotton;
Cballies Spool cotton, wht and coi'd
French printed lawns Marshall's patent thread
do do camibrics Bed ticking
do do muslins Col'd Jeans
Calicoes of every deseript'n Burlaps, &c. &c.,
Together with an extensive assortment of Millenery
goods, Ribbons, Whalebone, Reed, &e. &c.; all of which
will be sold at the very lowest prices, either at whole
sale or retail. Albany, June 12th, 1839..
jel2 ASHLEY SCOVEL.
FRL RSH DRY GOODS, FROM NEW YORK
AUCTIiONS, AT VAN BENTHUYSEN'S CArtH
STORE, No. 288 North Market street, (between Tem-
peratjce House and ttanwix Hall.)
V. B. solicits your attention to a new and desirable as-
sortment of English, Irish, India, French and Home
goods, which lie is enabled to sell on reasonable terms.
Having adopted the method of doing business for cash,
together with his experience in Europe, New Yorkt and
Albany, is quite satisfied he can make it an object for
buyers to call, and aford to sell less than in ordinary ca-
ses.
SNow in store a variety of shawls, silks and linensi-
Also, a handsome lot of French Needle Work, arnd al-
most every kind of house keeping and dress goods. Will
be glad to show them at any time. je20t
BLACK NET GLOVES-Prilled tops, and witl(-
out seamus; black lace shawls; bik mantilla lace, &c.
at VAN BEN'rHUYSEN'S,
jyll 288 North Market st.
Tl^H GREATEST CLOCK ESTABLISiH-
AI1ENTi' IN ''THi ktTY OF ALBANY- IhIe sub-
scriber has on hand all the variety of clocks j n pre-
sent use, and the cheapest prices, at 82 State st.
jyll JACOB BERHINGER.


A. ELTS, BELTS, BELTS-Children's Patent
U Leather Belts of the best quality, for sale at
THE VARIETY STORE,
392 South Market st.
N. B. Belts made to order at short notice. je2S
N EWCONIFECTIONARYESTABLISH
NL rAwf. 1'.-Thet subscriber has tWis day opened a stora
at No. 23 Steuben street, one door east of North Pearl st
tor the sale of Confectionary, Ice Creams, Jellies,Cakes.
Pies, &c. &c. He will be prepared to furnish ice cream,
jellies, &c. of a superior kind, and on reasonable terms,
for parties. tieveral rooms have been elegantly fitted up
by him for the reception of ladies andi gentlemen, whom
hie will supply at any time during the day or evening,
with ice cream, &e. and any article of confectionary.-
To make his establishment more agreeable to the ladies,
he will have no bar connected with it, and he hopes to
merit the patronage of the ladies and gentlemen. I
FR&NCIS D. BRIARE.
N. B. Mrs. P, Briare will have her new establishim-nt,
at No. 47 Green st. opened for the reception of company
in a few days. jej7Lt
WOOL DYED CLOTHS AND CASSI-
MlRES-Tihe real artieie can be tiad cheap aU tie
new store of H.H. BABCOCK,
424 South Market street, east side,
jvl17 corner of Division st.
G GUITARS, FLUTES, VIOLINS, &u.-A
Splendid assortment of highly finished Musical In-
struments this day received, consisting in part of Gui-
tars, a few of which are the most superb, both in tone and
finish, ever offered in this city; prices from $6 to ,75,-
A few very fine Flutes, from the manufactory of Messrs.
Firth & Hall, who stand unrivalled for superiority of
tone and beauty of finish; prices from $1 60 to #50-with
a great variety of other instruments, at the depot, 290 N.
Market st. je8
R IBBONS-Just received stone and fawn colored
ribbons, light silks tor hats, whalebone for shirredi
hats. by the gross or dozen, cane, ribbon, wire, &:., at
46 State st. [jel] : ASHLEY SCUV r-L,.
N EW BOOK-TIme Gentleman of the Old ,. >1
S a tale, by G. P. R. James, author of the Hug n
thle Gypsy, Philip Augustus, &c. Just received at
je24 0. STEELE'S Bookst<.:e.
EW NOVEL-harles Vincent, or the wo
A Clerks, a tale of Commercial Life, 2 vols.
Also, James's new vovel,, Charles Tyrrell, or the 13
ter Blood, 2 vols., and the Gentleman of the Oldh school,
2 vols. For sale by WV. C. LITTLE,
je29 corner State st.
COAL DUST-The subscriber has now on hand
100 tons Uoal Dust, suitable for brickmakers' use.-
For sale at market prices by C. LIVINGSTO N,
jc13 No. 12 Exchange, State st.
SILVER, Gilt and Steel Purse Rings, for sale at'the
apl3 VARIETY STORE. 392 S. Market ft.
CHAPEAU DES BRAS-An assortment of
military hats for field and staff officers of every grate
of the latest and most approved style, with superb and
appropriate trimming. Also, an invoice of military
plumesot various colors. JOHN MAYELL.
jy4 377 South Market street.
PAPER CAMBRICK, different colors, for sale.
by H. H. BABCOCK
424 South Market street (east side)


I -I&TIMT- MTIMW A w Im A I&TILr A ILTT% nnwbduKy MWXLILM A ILZTVY T- AT w IMw"b a"


l EnUVh!iN PEACH MOUNTAIN C5OAL L ONDON PORTER, BROWN STOUT
G -Th Subscriier as just received a small cargo of and SCOTCH ALE, justreceived and for sale by
very superior genuine Peach Mountain Red Ash Coal, the tierce or dozen, by
inferior to noue ever before offered in this m.irk t. The E. R. & E. SATTERLEO,
public are most respectfully invited to call and examine .je5 iState st.
for themselves. For s;ale very low iftaken from the ve- aHE subscriber having dissolved his business con-
sel, or atfair market price, broken, screened anddeliv- nexidns with his late partner, F. McGuigan. requests
ered. C. LIVING S'f .tie patronage of the public.at tllet.tills 7 and 8, Centre
589 South MarKct 't. Market, hLieretoiore occupied by them jointly. April 22d,
N. B. Orders for Coal left with Dr. H. G. WVynkoop, 139. ap24-tf HIENiY CASSIDY.
Stanwix Hall, Maiden Lane, or with Jno. F. Steele,3'o72
South Market street, will receive immediate and prompt ([OUGLAS'S PATENT COOKING STOVES-
attention. jy1 8 L Though the bhandlsomnest in market, sell best by be-
-rig in operatio~.t-ii n; trm re 'rizegrudcimylrizi, UU11&,e__


