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DAILY ALBANY ARGUS.

E. CROSWELL, Printer to th St t.
E. Ct1OSWELL, )
0. R. VAN be.T'rySr',, .. ,
THOSE. M. BURT, >
S. CROSVELL S
Office No, 370 south A arket street. 0ii' C'ounting
room tin the second story.

TERMS.
DAILY ALRANY ARGUS-Eight dollars per annurm,
payable half yearly.
THE ALBANY ARGUS, saMl-wEELYv-Four dollars
per annum, payable in advance.
ALBANY ARGUS, WEEKLY-Two dollars per annum,
payable in advance, without which no paper will be sent.
No subscription received for less than six mouths.
No paper will be discontinued (unless at the discretion
of the proprietors) until all arrearages arc paid.
1 Advertisements conspicuously inserted on the cus-
totuary terms.
33 Insolvent notices inserted six weeks for $1 67; ten
weeks for $2. Other legal notices are charged at the rate
of 5!) cents per folio (of 100 words) for the first insertion,
and 20 cents per folio for each subsequent insertion. In
all cases payment is required in advance.
All letters, and communications must be post paid.

IMPROVED STOVES.


NEW AND SPLENDID RUSSIA IRO
DUMB STOVES-Rendered complete by t
addition of Eli C: Robinson's Patent Improved FIR'
PLACE, and warranted superior to those of any oth
construction now in use; combining economy in fui
comnifort in cold weather, and perfect simplicity in regul
ting to suit the changes of the weather.
These Stoves can be connected with stoves for the u
of either coal or wood. and are made so as to be taki
apart and cleansed without difficulty. They are design
for parlors, upper halls, or bed-rooms, imparting an agre
able.and healthy warmth to the apartment in which the
re used; the air being pure and more fit for respiratih
waiK-where stoves in which the flarte conies in immedia
contact with iron plates, are used.
A.great variety of elegant patterns now finishing am
for sale by A. H. AUSTIN, 17 State street,
seC28 corner of Dean.
I{ATHBONE'S PATENT UNION COO]
S1TOViES.-The subscribers would invite the attei
tion of their customers and the public generally to the ;
above named article. They have recently made many in
portant improvements in these Stoves, suggested by ti:
experieuce of the past year, and can now confidently ru
eammend them as unrivalled in utility, convenience at
economy.
The various processes of boiling withthree boilers,ro
tlng and baking, are effectually performed at the sami
time, and the oven so improved in construction as to maim
tain at all times a perfect equality of heat in every part.
Certificates with the following names attached, show
ing the high estimation in which the Union Cook Stove
ire held anong those who have thoroughly tested then
t an be seen at the subscribers' store 47 State-st. Alban3
Albany-Peter Bullions, S. Hawes, L. Chapin, E. A
Iluntly, F. S. Pease, George (V. Peckham H. Dibble, [
Sparhawk, D. Banfield, Ira C. Baldwin, Calvin Pepper
Jnared L. Rathbone, John Worcester.
Troy-Thotnas Turner.
Watervliet-Samuel Miller.
Butternutts, Otsego county-Chauncey Todd, Obadia
Seely, Mordecai Ving, Salmon Starr, George Simmons
JohnI H. Bissell, Sylvester Nearing.
Sehodack, Rensselaer county-Joh n Link.
Schoharie county-WXVilliam |raig, Carlisle; D. Loucks
Sharon.
Homer, Cortland county-Rev. Dennis Platt, J. M
t"^ermnerhorn, Horace White, Daniel Glover, T. D
'"ollnr, Orrin Bowen, Mansion House, Edson Signor
,1 Ncrt Nesbit, John S. Fouhlder, N. H. Tanner, Hlome
CoLil Manufacturing Company.
'Cortlandville, Cortland county-Mason Salisbury, E
P. Brainard, Levi Taggart.
Tully, Onondagacounty-D. B. Bourtell, Salem Baker
WiVn. M. 0. Farrell.
Cortland county-A. H. Brogden, Preble; Horace Bliss
Truxton.
Tompkins county-William Brabrook, Groton.
Chenango county-Elijah 1athbone, Alvah Hunt
Greene.
Connecticut-David M. Jewet, lNorth Lyme; WV. WV
Reed, Andover.
Having made arrangements for our castings for the en-
MAiiiq f.ason, to be made in this city, utinder our own su.
pervision and care, and of the best quality of Scotch anm
American iron, we shall be enabled to furnish smooth amn
perfeet casting, far superior to any we have before been
alrte to procure. This arrangement will enable us also to
mouat and fit our stoves more perfectly than it is possible
to do with castings made at the blast furnaces.
ap22 JOEL RATHBONE & CO.
pa|OVED FOUR BOILER COOIN<4
I ES-Thesubscriber would respectfully imnform
those dealers and others, who were disappointed in get.
ting these stoves last fall, that he has made such arrange-
ments for the coming season, as will not fail to secure him
an ample supply. IHaving made a few alterations from
thie experience of the past season, lie can now confidently
recommend them, as being unequalled by any stove in
this or any oilier market, either as it regards finish of cast-
ings. cheapness or capacity for cooking.
Country dealers are invited to examine these stoves I'-
fore mnuilking their purchases; their superiority ia obvious
*lon a mere inspection.
Certificates from those who have used them in differ-
ent ,sections ofthe country have been sent in, and can be
seen at the store. Below are annexed a few from those
who have used them in this city.
ELISHA N. PRATT.
I have had one of E. lN. Pratt's improved four boiler
cooking stoves in use in my kitchen, for the last six
months, and take pleasure in recommending it to the pubi-
lie us the best article that has ever come under my observ-
ation. Its peculiar construction enables the user at the
sameetime to boil in four places, aind to bake itn an oven
with an even and regular heat, and to roast in a tin oven.
exposed directly to the tire, without the Interposition of
cast iron plateau ais in most other stoves. All this is done
Vvith great convenience, despatch and economy in fuel.
Thos. Lawrence, r.
HIlaving had in use the past winter, one of the improved
four boiler cooking stoves, I can safely say, from my own
observation, and from the information of my family, that
it is decidedly an excellent and economical stove. It per-
jorms well and expeditiously all tihe operations of baking,
roasting and boiling in four boilers at the sautme time, and
with the consumption of a very small quantity of fuel.
David H. Crry.
The subscriber has had in operation in his kitchen, for
the lastithree months, one of 1'. N. Pratt's improved four
'boiler cooking stoves, and takes great pleasure in recom-
uending it to the public, as being decidedly the best arti-
ele of the kind for baking, boiling and roasting that ever
came under his notice. It is durable and simple in con-
atltction, and consumes but a sminalli quantity of wood for
Mte work it does. Caleb N. Bement.
Mr, Pratt-The improved four boiler cooking stove
purelmafed of you, I ant highly pleased with, particularly
in account of the very small quantity of fuel it requires.
Herman Ten Eyek.
Mr. Pratt-I take pleasure in informing you that my
family are well satisfied with your improved four boiler
Cooklmtg stove. Your recommendations respecting it we
ftad perfectly correct; it certainly ec-onomizes very much
in fuel, for the amount of cooking that it will perform, and
i.s altogether a very handsome and labor saving article.
Yours, respectfully, E. H. Pease.
ica n recommend the improved four boiler cooking
i*i)-v.e4 as being the best stove I ever had in use. It will,
as you informed moe, boil. bake and roast at the same time,
and as the dampers are so constructed as to directthe heat
wherever it is required, the cooking is done with great
vae, and economy in fuel. I prefer it to any stove now
smanufacunrmed, and as such, wouMl recommend it to the fa-
i'ar: ble notice of the public.
H. C. WVhelpley.
Mr. Pratt-XWith the four boiler cooking stove purchas-
ed of you, my family are well pleased. It performs the
tlifferent operations of cooking in the best manner, with !
peat despatch, and consumes but very little wood fur the
work that is done. Ch;is. Wainwright.
apaj


pROFESSOR OLMSTED' S TOVES--
P Certificates and Reeommnendations:
A great number of gentlemen who have used the stove
during one, and In some casw, during two seasons, have
obligingly favored the proprietors with their opinion of
Ala merits, in the form of certificates, with leave to present
them to the public. A few of these are annexed in the or-
der of their dates. Tlhe proprietors can confidently refer
to hundreds of citizens of New Haven, for similar tevti-
monials.
From Francis Markoe, esq. of the house of Masters &
Markoe, New York, dated Jan. 8, 1i36 (addressed to
sthe patentee):
We are more and more satisfied with your stove every
,ay. There is no difficulty in managing it. The temper-
ature we vary according to the weather, whether high or
tow. It is equally distributed through the room. It keeps
up the fire through the night, and there is no difficulty in
the morning in additg to it. I think I may venture to say,
that one peck of nut coal keeps us as comfortable as we
could wish for 24 hours.* It is the most comfortable, eco-
nomical, easily managed, and clean fire place I ever
knew, and Ithank you for the invention.
.From Charles Taylor, esq., Newark, New Jersey, dated
May 19, 1836:
1 have for several years past, observed the various pat-
O-eras of stoves invented by scientific men, and made trial
,of the improvements more or less each year; but have ne-
iverfouad any apparatus for warming rooms to compare
,with ole of Olmsted's stoves. constructed by Messrs.
Smlth & sherman, which I procured last November, and
have had in constant use through the winter. In point of


v


VOL. XII.


,P IJGII.KrEEP3IE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL-
. ihie site selected for this institution is "Collegi
ili," 'which is situated about half a mile northeast o
the beautiful and flourishing village of Poughkeepsie; it!
location is unrivalled iu beauty and salubrity, and cannot'
fail to attract the attention and excite the admiration o
every lover of rural scenery.
The school will be conducted on philosophical princi.
plea. Reference will invariably be had to the nature o
the juvenile mind, and constant efforts will be empluye(
to develop its powers in their natural order, and to pro.
serve them in their relative strength. The domestic ar.
rangements and modes of instruction will be adapted t(
youth of every age, and they will be instructed in suet
branches as may be requsite, either to qualify them for
collegiate course, and the attainment of a liberal educa-
tion, according to the wishes of their parents or guar.
dians.
Those who may be designed for commercial life, will
generally be taught orthography, reading, writing, eng.
sh grammar, geography, rhetoric, logic, mathematics,
history, (in particular the history of our own country,)
natural philosophy, political economy, civil polity, the
French and Spanish languages.
Those who may be designed for a collegiate course, in
addition to minost of the above studies, will apply them-
selves to the study of the Latin and Greek languages.
The government of the school will be supervisory and
parental: whilst the strictest order will be enjoined, such
discipline only will be employed at may most effectually
tend to call into action the moral sense of the scholar.
Persuaded that the instructions contained in the Scrip-
tures are eminently conducive to the formation of moral
character, select portions of them will be daily read, their
fundamental truths inculcated, and such familiar lectures
occasionally delivered as may best serve to illustrate their
moral andreligious design and tendency, without having
a direct bearing upon the peculiarities of any christian
denomination. Sabbath mornings and evenings will be
devoted to the study of the scriptures. Scholars will at-
tend church at such places as their parents or guardians
may direct. No pupil wiill be allowed to absent himself
or leave the premises without permission.
Rewards and punishments will be of an intellectual and
moral nature, addressed to the understanding and tthe
t!$rt. Rewards for good deportment and diligence in
study will be, the confidence and good will of instructors;
approbation and love of friends and relations; self-go-
vernment; rapid improvement in learning; advancement
to a higher class and an approving conscience.
Punishment for negligence and irregularity of conduct
will I be chiefly-disapprobaticn of instructors; private
and public censure; studying during the hours of diver-
sion; removal to a lower class; and finally, if incorrigible,
dismissal from the school.
Strict attention will be paid to the health of the pupils,
and they will be attended by a skilful and experienced
physician, when necessary.
To prevent confusion and loss, every article of clothing
should be distinctly marked with the full name.
Buying or selling, or bartering-also the use of tobac-
co, will be strictly prohibited.
There will be two terms in the year, 23 weeks each.-
The 1st term will commence on the first Wednesday in
November. The 2nd term, the 1st Wednuesday in May.
Able and experienced instructors will be provided in
the several departments, who together with the Princi-
pal and his family, will constantly and familiarly asso-
ciate with the youth committed to their care.
Annual expense per scholar, will hbe 9230, payable quar-
terly in advance. This sum will include all charges for
instruction, board, books, stationary, bed and bedding,
washing, mending, room, fuel, lights, &c.
Clothing for scholars will, by order of parents or guar-
dians, be procured on reasonable terms by the principal.
CHARLES BARTLETT, Principal.
N. P. TALLMADGE,
GEORGE P. OAKLEY,
JOHN DELAFIELD,
PETER P. HAYES,.1
WALTER CUNNINGHAM,
PARACLETE POTTER,
GIDEON P. HEWITT,
ELIAS TRIVETT,
OAMALIEL GAY,
J. VAN BENTiUYSEN,
se2ft-dtf Trustees.
ALBANY EAGLE AIR FURNACE AND
A MACHINE SHOP.-WILLIAM V. MANY (for-
merly Corning, Norton & Co.), manufactures to order
IRON CASTINGS FOR GEARING MILLS & FAC-
TORIES, of every description. Also, MALT MILLS,
MIASHLNG MACHINES, STEAM ENGINES,and RAIL
ROAD CASTINGS of every description. The collec-
tion of PATTERNS of MACHINERY is not equai -d iu
the United States.
The following articles will be kept constantly for sale'
it the Furnace, and furnished at short notice, viz: POT-
ASH KETTLES, single and double bottoms, from 56 to
140 gallons,CAULl)RONS from I to 3 barrels, HATTERS'
and SOAP BOILERS' KETTLES, BARK MILLS. PA-
PEiR MILL and other SCREWS, PRESS PLATES,
OVEN MOUTHS and FURNACE DOORS, HAND-
PUMPS, singleand double FORCING PUMPS, WAG-
(ON, CART and POST COACH BOXES, SASH
WVEIGHITS, 7,14, 25, 23, 30,50,56, and 60 lb. WEIGHTS,
FORGE HAMiMERS, SLEIGH SHOES, STOVES,
HALL SCRAPERS, PORTABLE FURNACES, HAVW-
SER IRONS, MANDRILLS for Coppersmiths, BOOK-
3INDERS' and NOTARIAL or SEAL PRESSES.
IV. V. M. having an extensive assortment of Plough
Patterns, embracing almost every kind in use, keeps
:onstanJy on hand the following Plough Castings, viz:
Siarbuck's No. 1, 2 & 3 D Tice's No. 2 A
Clute's No 1 & 2 1-3 Wright's No. 0, 1, 2 & 2.
Bryanit's No. 1, 2, 2J, 3, & 1. Hudson's No. 2, D
Gibson's Np. 2, 3, 1, 5 & 6. Rutssell's No. 2.
Vood's (or 2, & A Wood's C. S. 1J, 2 &3 old
Freeborn's Chamberlain's No. 3.
Also-The celebrated Side-Hill Plough, No. 1 and 2.
Country Founders can be supplied with PIG IRON,
*IRE BRICK, COAL,AMBOY SAND and CLAY.
Bolting, Turning and Finishing, in all their vwriotin
ranches, executed with neatness and despatch.
Also-PATTERNS made and SCREWS cut to or-
er.
WV. V. M. being a practical Millwright, will furnish
a!culatlons, and any other information in relation to ma-
iinery.
COTTON MACHINISTS may obtain castings at thi-
'urnacet made of Scotch Iron.
All articles ordered can be forwarded to any part of th-
'nited States or the Canadas. Orders may be addressed
V WILLIAM V. MANY, Eagle Air Furnace, No. l
caver-street, Albany, or to the care of Messrs. ERAST-r
ORNINO & Co.
' -OACII AND WAGON AXLET-iEES of
._ tthe superior Newark and Derby manufacture.
an2 For sale by STEELE & WARREN.


P RIENTI8SSS SUPERIOR COSMETIC
W VASH BALLS, for sale at the Variety tore 39.J
South Market mt. oc2l S. VAN SCHAACK.
rI*ASlONABLE UPHOLSTERY AND
PAPER IIANGINGS.-P. M. ORANGE has uot
received by the latest arrivals, an extensive assortment of
3ik and cotton fringes and gallons, worsted damask cur-
tain ornaments, &e.; also, fine and common paper hang-
ings, comprising a great variety of patterns. He has con-
stantly on hand superb transparent paintings for curtains,
hair and moss mattresses, live geese feathers, beds, com-
mon do, paillasses, &c- will make to order to the latest
fashions, window and bed curtains, carpets, ottomans,
&c. &c.
N. B. Live geese feathers, common do, hair and moss
superior qualities, in large or small packages, o0)
COACH IIAMEtS-20M pairs japan'd, 80 do bra's
and silver plated coach haines, for sale by
an15 ST'EELE & WARREN, Argus Building.


ALBANY LOCK HOSPITAL.
DR. COOKE,
Member of the College of Physicians, London.
Fellow of the College of Ripley, Ohio.
Founder of the Lock Hospital, Albany, N. Y.
Fellow of the Royal Vaccine Institution, London.
Prof. in the Sylvanian Med. College at Erie, Penn.
rENCOURAGE3Dby the uniform success attending
his peculiar method of treatment, for the preventioni
and cure of venereal complaints, and confirmed by the ex-
perience of many years in a widely extended prartiot: sen-
sible also of the happy effects resulting to the comnmni-
ty, from having confined himself entirely to the study and
cure of a class of diseases which there is every reason to
deplore is too prevalent-
Dr. COOKE continues to direct hIls sole attention to the
treatment of every disorder that occurs from imprudence,
whilst under the influence of intemperance or anry other
baneful excitement, and to the cure of those dreadful mai-
adies which too often arise therefrom. These sometimes
commence in a most simple form, and through neglect or
injudicious treatment afterwards assume a more aggrava-
ted state of disease, occasioningabscess, ulceration, npsc.,
caries of the bones, psuedo syphilis, cancer, premature old
age, and too often ncad in a protracted incurable state of
miserable existence.
Dr. COOKE, though professing exclusively the study
and cure of these particular complaints, deems it proper
to inform his friends arnd the public in general, injustice to
his professional character, that he was properly educated
and regularly initiated into every branch of the profession
as a general practitioner in Europe.
D)r. COOKE may be consulted therefore at all times at
his offices, whiich arc properly fitted uip and arranged for
confidtentinl onsiunltntion tC,1nrv' nntients residinra t a


ALBANY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1837. No. 4500.


1 ,1ANY FEAIALE ACADEMY-The ."x'i
e L quarter will ccf!iienie on Thursday,thet first of r3ep
3f timber.
ts Thisinstitution (founded in the year I814,!ndoccupyiu,:
)t a spacious ind elegant edifice, erected especially for it a,-
)f coinmmodation) comprises,exclusive ofthe classescompose,
of those pupils from the higher departnienta, pursui.,ng th+
. study of the French and Latin languages, Naltu rai. Iltist-
)f ry. Chemistry and Botany, six departments, three ci
Which are subdivided, and the whole under the charge (C
. fifteen professors and teachers, and suhjt ct to monthly vis-
Sitations by coimmnittees of the board of trustees.
S The course of instruction is designed to be useful and
Practical, and to embrace all the various branches of a
a complete fer.iaie education.
I- Th institution isfu-nished *ith maps, charts, globes,
- models, a superior chemical and philosophical apparatus,
and an extensive library; in addition to which, in each of
Sthe three lower departments, is a smaller library, carefully
selected, with reference to the capacities and attainments
of the younger pupils instructed in them.
' Ample arrangements have been made, under such regu-
e nations a' the trustees feel confident will prove satisfacto-
ry to parents, in the establishment, connected with the
Families respectively of the Principal and Professor of
Natural Philosophy, as well as in several! private families,
for the accommodation of pupils from a distance. The
Expense incurred by a young lady for hoard and tuition,
h including all the studies tangblt in the Academy, will not
Exceed $225 per annun ; and in these establishments the
best facilities are afibrded for acquiring a knowledge of tnu-
sic, drawing, or any of the ornamental branches of female
education, at a moderate additional charge.
The academical year commences on thle first of Septem-
Sber and is divided into four terms, commencing respective-
ly on the 1st of September, '23d of Novenimber, 15thll of Feb-
ruary, and the Sth of.May; a vacation ofsix weeks follow-
ing the examination in July, and a second of one week ai
the close of the quarter ending the 1st of'May.
For terms of instruction, which have been placed on ai
liberal footing, or for any other information which may br
Required in relation tothe- institution,reference mnay be had
to A, Crittetiton, A. 31., the principal, or to either of the
Trustees.
For general information concerning lthe character of the 1
institution, &c. the trustees Wog leave to refer to Chancel-
lor Kent nf'lhe city of New York, Rev. Dr. Ludlow, Pro-
vost oftheUniversity of Pennsylvania, Rev. )Dr. Ferris, .
New York, who, during their residence in Albany, have
asucessively presided over the institution; to Benjamin F.
Butler. Attorney General of the i U. S.; Washington (CiT y:
hon, Jacob Sutherland, Geneva, New York, and J. T.
Norton, esq,, Farmington, Conn., late trustees. By order
of thle Board. ,
A. CRITTENTON, .Secretary.
The Trustees are:
Rev. JOHN N. CAMPBELL, LL. i). t
GIDEON HAWVLEVY, Esq. e
RICH'D V. D)E WITT, J
RICH'I) M. MEIGS, 1
ED)WVIN CROSWELL," 11
ISRAEL SMITH, e
Hon. JAMES VANDERPOEL. n
PHILIP S. VAN RENSSELAER, i'sq, h
TILOS. WV. OLCOTT,
IRA HARRIS, I
lion. GREENE C. BRONSON. s
ARCHIBALD McINTYRE, Esq. e
jy19 EZRA P. PRENTICE, "
LBANY ACAD ]tMY-The Academy will open tA
for instruction on the first day of September.
The students are arranged in departments correspond- h
ing to the wishes of parents, for the instruction of their
children, .
In the 4th or junior department, children are taken at ,r
the age of 6 or 7 years, and instructed in reading and
spelling, the elements of Geography and Arithmetic, and b
writing. In the more advanced classes these studies are P
pursued to the extent of a thorough English education.-
Mr. McDowell and Mr. Edwards are the teachers in thiF bf
department.
The remaining departments, viz. the Classical, under st
the Rev. Mr. Bullions; the Mathematical, under Dr. Ten h,
Eyck; and the English, under Mr. Clapp, offer all the ad- p
vantages of an extendeA course of instruction. P
The French language is taught by Gen. Du Coudray f
Holstein. A
Mr. Bell continues as instructor in Penmanship.
Students have for many years been instructed in allt a
branches required by the Civil Engineer; and many of
the pupils of the institution are now in actual service on ti
the canals and railways of this and other states. A class p
in these branches of study will be commenced immediate- sa
ly after the holidays.
The elements of drawing are taught in connection with ir
the above, and other branches of study. n
Classes in book keeping are also now in progress. L
The Principal will attend to the general superinten-
dence of the Institution, and instruct in various branehe- .
of Natural and Moral Science.
Prices of Tuition-In the junior department and ecle
mentary studies, $3 75 per quarter for the summer quar- h
ters; $4 25 for the winter quarters. Total, $16 per an-o
num.
In the highest studies of the 4th department, $4 75 ant pal
85 '5. Total, $29 per annum. -
English and Mathematical, 65 75 and $6 25. Tol-. w,
$24 per annum.
Classical, including also any of the above, 97 75 and ait
63 25. Total, $32 per annum. o(
For instruction in French. the price is 93 per quarter to E
parents, to which the trustees add $2 for each scholar. dy
Boarding-The trustees have obtained references to se- o0
veral boarding houses, where students can, if it be desir- 1
ed, be under the care of one or other of the teachers, who fo
will board with them. Price for board, fuel, lights, &ec. he
from 92 50 to $3 per week. w
Clanses commencing Latin are formed on thL first o he
Septtembt-r and the first of March in each year. fo
T. ROMEVNBECK Prinrioal. he
GIDEON HAWVLEY,
ERASTUITS CORNING,
JAMES M'KOWN, .
JNO. N. CAMPBELL dl
JAMES STEVENSON Un
WILLIAM B. SPRAGUT:, pl:
PETER GANSEVOORT, co
ARCHIBALD CAMPBELf,
THOMAS E. VERMILYE,
'THOMAS WV. OLCOTT,
RIClIARI) V. DE WVITT.
PHILIP S. VAN RENSSELAER,- i
JAMES GOOLD, i
WILLIAM C. MILLER,
sel-tf R[CHARI) YATES, Trustees.
wi


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1ICHIGAN LANDS-P'ersons desirous of pur-
Schasing land in the state of Michigan, are informed
that the undersigned has been appointed agent by Messrs.
Mickles & Co. of MIonroe, Michigan, who possess every
advantage of making a selection of the best location ami
choice otf a good soil. He will receive orders from such
ias wish to pIurchase for any quantity they may want.-
Siuch persons will be savedthe necessity of sending specie
to the land office, by depositing the price of the number of
Acres they want to buy, in the Mechanics' and Farnmers'
Bank in this city, at two dollars per acre, subject to the
drafts of Messrs. M.'s & Co., on the delivery of the ne-
-essary certificates and papers for said purchase.
THOMAS GOUGII.
N. B. References cari be given at the office of the sulb-
ceriber as to the respectability and standing of the above
gentlemen. Apply at 349 North Market-street, under the
iluseumn. seC7


L 'TOTICE-Application will be made to the legislature
L of the state of New-York, at the present session
thereof, for the incorporation of a company under the
name of the Mohawk and Hudson Saw Mill Company,
for the purpose of sawing and manufacturing veneers and
other articles of wood; also for making machinery; to be
located in the county of Albany, with a capital of fifty
thousand dollars. Feb. 4, 1837. fc6 e-w


7LTOTICE is hereby given that an application will be
Made to the legislature of this state, now in session,
for an act to incorporate a charitable society, to be estab-
lished in the city of New York, by the name of the So-
ciety for the relief of Half Orphan and destitute children
in thecity of New York; and its object will be to relieve,
provide for.iinatruct and protect such children. fe8-6w
T O all to whom these presents shall come: Know ye
that in conformity with the statute concerning limit-
ed partnerships,we the subscribers, do certify,that the lim-
ited copartnership heretofore formed and conducted tinder
the name and firm of Colgate,Pollen and Colgate.in the city
of New-York, in which firm Charles Colgate, George P.
Pollen and lobert Colgate are general partners, and
George Colgate and John Colgate are special partners,
has been dissolved by mutual consent. Made and sever-
ally signed by the said partners, this seventeenth day of
January, in the year 1837.
CHARLES COLGATE, ) Gn
GEORGE P. POLLEN, enerl
ROBERT COLGATE, partner.
GEORGE COLGATE, Spejil
ja23-dlaw4w JOHN COLGATE, 5 partners
APPLICATION will be made to the legislature of the
state of New York, now in session, for an act to in-
corporate the CLIFTON IRON COMPANY, with a ca-
pital of $200,000, with liberty to extend the same to
$500,000, to be located in Richmond county, Staten Is]
and. ja30-6w
PPLICATION will be made to the legislature of the
A k tate r"o N^owtir 7 ] Lv i n .%i- in _f*h r -n net ti ii1


TH-E DIFFERENCE-It cannot lie denied that
wI hilstnmany medicines whili are recomrimendcd to
the public have not even the negative rmerit of harmless-
ness, there are others which it would be great init7stice
indeed anmid suicidal prejudice to involve, untrie-, in a
common condemnation. And when a medicine comes en-
dorsed with all the great names that have adorned the an-
nals of the medical profession, and warranted by the seal
and signature of long and uniform success, its proprietor
makes no unreasonable deniand upon. public confidence,
when he claims for it a superior consideration.
THE CAMOMILE PREPARATION of Dr. Evans is
undeniably entitled to this enviable distinction; for whilst
the medical authority in existence condemns it,every me-
dical work which alludes to it, and every medical practi-
tioner that is acquainted with it, freely acknowledges its
pre-eminent virtues; and that the latter should be so in
opposition to their personal interests, must be attributed
either to their candor or love of truth, or to their unwil-
lingness to fly in the face of al!l observation, and the testi-
mony of thousands.
Dr. WV. EVANS does not pretend that his Camomile
Tonic Pills will cure all diseases. He frankly and consci-
entiously admits that they will not. He lays uo claim to
the discovery of the "'Philosopher's Stone," and wishes
nobody to believe that he sells the "Elixir of Life;" but
hlie DOES SAY, and he DOES BELIEVE, and lie CAN
PROVE, that in debility and impaired constitutions; in
NERVOUS DISEASES OF ALL KINDS; in weakness
of the digestive organs; in incipient consumption, wheth-
er ofthec lungs or of the liver; in the dreadful debility oc-
casioned by the use of purgatives, in palsy, rheumatism;
(more especially) in the sicknesses incident to mothers
and to females of relaxed nerves; in every case of deliri-
umn tremens, or that disease which is brought on by in-
temperance, in the wretched horrors, of mind and body
which accrue from occasional inebriety; in loss of appe-
tite, languor, melancholy, pains in the head, limbs or side;
in corrupt, sallow and uncomely complexions, which arise
from the bad state of the fluidi;-in all these cases, and in
some others mentioned in the bills of directions given with
his medicines, HE DOES SAY, that thie CAMOMILE
TONIC PILLS, interchanged occasionally with his A-
PERIENT' FAItLY PILL,, (tie best known) which
ire sold with them, will effect itmnediate relief; and if
ised but for a fair period of trial, a perfect cure. This
nuch is placed beyond doubt by daily testimonies which
would be given on oath; and for this much, Dr. XV. EV
ANS can conscientiously request confidence. Ile there
ore need only add that his CAMOMILE TONIC PILLS
together with his excellent FAMILY APERIENTY
'ILLS can be obtained, wholesale or retail, at No. 7 Di-
'ision street, near Chatham Square, New York, and of
his authorised agents in town and country.
RESPECTFULLY TO TIHE PUBI.IC.-In addition
o the many references already given tothe public, andoth-
ers in possession, DR. WV. EVA \NS will now refer to Mr.
bohn Gibson, of North street, XVWilliamsburgh, who has
een troubled with the rheumatism forthree years, and for
linemonths had to use crutches, lie has been so far restor-
ed to health, by using a few bottles of Dr. Evains Carno-
nile or Tonic Pills, and a few boxes of Aperient Pills, that
ie feels able to go to work again.
Mrs. Watts, 60:3 Vater street, by using two bottles of
Dr. XV. Evans' Tonic Pills has been greatly benefitted;
he feels better than she hlias in a year previous. Hier dis-
ase, ditspepsia and palpitation of thle heart.
Mr. Willard Snow has been cured of dyspepsia by taking
wo bottles of Tonic and two boxes of Dr. XV. Evans7
Aperient Pills. Ils residence is 354 Waterstreet. 1
Step!l,,- n tAmes, 127 Amity street for a length oftime past
as been troubled with a load and distress at the stomach,
digestion, and dizziness in the head. By using Dr. VW.
Ivans' Tonic and percentt Pills, the complaints lhave been
moved. 1
Mrs. Rapelye, Middleton, Long Island, has been cured (
y using Dr. WV. Evans' Pills. Hier complaint was dys-
epsi a.
Mrs. Blackwell, 151 Madison street, has received great
benefit by 'iqing te Tonic and Aperient Pills. J
Capt J.',,i.vaiofship Willi.m, has b'cn so far re-
tored to health, as to he enabled to attend to his business,
having been unable to do so for a long time. His corn-
lainis were nervous irritability, vith spasms, often lan- j
uid, indigestion ani. palpitation of tche ealt. tie has used
Our bottles of Dr. XV. Evans' Tonic, and three boxes of
percent Pills. c
Mr. Israel S. Smith had a complication of diseases, such -
s indigestion, loss ofappetite, lassitude and loathing; felt 1,
s if hedid not want to see any one. By using three hot- v
es of Dr. WV. Evans' Tonic, aind two boxes of Aperient J
ills, considers himselfcured; hlie is cheerful and lively- a
iavs he has not felt so well for ten years, t
Mrs. Nolan, corner of Spring and Mercer streets, disease v
n the head, was obliged sometimes to walk the floor all
eight. the distress was so great; greatly relieved by usina
he Tonic and Aperient Pills.
TO TH1E L ADIES.-Amongst thousands of ladies 'ben-
itted by Dr. WX. Evans' Camomile or Tonic Pills, Mrs. V
1. Beaumoont (corriner of Canal and Washington streets) a
is kindly a',;'d it to be made known for the benefit of
others, that she was brouml.t (by mental affliction) to ai t
.ry weak and lid. j tlate, of health, and pains in the sidt
id head, was recommeinde to take Dr. WV. Evais' 'T,.niv t
ills, v.which she hias .lone to her comfort of mini and re-
oration of health. It*. MA. Beaumiont.
TO THE AFFLACTED.-For the benefit ofthe public t
id in gratitude to DrM. ,. Evans, I consider it a hity I h
ve to make known the great good I have derived from
vans' Tonic Pills. Havinm ig-en five yeyears aifmcted w.ith S
'spepsia of the worst kind, 1 made application to numer- I,
is soure-es withoeit benefit, 6y the use of Evans' Tronic
ills, and three boxes of Evans' Aperient Pi;ls, I hav,, V
und signal relief ifu!!ly to mray satisfaction, and am mo)r:
ealtliy than l h'ave been tor years. The syahptouns (which C
ere pains in the chest, weakness in the whole frame, b
art-barn, fiatuleny, acid.lity oind head-iiche) are atl re
oved|. I tehiver this testimiony over to i)r. VI'. Kvans. r
r his and the public benefit, for it to be made known. I
reby sign my name and address. P
Edward Rhodes, 95 Croshy street, N. Y. ]i
The following person have bi-en lenefittedand cured o
f'e'ent clmplaints, as dyspepsia, consumption, bilious S!
n; liver complaints, headache, vweaukiiness, femtule coni- h
tints, nervous diseases, spasms., andt other, of all tins.
mplaints for which those pills are so ehlicacious. a:
Mr. Samuel McCully, 431 Pearl street.
Mr. J. Vardycke, 62 Forsyth street. "
Mir. J. Gillis, Milton, l:!ster county, N. V, p
Mr. A. Ilayct, 217 Brooine street.
Mlr. 'lark, 482 Water street. K
XMrs. Ml.., Thompson street.
Lapt. Joim Clark, of shi) Je;reion.m .
iDr. W. Evans-Sir : "hiat ";ic public may Ite satisfied W
th the virtues of your Tomic and Aperi't', Pills, 1 wiil 1g
io; that, for a long tuime hi.ve been suffering With a dis-
'as in my stomach, pa.is in my head and side, and oflte T
lubled vwitii langim iness, someatimei's with pimples and t(
utches io my skin. By using a few of your Pills I a~n
early benefiltteJ, aid have not the least. doubt titoy wii lii
oct. a cure. hlespc.iluliy yorii-s,
1V. G. tl:!ri', % Oliver street, ti
vihany Agent-Mr. ..STEPItEN VAN SCIIAACKt 39'2 in
nth Alarket street.
rroy--Vr. Z. CLA.RK, bookseller, 21f Riwvr street. I1
Vest Troy--Mr. B. Cgo VVN, it
-Iudsoi-Mr. S WVestcott, postmaster.1t
'ouglbkeepsie--Messrs. Potter & Vi,"l-. ci
lhaca Mr. David Ilanminer.
\Vmaterford--.l. J. & C. Scott. fc
Saratoga Springs-Mr. Phineas Fletcher,
Ballston Spa--Mr. Jas. Comrstock.
)r. WV. Evans' niedical office, is at No. 7 Division street, cu
mr Chatham Square. N. York, where application tor C(
encies are rcquested to he made by a Imerchamlt iui each,
age,.c. b.