BY JONES & LAISDELL,
[Auctioneers and Commission Merchants-Store No. 76
State street.]
Peremptory Cash Sale of Stock and Cut DRY GOODS.
EXPENSIVE CREDIT SALE OF DRY GOODS.
On Tuesday, 13th inst., at 10 o'clocK,
In sales room, (Cloth Hall) on a credit of 4 months, an
extensive and seasonable assortment of stock and cut dry
goods, consisting of cloths, cassimeres, buckskins, saiti-
vets, flannels, moleskins, drillings, vestings, brown and
bleached sheetings, prints, mousseline de laines, challys,
a splendid assortment of silk goods, 200 lb bik and col'd
sewings,, cotton thread. Legee twist, hosiery, gloves,cot-
ton bats, wadding, trimmings, &c.
At Private Sale.
Domestic dry goods. Furniture.
bhlk, brn, blue & cadet broad- Mahogany secretaries and
cloths Ass'd col's 3-4 cloths bureaus, mahogany sofas
Premium medium and corn- Mahogany chairs
mon satinetts French bedsteads
9-8 4-4 7-8 blchd and brwon Maple chairs
sheetings Madder prints Fancy do
Dorchester and imprv'd ticks Windsor do
Blankets Candle wick Kitchen do
BIk and white wadding 4, 6 and 8 feet settees
Cotton twine 8 day and 30 hour clock.
No. 1 and2 batting Boston rocking chairs
Jones & Laisdell'sdays o fsale for ouscholdfurniture
groceries, &c., are Tuesdays and Fridays of each week.
Persons having property of the above description to sell
willplease reportthe same atthe office24 hours previ-
ou, tothesale. in ordcrthat they may iheadvertised.


mck -1== M.










I IYTiE PRESIDENT OF THE UNI-
' TED SI'ATE6.-In pursuance of law, I, MART IN
VAN BUREN, President of dhe United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and minake known, that public sale
will be held at the undermentioned Land Offices, in the
state of Illinois, at the periods hereinafter designated, to
wits
At the Land Office at Danville, on Monday, the six-
teenth day of September next, for the disposal of tire pub-
lic lands lying within the limits of the undermentioned
townships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the third principal me-
ridian.
Townships twenty-nine and thirty, of range seven.
North of the base line and west of the second principal me-
ridian.
Townships twenty-nine and thirty, of range twelve.
Townships twenty-eight and twenty-nine, of range
thirteen.
At the Land Office at Chicago, on Monday, the ninth
day of September next, for the disposal of the public lands
lying within the limits of the undermentioned townships,
t I wit:
North of the base line and east of the third principal me-
ridian.
Townships forty-two and forty-five, of range four.
Township-forty-five, of range five.
At the Land Office at Galena, an Monday, the twenty-
third day of September next, for the disposal of lhe public
lands lying within the limits of -the undermentioned
townships and fractional townships, to wit:
Jierth of the base line and east.of the fourth principal me-
ridian.-
That part of fractional township eighteen lying north
of the Indian boundary, and fractional township nine-
teen, of range one.
.Township nineteen, of range two.
North of the base line and west ofthe fourth principal me-
ridian.
Fractional township eighteen, except the part of Rock
Island and the Indian Reserve of 1,280 acres situated
therein, of range one.
That part of fractional township eighteen, lying north
of the old Indian boundary line, except the part of Rock
Island situated therein, of range two.
Also at the same time and place, for the disposal of
such of the public lands as rem,-ined unappropriated for
military bounties, after the selections were made for
satisfying military land warrants, for services rendered
during the late war, in the following townships and frac-
tional townships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the fourth principal me-
ridian.
Township thirteen, of range six.
Fractional townships thirteen and fourteen, of range
ten.
North of the base line and west of thefourth principal me-
ridian.
Townships thirteen, fourteen, and fifteen, of range one.
Townships thirteen and fourteen, of range two.
Townships thirteen, -fourteen, and fifteen, of range
three.
Fractional townships thirteen and fourteen, of range
five.
Printed lists of the unappropriated military lands, sub-
ject to be sold upder this proclamation, and to which pro
emption rights hive not heretofore been admitted, will
be furnished on application to the Land Officers at Ga-
lena.
Lands appropriated, bylaw, for-the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded fram sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks, (unless
the lands are sooner disposed of,) and no longer; and no
Private entries of land, in the townships so offered, will
be admitted until after the expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand at the City of Washington, this
fourth day of JuneAnno Domini 1839.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption to any
of the lands designated in the above proclamation, is re-
quested to prove the same to the satisfaction of the Reg-
ister and Receiver of the proper Land Office, and make
payment therefore as soon as practicable after seeing this
notice, in order that time claim may be adjudicated by
these officers agreeably to law, in due time prior to the
day appointed for the commencement of the public sale ;
and all claims not duly made known and paid for prior
to the date aforesaid, are declared by law to be forfeited.
oJAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
au9-law6w


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNI-
TED 81ATIS.-In pursuance of law, I, MARTIN
VAN BUREN, President of the United States of Ameri
ca, do hereby declare and make known, that a public s.ile
will be held at FAYETTh, in the state of MIssouRI, on Mlon-
day the twenty-third day of September next; for the dispo-
sal of the public lands within the limits of the undermen-
tioned townships, to wit:
North of the base line and west of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
Townships fifty-eight, fifty-nine, and sixty, of range
seventeen.
Townships fifty-eight, fifty-nine, and siatty, of rnnge
eighteen.
Townships fifty-eight, fifty-nine, and sixty, of range
nineteen.2
Lands appropriated by law for the use of schools, also
lands reserved for military or other purposes, will be ex-
cluded from sale.
The sale will ke kept open for two weeks, (unless the
lands are sooner disposed of) and no longer; and no pri-
vate entries of lands in the townships so offered, will be
admitted until after the expiration of the two weeks.
liven under my hand at the city of Washington, this
twenty-second day of May, Anno Domini 1839.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAB. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption to any
of the lands designated in the above proclamation, is re-
quested to prove the same to the satisfaction of the Re-
gister and Receiver, and make payment therefore as soon
as practicable after seeing this notice, in order that
the claim may be adjudicated by those officers agreeably
te law, ii due time, prior to the day appointed for the
commencement of the public sale; and all claims not duty
made known and paid for prior to the date aforesaid, are
declared by law to be forfeited.
JAMES WVHITCOMB.
law6w Commissioner df the General Land Office.

BY THE PRESIDENT 01F THE UNI-
STED STATES.-In pursuance of law, I, MARTIN
VAN BUREN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do-hereby declare and make known, that a public sale
will be held at Chicago, in the State of Illinois, on Mon-
day the second day of September next, for the disposal of
the public lands within the limits of the undermentioned
townships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the third principal meri-
dian. -
Townships forty-two, forty-three, forty- four, forty-five,
and forty-six, of range six.
Townships forty-two, forty-three, forty-four, forty-
live, and forty-six, of range seven.
Lands appropriated, by law, for the use of schools, also
handss reserved for military, or. other purposes, Will be ex-
cluded from sale.
The sale will be kept open for two weeks, (unless the
lands are sooner disposed of,) and no longer; and no pri-
vate entries of lands, in the townships so offered, will be
admitted until after the expiration of the two weeks.
Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this
twentieth day of May, Anno Domini 1839.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAs. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.

NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
Every person claiming the right of pre-emption to any
of the lands designated in the above proclamation, Is re-
quested to prove the same to the satisfaction of the Reg-
ister and Receiver, and make payment therefore as soon as
practicable after seeing this notice, in order thatthe claim
pay be adjudicated by those officers agreeably to law, in
due time, prior to the day appointed for the commnence-
ment ofthe public sale; and all claims not duly made
known and paid for prior to the date aforesaid, are de-
clared by law to be forfeited.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
law3w Commissioner of the General Land Office.
13Y THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNI-
STED d 'ATEB.-In pursuance of law, I, MARTIN
VAN BUREN, President of the United States of Ameri-
ca, do hereby declare and maketknown, that public soles
will be held at the undermentioned Land Offices, in tle
State of Misaquri, at the periods hereinafter designated,
to wit:
At the Land Office at Lexington, on Monday the ninth
day of September next, for the disposal of the public lands
lying within the limits of the undermentioned townships
and fractional townships, to wit:
northh of the base line and west of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
Townships fifty-eight and fifty-nine, of range twenty-
eight.
Townships fifty-nine and sixty, of range twenty-nine.
Townships fifty-nine and sixty, of range thirty.
Townships fifty.nine and sixty, of range thirty-one.
Townships fifty-nine and sixty, of range thirty-two.
Fractional townships fifty-nine and sixty, lying east of
the former west boundary of Missouri, of range thirty-
three.
At the Land.Office at Springfield, on Monday the twenty-
third day of September se, for the disposal ofthe public
lands lying within the limits of the undermentioned
townships, to wit:
trvth of the base lt4 a14,we6t of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
Township twenty-seven, of range nineteen.
Townships twenty-six and twenty-nine, of range
twenty-one.
Township twenty-nintie, of range twenty-five.
Tarwnahins twpentv-six. twenty seven. twenty-eight.


1Y_ THE PRESIDENT OF THE IUNI-
% '1'Et) 'iATES.-In pursuance of law, I. MAIR-
TIN VAN BUREN, President "if the Unitcd States of
America, do hereby declare and make known, that a pub-
lic sale will be held at the Land Office at Burlington in
the Territory of Iowa, on Monday, the 21st day of Octo-
ber next, for the disposal of the public lands within the
limits of the undermentioned townships and fractional
townships, to wit:
North of the base line and east of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
Fractional township seventy seven, of ranges one, two
and three.
North of the base line and west of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
The fractional section six, in fractional township seven-
ty, fractional townships seventy-one, seventy-two,
seventy-three, and the fractional section thirty-one, in
fractional township seventy-four, of range one.
Fractional townships sixty-eight, sixty-nine, and sev-
enty, townships seventy-one, and seventy-three, and
fractional townships seventy-four, seventy-five, and
seventy-six, of range two.
Fractional township sixty-eight, townships seventy,
seventy-one, seventy-two, seventy-three, seventy-four,
seventy-five, and seventy-six, of range three.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships sixty-
eight, seventy, seventy-one, seventy-four, seventy-five,
seventy-six, and seventy-seven, of range four.
At the same place, in continuation, commencing on
Monday, the fourth day of November next, for the dispo-
sal of the public lands within the limits of the undermen-
tion townships and fractional townships, to wit:
North of the base line and west of the fifth principal meri-
dian.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and townships sixty-
eight, seventy, seventy-one, seventy-four, seventy-five,
seventy-six, and seventy-seven, of range five.
Fractional township sixty-seven, andtownships sixty-
nine, seventy, seventy-one, seventy-four, seventy-five,
and seventy-six, of range six.
Fractional township sixiy-seven, and townships sixty-
eight, seventy one, seventy-two, seventy-three, seventy-
four, and seventy-five, of range seven.
Fractional township sixty-seven, townships sixty-eight,
and seventy-three, of range eight.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and township sixty-
eight, except section twenty-one, of range nine.
Township sixty-eight, except section twenty, of range
ten.
Fractional township sixty-seven, and township sixty-
eight, of range eleven.
Lands appropriated, by law, for the use of schools,
military, or other purposes, will be excluded from sale.
The sales will each be kept open for two weeks, (un-
less the lands are sooner disposed of.) and no longer;
and no private entries of land, in the townships so of-
fered, will be admitted until after the expiration of the
two weeks.
Given under my hand at the city of Washington, this sec-
ond day of July, Anno Domini 183 9.
M. VAN BUREN.
By the President:
JAS. WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
NOTICE TO PRE-EMPTION CLAIMANTS.
l-very person claiming the right of pre-emption to any
of the lands designated in the above proclamation, is re-
quested to prove the same to the satisfaction of the Regis-
ter and Receiver, and make payment iherefor as soon
as practicable after seeing this notice, in order that the
claim may be adjudicated by those officers agreeably to
law, in due time, prior to the day appointed for the com-
mencement of the public sales; and all claims not duly
made known and paid for prior to the date aforesaid, are
declared by law to be forfeited.
JAMES WHITCOMB,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.
au8-! aw6w