ji Ask for Dr. EVANS' PILLS-Beware of Counter- b(
s--Go to is appointed Agients. jy7-dae


SALT RHEUM, ,SALT RHEUM &RING-
WORtM-OGibney's letter and Ringworm Destroy-
er-The success which has attended the use of this remne-
dy has induced the proprietor to spare no expense that i!
may be more generally known, that thwsc aflkgted with
Better, Ringwormns and Salt Rheumi, may receive a spee-
dy and permanent cure at a trifling expense.
In no Instance has the medicine failed in curing Tetter
and Ringworms, r.or will it fail if used according to di-
rections.
It is a certain test of the superiority ofthis remedy, that
persons who have been using other medicines and have
considered a cure effected, have experienced merely a
temporary suspension of the disease, which has returned
with greater violence and more obstinacy than at its first
appearance, and the effect of the Tetter and Ringworm
Destroyer is speedy and certain, for no sooner Is it ap-
plied, and should even the smallest particle of the disease
remain, than it wil manifest its effect, by producing a
redness and itching; and so long as any vestige remains
so long will this remedy act, andas soon as the cure is per-
formed its application will cause no further uneasiness.-
It is a pleasant and safe wash, and mnay be applied to the
most delicate infant; it requires no restrictions as to diet
and exposure.
A large supply of the above valuable medicine con-
stantly kept on hand at the proprietor's price, wholesale
and retail, by JOHN ONTHANK, GenerdilAgent,
145 Broadway, 6 doors above the City Hotel.
And at H. RAWVLS & CO.,
noll-ly Albany, New York.
FEVER AND AGLJE CURED BY THE
GENUINE RO WANI'S TONic Mx'iTUi1,,--
100,000 cases being annually cured by its employment-
like the following, viz:
"3Mr. lc.wand--ir : I feel it a dutv which I owe to you


DAILY ALBANY ARGUS

SATURDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 1


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ie C. J. should allude to this fact, as he did in 1f
s answer to the judges. He remarked that of
had the salary been adequate to the support t(
of myself and family, or had been permitted th
to remain at $3000," "and my private funds ni
had been permitted to accumulate, I should to
not now have been under the necessity of w
either retiring from the city, or of engaging ar
in any lucrative employment." No one will of
nture to deny that in the thirteen or fourteen tri
ears of unremitted devotion to the public du- of
es of his station, the C. J. was obliged to ex- sh
end at least $1000 per annum beyond the a- by
ount of his salary; and after having given se
it only his time and his talents, but some th
13,000 of his money to the public, he is now ev
preached for accepting enmploymnent which ex
ill enable him to maintain his family in the ye
joyment of those social relations and privile- wi
's to which they have been accustomed." wi
The Journal, after accusing several gentle- sti


We proceed to take some farther notice of
the recent attack of the Evening Journal on the
late Chief Justice SAVAGE. To the epithets
"meanness and cupidity," "sordid nature," and
the like, which that print applies to the Chief
Justice, and the other vulgar abuse in which
the continued assaults from that quarter abound,
we shall not be expected to reply: They are
characteristic of the source from whence they
emanate, and can do no harm to a gentleman
who in a long course of public duty has stood
so far above reproach, that his enemies, if he
have any, were never able to point to a single
departure from the path of honor and upright-
ness. We feel quite sure that the Chief Jus-
tice will never be disturbed by any of the hard
names or coarse epithets that may be heaped
upon him from that or any other quarter.-
Whether the calumnies of the E. J. proceed
from the editor, or from another, cannot be ve-
ry material to our present purpose. When.
we have noticed a few matters in the recent ar-
ticle which may be calculated to mislead the
public in relation to facts of some importance,
we shall leave the author, whoever he may be,
to such consolation as hlie may be able to derive
from a review of the whole subject.
With regard to the renewed assertion that
the C. J. is a man of ample fortune," and
ought not for that reason to accept of public
employment; it will be sufficient to refer
to the published correspondence. Disposed
even as most men undoubtedly are to consi-
der those persons rich who live in cities and
maintain a respectable standing in society, vwe
have no fear that the reckless assertions of
the Ev. J. will outweigh the explicit declaration
of the C. J. He has said that he retired to the
country, because he had not sufficient income
to support his family in the city.
There are only two points in the Ev. J.
which we deem worthy of notice: The one, I
that the correspondence between the members t
)f the court and the late Chief Justice was
"got up" to induce the legislature to increase
judicial salaries; and the other, that judge Sav-
tge had himself been an advocate for the pre- t
sent low rate of compensation to the judges.-
n relation to the first, the E. J. says:
WVe have also asserted-what the got-up correspon-
dence between the parties to this bargain clearly discloses
-that the whole affair was contrived to Induce thelegis-
ature to increase the judicial salaries. No man of sense
who reads that correspondence, will doubt but that Chief
justice Savage, in accepting the clerkship, was to write t
a doleful letter about the inadequacy of the salaries, for
he purpose of getting them up to the $3000 maximum to 0
v;'hih he alludes so plausibly."
Those who have read the correspondence I
need not be told that there is nothing in it a
which can give the least color of truth to the r
Assertions of the Ev. J.; and the characters of r
he gentlemen assailed will, we trust, afford j
hem an ample protection against the naked as- d
ertion of one who has long been accustomed
o impute to others motives and feelings which b
.e finds the governing impulses of his own bo- s
eom. We are, however, enabled to say in re-
ition to this correspondence-and to say ad- V
isedly-that the Chief Justice at the time the
lerkship was tendered for his acceptance, was a
usily engaged in making preparations to re- c
hove from the city, without thie remotest ex- n
ectation of again undertaking any kind of pub-
c employment. We also speak advisedly in n
lying, that the justices of the supreme court M
ad no intimation that the C. J. would in his s1
answer to their communication, say any thing ro
whatever on the subject of salaries: and thep
publication of the correspondence was designed p
)r no other end than that of correcting an er- ,
)r which had prevailed to some extent, and ,
'licli the Ev. J. labors to perpetuate, that the "
Lte C. J. was a man of ample fortune."- ,
'hat this was an error, was personally known
) the present Chief Justice, and was fully be- "
eyed by the other members of the court; and ,
hey thought it proper that the motives which ,
iduced the offer and acceptance of the appoint- ,
lent, should be laid before the public. With ,
tis simple statement of facts, we dismiss the ,
charge that the correspondence was got up" -
ur effect in relation to salaries. ,
There is, however, one other fact which we ,
Ln not forbear to notice. When the C. J. ac- w
Ipted the office in 1823, the salary was fixed sE
y law at $3000-the smallest sum that had t
hen paid since the year 1809. Within three t
months after his appointment, the salary was e
-duced to $2000. It was not unnatural that h,


1800, with & population of 959,000, the sala-
ries were increased to $3000-in 1813, to
$3500-in 1816 to $4500-and at this sumn
they remained until 1820, when they were roe-
duded to $3500. The population of the state
was then 1,372,000. It is. worthy of remark,
that this reduction, and fixing -the salary at
$3500, took placo at the very nxtt session
and a few weeks after the Washington county
meeting wams held. The "equitable" standard
which had been recommended, was considered
and established' by the legislature; and there
Sis not the slightest foundation for saying that
judge Savage ever said or desired that the pay
should be reduced below the sum then prescrib-
ed by the legislature. If he set the low sal-
ary ball in motion," he had the satisfaction of
seeing that the great body-of the people con-
curred with him in the opinion that $4500 was
too much; and after the subject had been pub-
licly canvassed, it resulted in a reduction of
$1000.
A few brief comparisons, and we taki leave
of the subject. In 1816, when the popujla-
tion, business and resources of the stato, were
less than one half what they are at present the
salaries were fixed at $4500 '8ix 'judicial
officers received in the aggregate $27,000 per
annum. In 1823, when th.-judiciary-was re-
organized, the salaries of the chancellor, justi-
ces of the supreme court and circuit judges, in
all twelve officrs, amounted in the aggregate
to $18,000-, or $9000 less for twelve judges,
than had been paid to Qix. At the present
rates of compensation, and including the vice-
chancellor of the city of New York, the whole
pay of the judiciary amounts to $24,800.-
There are now thirteen judges, in law and-equi-
ty, who receive 2200' lesa than was paid in
1816 to only six:.' and this ata period when the
businessof the courts has quadrupled, and all
the expenses of living have been greatly aug-
mented.


make the attainment of office the gratification of avarice.
"Under the influence of these opinions, your commit-
tee have thought proper to take a review of the salaries
of some of tihe principal officers of the state government
for the last 18 years, andi to note their amount at the pe-
riods of 1801, 1813, 1819, and find the result to be as fol-
lows:
Years 1801 1813 1819
Governor, $3,750 05,000 $7,000
In addition to whie-h, he has #2,500 for house rent and
taxes; 3,000 for contingent expenses, and V2,500 as canal
commissioner; making the enormous sumrof'l15,000 per
year.
Chancellor, 2,000 2,500 4,500
Chief Justice, 2.000 3,500 4,509
Other Judges, 1,875 3,5400 4,500
Secretary, 1,500 2,000 2,000
Deputy Secretary, 1,750
Senators and
Members of Assembly, $2 50 4 00 04 00
"Your committee observed with regret, that an attempt
madUle at the last session of tile legislature to reduce the
salaries of the public officers, was muccessfully opposed
by the friends of Gov. Clinton.
"Resolved, therefore, That the senators from the east-
ern district, and the members of assembly from the coun-
tics of Washington and WVarren, be requested to use
their influence in reducing the salaries of the officers of
government, and tihe compensation of the members of
the legislature to the same respectively received by each
in 1801, or to such other sum or sums as shall be equita-
ble and bear a just proportion to the resources of the
state."
There is one inaccuracy in the above state-
ment, which it is proper to correct. The sal-
aries of each of the judges in 1801, as fixed
by the general law, with the addition made in
the supply bill, was $2,500, and was never af-
terwards less than that sum until 1823.
Now let us see what become of the charge
that the late C. J. "set the low salary ball in
motion"-that he "instructed the legislature
to pull the judicial salaries down to $2000 per
anlnum"-that this "was the means of pros-
trating a judiciary of which New-York had
just reason to be proud."' To the praise which
the Journal so lavishly bestows on the former
judges, we have no answer to make. We cer-
tainly shall not follow its example and assail
those officers merely because they happen to
differ from us in relation to the political ques-
tions of the day. The people have passed
upon their merits, and nothing that we could
say would be likely to change the verdict,
whether it be more or less favorable to the par-
ties concerned. Our present purpose is of a
different character. What were the low sa-
laries" which judge Savage advocated-w-hat
the pay which he thought in 1819 should. be
reduced I Each of the judges at that time re- 1
ceived an annual salary, fixed by the law of
1816, of $4,500. This was the compensa- t
tion which judge S. thought too high, and P
ought therefore to be reduced. And how far 0
did he propose to reduce it? Not, as the Jour- C
nal says, to $2,000; nor yet to the sum of 0
$2,500, which was the real compensation paid P
ii 1801; but, in the language of the resolu- 9
tion, to the sum received in 1801, "or to such I
other sum or sums as shall be equitable, or bear r
Sjust proportion to the resources of the state." 1
We are greatly mistaken if the C. J. can find a
any thing to regret in having requested" the t
representatives from his county and district-
not "instructed the legislature," as the Evening s
Journal asserts-" to use their influence in re. n
ducing the sala-ries" from $4,500, to the t
standard of 1801, or to some other "equita- 0
ble" sum, bearing just proportion to the re- P
sources of the state." t
And what were those resources in 1819, s
vhen the meeting was held? The population e
was little more than half what it is at present, (
and the business and "resources of the state"
could not have been over one-third of what they b
now arc. t
But let us look a little farther into the senti- c
nents of judge S. on this subject, and see e
whether any but those who advocate high g
salaries" for federalists and low salaries" for t
epublicai.s, can find any just ground for com- ti
flaint. The committee of which he was chair- ti
tan, say they are of opinion, that whoever
devotes his time and talents to the public, P
should receive a compensation proportioned to -r
the services rendered, the expenses incurred, b
and the sacrifices necessarily sustained in con- c,
sequence of such service--and proper- d
tioned also to the ability of the people to ti
pay; which ability will, of course, depend t
on the appreciation or depreciation of money, sI
The salary of public oedicers should be liberal, h
but not extravagant; sufficient to command It
the best talents of the state, whether found in au
affluence or in poverty; but not so highas to e'
make the attainment of office the gratification i
of avarice." We think these sentiments
worthy to be written in letters of gold-they ci
et forth the true republican creed in relation to b


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A PLAINand PRACTICAL VIEW ofjthe EL-
EMENTS qf POLITICAL ECONOMY.
CHAPTER I.
SEc. 9. Of the ways and methods by which the gov-.
ernmtent of a country can most effectually aid
production.
The following, it is suggested, are among the
moat efficient ways and methods in which this
can be done: -
1. To afford ample protection to every member
of society, against fraud, force and oppression.--
Laws ought therefore to be framed, securing to
very citizen the fruits of his labour; and these
aws ought to be strictly and impartially enforced.
The poor must be protected against the avarice of
,he rich, and the rich against the violence of the
oor. There must also be a prompt administration
justicec, so that, when the fruits of a man's in-
lustry are invaded, he may have it in his power to
)btain immediate redress. The insecurity of pro-
perty in despotic countries has been found to be the
greatest hindrance to production with which the
people there have had to contend. This insecu-
ity takes away a large.part of .the stimulants to
abour. Large portions of the fertile parts of Asia
are lying idle, or are but partially cultivated, for
he reason, that property there is 'insecure.
2. All unequal legislation must, as far-a p4s-
ible, be avoided. One portion of citizens ought
never to be taxed for the benefit of another por-
ion; or for the benefit of the whole. Neither
ought the whole to be taxed for the benefit of &
part; nor ought the people of one section tL be
axed for the benefit of those resident in another
section. In direct taxation, no legislature would
ver dare attempt this; but in indirect taxation,
levying of duties) this has sometimes been done
without designing it.
Let it be supposed that the most of the cheap
lack tea imported into a country is used by a par-'
icular class, or in a particular section, of that
country; a heavy duty 6n this article therefore
would, it will be seen, operate injuriously and un-
qually upon the class or section consuming the
greatestt portion of it. This illustration may serve
o put the reflections of the reader in such train
bhat he may readily perceive the numerous and
powerful evils which result from unequal legisla-
ion.
3. A government that wishes effectually to aid
reduction, must cease creating monopolies.
A monopoly may be defined to be -an exclusive
ght to grow, make, or sell a thing, or do'anact.
lonopohles thus dtfmed are, as is now generally
conceded, an evil; as they are virtually, by exclu-
ing competition, indirect taxes on the whole for
he benefit of a few. A monopoly of this descrip-
ion is the worst species of unequal legislation.-
KXelusive commercial companies, such as have the
ole right to trade to a particular country or place,
ave been pronounced by the most enlightened po-
tical economists, public nuisances; and it is be-
eyed that the time is rapidly approaching, when
W exclusive privileges will cease to find favor with
very enlightened people.
4. If the legislature wish to encourage produc-
on, they must not create too many corporate, or
Int stock, companies. Some ot these are a spe-
ies ot monopoly, for which no good apology can
e framed. Such, for instance, as the law once
passed in an eastern state, giving Certain stage
roprietors an exclusive right to run a stage on a.
m ticular road, and incorporating them into a
company. Individual wealth can seldom success-
illy compete with chartered wealth, brought to-
ether by a clubbing of funds. -
'i here are, however, some branches of business,
Which, in the opinion of many eminent states-
nen and political economists, chartered companies.
lay, with proper restrictions, be created. These
re banking,* the erection of bridges over large
vers, insurance against the perils of the sea, and
he ravages of fire; also the supplying of cities and
villages with pure and wholesome water.
By chartering a few companies, great public be-
efits are sometimes attained; and useful public
orks promoted.
5. Production can generally best be promoted by"
rmitting every individual to follow such lawful
aiiness as he pleases.
Individual energy and enterprise are the levera.
hich keep in motion the business world.
Within a few years, the supporters of" the sysy
n of leaving most branches of business free,
wve, it is believed, rapidly increased.
Note-The argument in favor of making banking bu-
nie.B an exception to the general rule in relation to'
bartered companies, is (in a condettsed form) the fol-
winlr: Experience seems to hove established' the neces-
ty of banks in a commercial country. It is exceedingly"
fficult, if not impossible, to procure enough of the pre-
ous metals to constitute the ans l- e';rtntlni~. nuiui ,'


ie payment of public servants; and we think P'
ley may be read with profit now, when the
expense of living and the labor of the judges cc
as nearly doubled from what they were in ft
819, when the Chief Justice thought the sum g'
f $4,500 ought to be brought down to some i
'quitable" standard. The "whig" editor of nm
he Commercial Advertiser, of whor# the Eve- in
ing Journal complains, says he was opposed a.
Reducing the salaries from $4,500; and so t
vere all the other whig, or federal journals, vi
nd partizans so long as their friends were in
office: and yet the Journal now talks of a con-w n
W4
ivance to get the salaries up to "the maximum
f $3000"-a sum that will fall considerably pe
tort of the "equitable" standard advocated bt
y judge Savage. To say nothing of "thew
services rendered," it is not "a compensation"
at will cover "the expenses incurred," aa te
very one must well know who has tried thle he
experiment of living in the city for the last two 7
ears. No one acquainted with the subject si
ill pretend that it is such "liberal" pay as ho
ill long command the best talents in the it
tatp_ wht.her fnmund in nBffleneonr nnrtrv.-u ci


FOR TH2 D AILY ALBANY ARrioS.










LAWS OF NEW-YORK.-[By luthowrily.]
([Every law, unless a different time shall be prescribed
therein, shall commence and take effect throughout the
state on and not before the twentieth day after the day
of its final passage, as certified by the Secretary of State
--Vol. 1. R. S. page 157, 12.]
An act for the payment of Sylvanus J. Penniman for ole-
oineters and other expenses. Passed January 24, 1837.
The People of the state of New York, represented in Sen-
ate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
1. The Treasurer shall pay on the warrant of tlhe
Comptroller, to Sylvanus J. Penniman, one hundred and
seventy-six dollars for moneys expended hnd services ren-
dered in purchasing oleometers, in pursuance of an act of
the legislature, passed May 25, one thousand eight hun-
dred and thirty-six.
'2. This act shall take effect immediately on the pas-
sage thereof.
State of New-York,t This bill having been approved
Secretary's O.ffic. and signed by the Governor of ihis
state on the 24th day of January 1837, 1 do hereby certify
that the same became a law on that day.
JOHN A. DIX, Secretary of State.
An act to divide the Eleventh ward of the city of New-
York into two wards. Passed February 1, 1837.
The People of the State of New York, represented in
Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
1. All that part of the present Eleventh ward of the
city of New-York, which lies northwesterly of a line
drawn from Fourteenth street, through the centre of Av-
enue B. to Houston street, thence across llouston street
to the Centre of Clinton street, and thence through the
centre of Clinton street to Rivington street, is hereby
constituted and declared to be an additional and separate
ward in the said city, and shall be called the seventeenth
ward of the city of New-York.
2. All the residue of the present eleventh ward of the
said city, lying southeasterly of the line above mentioned,
shall be a distinct and separate ward, and shall be called
the eleventh ward of the city of New-York.
3. The first election of charter officers under this act
shall take place on the second Tuesday of April next.
Stats of New- York, Z This bill having been approved
Secretary's Office. S and signed by the Governor of this
State on the 1st day of February, 1837,1 do hereby certify
that the same became a law on that day.
JOHN A. DIX, Secretary of State.
An act to extend the time for the collect ion of taxes in the
town of Salina, Onondaga county.
Passed February 4,1837.
Thepeople of the stale of New-York, represented in sen-
ate and assuoly, do enact as follows:"
1. If the collector of taxes of the town of Salina, On-
ondaga county, shall execute a new bond, With sureties to
be approved of by the supervisor of said town, in the
manner prescribed by law, eond'itio0ne for the faithful
performance of the duties of said'coHectoi, then the time
for collecting, paying over and ma-iin rpturn- of taxes
therein, is hereby extended to-the fifth diayof March next.
2. This act shall take effect immediately after Its pas-
sage.
State of New-York, Z This bill having been approved
Secretary's Office. S and signed by.-, the Governor of
this state, on the 4th day of February, 1837, I do here-
by certify that the same became a law'on that day.
JOHN A. DIX, .e4eitary of State.

An act authorising the Governor to appoint a coroner for
the city and county of New-York, to supply a vacancy
in said office. Passed February 4, 1837.
The people of the state of New: York, represented in Sen-
ate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
SL The Governor shall designate some fit person who
is eligible to the office of coroner, to execute the duties of
the same, for the city and county of New-York, until the
vacancy existing in said city shall be supplied by an elec-
tion.
2. This act shall take effect immediately on the pas-
sage thereof,
State of New-York, This bill having been approved
Secretary's Office. and signed by the Governor of
this state on the 4th day of February, 1837, 1 do hereby
certify that the same became a law on that day.
JOHN A. DIX, Secretary of State.
An act to confirm the proceedings of the village of Bath,
in the county of Steuben. Passed February 9, 1837.
T4people of the state of New-York, represented in Sen.
ate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
1. The proceedings of the trustees of the village of
Bath, in Steuben county, are hereby declared to be as
valid as if the notice given for holding the first election
of the officers of the corporation had been agreeable to
the act to incorporate said village, which passed May 6,
1836.
State of New- York, t This bill having been approved
Secretary's Office. J and signed by the Governor of this
state, on the 9th day of February, 1837, I do hereby certi-
fy that the same became a law on that day.
JOHN A. DIX, Secretary of State.
FOREIGN.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF THE INDEPENDENCE
OF THE S. AMERICAN REPUBLICS BY SPAIN.
SThe Madrid Gazette contains the following de-
cree, acknowledging the Independence of the South
American Republics:
Isabella II, by the grace of God, &c.
"The Cortes of the kingdom, authorize the Go-
vernment of her Majesty to conclude, notwith-
standing the 10th, 172d, and 17Jd articles of the
Constitution, promulgated at Cadiz in 1812, trea-
ties of peace and amity with the new states of
Spanish America, adopting as the basis of the ac-
knowledgment of those states, the renunciation of
territorial rights and of all sovereignty on the part
of the ancient metropolis, without, howevercom-
promising the national honor and interests.
"Palace of the Cortes, :4th Dec. 1836.
(Signed) "A. GONZALEZ, President.
"P. F. BAZZA, Sec'y,.
."J. DE HUELVAS, ^ y8
"We order all the tribunals and civil authori-
ties to attend to the execution of the present pro-
visions."

THE GREAT SNOW STORM IN ENGLAND.
A severe snow storm bad occurred in Eng-
land, says the Ev. Post, in the latter part of De-
cember. It was more violent and deep than had
been known for years. The mails were delayed in
consequence, and a general derangement followed.
The London Courier of the 27th December, says:


The very severe snow storm, which seems, though
every where heavy, to have been rather heavier to
the south of the metropolis than in the other di-
rections, has again laid in embargo on all news
from abroad, and on almost all from the interior.
Never before, within our recollection,- was the
London mail stopped for a whole night at a few
miles from London: and never before have we seen
tne intercourse between the southern shires of
England and the metropolis interrupted for nearly
two days.
Column after column is occupied in the English
papers with accounts of the accidents and disas-
ters, occasioned by the storm. Sheep perished by
hundreds in the fields, the horses of travellers were
buried in snow drifts and died there, foot travellers
were frozen to death, and in one instance a terri.-
ble avalanche swept away houses and killed several
human beings. The drifts were in many places
twelve feet deep in the valleys. The mails were
stopped, and the English journals for several days
were barren of news; notes and bills of exchange,
were unpaid and protested by scores. The gale on
the coast was terrible, and much damage was
done to the shipping.' A Brighton paper says:
" There has been no fall of snow equal to the pre-
sent since 1806, when the unfortunate Neville was
frozen to death, .
[From the Brighton Gazette of Dec.' 29.]
THE AVALANCHES AT LEwEs.-Entering Lewes,
from. Southeram corner, there is a range of pre-
cipitous cliffs. The snow during Saturday, Sun-
day, and Monday morning, had accumulated on
the brow to an immense extent, and hung over
the sides. An old man, named Martin, a barge-
man, well recollected a similar appearance fifty
years ago, and when the snow thawed, it came
down from the height with tremendous violence,
knocked down buildings and drove every thing
before it across to the other side of the river, which
runs at the foot of the cliffs. He drew the atten-
tion of the people to the subject; but, although
the sight was fearful in itself, still no one antici-
pated danger to the houses immediately, beneath.
However, as evening approached on the Monday,
a. small quantity came down, which fell upon a
saw house; this it completely destroyed, and
drove some deals to upwards of fifty feet distance.
Early next morning a second fall took place.


The names of the unhappy sufferers were Win.(
Gear, Joseph Wood, Mary Taylor, Phoebe Barn-
den, Maria Bridgman, Mary Maria Brigman,Jane
Brooks, and Susan Haywood. James Rooke,
aged 15, and John Bridgman, 12,had their thighs
broken; doing well; three children, and Mrs.
Sherlock, were slightly bruised. It has been as-
certained, beyond a doubt, that every person who
'was buried beneath the ruins had been dug out.
After the workmen had left their labor on Wed-
nesday night, another fall of snow took place,the
effect of which was to destroy the back offices and
the doors and windows of four houses, but fortu-
nately no person was hurt. This was succeeded on
Wednesday morning by another immense fall be-
tween the chalk pit and Southern Gate, which for
some time at once choked up the road and the ri-
ver, but this obstruction was soon removed.
We are happy to announce that in these dread-
futl circumstances the work of charity was not for-
gotten A meeting was held at the Bear Inn on
Tuesday night for the purpose of raising a sub-
scription to ralieve the immediate wants of the
surviving sufferers in this great and awful calami-
ty.

THE THEATRE DELLA, VENICE DESTROYED BY
FIRE.-It was the largest and finest in Italy, and
was the work of the Venetian Architect Antonio
Silva. The flames first broke out about 3 o'clock,
on the 12th Dec., and in spite of every exertion
made by the authorities and the assembled citi-
zens, nothing now remains of this splendid monu-
ment except its exterior walls.

[FOR THE ALBANY ARGUS.]
STANZA S.
"At Chichester, affecting anecdotes are related of Col-
lins' last days. He would haunt the aisles of the Cathe-
dral at twilight, and when the choristers chaunted, the be-
wildered poet moaned and shrieked, and woke a sadness
most touching in a place so solemn."-Atheneum,
I.
When the bright star of Reason set,
And Madness hung, with funeral jet,
The fine wrought chambers of his brain,
To be relighted ne'er again,-
The Wizzard of the Passions still
A-lioly16vefor mustefelt,-
And stormily his pulse would thrill,
His bardic spirit melt,
Asorgan tone or warbled word
In his lone wanderings he heard.
II.
When twilight, clad in ruddy vest,
Came gently whispering of rest,
And kindled round the lofty spire
A bright, but unconsuining fire,
The melancholy bard would seek
The worn Cathedral aisle, with cheek
By fever sunken, and an eye
Denoting red insanity.
Oft rang the dim roof overhead,
With his mad shriek and hurried tread :
And the rapt chorister would raise
His head in wonderment, and gaze,
And in his solemn strain to list,
Would wildly stop the organist-
As if afraid his skill to earth
Had lured some one of demon birth !
Delusive fear 1 before him stood
His kinsman, hard, in frantic mood-
To music and her mighty spell,
Still fatally susceptible.
III.
Oh, Fame! thy bays are dearly bought,
When night of waking, day of thought,
By wasting malady and care,
With viper fang, succeeded are.
The soul of genius, like the lyre,
Makes discord when its master wire
Is tuneless, and no longer bright,
And broken never to unite.
Can plaudits of the crowd repay
An intellect unstrung for aye;
Or pleasantly that bosom stir
Of health, of hope, the sepulchre?
No! worthless is the laurel wreath
When madness is the price, and death.
A-N B-D.