NEW YORK DRY GOODS STORE-P.
& G. ISROWN, 434 South Market street, return
their sincere thanks to the ladies of Albany and Troy for
the very distinguished patronage k which they have receiv-
ed since they opened this branch of their establishment.
They beg to assure them that their exertions will be re-
doubled to render it still more worthy of their support.
In order to accommodate the daily increase of their bu-
siness, P. & G. B. have iaken the store next to them, and
added it to their present premises, 40 cases of new spring
goods have just been received from New York, large ad-
ditions to which they will receive by almost every steam-
boat during the season. They feel confident that their
present stock contains as large, rich and fashionable an
assortment ot goods as was ever offered to the inspection
of the ladies of Albany, consisting of
Colored, blk and blue blk gro do naples, pou de sole and
English lutestring
Colored, bik and blue blk fig'd do, la endless variety of
style, quality and shade
Bonnet silks and satins of the fashionable colors
Bonnet ribbons of the latest modes
Ladies' col'd and white straw hats of the newestshapes,
consisting of Leghorn, Tuscan, Florence, &c., at prices
much belov N what they can be bought for elsewhere
Irish linens, sheetings and table linens of the most du-
rable fabric, linen diapers, lawns and damask
English and French calicoes in unequalled variety
Brachay and cashmere shawls ot the most chaste and
elegant designs, imported expressly for themselves per the
latest European pa -kets
Mous. de lines and challys, newest patterns, of all
qualities, of which they can Ahow an immense assortment
Cambric, medium, jaconet, book, mull, Swiss and plaid
m-islin Bishops lawn and cambric dimity aps
HE article named below is warranted to cure the
PILES in all cases, or nothing charged for it.
LOOK OUT FOR IMPOSITION-A base attempt
has been made to imitate Hay's Liniment, and infringe
upon the copy and other right of the proprietor. Never
buy Hays' Liniment unless it has a splendid engraved
wrapper, and the written, mind written signature of
COMSTOCK & CO all others must be impositions.-
Any person vending any other article, by the name of
Hays' Liniment, either at wholesale or retail, will be
prosecuted for a violation of our copy right. The oath
of Mr. Hays may be found copied on our inside wrap
per, swearing that no other person knows any of the
component or essential parts of this Liniment-and that
he will not reveal the secret for twenty years.
United States District Court of the State of New York.
Office of the Clerk for the Southern I
District of New York. 5
This is to certify that the copy rights for the wrappers,
andl for the descriptions and directions to use, Hays' Lin-
iment, were secured in this office in the year 1838, by
Comstock & Co., and have not been obtained by any oth-
er person since that date or before.
Fred. J. Betts, Clerk of U. S. Court.
COMSTOCK & CO.,
Sole Proprietors, 2 Fletcher st., New York.
N. B. All persons that advertise Hays' Liniment for
us, will please attach the above leaded to the advertise-
ment. [Our customers are requested to hand in the a-
bove to the newspaper offices].
For sale by most respectable Drnegists. Jy25
DR. SHUBAEL HEWE' CELEBBA-
TED RHEUMATIC, BONE AND NERVE LIN-
IMENT, applied morning and night has cured hundreds.
It gives relief in the swelling of the ; lands of the throat,
and relieves the numbness and contractions of the limbs,
and will take swellings down, and inflammations out of
the flesh, rheumatism, bruises and sprains. It gives im-
mediate relief; it strengthens weak limbs, and extends
the cords when contracted. A few drops on sweeps'
wool applied to the ear of deaf persons, will, by constant
application, cause them to hear in two months' time.
R RECOMMENDATIONS.
From numerous certificates which the proprietor has
received of its efficacy, he presents the following SHORT
FACTS TO THE AFFLICTED:
It is sometimes urged that the Rheumatism cannot be
cured by external applications. This may be true some-
times; but it is certainly true that that distressing com-
plaint cannot be reached by internal remedies, except by
their long and constant use, by which perhaps at the
same time the system becomes generally deranged, debili-
tated and destroyed. Even were not this the case, how
shall the great distress of the sufferer be alleviated, while
such slow and doubtful remedies have their effect? The
answer is plain, candid and most true, use Dr. S. Hewe's,
Nerve and Bone Liniment. No name could be more
appropriate. It reaches and soothes the nerves, and al-
lays pains most effectually on its first application, and by
a few repetitions removes more effectually and speedily
Rheumatic pains, than any internal or external applica-
tion was ever known to. Its effects are powerful and
immediate. Let those afflicted try it but once and they
must be convinced.
SHUBAEL HEWES, M. D.
1 The following is too respectable and the gentleman
too well known to require comment. Let it be read.
"I have been afflicted most grievously since 1832, with
rheumatism and contraction of the cords of my legs,
caused by the cramps of the cholera, which I then had in
its most severe form. After trying many remedies in
vain. I have found relief-had the cords of my legs relax-
ed-the swellings reduced, and am greatly benefitted by
the use of one bottle of Hewes' Nerve and Bone Lini-
ment. used externally, and one bottle of Indian Vegeta-
ble Elixir, used internally at the same time. I now walk
with ease in positions that I could not a week ago en-
dure at all. JAMES G. REYNOLDS,
141 Chrystie st., corner of Delancy st.
The above artic'e for sale at No. 2 Fletcher at., near
Maiden Lane, one door below Pearl street, by Comstock
& Co General Agents, and by nearly every Druggist in
America.
Sold by COMSTOCK & CO.;
WT_ -ktecnr XT-, 5WXorL_


JNo. 2 Pletcher St., NMew yorK.
T HE HUMAN HAIR-Where the hair is ob-
served tobe growing thin, nothing can be more pre-
posterous than the use of oils, grease, or any fatty mat-
ter. Their application can only be recommended through
the grossest ignorance, as they hasten the fall of the hair,
by increasing he relaxation of the skin. When there
is a harsh, dry, or contracted skin, and where the small
blood vessels which carry nourishment to the bulb are
obstructed, then the oils. &e.. may be good, as they tend
to relax the skin ; but alone they are of no avail. There
must be a stimulus to rouse the vessels from their torpor,
and quicken the current of the blood.-Extract front Clire-
hugh's Treatise on the Hair.
q heta Dlm of rnhl. mh iai nthe onlv nreanrattin thnt can


CORPORATION NOTICE.

P UBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to the several owners of the following described lots, pieces or parcel of land, which were sold at public auction, by order of the mayor, aldermen and commonalty
ot the city of New-York, on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th days of March, 1838, for non-payment of sundry assessments, as expressed in the following list; which said lots, pieces or parcels
of land have not been redeemed; that they are severally required to pay to the street commissioner of the city of New-York, on or before the expiration of Wo years from the date of the respective sales
of' the said several lots, pieces or parcels of land, as hereinatler particularly described, which will be on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8tb, 9th and 10th days of March, 1840, according as the dates-of such respec-
tive sales were on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th days of March, 1838, as hereinafter particularly mentioned, and for the use of the purchasers of the said lots, pieces or parcels of land; the respec-
tive sums of money for which the said lots, pieces or parcels of land were sold, with the interest thereon, at the rate of twenty per cent per annum, and all charges; or in default thereof; leases will
then be executed to the purchasers of the said lots, pieces or parcels of land, for the term of years for which they were respectively sold, and the owners thereof will be deprived of the privilege of re-
deeming the same. .__


When confirmed.,


1836-January 5.
44 4
44 44
4t 44
l135-July 3.
1836-January 27.
1835-July 3.
1836-J-nmary 27.
1835-July 3.
1836-January 27.
1835-December 5.
4. 44

1836-January 14.
1836-January 27.
66 66
i< 11

1835-July 22.
g44 #
94 46
18386-January 5.

1835-Novem. 19.
44 46


I.


136-January 5.

1836-Septem. 23.
.6 66
do 44A

44 46
46 46
183--Novem. 4.
to is
64 944


61 1'4
l I1






1835--Novena. 19.
1535-July 3.
183.--Novem. 9.
I83-July 3.
64 44
64 44
1836=;-January 27.
l II






6. 644
44 .6
41 66
46 64
S4 94
t I






44 A

64 4
1835-Novem. 19.
64 66
44 44
66 66
445- ul 44








44 A4g
64 46
1836-Novem. 16.
44 44
1835-October 9.
1836-July 9.
1 835-Decem. 2.
1835-Au gust 6.
64 .4
44 44I
do 44
1836-January 5.
1834-January 1.
1836-January 5.
44 66
1836-January 27.

1836--Novein. 4.