NOTICES OF THE WAR IN FLORIDA.
BY HENRY O'REILLY.
THE MAROONS-THE SEMINOLES-A PARAL-
LEL FROM HISTORY.
To the Editors of the Albany Argus.
The disappointment occasioned throughout the
land by the failure of our troops to subdue the Se-
minoles, has frequently resulted in expressions de-
rogatory to the sagacity and courage of the forces
employed in that disheartening service. That the
movements against the Indians might have been
better arranged, and thus have proved more effec-
tive ere this, seems nowise improbable; but that
even the best arrangements which could have been
devised by the government or executed by the for-
ces in Florida, should fail thus far in subduing sa
vages so resolute and so well fortified by the local
advantages of their peculiar position, will not
probably seem very astonishing to those who exa-
mine closely and coolly judge of the unfortunate
affair.
In reaching right conclusions respecting the Flo-
rida war, it should be remembered that the Semi-
nole country embraces a large portion of peninsu-
lar Florida-a region abounding at all seasons


with roots, fruits, game and fish, sufficient amply
for the simple sustenance of aborigines in warm
climates. It should be recollected that their prox-
imity to the West Indies furnished the Seminoles
abundant opportunities for supplying themselves
with arms and ammunition from the Cuban and
other fishermen or smugglers frequenting their
extensive coast ; and that fugitive negroes,
as well as pale-faced desperadoes, subserved
their own baseness by exciting against our peo-
ple thw inflammable passions of the red men.-
More especially should it be considered that
South Florida, besides the thousand keys or islets
on its seaboard, abounds in retreats like the ever-
glades-a singular admixture of land and water-
unexplored, and almost inexplorable by the white
man, even in peace and at any time-fastnesses,
amphibious though they are, yet in their impreg-
nability somewhat resembling the craggy for-
tress of the Island Lord"-whereat,
With valor fir'd, one sturdy hand
Might well the frightful pass command
'Gainst hundreds arm'd with spear or brand."
Additional to all these, and of at least equal im-
portance, are the considerations, that the Semi-
noles, though prompted by the wild and reckless
impulses of revenge and despair, have manifested
an extraordinary degree of method in their mad-
ness;" while all these concurring circumstances
of power have been improved with consummate
adroitness by OCEOLA and other chiefs probably
unsurpassed in tact or bravery by the bold war-
riors of Indian- story.
When all these points are fully considered, the
reader will probably concur with the writer in de-
claring that hasty condemnation should not be
pronounced against those whose privations in ser-
vice have been aggravated by disappointment in
not being able to grapple with and overcome (for
overcome they surely and soon would, could they
once fairly grapple with) an enemy whose fast-
nesses, fortified and victualled by nature, laugh
scornfully alike at the rules of war and the occa-
sionally more effective tactics of the backwoods.
Justice to the SOUTHERN STATES, from whose
planters the requisite militia have been chiefly
drafted or freely volunteered-justice to the many
MEN OF UNDOUBTED SKILL AND BRAVERY who have
perished ingloriously or returned mortified from


cess till the present winter; that, paltry as the tribe
might be thought, thie nature of'the country might
enable them to prolong hostilities for an indefi-
nite period; arrd that several of the "surplus mil-
lions" would certainly be consumed before the ig-
noble broil could be terminated. These predic-
tions, which are now almost history, resulted from
information acquired from competent authority,t
and from observations personally made while in I
the region of hostilities; and it now seems to me
that public attention should be called to the whole
circumstances of these Floridian troubles, to the
end that, all the peculiar difficulties being consider-
ed, expectation should not be greatly disappointed
by the failure of future (as former) expeditions,
nor disgraceful epithets be showered on troops or
officers for not speedily conquering an almost in-
tangible foe-a foe rarely found where sought for,
and rendering their own power most annoying
from the incertitude where it may be, and the sud-
denness with which it is, usually manifested.
The French question having had an angry as-
pect at the outbreak of these Indian difficulties,
it occurred to the writer at that time, while near
the scene of hostilities, that the landing of twen-
ty thousand armed Frenchmen at Cape Florida or
Tampa, strong as they might be in military im-
plements and science with which our officers are
also conversant, would not prove as annoying as
the troubles occasioned by even half as many hun-
dreds of Seminoles, whose skulking warfare sets
discipline at defiance, and destroys the health of
troops disheartened by the impracticability of
bringing to close quarters the savage foe. Such
a regular force, landed any where on our coast,
especially in that quarter of Florida while our five
or six thousand troops~were in the Peninsula, would
speedily share the fate of the invader at New-Or-
leans: and yet what have even the gallant rifles of
Tennessee (so efficient against the British army)
been able to effect against the comparatively pal-
try band of Seminoles!
But it may be asked, wherein are the Seminoles
now more invincible than heretofore? Are our ri-
fles less true, our bayonets less sharp, our soldiers
less valiant, than when former forces fought and
conquered those haughty savages? The Semin-
oles probably vary little from what they were-out
the hatte-fidelds are vastly changed! It should be
Srecollected that this tribe was formerly encounter-
ed and subdued chiefly in Middle Florida-that
our troops were probably scarcely compelled to
cross even the Suwanee in pursuit-whereas, now,
profiting by former dear-bought experience, the
Seminoles have concentrated their power in the
marshy strongholds of South Florida, where that
power can be rendered far more effective than
could possibly be the case in the region wherein
their nation was formerly signally chastised.-
Those familiar with the respective sections of
country, will readily believe that ten thousand In-
dians between the Suwanee and Perdido would be
less formidable to the Floridian army than one
desperate thousand with retreats in the everglades
and leaders like Oceola.
It is sometimes said that this Seminole war,
which has already proved so disproportionately
disastrous to the white man, is alike unparallel-
ed and disgraceful." That there maybe "dis-
graceful" tbatures in this contest, will not be de-
nied; but that the war itself is unparalleled,"
is not correct. Thie Floridian difficulties have a
striking parallel thus far in the history of one of
the West India Islands. It is to be hoped that
the parallel may not be much longer continued;
though, in the embittered feelings occasioned by
this provoking strife, a plan has been mentioned
of bringing into Florida from Cuba such fell auxili-
aries as the British were compelled to employ in clo-
sing their HUNDRED YEARS' WAR WITH THE MAROONS
OF JAMAICA. Of this latter event, history gives
these particulars, and the closeness of the parallel
in several points will be noticed by all readers:
The Maroons and the British.
"The most important event in the recent history of Ja-
maica is the final overthrow and exile of that formidable
'band of fugitive negroes, who, under the name of Ma-
roons, had formed an independent and hostile communi-
ty in this island, for the greater part of a century. On
the conquest of the island from the Spaniards in 1655, a-
bout 1500 African slaves fled to the mountains, beyond
"the reach of the invaders, and maintained themselves in
these fastnesses in spite of all their efforts. Their num-
"bers were continually increased by the accession of de-
serting slaves; and a harassing conflict was kept up
with the whites: in which the latter were the principal
sufferers. In 1738, an accommodation was effected, and
a species of independence guarantied to these hardy out-
laws; but at length, in 1795, hostilities broke out again.
The activity and skill of the Maroons rendered them an
overmatchh for the great force brought against them. In
"this state of things, the British resorted to the use of
blood-hounds/-1l00 of which were imported from Cuba,
"and, under the direction of experienced huntsmen, were
"let loose upon the mountaineers, to seize and tear the
"unhappy fugitives.' Thus hunted down like wild beasts,
"and hemmed in by a force too powerful to be overcome,
the Maroons had no alternative but submission. The
"expulsion of this brave and unhappy race was determin-
ed upon, and finally carried into effect. About 600 of
"them were transportedfto the cold and bleak shores of
"Nova Scotia, where many of them perished miserably.'
Personal acquaintance with many of the fear-
less southrons who gallantly volunteered for the
Floridian service, and some knowledge of the coun-
try wherein they had to operate against the foe,
impel me to present these remarks in addition to
those heretofore communicated for the Argus, &c.
-with the hope of contributing to awaken proper
attention to the subject-so that here in the north,
remote from the scene of hostilities, and where
the circumstances of the case are not so readily
understood as they would probably be were the
Seminole country like this region in climate or lo-
cal features, injustice may not be unintentionally
done to the southern character through the troops
employed in the war, from want of information


respecting the difficulties (different from those com-
monly experienced in Indian wars) which have foil-
ed all efforts from repeated expeditions-the troops
in each successive expedition burning with ardor
to efface by their own bravery the disasters which
marked the marches of their predecessors-disas-
ters which have unhappily become in turn their
own fate.
When the calamities flowing from the Seminole
contest are brought in review, the recollections of
the Maroon war may serve to excite more consid-
eration respecting the difficulties experienced by
our southern fellow-citizens, on whom the burthens
of this most disheartening service have chiefly fal-
len. Such recollections too, may serve to abate that
feeling ofnational disgrace which seems to be grow-
ing in the public mind, as expedition after expedi-
tion returns dejected from unsuccessful campaigns.
If the Seminoles have braved our troops for a twelve-
month, owing to the peculiarities of their local
position; it is equally true that the Maroon bands
of Jamaica for about a hundred and fifty years
(two-thirds of which long period were spent in ac-
tual hostilities) defied the power of Great Britain;
and were at length conquered, as it is hoped the
Seminoles will not yet have to be conquered-by
the employment of such ferocious auxiliaries as
aided the Spaniards in subjugating Peru.
Rochester, January, 1837.

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT UPON
MEXICAN AFFAIRS.
[Made to Congress, February 6.]
At the beginning of this session, congress was
inibrmed that our claims upon Mexico had not been
adjusted, but that notwithstanding the irritating
effect upon her councils of the movements in
Texas, I hoped by great forbearance to avoid the
necessity of again bringing the subject of them to
your notice. That hope has been disappointed.-
Having in vain urged upon the government the
justice of these claims, and my indispensable obli-
gation that there should be "no further delay in
the acknowledgment, if not in the redress, of the
injuries complained of;" my duty requires that the
whole subject should be presented, as it now is,
for the action of congress, whose exclusive right


F


rage from the President of the U. States, trans
emitting certain information called for in relation
to the exploring expedition. The President says,
"that he trusts all facilities will be given to this
exploring expedition that congress can bestow
and the honor of the country demands."
The SPEAKER also presented sundry other ordi-
nary communications from the executive depart-
ments.
Mr. CAMBRELENG, from the committee of ways
and means, reported a bill to authorise merchan-
dize to be deposited in warehouses as public stores,
and for other purposes.
Also a bill to repeal a provision of the act of
14th July, 1832, entitled "an act to alter and a-
mend the several acts imposing duties on imports,
and to provide for the limitation of debentures."
The object of this bill is to repeal so much of the
act referred to, as authorises the collector to sell
goods bfor duties so soon as those duties are due.
The bill revives the old act, and gives an exten-
sion of time of nine months, besides one month
for advertising: or, in other words, a credit often
months for the payment of duties. The two bills
last named may be considered as one and the same;
the one involving the warehousing system, and
the other the extension of credit.
Mr. CAMBRELING did not move to commit the
latter bill, because it was very important that ear
ly action should be had upon it. On his motion,
therefore, the bill was read twice, and it lies on
the Speaker's table to come up, for consideration
n the order of business.
ELECTION OF PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED
STATES.
The hour 12 having arrived, and messages to
that effect having been interchanged between the
two houses, the senate in a body entered the hall,
preceded by their president and secretary, and
were received by the members of the house stand-
ing uncovered.
The President of the senate presided, the Speak-
er of the house sitting Off his right hand.
The tellers, Mr. GRUNDY of the senate, and
Messrs. THOMAS and LINqCOLN of the house, hav-
ing taken their seats, the return of electoral votes
.f*n rlnPon o *iXzT O n /qnn0.nA .rp m en.ai rpon.i.A0,4 *t-ha


Tn A TYT AYDr T .t 4 T/- A 1ICTTL0


Twenty-Fourth Congress...2dsess.
[From thle Courier and Enquirer.]
IN SENATE.
Wednesday, Feb. 8.
The CHAIR laid before the senate a communica-
tion from the Secretarwof war in relation to the
Indian department.
Mr. WEBSTER presented a petition of 1400 or
1500 mercantile houses in the city of New-York,
praying for the establishment of a National bank
in-that city for the improvement of the currency.
It was accompanied by a short communication
stating that the signers were of the most respecta-
ble firms. He said that his opinions are what they
always were on the coiistitutionality and expedi-
ency of such a bank. If congress had the power
to adopt, it has the same power to create such in-
stitutions. He had determined however not to
move on the subject until it shall be demanded by
the united voice of the people. He anticipated
that a change would soon or late, take place in the
opinions of gentlemen who were now opposed to
his views, and they would then most properly in-
troduce the subject.
Mr. MORRIS offered a petition from Loraine
county, Ohio, praying for the abolition of slavery
in the District of Columbia. The reception was
objected to, and the motion to receive was laid on
the table.
A message was received from the President of
the United States, enclosing a report from the
War department, on the subject of a treaty with
the Sacks and Foxes.
The bill to amend the act to establish branches
of the mint, &c. was read a third time and passed.
A message was received from the House of Re-
presentatives, announcing that the House was
ready to receive the Senate, to witness the count-
ing of votes for President and Vice President; and
the Senate accordingly, at 20 minutes past 12, re-
paired to the House.
At half past 3 o'clock, the Senate returned to
their chamber, and being called to order,
Mr. GRUNDY, from thejoint committee, appoint-
ed to consider and devise a mode of examining and
counting the votes for President and Vice Presi-
dent, reported a resolution- that a comihniiittee oi
one be appointed to join the committee of two ap-
pointed by the-House,-to wait on the Hon. MAR-
TIN VAN BURmN, and inform him of his election-
which resolution was agreed to,.
ELECTION OF VICE PRESIDENT OF THE U. S.
Mr. GRUNDY offered a preamble and resolution.
The former set forth that whereas it had been
found on counting the votes for Vice President,
that no person had a majority of the whole num-
ber of electoral votes, it had devolved on the Sen-
ate to make an election, and as Richard M. John-
son of Kentucky and Francis Granger of N. York,
had the highest number of votes, the Senate
would have to choose between these two. The reso-
lution was to the effect that the Senate now pro-
ceed to the election, and that the Secretary call
over the names of the senate, s, in alphabetical or-
der, each senator responding the name of the indi-
vidual for whom he voted, The resolution was
considered and agreed to.
Some time elapsed before all the senators could
be collected, when the Senate being full, the Sec-
retary proceeded to call over the names, and the
senators responded.
The senators who voted for R. M. JoHNsoN
were Messrs. Benton,3 Black, Brown, Buchanan,
Cuthbert, Dana, Ewing, (Illinois,) Fulton,
Grundy, Hendricks, Hubbard, King, (Ala.,) King,
(Ga.,) Linn, Lyon, M'Kean, Moore, Morris,
Mouton, Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker,
Rives, Robinson, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange, Tall-
madge, Tipton, Walker, Wright.
The senators who voted for FRANCIS GRANGER
were Messrs. Bayard, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden,
Davis, Ewing, (Ohio,) Kent, Knight, Prentiss,
Robbins, Southard, Spence, Swift, Tomlinson,
Wall, Webster.
Mr. Calhoun, Mr. Preston, Mr. White went oul
from their seats, and did not respond when theii
names were called,
The PRESIDENT then made the following an-
nouncement of the result. The whole number o:
senators is 52, and 27 of these are necessary to a
choice. The quorum required by the constitution
to be present is 35. The whole number of votes
given is 49, of which 33 are given for Richard M
Johnson, elected Vice President of the Unitec
States for the term of four years, commencing or
the 4th day of March next.
On motion of Mr. GRUNDY it was ordered, Tha
a committee be appointed to wait on Richard M
Johnson, and to notify him of" his electionm-anm
the chair was directed to appoint said committee
On motion of Mr. WEBSTER at a quarter past
o'clock
The Senate adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
On motion of Mr. E. WHITTLESEY, the question
of privilege under consideration at the adjourn
ment of the house yesterday, was postponed fbo
the purpose of proceeding to the usual business o.
the morning hour.
By consent the SPEAKER laid before the house c
message from the President of the United States;
on the subject of our relations with Mexico.-
[The same as sent to the senate yesterday.]
The message was read, and with the accompa-
nying documents was referred, on motion of Mr.
CAMBRELENG, to the committee on foreign affairs;
and ordered to be printed.
The SPEAKER also laid before the house a mes-


We publish to-day the Message of the Pre- t
sident, of the 6th inst., on the subject of our f
relations with Mexico. The Message, it will c
be perceived, recommends reprisals. A Wash- b
ington correspondent expresses the doubt,
however, whether the present congress will s
authorise them; the session being too near its (
close to enter upon the discussion of a question
of such importance, and tending to hostile re- ]
suits. Meanwhile, we may count upon seeing t
in the opposition journals, not only all manner
of apologies for the conduct of Mexico, but the
usual degree of disparagement and perversion
in relation to the course of our own govern-
rnent, whatever it may be.

We have the gratification to-day to an-
nounce the result of the counting of the presi-
dential votes, in the presence of the two hous-
es of congress. MARTIN VAN BUREN, of the
state of New-York, is elected President of the
United States, by a majority of 97 votes o-
ver gen. Harrison, the highest candidate of the
opposition ; and a majority of 46 votes over
all the opposing candidates. RICHARD M.
JOHNrSON, of Ky., lacking one vote of a choice
by the electoral colleges, was chosen Vice
President of the United States, by a majority
of the votes of the senate.