44 64
4;4 44t
44 44S

1835-Novcm. 19.
1835-August 6
1836-Septem. 23
$4 44
44 44
44 44
44 46
44 4.
1836-March 1.
& At


















1836-June 4.
1836-October 27.
1836-January 5.
1836-October 2.
644 446
69 64
44 44
ad 44
at g 66
44 4.
1838-Noveam. 16.
1835-Decem. 20.
66 641




44 44
44; 14

44 4.
4464
4. 66
+44 44
1834-January 29.
1836--Septem. 23.
46 44
1835-Novem. 19.
4. 44
1835-Novem. 18.
44 .6
44 46

1836-January 9.
4. 66

446 64
4;4 4;4
64 64
48g 44
44 44
44 44
44 44
185-ov-m 19
185-ugs 6























44 44|
4;4 44;
44. 4 3



644 44;
44 44



4;4 44
11 4
4 44




183-Mrc 1.;




















1 44 4 4.





446 441



44 446
446Ocoe 27.
448Jaur 44
446Ocoe 224
44 44
44 44
44 44
44 4.
44 44
146-ov4 16.
445-em 34 .
44 44
4 44
4 44


44 is
4 LII
44 44
L44 44+
144 44L
is 66
44 44
44 446
14 46
66 $6.
64 64
44 44

46 is
4 44.
14 44
4I 44
44 44
44 44
(C 44


Farm
Map No. No.


1294
1332
1298
1312
75
74
127
75
128
76
13
14
16
49
78
79
80
81
3
5
9
153
214
5 to 8
16 to 9
32 to 39
2:33
o111
1014
8
9
10
24
25
26
27
28
80
81
82
93
88
89
95
97
98
100
102
417 to 422
62
477
73
74
78
79
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
102
520 to 525
538 to 545
552 to 556
,261
457 to 466
453 to 456
494 to 497
17
18
144
38
50 to 53
43
13
20
46
1388
2
856
857
230
MO
231
60
61
66
67
68
69
70
297
103
19
33
34
52
53
64
81
92
83
F 33
13 to 17
3 to 21
192
1183
16
17
19
20
57
89
3
36
38
39
40
,U
4'
42
43
44
45
4t
47
48
49
50
51
8
48
57
451 to 452
453 to 456
457 to 466
2
3
4
5

6
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
33
34
39
40


41
42
43
44
45
46
4T
107
108
109
110
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
111
112
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146


46;
425

4241(



1




















47
49
50
51
56
57
29
31
32
34
36
543

444
436
338
322




























95
96
101
102
103
104
105














7
6
4
3



112
113
114
t115
116
117
118
119
120
121
12"2
123
124
125

}



775
776
777
778
779
1
2
3
4
5
48
49
50
51
80
81
134
135
136
137


187
188
189
190
J91
175
176
177
178
181
182
183
184
185
186
6
7
8
9
10
t11
12
13
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
179
180
44
45
46
47
138
139
140
141


Number of lots.


Lot
Loll
Church and !ot
Lot
Lot
Lot

Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Part of stas. cal
East I ank-st


do
do


Lot
Lot
4 lots
4 lots
8 lots
Alley
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lotl
Lot
Lotj
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot ..
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Gore
Lot '
Lot
Lot
Lot .
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lotl
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
6 lots
8 lots
5lots
Lot
10 lots
t lots
4 lots
Shop
Shed
House and lot
Lot
4 lots
2 lots
2 lots
4 lots
Lot
Gore
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Gore
Lot
4 lots
4 lots
6 lots
6 lots
Gore
Gore
Gore
2 lots
Gore lot
5 lots
19 lots
House and lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Shop and lot
House and Int
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
House and lot
1 31 lots
2 lots
4 lots
10 lots
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot -
Lot
Lot
Lot
Dot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot"
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Loi
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot


Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot
Lot


led
it.


S To whom assessed.


G C Tunison
Stephen Rich
African Church
Estate of Thomas Pleader
David P Hall


do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
D B Talmage
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do


For what purpose.

Widening Chapel-street
do
do
do
Paving 5th-street
Paving Avenue B
Paviug 5th-street
Paving Avenue B
Paving 5th-street
Paving Avenue B
Paving Bank-street
do
Paving Bank-street
Pitching & paving Washington-st
Paving Avenue B
do
do
A-


I


David P Hall
David F Hall
Benjamin Sutton
do
Benjamin Sutton
David P Hall
do
do
do
I L Graham, agent
D Wilon
I L Graham, agent estate of A
Peter Remsen [Robinson
John Martin
B P Pierson
David P Hall
Samuel Jones Mumford
Judith rVinthrap
Alley
M Fagan
Catharine and M Pagan
Henry Areularius
do
do
Alexander A Hamilton
do
do
do
do
William Leroy
do
do
do
do
do
do ;
do
do
do
do
Judith Winthrop
David P Hall
Doctor Marvin
David P Hall
do
do .
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
HF (lark
David P Hall
do
do
Samuel Jones Mumford
Judith Winthrop
T Benjamin
H M Western
do
(William Rzbinson, lessee)
rs. I G Bogart
Henry A Nelson
Kobert Cheeseborough
Rat nabas Bates
Owner unknown
do
Barnabas Bates
James Mulligan
Harman Leroy
S Gibson and M Davis
do
H F Clark
do
William H Leroy
do
do
do
do
do
do
H F Clark
B P Greggs
Ebenezer G Burling
John T Smith
Henry R Abbot i;
John F Vogal
Parker and Runyan
Stephen Reed
Unknown owner
do
Stephen Reed
Estate of Sampson Benson
1 G Pierson
Enoch Wiswall
S and M Allen
John Skinner
Bailey and Remsen
do
do
William H Leroy
William Renwick
Edmund Morewood
Jacob Duryea
Thomas k Davis
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Enos Burrows
Isaac Adriance
David B Hall
Judith Winthrop
Silas M. Stilwell
do
do
do
do
Philips and others
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do


On what street.


I


do
10th-Avenue
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
31st-street
d)
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
de
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do


Side.


Front.
ft. in.


Between what streets.


S Church and chapel
N do
S do
S Chapel and Hudson
E Corner of 5th-street

E 4th and Sb-street
E 4th and 5th-street


Uo
Regulating East Bank-street
do
do
Widening Chapel-street
do
Widening Avenue C
do
do
Widening Chapel-street
do
do
Well and fump in 86th street
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
5th Avenue Reg. and curb & gutter
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Widening Avenue C
Paving 5th street
Widening Avenue C
Pavin5 Sth street
do
do
do
Paving Avenue B
do
do ;J
do
do i
do
do
do
do
Widening Avenue C
do
do
do
do
do
Paving South and Front-streets
do
Widening Gold-street
Paving Jane-street
Regulating 24th st. [ington Avon.
Opening a new st. now calledLex-
do
do
do
Widening Chapel-street
Paving sidewalks
Widening Chapel-street
do
Paving Avenue B
do
Curb and gutter, 5th Avenue
do
do
dn
do
do
do
Widening Avenue C
Opening a new st. between 21st
and 31st st. & 3d & 4th Avenues
Opening 2d Avenue
do
do
do


8
S
8
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
S
8
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N


A





A


Anthony
do
do
do
Avenue B
Avenue B

Avenue B
Bank
do
Bank
Washington S
Avenue B
do
do
do
East Bank-street
do
do
Church
Chapel
Avenue C
dj
do
Chapel
Chamber
do
86th-straet
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
18th-streets
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Eighth
Sth-street
do
do
do
do
4th-astrect
do
do
do
do
do
do
dol
do
do
do
do
do
5th-street
6th-street
5th-street
Couverneur
do
Gold
Jane
Lexington Aven.
Lexington Aven
do
do
Leonard
Munroe
Murray
do
9th-street
do
19th-street
do
do
do
do
do
do
9th-street
Old post-road
l14th-6treet
115th-street
do
117th-street
do
S118th-street
120,h-street
12'd-strset
120th-street
121st. street
do
116th-street
Pearl
Read
l7th-street
do
do
do
do
do
Sonth-street
6th-street
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
16th-street
2d Avenue
2d Avenue
6th-street
6th-street
5th-street
26th-street
do
do
do


25
30
50
24 6
24j1
140
24 1
241
24
24j
is .
18
18
13 2
48 8
24
24
24 i
21
25
20
240
25
21 6
96
98
194
7
25
25


W
E
W
W
W
E
S
S
N
N
N
S
S
S

S
S
N
N
N
N
N
N
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S


8
N
N
N
N







8
N
N
N
N
N
N
S
N
N
N
N













N
S
N
N
















s
E
S
N
N
E

S

E
N
S

N
N

8
N
N
S
8
8
8
8
8
N
W
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
S
N
N
8
E
N
N
N
N
N
N





S
8




S
8
S
8




N
8
8
8
8
S
8
S
S
S
S



N
8



N
N
N
N
N
W
'V
'V
W
W
W
W
W
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
B
S

8
S
S

S
S
S
S
S
E
E
E
E
S
E


35
25
95
25
25


Greeenwich and Washington
do
Corner of Washington
Hammond and Batink
4th and 5th-streets
do
do
do
12th and 13th-sts. and 7th anl 8kh Ave-
nue
do
do
Duane and Reed
Walker and Lispenard
3d and 4th-streets
4th and 5th-streets
5th and 6th-streets
Leonard and Franklin
Chapel and Greenwich
do
3d and 4th Avenues
do
do
4th and 5th Avenues
do
do
do
do
5th and 6th Aveunes
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Avenues C and B
Avenues B and C
Avenues B and C
do
Avenues A and B
Avenues A and B
Avenues B and C
do
do
do
do
do
do
de
do
Avenues C and D
Avenues B and C
Avenues C and D
Avenues B and C
Avenues B and C
Avenues C and D
Water and South
do
Fulton and John
Washington and Greenwich
24th and 25th-streets
221 and 23d.streets
do
-4th and 25th-streets
Chipel and Hudson
Seaminel and Walnut
Chapel and Greenwich
Corner Chapel
Avenue B and C
do
5th and 6th Avenues
do
do
do
do
do
do
Avenues B and C
30th aud 31st-street
1st and 2d Avenues
do
1st and 2d Avenues
2d and 3d Avenues
Corner of 2d Avenue
Is and 2d Avenues
2d and 3d Avenues
do
1st and 2d Avenues
3d and 4th Avenues
do
do
Old Slip and Wall-street
Broadway and Church
5th and 6th Avenues
do
do
do
6ih and 7th Avenues
5th and 6th Avenues
Clinton and Montgomery
Avenues C and D
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Northeast corner of 9th Avenue
116th and ll7th-streets
117th and 118th-streets
Avenues B and C
do
4th Avenue and Lexington Avanue
do
"- do
do
do
30th and 31st-streets
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
3-2d and 33d-streeta
3[st and 32d-streets
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
9th and 10th Aveune.
do
do


d


I


Whensold
1838. Total.

March 7 $321 64
7 653 80
8 37230
8 393 70
5 226 65
5 49 19
5 48 47
6 49 97
6 49 97
6 154 10
6 43 94
6 43 94
6 43 94
6 62 26
6 3204
6 29 82
6 227 64
7 62 67
10 444 37
8 57 16
'* 8 57 16
8 102 31
8 259 71
8 348 66
10 268 72
6 18 61
6 17 50
6 16 40
6 18 61
6 19 71
6 20 80
6 21 90
6 18 (4
9 15 29
6 15 29
9 15 29
6 15 29
6 15 29
6 15 29
6 1529
6 15 29
6 15 29
6 15 29
6 15 29
9 62 86
9 5664
5 43 30
5 43 30
"4 5 43 30
5 43 30
6 16 54
6 16 54
6 16 54
6 16 54
6 16 54
6 16 64
6 15 67
6 15 67
6 16 54
8 96 67
8 129 40
9 40 2t
8 35 70
8 22397
8 48 12
6 19 22
6 15 61
7 610 42
6 265 10
6 1614 10
7 1i02 41
7 1253 04
7 1342 88
7 5029
7 85 04
8 273 22
8 69W2 07
6 17 07
6 17 07
6 17 29
," 6 17 29
6 17 29
6 17 29
6 17 29
6 17 29
6 13 39
8 30 17
7 33 91
7 16 41
7 29 63
7 38 44
7 42 84
7 135 37
7 60 46
7 16 41
7 27 42
7 20 82
6 696 50
6 297 20
6 590 09
.' 6 997 05
7 174 14
6 45 06
6 31 821
6 37 50
6 18 72
6 21 62
9 3002
6 420 77
9 53 08
6 5349
S" 6 53 49
6 5349
6 51 37
'" 6 5137
6 5137
51 37
6 51 37
6 51 37
6 51 37
6 51 37
6 51 37
"* 6 51 37
6 169 61
6 201 22
,," 7 446 87
7
8 57 16
" 8 223 97
5 79 95
5 76 47
5 73 06
5 69 22
5 72 61
5 109 05
"f 'S 91 11
5 98 31
"' 5 99 90
5 122 96
5 115 16
'4 5 93 49
5 93 49
5 91 96


25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
209 3
21 9
21 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
24 9
20
20
24 9
150
198
112. 11
24 9
247 6
93
100
t0
10
24
97 5
98 9
9S 9
98 8
88 9
258
92
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
6 7
25
57 5
35
100
100
145
160
220 4
49 6
56 6
50
110
128
125
21 9
32 9
25
25
25
5 7
12
14 5
92 6
22
21
21
21
20
20
20
20
30
20
20
20
29
20
80
I0o

20 8
so
93
247 6
25 8
25
25
25
25
31 3
24 eg
24 St
24 8&
24 9f
24 FS
23 LA
24 8C
24 e,
24 Br
21 8-
24 84
24 sc
24 8g
24 8r
24 8
24 6r
24 6c
I1 8I
22 7
35
O5
25
25
25
25
35
25
25
35
25
26
25
25
25
25
35
35
2S
25
35
35
35
35
35
25
2S
25
9S