We sympathise with the editors of the Dai-
ly Advertiser. Notwithstanding their patriot-
ic and disinterested labors for months, and the
transmission of' documentary proofs to their
friends at the seat of government, not a sin-
gle member of either house of any party rose
to enter his protest or his vote against the ille-
gal and unconstitutional election of Mr. Van
Buren Alas, for "the country and the con-
stitution" !
It seems that Messrs. Calhoun, Preston and
White left their seats in the senate, when the
election of Vice-President was going on, and
thus avoided a vote for Mr. Granger. Call
you this "backing one's friends"? What say
you, Messrs. Whigs ?

THE PILOTS.-On Saturday, Mr. HERT-
TELL, from the select committee, reported, as
the result of their deliberations, a bill "for the
appointment and government of the Pilots of
New York by way of Sandy Hook." The
natural impatience of the public in relation to
the subject, and the prevalent excitement, have
led to the impression, and to the assertion also,
that undue delay has attended the progress of
the question in the committee, and that it was
regarded with apathy by the legislature gene-
rally. We believe any such impression to be
erroneous. The subject was one with which
the committee could not be familiar, and the
importance of which would not justify them in
jumping to conclusions. With the conviction
that the result of their deliberations would pro-
bably govern the action of the house, they have
felt the greater solicitude to attain correct con-
clusions; and they have endeavored to do so
through a patient and laborious examination,
daily, of the ship masters, merchants, pilots
and others in attendance. That the question
was one which could not be disposed of at the
instant, may be inferred from the factc tat,. tihe
bill contains forty nine sections, the general
features of which are as follows:
It provides for the creation ofa" Board of Com-
missioners of Pilots" in the city of New York, fir
the appointment, licensing, regulation and gbv-
ernment of the pilots of the port by way of Sandy
Hook: The board to consist of three persons,
experienced in nautical concerns, and skilled in
the management, sailing and navigating of ships
and other square rigged vessels on the ocean:" To
be appointed by the governor and senate, immedi-
ately after the passage of this act, and to hold their
offices for two years from the first Monday in
March proximo: To open an office in the city of
New York, where one or more of them shall be in
daily attendance, with power to use a common
seal, appoint a secretary and messengers, establish
regulations of pilotage and enforce their observ-
ance, to cause telegraphs to be established and
maintained, one at Sandy Hook light-house, one
on the highlands on Staten Island, and one in the
city of New York, and to keep a registry of the li-
censed pilots, with residences, &c. open at all
times to the public inspection.
The Board are required to proceed, with all con-
venient speed after their appointment, to license


without examination as to their qualifications, all
the present pilots and deputy pilots, and also every
other person of full age and good moral character
making application therefore, who shall have serv-
ed five years as an apprentice to a licensed pilot by
way of Sandy Hook, and who after a rigid exam-
ination, in the presence of one or more pilots,
shall be found qualified; and to continue from time
to time to increase the number of pilots until the
whole number engaged in actual service by way of
Sandy Hook shall amount to one hundred: Li-
censes to be renewed annually, and to be suspend-
ed or revoked at any time for negligence, disobedi-
ence of orders, regulations, &c.
In addition to his examination, eachti pilot is re-
quired to enter into a recognizance fbr the diligent
and faithful performance of his duty, in the pen-
alty of $250, with two sufficient sureties: and any
pilot convicted of having lost a vessel through neg
ligence or carelessness, shall be deprived of his li-
cense and be deemed forever incapable of acting as
a pilot.
The commissioners, their secretary, messenger,
-rnh .- "1 41-..


A2L

MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 13.

We refer to "Notices of the War in Flor-
ida," from a source that will ensure perusal.-
So much at least is due to the subject, and to a
right appreciation of the difficulties attending
the Seminole campaigns.

Our paper of Saturday having been nearly
illegible, owing to bad printing, we re-publish
several articles of that day, on our first page
this morning.


[From the Mobile Mercantile Advertiser of Feb. 22.J
The steamboat Champion, Capt. Murray, brings
the following intelligence, derived from passen-
gers on board the cutter Jefferson, at Pensacola,
three days from Tampa Bay. The intelligence is,
that the celebrated Indian called Jumper, and the
negro Abraham, have been captured; and that
Osceola himself barely made his escape, with only
five followers, in the direction of the south. Ge-
neral Jesup was making every effort for the cap-
ture of this bold and persevering chief.

Legislature of New-York.


A nIt kw)


i-.A1.L .1


IN SENATE. Friday, and double the usual number of copies or-
Saturday, February 11. pered to be printed.
Petitions presented and referred: By Mr. SPRA- On motion of Mr. C. ROGERS, the preaent-
KER, proceedings of a public meeting relative to ment of the grand jury of New-York (embracing
the erection of a bridge across the Mohawk river a history of the losses at that port) was also or-
at St. Johnsville. By Mr. LIVINGSTON, of' the dered to be printed.
Jackson marine insurance company, for an amend- GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE STATE.
ment of their charter. By Mr. MCLEAN, of the A communication was received from the Gover.
fire company of Union village for an act ofincor- nor, transmitting the report required by law, from
portion; of inhabitants of Union village for a law the persons appointed under the act to provide for
authorising the appointment of a supreme court a geological survey of the state, accompanied with
commissioner at that place. By Mr. DOWNING, of a communication from the surveyors.
Thomas Parr and others, executors of Thomas On motion of Mr.-CUTTING, 500 copies of the
Gould, for leave to sell real estate, document were ordered to be printed for the use of
Mr. MAIxON reported against the bill from the the surveyors, and ten times- the usual number of
assembly to enable the Methodist Episcopal Soci- copies for the use of the legislature.
ety of Cadiz to sell real estate, for the reason that A report was received from the comptroller,
the revised statutes already provide for the case. embracing the annual statement required by law,
Mr. EDWARDS reported against a similar bill to of the moneys expended on the several canals, du-
authorise the Methodist Episcopal Society of Pike ring the year ending on the 30th September, 1836:
to sell real estate, for the same reason. -Also a report on the bill relative to the state


p
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n
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14
12
II

S
tyl




C(
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yr


false:" and he desired the house to under- "
tand that he spoke in italics! Nothing could
have been more appropriate than the expres- n
ion of such a desire from such a quarter: d
Though, we venture to say, that the sugges-
ion of Mr. Gillet, that a statement of the
facts of the case, concurred in by the entire s
committee, and reported as such, would have ji
)een quite as proper, and would have carried
with it full as much weight, as the individual r
statements of the persons involved in the fra- i
cas. It is proper to remark, however, not- (
withstanding the speech of the noisy Virginia
Bobadil in italics, that his account of the mat-
ter and that given by Mr. Whitney in his card, j
do not, so far as we can discover, essentially
vary. Even in his hands, the conduct, lan-
guage and bearing of his friend Peyton was as
gross and as passionate as it could well be.
CoNGREss-Thursday.--The Land Bill
(limiting the sales of public lands to actual set-
tlers, &c.) was read a third time and passed by
the Senate, yeas 29, nays 22. Another entire
day was spent in the House, on the privilege
question. It was brought to a conclusion by
the aid of the previous question ; when Mr.
Patton's resolution, declaring that any member
who should hereafter present to the house any
petition from slaves, ought to be considered as
regardless of the feelings of the house, of the
rights of the southern states, and unfriendly
to the Union, was rejected, yeas 92, nays 105;.
and the second resolution, declaring that Mr.
Adams having disavowed all design of offer-
ing any thing disrespectful to the house, there-
fore all proceedings in regard to his conduct
do now cease, was also rejected, yeas 22,
nays 137.
The Eve. Post justly says :-
"The fault of Mr. Adams was in allowing the
debate to proceed on the idea that he had asked to
present a petition from slaves on the subject of sla-
very. He knew the excitement which such an idea
would produce, and he allowed a wrathful and use-
less debate to proceed, when, by a single word of
explanation, he might have set the matter right.
There is surely cause enough of strife between
different parts of the country without getting up
imaginary ones.
We deem Mr. Adams highly reprehensible for
this neglect to inform the House that the quarrel
which he saw going on was without the least oc-
casion. But when the truth came out at last, the
debate should have ceased. The mere exposure of
the trick, for it does not seem to us worthy of any
other name, should have been suffered to carry
with it the degree of reprehension it deserved. To
continue the debate for two or three days longer,
to waste the short remainder of the session in talk-
ing about the conduct of a member, while the ap-
propriation bills are not yet passed, and other im-
portant business lies unfinished, is unpardonable."
IMPORTATIONS.-By the ship England, 15 pack-
ages for E. Corning & Co,: 6 Humphrey & Co.
COAL.-The North River Times says that an ex
tensive bed of Anthracite Coal has been discovered
on the banks of the Hudson, in the town of Haver-
straw.
ELECTION OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-
PRESIDENT
[Correspondence of the Courier and Enquirer-Wash-
ington, 7th February, 1837.]
For about two hours this morning, I attended
the House of Representatives while they were can-
vassing the votes for President and Vice-President.
it is a tedious operation. The process simple.-
The President of the Senate pro tern. the hon.
William R. King, of Alabama, handed to the can-
vassers the returns from the several states, first
breaking the seals of the envelopes, commencing
with Maine. The canvassers read the names of
the electors, certified by the governor of the state;
then the result of the votes, given by the electors,
which result was announced by the canvasser
reading, and taken down by the secretary of the
Senate and clerk of the House. Having comple-
ted Maine, the process was continued, proceeding
geographically.
The assemblage of beauty and fashion was bril-
liant. A resolution passed to admit the ladies
on the floor of the House during the canvass,
and to occupy the privileged seats. To this mo-
tion, I conceived that I heard a feeble negative;
but a gallant friend near to me, said that it was in
the gallery, among the gentlemen, who were un-
willing to be deprived of that society which, un-
der all circumstances, and in every change of
scene, gives a zest to life. The gallery, however,
remained crowded to overflowing.
The Senate elected the hon. Richard M. John-
son Vice-President for four years, from the 4th of
March. The votes were for Richard M. Johnson
33-for Francis Granger ]6. Judge White of
Tennessee, and Messrs. Calhoun and Preston of
South Carolina, not voting.
IMPORTANT FROM FLORIDA.


much of the message as relates to pilots in the
port ot New-York, reported a bill "for the ap-
pointment and government of pilots in the port of
N. York, by the way of Sandy Hook."
Mr. BRAPISH moved that the bill be made the
special order for Monday next.
Mr. CUTTING said that it was the desire of the
committee that a copy of the bill should go to N.
Y., and be published, in order that the house might
be aided in its deliberations, by such comments as
it might draw out. For that purpose he was
about to move to make it the special order for Fri-
day, and that double the usual number of copies of
the bill be printed.
This modification of the motion was assented
to. nnS the. Fillrauleh tXhe ma ln u thm bne l ofcopi. esr.


come to be added to the capital of the common
school fund.]
On motion of Mr. MAISON, ten times the usual
umber of copies of the report and bill were or-
dered to be printed.
Mr. PAIGE moved that the bill be made the spe-
ial order for Thursday next.
Mr. TALLMADGE hoped a later day would be as-
igned. It was probably the most important sub-
ect on which the present legislature would be cal-
cd to act, and a week, at least, was necessary to
canvass and reflect on the suggestions of the com-
nittee, before coining to vote upon them. He
now thought that he should be opposed to some
of their recommendations; but he desired time,
after the report and bill should be printed, to exa-
nine them in detail.
The motion was modified so as to make the sub-
ject the special order for Monday week, and car-
ried.
Mr. PAIGE reported in favor of the bill to incor-
porate the Albany Exchange Company; and, after
briefly stating the objects of the association, mov-
ed that the bill be ordered to a third reading.
Mr. LoonMis resisted that motion, but would not
object to go into committee of the whole to-day,
or whenever the senate pleased; upon which Mr.
P. withdrew the motion.
The report of the trustees for building the new
state hall was received, and referred to the commit-
tee on public buildings.
Sundry memorials heretofore referred to the
joint committee of which Mr. PAIGE is chairman,
were referred to the committee on literature.
On motion of Mr. EDWARDS, the bill for the ap-
pointment of commissioners to digest and report
a judicial and equity system for the state of New-
York, was re committed to the committee of the
whole.
Bills read a third time and passed:
STo incorporate the Glenville and Rotterdam
bridge company.
To authorise the executors of John Ireland, de-
ceased, to become purchasers of his real estate.
On motion of Mr. SEGER, a resolution passed
calling on the Comptroller to report what money
and property has been appropriated by the state
to the several Colleges, and other seminaries of
learning, independent of the appropriations from
the Literature Fund.
THE USURY LAWS.
The committee of the whole, Mr. H. F. JONES
in the chair, again took up the bill to repeal with
certain limitations the penalties against usury;
Mr. DICKINSON resumed and concluded his argu-
ment against the bill, speaking until the hour of
adjournment. Adj.

IN ASSEMBLY,
Saturday, February 11.
Petitions presented and referred :-By Mr. GIL-
BERT, for a bank at Chappelsburgh. By Mr.
STOKE.S, against the removal of the Chenango
county buildings. By Mr. S. SMITH, for the re.
lease of citizens of Sherburne, from a bond execu-
ted to the canal commissioners. By Mr. HuR.
BELL, of Calvary Freman, for legislative relief.-
By Mr. HAMMOND, for the merchants and manu.
fractures' bank at Moriah. By Mr. C. 0. SHEF-
ARD, ofinhabitants of Lenox, Madison county, for
the more effectual abolition of slavery in thisstate.
By Mr. T. W. TUCKER, to incorporate the New-
York and Southern steamboat company. By Mr.
VAN TUYL, to amend the charter of the city of
Troy ; of the Canaan and Union village turnpike
company, relative to alterations of the charter of
thie Albany and West Stockbridge railroad cowm.
pany. By Mr. DEPUY, to incorporate the Esopus
manufacturing company. By Mr. P. TUCKER, for
the Syracuse and Rochester railroad, By Mr.
FITCH, of Phmineas Canfield and other inhabitants
of Mt. Morris, Livingston county, charging the
Livingston county bank with having applied its
funds to other uses than the legitimate purpo-
ses of banking, &c. &c., and asking an investiga-
tion. [Mr. F. stated that the memorial was en-
closed in a letter to him, received this morning;
and that upon the suggestion of the delegation from
Livingston county, to whom he applied to present
it, he had concluded to present it himself, as it
was directed to him. The memorial was referred
to the select committee, of which Mr. TALMAGE
is chairman.]
Bills reported :-
By Mr. RUGGLES, to incorporate the Bushwick
bridge and turnpike company : To authorise the
raising of money to repair a bridge over the Ron
dout creek in Marbletown. Mr. R. also reported
against the petitions to repeal the law for laying
out a road from Skaneateles to Canmillus. The
report was agreed to, and the petitions denied.
By Mr. JENNINGS, to amend the act incorporat-
ing the village of Johnstown.
By Mr. ZABRISKIE, for the more effectual pun-
ishment of crime in the city and county of New-
York :-Relative to the police of the city of New-
York :-[These two bills were ordered to be print
ed]-To enable the corporation of New-York to
raise money by tax.
By Mr. WESTLAKE, authorising John C. Clark
to erect a dam across the Chemung river in the
town of Chemung.
Mr. MORRISON reported in favor of the bill from
the senate to authorise the establishment of a med-
ical faculty in the New-York University; and
on his motion it was ordered to a third read-
ing, and subsequently passed : ayes 95, noes 0.
PILOTS.
Mr. HERTTELL, from the select committee on so


On the 41-h insf., Messrs. IPeyton and Wise, ate. These commissioners are to draw for the
ar nobile fratrum, rose in'their seats in the money and loan it out in certain sums, the inter-
est to be paid annually, and the loan not to extend
4ouse, and attempted by explanations, to re- for a longer time than five years. $80,000 of the
nave the public impression in relation to their interest is to be annually appropriated to the bene-
onduct in the committee of investigation, fit of common schools. $16,000 annually for the
vhen R. M. Whitney was under examination. education of common school teachers. The sum
y we o d y er G d G- to be given to the common schools is to be increas-
[hey were followed by Messrs,. Garland, Gil- ';ed $10,000 a year, until it shall reach $110,000.
et and Hamer. Mr. Wise pronounced Whit- $9,000 is to be annually distributed as the present
lev's card "intentionally and emphatically literature fund is distributed-tthe remainder of the









- ~- ----- .-------


TOIVN 0o COEYMANS.
-At a meeting of republic.:uin citizens of the town
Coeymans, held at the house of John B. Shear,
the 14th day of January, 1837, pursuant to public
tice, "for the purpose of an interchange of opinion
to the propriety of repealing the Usury Law, and at
the extension of the Banking System, and such ot
subjects as are interesting and bearing upon thl int
estof the people, and now agitated before the legis
ture,"MosFs STANTON, Esq. was called to the chair,
HENRY HALSTED, Esq. appointed Secretary.
A motion was made that the chair appoint a commit
of eleven, who with the chairman and secretary sho
prepare resolutions expressive of the sense of tihe me
ing, in relation to the subjects contained in the not
concerning the meeting. Whereupon the chair appoi
ed Tfhe following persons said committee, viz. John M
Carty, Nathaniel Niles, Christopher. Mosher, John
Blodget, Gideon Stephens, Isaac Skinner, Garret WV
beck, William Palmer,Moses Northrup and Jared Thuye
The committee reported as follows, and their report w
adopted with but one dissenting vote:
Whereas it is one of the inestimable benefits enjoy
Sby the people to meet in primary assembly to express the
opinions in relation to the acts of their agents which m
in the form of legislation bear upon the general intere,
Therefore,
Resolved, That while we accord in the main with t;
sentiments of the message of our excellent Chief Magi
rate, we are constrained by a regard for our own opi
ions, to disagree with him in some of his views "in rel
tion to the subjects connected with the currency," esp
cially those relating to a repeal of the usury law.
Resolved, "That there is a broad distinction between
free trade in money" and the unrestricted trade in othf
commodities, for the very plain reason that money coe
trols them all, as the representative of value, am
whatever cannot be controled or regulated by that whi(
it controls, ought to be regulated by law.
Resolved, "That we can conceive a very sufficient a-
son why the price of money should not be left like th:
of other commodities to the free operation of the gene
al rule of demand and supply;" Because the intrinsic va
uae'of money consists in its being a circulating medium
exchange; Because its creation depends upon govern
ment as its creator; Because "it toils not, neither does
spin," yet as an agent it controls all labor and feeds an
clothes mankind;|Because it is held in the aggregate by
few as compared to thIe whole, and those few are person
with souls and bodies, without souls that expand and cot
tract at pleasure; Because the sale and purchase of prop
erty of every description loses its distinctive character
in the transfer, and assumes that of debt or credit, paya
ble in the currency of the country; Because the dues o
government are paid in money, and for the forbearance c
which a specific rate of interest is required by the govern
mrient, reasonable in amount and never usurious; Be
cause individuals, corporations arid government ought t
be alike subject to the operation of laws, uniform in their
application as to general principles. Hence the proprie
1yof" a uniform rate of interest regulated by law.
Resolved, "That the usnrylawv does" not "appear to u
the f'r'it of"' any "crror,"whatever on the contrarywe re
cognise the blessing upon that people or government wli
putteth not out (and who make it unlawful to put out)
inoney to usury, viz. they shall never be moved.
Resolved, That we distrust the opinion of foreign wri.
ters ou political economy, as applicable to our own coun
try, front) the fact that aided by all the light of such wvri.
terms as Smirthi, Bentham and others, still the British gov.
ernment is loaded down with a public debt, obstructions
on trade, and one out of six of her whole population art
paupers.
Resolved, That we hava more confidence in one
penny-weight of plain practical operation of principles
than in tons of theoretical speculation.
Resolved, That we are opposed to the repeal of the
usury law, and we pray the legislature not to repeal it.
Resolved, That we are decidedly opposed to monopo-
lies,but we do not view every law granting certain privile-
ges as such, conceiving it to be absolutely necessary in cer-
tain cases to combine capitalto enforce and complete ob-
jeets of great public utility, and which could not be done
under articles of private association, not binding in law
tor restricted thereby.
.Resaived, That interwoven as the banking system is
with,ouer commercial, agricultural and manufacturing in-
terests, thestopping short in extending it, would produce
incalculable injuries to those interests, and would give a
monopoly to the existing banks, not warranted by the ex-
igency of the times.
Resolved, That we believe a prudent extension of
baking capital, at such place or places as would give fa-
cilities to the production of articles of trade, and em-
ployment to labor in producingkihem, would tend to coun-
teract monopoly, and aid in removing those sudden checks
produced by monied associations.
Resolved, That we believe the Safety Fund Banking
System the best yet devised for protecting bill holders;
oW until those who condemn it produce a better system,
we tiust protest against the movements of any and every
class of agitators to destroy it, and we invoke the broad,
Adeep ewrent of public opinion, which has so decidedly
approved .of this system, to sweep from its surface by its
expression She ripples of opposition.
Resolved, 'That we are in favor of a repeal of the re-
2vai'ing law, so far as to allow of opening offices of dis-
count and deposit of a legalized curremiy, subject to the
provisions of law.
Resolved, That we will justify the representatives from
this county in voting for a moderate increase of banking
capital, at such places where in their opinion it is requir-
ed.
Resolved, That we believe that the bills of the various
banks of this state ought to be made redeemable at each
other's counters, and received in payment of debts due to
baunks without a depreciation of value to the holder, in the
form of a discount.
Resolved, That the banks ought not to object to the
passage of such a law, requiring them to maintain the
value of their paper, as required by the preceding resolu-
tion, as they possess advantages not enjoyed by the com-
munity in general, and we pray the legislature to pass
such a law at the present session.
Resolved, That our system of educationespecially that
of eomnton schools, stands foremost in the rank of ob-
jects worthy of the fostering care of the legislature, and
the fund belonging thereto ought to be inviolably held for
,its extension.
Resolved, That we do not consider a legislative agree-
jnent or compromise in relation to a public question of
great niagnitude and importance, to be binding, if the
public interests should require a departure from it; and we
therefore hope the act of congress, commonly called the
compromise act, in relation to the tariff, will be immedi-
ately revised by congress, and a reduction of duties be
made o0 such articles as enter into the consumption and
common useof the people, so as to leave a sufficient re-
venue for the use of government, and no more.
Resolved, V'hat we hail the approach of the period
when a free trade shall exist between nations and people,
aWft restricted by protective systems of any kind, save
those of public and private rights.
Resolved, That the proceedings be published.
MOSES STANTON, Ch'n.


H. HALTED, Sec'y.
PUBLIC MEETING-City of Albany.


At a .keeting of the citizens of Albany held pursuant to
public notice, at the City Hall, on the 10th instant, the
eommitt,.'e appointed to prepare resolutions expressive
of .the senue and objects of the meeting, reported the
following, which were unanimously adopted :-
Resolved, That speculators in the necessary articles of
consumption are making themselves richer by making the
poor poorer, and that they have produced a state of things
which renders it impossible for the honest, industrious,
economical, ordinary laboring man to obtain a support for
himself and family.
Resolved, That those banks that are in the practice of
loaning of large sums of money to speculators in the sta-
ple commodities of life, thereby enabling them to carry
on their business of robbing the poor, are a curse to the
country, and should meet with the fate of the "Big Mon-
ster."
Resolved, That a committee be appointed to prosecute
and king to punishment according to law, all forestallers
and eagrossers; and we hereby pledge ourselves to said
. committee to sustain them against all the power of all the
speculators in the city.
Resolved, That we will meet in our respective wards
;and form associations simniilar in principle to the "Albany
coal company," for the purpose of raising finds and ap-
p.itaing agents to purchase for us the necessaries of life,
when comparatively cheap.
THOMAS D. GAYNOR, Ch'in.
CALVIN PEPPER,. jr. Sec'y.
MARRIED,
In New-York, on Wednesday, by the Rev. Bishop On-
derdonk, Tuos. J. MARVIN, esq., of Saratoga Springs, to
Mrs. HARRIET FRASER, of the former place.
In Essex, on the 6th inst., by the Rev. Joel Fisk,
iHENRY R. NOBLE, of Elizabethtown, merchant, to Miss
CORNELImA, daughter of the hon. John Gould.
DIED.
InTrtu'y,on Thursday afternoon, much lamented, Mr.
ErriNrmiw'A L. BUCKLEY, of thIe firm of P. H. Buckley &
Brother, in the 29th year of his age.
In Troy, o0 Saturday morning, Mrs. JULIA M. wife of
Matthew Lane, and daughter of Joseph Russell, esq., of
that city-a highly esteemed and valued member of socie-
.ty. .
Sin New-York, in the 72nd year of his age, after a lin-
geriag illness. WILLIAM HAMERSLEY, I. D., Senior con-
sulting Physician of ihe New-York Hospital, formerly
Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic, and, of
,Chlinical Medicine in Columbia College,land in the College
.At Greenbush, Rensselaer co. on Monday morning,
SFebruary 6th, PETER VAN VALKENBURGH, aged 53 years.


-S.-------- -. -.-- -- -V


STr. PATRICK'S BENEFIT SOCIETY.
At amecting of the Society held at Constitution Hall,
fon Wednesday evening, February 8, the following gen-
tlemen were elected officers for the ensuing year:
President-Thomas Gough.
First Vice President-John T. Maher.
.Second Vice President-Jocelyn Hickey.
Treasurer-John T. Gough.


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Vi,- rtl [;" y a ..-............, ...,...... .... 0......
lie's Philosophy.
Monday afternoon-Astronomy, Rhetorick and Kame's
Elements.
Tuesday morning-Arithmetic, Arnott's Physics and
Physiology.
Tuesday afternoon-French.
Wednesday morning-Watt's on Mind and Algebra.
Wednesday afternoon-Astronomy and Biblical Anti-
quities.
Thursday morning-Moral Philosophy and Evidences
of Christianity.
Thursday afternoon-Chemistry.
The examinations will be commenced each day at 9 o'-
clock A. M. and 2 o'clock P. M.
On Friday afternoon at half past 2 o'clock, compositions
will be read in the chapel of the academy.
All who fell an interest in female education are respect-
fully invited to attend.
By order of the Board of Trustees,
T. W. OLCOTT,
IRA HARRIS,
R. M. MEIGS,
Committee of Arrangements.
N. B. The next term of the institution will commence
on the 16 inst. fe6


%/F RICHTER, A. M. begs leave to inform the
ITA inhabitants of Albany, that he has taken up his a-
bode in this city with the intention of giving instruction
in the French, German and Italian languages, as well as
in Music. Apply to Mr. DUFF, at Congress Hall, and the
music stores. feS:d3mo
W ANTED--A waiter of experience, in a private
family, who can bring good recommendations.-
Enquire at this office, fellI


11


WTANTED-An experienced Cook. None need ap-
ply without good recommendations. Enquire at
02 State-street. fell-3t


W ANTED-To go in the country to work in an
Iron Foundry, two Blacksmiths, one Machinist,
four Laboring men and six boys. None but Americans
need apply. Enquire of


f


fel3


BACKUS, AMES ', CO.
No. 8 State-st.


LOST-A large BRASS KEY. The finder is request-
ed to leave it at the Post-office. fel3-3t
JUST RECEIVED AT 0. STEELE'S Book-
store.
The works of Benjamin Franklin, with a life and notes
by Jared Sparks, vol. 4
Gesenius' Hebrew and English Lexicon, edited by E.
Robinson
A new Universal Atlas, containing maps of the various
Kingdoms, States and Republics of the world, by H. Y.
Tanner
Thomson's Outlines of Mineralogy and Geology, and
Mineral Analysis, 2 vols. &c. &c. fel3
EW ENGRAVINGS, &c.-The Shakspeare
Gallery, parts 1 to 4.
The Byron Beauties, Byron Gallery, and Gallery of the
Graces, for sale by AV. C. LITTLE.
fel3 67 State-st.
CABINET AND UPHOLSTERY WARE-
V HOUSE-The subscribers have on hand a fine as-
sortment of fashionable Furniture at their warehouse,
No. 110 State-street, where they will constantly keep
a general assortment of Cabinet and Upholstery WVare.
Also, Cushion, Moss, Manilla, Feather and Upholstery
trimmings and goods of all kinds.
fel3 _____ JOHN WINNE & CO.
PURE SPIRI'S-For sale in bbls. and hhds. at
13 State-street, by
fel3 E. THOMAS.


IXIAKEK (.OOi-US-A general assortment of
articles manufactured by the Shakers, kept constant-
ly on hand at tihe Variety Store, 392S. Market-st., by
fel3 S. VAN SCHAACK.
UBURN AND ROCHESTER RAIL-
ROAD-Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the
stockholders of the Auburn anid Rochester Rail-road Com-
pany, will be held at the Franklin House in the village of
Geneva, on Thursday, the 16th day of March next, at 11
o'clock A. M., for the purpose of choosing Thirteen Di-
rectors of said company, and that thie polls of the elec-
tion will be kept open from II o'clock A. M., to 3 o'clock
P. M. By order of the Board of Commissioners. Dated
Feb. 7, 1837. SAML. J. BAYARD,
fel3-dactd Secretary.
STO LET-Buildings os. 30 and 32 Green-
street.
Two stores on Pier Lot No. 86.
fel3 AUGUSTUS JAMES.
N the matter of proving tie last will andl testament of
WVilliam Newson, deceased. To the heirs at law of
William Newson, lateof the city and state ofNewv York,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that thIe undersigned, executor in
the last will and testament of the said WVilliam Newson,
deceased named, intends to apply to the surrogate of the
county of New York, at his office in tihe city of New-
Vork, on the tweuty-seventh day of March next at ten
o'clock in the forenoon of that day, to have the said last
will and testament of the said deceased, duly proved be-
fore said surrogate, according to ithe statute in such
case madeand provided. Dated this 30th day of January,
1837.
fel3-6w OBED JOHNSON.


T O the heirs at law of Abraham DeGraff, late of the
tuwn of Rlotterdam, in the county of Schenectada,
deceased:
Please to take notice, that I intend to apply to the sur-
rogate of said county at his office in the city of Schenec-
tada, on the twenty-fifth day of March next at one o'clock
in the afternoon, for the purpose of having the last will and
testament of said deceased proved before said surrogate,
pursuant to chapter sixth, title first, article first, part se-
cond, of the revised statutes of the state of New York.-
Dated the 8th day of February, 1837.
JOHN F. VEDDER,
fel3-6w Executor named in the will of said deceased.