Term of
years.
24 Years
47 "
85 "
20 "
29 "

30 "
30
13
10 "
20 "
24 "
23 "
20 "
20 "
7 "4
9 "
5 "
2 6
7 "
21 4
11 "
33 "4
12 "
15 "
14 "
40 "
25 "
16 "
40 "
45 "
45 .
45 "
40
15 "
9 4'
15 "
10 "
10 "
10 "
10 "
10 "
9 "
11 "
14 "
75 "
2S "
25 "
.25 4
28 "
30 "
15 "
14 '
13 "
11 "
10 "
10 "
12
12 "
15 "
45 "
14 "
14
19 "
60 "
22 "
4 "
4 "
12 9
15 "
to100 "
68 "
60 "
100 "
1 "
35 "
2 "
22 "
9 "4
14 "
12
18 "
12 "
10 "
11 "
10 "
30 "
35 "
19 "
21 66
20 "
25 "
30 "
40 "
10 "
20 "
25 "
20 '-
500 "
125 "
100 "
5 4'
18 "
15
13 "
15 "
25"
19 "
25 "
18 "
7 1'
30 "
30 At

35 ..
30 "

35 "
34 "
34 "
35 "
37 "
35 "




325 "
35 '4
40 "
14 "




90 "
35 ".
O0 "
25"'
25 "
24
25
30 "
75 4'
90 "*
85 "
100"*
85
90 "
90 "
75


Nay, more--umntr says there's a growing suspieien
That He and Dame Fashion have managed-nay driven
A bargain aye, even a boll coalition,
To shine at Three hundred and seventy-seven!
Be this as it may, the heart cheering, gay "season
Of flowers" is approaching-there's no doubt of at
And he againstt gooil taste would be guilty of treason
Who'd welcome in May Day without a new hat.
If aught can be wanting to call men's attention
To neatness, and with their compeers to be even,
Let them ponder these facts, of which Mayell makes men}
tion,
And call at Three hundred and seventy-seven! apvis
ROINSON'S8PATENT PARLOR STOVES
-This stove is very simple in its construction, and
ossesses the long desired qualities of economy, durabili.
ty and beauty. It has taken the premium at the Meebhan-
ic's Institute, New York, and may therefore be emphati-
cally called the Premium Parlor Stove. This stove is
now offered to the public as the cheapest and best oal
and Wood stove in market. The heat generated, is con-
ducted by means of dampers throughout every part of it
-its fire chamber is constructed of cast iron, and lined
with firebrick or soap stone (which maybe replaced whIen
necessary, without any expense except the coat oftho fir
brick). When the heat leaves the fire chamber, it may
be made to descend by dampers through sheet iron diving
flues, and after performing the circuit of tile whole stove,
ascends into an ornamental sheet iron top-by this means
the heat is carried down below the grate; consequently,
the heat is emitted before reaching the pipe-there is ali
so at cold air rarifier in the bottom of the stove; the grate
is constructed on an entire new and novel principle, and
is admired by all who have seen it-it is made of three
parts, and agitated by three cog wt eels attached to thema
-and when turned by a simple leVer, one-part of it is de.
pressed in the same proportion as the other is elev;ate4-
thereby the ashes are freely separated from th)e coal, ad4
the grate emptied of its contents and replaced insta 4ly by
the same lever with whish it is agitated. For sale by
Oc29 DANIEL FRY & CO., 358 S. Markfetst,

HATHAWAY'S PATENT HOT AIR
H COTOKING STOVES-The subscribers would In-
vite the attention of the public to this much celebrated
Cooking Stove, which, during the short time ft has beel
introduced, has superseded every other kind of rookfpg
stove in those sections of country where its merits have
become known, One great point in this stove is the ba-
king, by the application of hot air to the oven. It con-
tains an oven equal in size to most brick ovens, and will
pe, form the baking equally as well as any brick oven, std
witbsut the least danger of burning The whole preAss
of baking, boiling and roasting, can be performed at the
same time, anw with less fuel and with less labor thln the
same amount of business can be performed in afy o iler
way. There is large sizes well adapted fOr use in public
houses; also small sices for the use of private famsilies,
For sale wholesale and retail by
apl. DE GROFF & SHEAR, 14 tate-sC
1ITSStOLTUTION--The conartnershin heretofore


-- 392 South Market st.-
SThe subsciber he eby
f' expresses his gratitude
'1 to his friends who have
so liberally patronized his establishment, and intends to
deserve the continuance o( their custom. He now hasb
on hand, (and intends to have constantly) an extensive
collection of House Keeping articles, Fancy Goods, Per-
fumery, Toys, &c. at wholesale and retail. The follows
inu is a part of tile multitude of things in his store, viz:
Willow travelling baskets Indelible ink
do knife do Backgammon boards
do cradles Chessmen and graces
do wagons & chairs *Jack straws
Cedar and oak churns Chinese puzzle
do pails andti tubs Battledoors and shuttle
do and maple keelers cocks
Patent painted pails Dominoes
Shaker brooms and mops Cups and balls
do sieves and dippers Dissected pictures and map
do herbs and brushes Clothes and hat bfushea
Knife boxes Hair and flesh do
Bellows and shuttles Tooth and nail do
Trays and bowls Comb and curl do
Paste and wash boards Crumb and hearth do
Boxes in nests Portrait painters do
Towel rollers Varnish do
Rolling and clothes pins Camels' hair do
Wooden ladles Ever pointed pencil cases
Boxwood spoons and forks Lead points for do
Horn do do Dinner and tea bells
Bootjacks Sugar nippers
Foot stoves and benches Carpet hammers
Paper files Paste jiggers
Yard sticks Fine razors in cases
Grain scoops do pen knives &scissors
Teacup mops and mats Carbonic dentrifice
Table mats Chlorine do
Hemp, grass and husk door do tooth wash
mats Preston salts
German wax tapers The otto of roses
Magic and lucifer matches Persian do of rose soap
do lanterns do do do lip salve
Whalebone and steel husks Naples and almond soap
Hair pins Castilian and musk do
Fine pocket books Camphor and oxygen soap
do card cas-s Extract of tonquin bean
Ivory fine tooth combs do bergamot
do dressing do do roses
do pocket do Macassar oil
Cut beads of various colors Bears oil
Seed do do Coldcream
Gilt do Florida and cologne water
Bead bags and purses Lavender and honey d o
STEPHEN VAN 8CHAACK.
GREAT REDUCTION OF PRICES OF
GOODS-P. & 0. BROWN, No. 434 South Mar-
ket st, Albai.y, beg leave to inform the ladies of Albany,
Troy, &c., that, according to their custom, they have
commenced a "clearing cheap sale" of their whole stock,
at greatly reduced prices Such an opportunity of pur-
chasing the most rich and fashionable goods, at surpri-
singly low prices, rarely or never occurs.
In the Silk Department will be found a most extensive
assortment of :he newest and most desirable styles, con-
sisting of black and colored gros de naps, 5s, 5s 6d; rich-
est pou de sole 6s 6d; rich fig'd pou do soie 6s; richest do
7s; very rich changeable pou de sole 7s; rich brocade
striped tido 7s; richest do 8s 6d.
Moaus. de Laines and Challys-A very large assortment
of every style and quality. A large lot of very riehmous.
de laites, in 10 yd. lengths, only 4s per yard; chally dwes-
sea of the richest style ever imported; splendid embroi-
dered challys, newest style; blue bik and lead and black
mious. de lines.
The stock of Calicoes is very large, and contains an
uncommon variety of patterns, from a good article at Is,
to the finest French. A large lot of beautiful English
calicoes 18d to 2s per yard.
P. & G. B. would call attention to their assortment of
Linens, which are all the first quality, and soft finished.
4-4 undressed linen 2s 6d, 2s 9d and 3s; fine 4-4 Irish lin-
en 3s 6d and 3s 9d; an excellent article at 4s; extra fine
linens at all prices; stout 6-4 table cloth damasks3s per
yard; 7-4 do at 4s; an excellent damask (2 yards wide)
4s 6d; table cloths of all sizes, and napkins to match; 3.4
diaper towelling Is per yard; very fine do Is 6d; 5-4 wide
stout Scotch sheeting only 3s 6d per yard; fine do in pro-
portion.
Also, Printed Muslins, Black Bombazine, Crapes and
Merino, domestic shirtings, sheetings and long cloths;
hosiery, gloves and fancy hdkfs; ribbons; cambric, mull
and iswiss muslins; cashmere, brochay, thibot and ehally
shawls; thread laces and embroi'd collars; flannels, &c.
Just landed from the packet ship England, a lot of beau-
tiful Hemp Carpeting. fast colors.
S As P. & G. B. will sell at reduced prices only for a
few days, an early call will be necessary. je9
RAILWAY COOKING STOVES-BIEG-
LOWV, PIERCE & WICKES, 221 River sat.,Troy,
N. Y., exclusive owners and manufacturers of Bucklin's
Patent Railway Cooking Stoves, for which a diploma
was awarded by the Amerihan Institute in October last,
give the following description of this highly approved
stove:
The oven of this stove is placed above the fire, and will
bake six or eight loaves of bread, weighing from 4 tq 6
bs. each, and a single fire of dry wood, kindled when the
stove is cold, will bake this quantity of bread fully done
and of a brown color.
The stove part containing the fire chamber, and 4 biell-
er holes, moves to and fro under the oven, thus increas-
ing or decreasing the size of the stove about 14 inches,
and carrying the fire through Ihe same space nearer to or
further from the oven for the purpose of regulating the
heat in the oven. A boiler for washing, fitted to this
stove, holds 20 gallons, and will boil with an rAinary
fire in 20 minutes, either on the back or front boiler holes.
Finally, 20 gallons of waier may be boiled, 30 or 40 lbs.
of bread baked, and as many pounds of meat roasted and
broiled at the same time, and with the same fire, leaving
the two front boiler holes unoccupied, in which may be
boiled food for 40 or 50 persons.
With all the advantages named above, we offer this
stove as the most ornamental cooking stove in the mar-
ket, requiring less fuel, less labor, and performing more
business than any other stove with which we are ac-
quainted.
Among the numerous testimonials which might be giv-
en of the excellency of this stove, we select the rollow-
lag only:
From the Hon. Geo. R. Davis, of Troy.
Messrs. Bigelow, Pierce & Wickes: Gent.-! have ured
in my family one of Bucklin's Patent Railway Cooking
Stoves, and believe it the cheapest and best cookingstove
we have ever had-as it regards the quantity of fuel re-
quired, and the great variety of cooking that ca[ bepcr-
tied on at the same time. Sept. 10,1838,
Geo. R. Davis.
BIGELOW, PIERCE & WICKES.
Troy, June 4, 1839. Jel.-Jw
Bf THE old and the young who'd "improve their
Conditionn"
mAnd give to their personal aspect an air
S Becoming a gentleman's taste and ambition,
Should lookto the style of their BE VERg with care.
This hint concerns all, from the lake to the ocean,
And those who their minds to improvement are given
Should walk to South Market street "just for'the notIon,"
And stop at O*" Three Hundred and Seventy-Seven'
The best of the custom (a share far from stinted)
To MAYELL for twelve years has steadily gone,
From which stubborn fact it is e'en more than hinted,
That he 0" bears the palm for the "tip of the ton"!


" 9 23 99
" 5 57 11
" 5 92 25
' 5 89 96
' 5 EQ 96
" 5 110 72
" 5 125 40
'" 5 103 05
" 5 100 67
" 5 96 81
" 5 88 71
" 5 17 18,
" 9 17 18'
9 17 189
" 9 17 189
" 9 17 18
" 9 17 1 8.
" 9 .17 18i
" 5 17 18-
" 5 17 18
" 5 17 18,
" 5 17 IP,
" 5 17 181
"4 5 17 18
" 65 17 18,
" 5 17 18 .
i' 5 17 18,
" 5 17 18
" 5 17 18
" 5 17 18,
" 5 17 18l
" 5 17 18
5 17 18,
S 17 18k
" S 17 18l
, 5 17 I1
5 17 18
" 5 17 lr
' 5 17 18
'* 5 17 18S
" 5 17 18
" 6 17 18
" 6 17 18r
" 6 17 18
" 6 17 t8
" 6 17 14
" 5 17 18l


do
do
do
do
do
do
do
10th and ltth Avenues
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
9th and 10th Avenues
do
do
do
do
do
do
41o
do
do
10th and llth Avenues
do
do
do
9th and 10th Avenues
do
do
do


100 is
48 "
80. '"
90 "
85 f*
90 "
85 "
90 "
95 "
90 "
70 49
85 "6
35 "
29 -4
3() 6,
30 "
10 it
20 "s
20 "
25 "
20 "
20 '
20
19
20 "
25 "




20 .'d
25 is
25 "
25 a-
25 is
25 "
24 "
24 6'
25"*
25 "
25 4'

27 "6
30 .4
35 .6
35 "
35 do
30 6
27 "4
22 '6
20"


2d Avenue opening
do
do
do
do
Opening 121st street
do
Opening 116th.street
Widening Wall-street
Widening Chapel-street
Reg. and curb and gutter in 17th-st.
do
do
do
do
do
Paving South and Front-streets
Paving 6th-street
do
do
do
do
do -
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Paving 16th-street
Opening 2d Avenue
Widening Avenue C
do
Regulating 26th-street
do
do
do
do
Regulating 10th Avenue
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do