T HE people of the state of New York, to the widow
and next of kin of William Davis, late of Colombia
county, in tihe state of Pennsylvania, deceased.
You are hereby cited to appear before Jared WVillson,
esq. surrogate of our county of Ontario, at his office in
the village of Canandaigua, on the twenty-seventh day of
March next at ten o'clock in the forenoon, and shew cause
why administration of the goods and chattels and credits
ofthe said WVlliam Davis, deceased, should not be gran-
ted to WVilliam S. Davis. of the county of Colombia in
the state of P'ennsylvania, to whom letters testamentary
with the will annexed, have been granted by competent
authority in the state of Pennsylvania; who has made ap-
plication for the same, and produced a copy of the said let-
ters testamentary.
Given under my hand and seal of office of our said sur-
[S. S.] rogate, at Canandaigua, in the said county, the
4th day of February, 1837. Copy.
11T6 JARED VILLSON, Surrogate.
YIEFORE the Chancellor-Nicholas Switts, vs. Abrat-


office, Albany, Feb. 13th, 1837.-Notice is hereby giv.
en, pursuant to section 46, chapter 9, title 5, of the revis-
ed statutes, that those of the lots of land hereinafter
enumerated, or those parts thereof, for which the interest
due on them to the state, together with the expense of
advertising the same, shall not be paid before Thursday,
the twentieth day of April next, will be sold by auction
at the Capitol, in the city of Albany; the sale to com-
mence at 10 o'clock in the forenoon of that day, to wit:
In the township of Cincinnatus-Sub. 2 of lot 30.-
Elijah Rose's part of lot 92.
In the township of Solon-SiSub. 4 of lot 30.
In the township of Virgil-Sub. 2 of lot 20.
In the Iassachusetts 10 townships, north tier-lot 70.
Also-Caleb Benjamin's bond for lot 17, south side of
State street in th'e city of Albany, formerly mortgaged by
James Chestney.
The conditions of sale will be, that one-fourth part of
the purchase money be paid within forty-eight hours,
and the remainder in six equal annual instalments, with
interest at the rate of 6 per cent per annim ; excepting
the premises formerly mortgaged by James Chestney, the
interest of which will be seven per cent.
WILLIAM CAMPBELL,
Surveyor General.
The Editors of the Broome County Courier and Cort-
land Advocate, are requested to publish this advertise-
ment for eight weeks previous to the day of sale, and
send their first paper containing it to the Surveyor Gen-
eral's office, and omit this note in the publication.
febl3-dlawclaw8w
SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, State
of New-York, Albany, February 13th, 1837.-Notice
is hereby given, pursuant to section 46, of title, of chap-
ter 9 of the revised statutes, that those of the lots of land
hereinafter enumterated, or those parts thereof !or which
the interest due oni then to the state, together with
the expense of advertising thie same, shall not be paid be
fore Thursday, the 20th day of April next, will then be
sold by auction at the Capitol in this ciy; the sale to com-
mnence at ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day, to wit:
In the Cayuga Reservation, west side, Robert White's
part of lot 64.
In the Cowasselon tract-Lot 9.
In the township of Cato-Southeast, 100 acre-i of lot 8.
In the township of Cicero-Subdivision 4 of lot 51.
In the township of Dryden-Micah Pool's part of lot 90.
In the township of Galen-Southeast: 100 acres of lot
52.
In the township of Hector-Subdivision 3 of lot 54-
Subdivision 6 of lot 85.
In the township of Junius-Southeast 100 acres of lot
32.
New Stock ridge-Southwest part, Alexander Doug-
lass part lot 13.
New Stockbridge, Mile tract-Lot 3.
New Stockbridge, purchase of 1825-John Morgan's
part of lot 29.
Oneida purchase of 1802-Hanyost Klock's part of lot
18.
Oneida purchase, 1802-Martin Lamb's new account for
lot 36.
Oneida purchase of 1826-Lot 19.
In the village of Oneida Castleton-Lot 8 of block 10,
lots 1, 5 and 6 of block 12, lot 7 of block 15, lots 3 and 4
of block26, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of block
31.
In the south part of the village of Oneida Castleton-
Lots 3 and 5, lot 6 of block 10.
In the Oneida creek tract-Samuel Baker's part of lot 1.
In the Onondaga Reservation, purchase of 1817-Lot
13.
Onondaga Salt Springs Reservation-Farm lots No. 8,
9, 80, 96, 242, 245, 315.
In the village of Liverpool-block 13, lot 1 and 2 of
block 27.
Tn iteilage o Salina-Lots 31 and 3S of block 37,
block 41, lot 49 of block49, lot 1 of block 81, block 107.
In the village of East Oswego-
Lot 250 of block 70.
283 of block 71.
2S4 of block 71.
289 of block 89.
295 of block 107.
In the First Pagan purchase-Lots 11, 25.
The conditions of sale will Ib, that one-fourth part of
the purchase money lbe paid within forty-eight hours, and
the remainder in six equal annual installments, with in-
terest at the rate of six per een per annunm.
WILLIAM CAMP BELL
Surveyor General.
The Editors of the Cayuga Patriot, Madi -on Observer
and Recorder, Utica Olserver, Romine Telegraph, Onon-
daga Standard, Onondaga Chief, Oswego Palladium,
Seneca Observer, Ithaca Journal, Ithaca Herald, Western
Argus at Lyons, and WVayne Sentinel at Palmyra, are re-
que-ted to publish this advertisement for eight weeks be-
fore the day of sale, and respectively send their first
paper containing itto the Surveyor General's office. Ex-
amine your proof carefully by this, and omit this note in
the publication. fel3-dlawclaw8w


WILLIAM CALDWELL, at Room No. 10,
Congress 11ll. febll-dac3w
WESTERN CLOVFR SEED-New crop,
just received, and for sale by
AV. THORBURN,
fell cor. N. Market-st, and Maiden lane.
FARMERS SCHOOL BOOK-This work
has received the highest possible commendation.-
The late agricultural convention of this state, recommen-
ded its use in all the common schools. For sale at tihe
Common School Depository, No. 71 State-st., Albany.-
$25 per hundred; $3 50 per dozen, fell
LAMP SCISSORS-Made expressly for trimming
lamps, for sale at the Variety Store, by
S. VAN SCHAACK,
fel 1 392 South Market-st.


W C. LITTLE'S LIST OF NEW BOOKS
received.
Influences of Democracy on Liberty, Property and the
Happiness of Society considered, by an American, former-
ly a member of congress.
Synopsis of the Family of Niades, by Isaac Lea.
The Periodicalis, &c. fell
ALBANY FEMALE ACADEMY-The next
term will commence on Monday, thIe 13th inst. Ap-
plication may be made to the Principal or either of tIhe
Trustees.
N. B.-The Trustees take this opportunity to state,
that the attendance and studies of the ensuing two quar-
ters, are taken in the account in awarding premiums, me-
dals, &c. at the July examination.
A. CRITTENTON, Secretary.
The Trustees are-
Rev.JOHN N. CAMPBELL, LL. D.
GIDEON HAWLEY. Esq.
RICH'D V. DE WITT, "
RICH'D M. MEIGS, "
EDWIN CROSWELL, "
ISRAEL SMITH, "
Hon. JAMES VANDERPOEL,
PHILIP S. VAN RENSSELAER, Esq.
TIIOS. WV. OLCOTT,
TP A *14 AUP Q Y


GANGES, do W. Hinkley.
BANNER do E. Lewis.
BALANCE, do J. lodges.
HENRY FRANKLIN, do A. Mathews.
CLARION, do S. C. Aimes.
HENRY CURTISS, do A. Bearse.
(building,) do F. Scudder.
Which will be regularly despatched twice a week from
the above places, with whatever freight may offer, thus
affording facilities for the shipment and transportation of
merchandize hitherto unknown.
The vessels are all new, and built expressly for the
trade, drawing light draughts of water, and carrying about
100 tons each, commanded by the most experienced cap-
tains, who are individually interested in the enterprise,
which will guarantee their best attention to every thing
committed to their charge. Goods destined to or trom
the interior, shipped by this line, will be forwarded with
puneuaity and depatch by the captains or agents, who
shall lose no opportunity to prove themselves worthy the
patronage they now most respectfully solicit, and confi-
dently look for.
For freight or passage apply to the masters on board,
or to the agents.
DAVID SNOW, 9 City Wharf, Boston.
J. K. WING, 80 on the dock, Albany.
REFERENCES.
Nichols & Whitney, Lyman Root,
Hawcs, Gray & Co., Joshua Tuffs,
Stanley, Reed& Co., Gee. WV. Stanton & Son,
fes Boston. Albany.


t


ACKAWANA COAL--50 tons Lackawana co!
J for sale by R. KETCHUM,
ja31l-dtf Corner of Montgomery and Spencer sts


al


LUCIFER AND LOCO FOCO MATCHES
Sold and warranted at the Variety Store 392 South
Market st. no5 S. VANSCIIAACK.

ALBANY FEMALE SEMINARY-The se-
mi-annual examination in this institution, will he
he-ld at the Seminary on Thursday and Friday next, com-
mencing at 9 o'clock A. .M1. on each day. The friends of
education are invited to attend. The next term conm-
mences onl Monday, the 13th iust.
N. B. The authorities take this opportunity to state
that the attendance and scholarship of the students the
two ensuing terms, will be taken into the account in
awarding the premiums, medals, &c., at the close of the
anuiit. session in July n xt.
fe4-tf JNO. M. GARFIELD, Principal.
PIANO FORTS--Just received from the factory
of Messrs. Gralihmn, Burns & Tracey, one of their
high toned, grand action Piano Forts, and tor sale at
fe2 R. O'HARA'S, 5 Green-st.
COLORED SILK BRAIDS, 376 S. Market
st. [fe3l A.M. SLINGERLAN 1)..


SFOR SALE-The good and substantial
schooner JAMES RUSSELL, 135 tons burden
well found in sails and rigging, and has two
chain cabl.-s, now lying at tmhe foot of Cedar st
Apply to CROOKE & FAWKS, corner of West and
Liberty street, New York, or to
JEREMIAH AUSTIN,
fe3-dlw No. 96 Beaver st., Albany.


al
1,
0
L.


P LATE BRUSHES, of various sizes, for sale at
the Variety Store, 392 .outhMarket street, between
Hudson and Division streets, by
fe4 STEPHEN VAN SCHAACK.
PRUNING GRAPE VINES-The subscriber
lbegs leave to inform the citizens of Albany, that it
is now the proper time for performing the above busi-
ness, and that a capable person will be sent to those who
are desirous to have their vines pruned, !-rv,'-6 ,'-g
<,tj WV. T[HOlttuw'SS eed Store.
W AT NTzio xAlxuEDIATELY-A good, smart
active Boy, to tend in a Bookstore. Apply to
felO R. O'HARA, 5 Green-st.


G ROCERIES AT COST-The subscribers bet
ing desirous of closing up their present business.
now offer their entire stock of Groceries at wholesale a-
cost. Their assortment is large and general.
BOARDMAN & PERRY,
fel0-3t 14 State-st.


T HE fi'tores and btock of a retail DRUG AND ME-
DICINE STORE FOR SALE-worthy the atten-
tion of any young man wishing to commence business,
with a small capital. Apply at 444 S. Market-st.
felO GREGORY'S.


TlHE USEFUL SCHOOL BOOKS-Far-
mers' School Book
Political Economy, Expositions of the Constitution,
Citizen's Manuel, Town's Analysis,
Help to Young Writers. Wholesale at the Common
School Depository, No. 71 State-st., Albany. felO
1F LOWER SEEDS-$1 per package-For sale at
the Seed Store, 317 North Market-street, packages of
the most slhowy and rare varieties of Flower Seeds, con-
taining20 varieties, among which are-
Mignonette, Teni Weeks' Stock Gilliflower,
Mixt Asters, Double Balsams,
Flos Adonnis, Lobeha Cardinals,
Mixt Lupins, elegant Corcopsis, &c. &c., with direc-
tions for their culture.
Also, packages containing 30 varieties, $1 50; packa-
ges of 50 varieties $2 50.
felO-tf V. THORBURN, Seedsman.
pRENTISS'S LIP SALVE, for sale by the doz.
or single box, at the Variety Store, by
felO S. VAN SCHAACK.


NEW AMERICAN LAW WORK-G. & C.
MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass., have just publish-
ed an original American Law work, entitled "AN AN-
ALYTICAL DIGEST OF THE EQUITY CASES, de-
cided in the Courts of the several states, and of the Uni-
ted States, from the earliest period, and of the decisions
in Equity, in the Courts of Chancery and Exchequer in
England and Ireland, and the Privy Council and House of
Lords, from Hilary Term, 1822: and forming, with the
third edition of Bridgman's Digest, a complete abstract
of all the American, English and Irish Equity Reports,
down to 1836. By 0. L Barbour, Counsellor at Law,
and E. B. IHarrington, Solicitor in Chancery."
From Chancellor Walworth.
Saratoga Springs, June 14,1836.
The Equity Digest of Messrs. Barbour and Harrington,
of which the first volume is now published, and the resi-
due is ready for the press, has been compiled from the
books in my library, and embraces all the American Equi-
ty Reports, and all the English and Irish Equity Reports,
subsequent to those contained in the American edition of
Bridgman's Digest. I have had occasion frequently to
refer to the work in manuscript, and have also examined
very tully the volume which is published. I have no hes-
itation, therefore, in recommending it to the Profession
as a valuable Digest of Equity Cases, which will be found
very useful to those whose libraries are furnished with
the reports, and indispensable to other members of the
profession, who wish to become acquainted with the de-
cisions of the various Equity Courts in this country and
England in a condensed form.


.iLItilHerkimerst. Also, a two story wooden dwel
ling, 3t Lansing-st. Enquire of REUEL CLAPP,
felO-tf 97 Herkimer-st.


E TO LET-From the first of May next. the
house, corner of Steuben-street and Middle lane,
nll ow occupied by William Kline. Enquire of
S fel-3t JAMES DEXTER, State Hall.


AlSIS TO LET-From the first day of May next,
II the house No. 23 Montgomery-st. Apply to
III CHAS. D. GOULD,


BIlk fel at Dr. MarchI's Office.
TO LET-Two stores in Hamilton-stree
Enquire of
l E u C. F. PRUYN.
ItfI-tf


I


TO LET-From the first of May next, two
stores in South Market-st., Nos. 481 and 483,
with lofts.
SAlso, two dwellings in Liberty-streel, Nos. 51
aXd .Enquire of H. T'. MESICK,
fe2-2w No. 439 South Market-st.
TO LET-At low rents, with immediate pos-
session-Three Stores in Stanwix Hall, on Maid-
en lane, with cellars and lofts, lately occupied by
t Packer, Prentice & Co., L. Annesley and P. M.
Moraige. These stores can be enlarged to suit any kind
of business.
Also, large rooms for societies or mechanics, and offi
ces for artists, &c. Apply to
GANSEVOORT & HILL,
del2 Office No. 5 Stanwix Hall.


-W TO LET-One office on the second floor, and
-amju one large room 48 by 34 feet. on the third floor of
l the new building, corner of Market street and
I Maiden lane. Also 3 fine rooms on the second
floor and one on thethird floor of the house (with board)
No. 134 South Pearl street, near Westerlo st. Enquire of
del9 P. M. MORANGE, 313 N. Market st.


AM TO LET--The large room over Sands &
inShaw's Druggists store in State street, known as
CONCERT HALL. Enquire at 42Lydius st.
no22 P. VAN LOON.


TO LET-Two Lofts in the store house No. 6
Exchange street. Possession given immediate-
ly. Enquire at 24 State street.
au5
TO LET-Fromin the first of November next,
three Rooms for Offices, in the new building cor-
ner of N. Markst-st. andl Maidlenj Lane; and also,
ithe store No. 289, North Market-st., now occu-
pied as a dry goods store. Enquire of
P. M. ORANGE,
sel6 16 Maiden-lane.
TO LET, from the first of May next, the
large three story brick house No. 19 Columbia
street. The house is one of the best in this city,
and has recently been put in good repair. En-
quire ot S. CHEEVER, 67 State-st. j30-tf
TO LET-The two story brick houses Nos.
48 and 50 Chapel-st. Also, house No. 130 South
ll Pearl-st., at present occupied by Mr. J. Fergu-
son. E nquire of .


ft


~l1


PRUYN & MARTIN,
Argus Buildirngs.


S TO LET-AAnd possession given immediate-
ly, two substantial fire proof brick stores, Nos. 7
anid 9 Hudson-st. Enquire of
BACKUP, AMES & CO.
fell 8 State-street.
-l.o t Mra wd-.xiy. 'nd posses-
sion given 1st May next.-- tnree e tony uuIcM
Ijll dwelling house, No. 154 South Pearl-st., oppo-
.lll .site Katie's walk; and a three story brick dwel-
ling house, No. 54 Washington-st., both modern built and
in good order.
A two story frame dwelling in Malcom st.
A two story frame dwelling, No 12 Van Tromp st.
do do 31 Van Schack st.
do do 72 Orange st.
do do Second st., Abour Hill.
do do Schenectada turnpike.
Three two story frame dwellings in Herkimer st.
The above property has recently changed owners, and
will be rented without reference to the present occupants,
and will be put in good tenantable order. Apply to
S. COBB,335 North Market st.
The present occupants will pay all rent on the above
on the first of February next, at my office, No. 335 North
Market st. [ja28] S. C.
A BOARDING HOUSE TO LET-From
the first of May next, the large and convenient
double house, Nos. 316 and 318 North Market st.,
I oc-upied as a boarding house by Mrs. Jenkins.-
The yard is spacious, extending to Montgomery street,
and additions to the house can be made to furnish ample
accommodations for a hotel.
The fire proof brick stable in the rear, on Montgomery
street, will be let separate or with the house. Apply to
GANSEVOORT & HILL,
fe6-tf Office No. 5 Stanwix Hall.
TO LET-From the first of May next, or
before if required, the brick mansion, with apor-
tion ot the flower and vegetable Firden in Lyd -
us street, formerly the residence of the late Douw
B. Slingerland, esq. Enquire of either of the subscri-
bers. ASHLEY SCOVEL,
fe6-d3t LEVI PHILLIPS.


TO LET-The store now occupied by the
Misses Mott, 287 N. Market st.
ERASTUS PERRY, Agent,
S fe6 82 State st.


Af FOR SALE, the modern three story brick
al house, No. 16 Lumber street, with or without
Ill two vacant lots adjoining. Said houseisnew and
IL, replete with every convenience. For terms ap-
ply to F. J. BARNARD,
fe6-dtf 1 5 N. Market st.


LAFAYETTE HOUSE. No. 91 Wasn-
ington street, Albany-The subscriber respectful-
ly informs his friends and the public, that his
house is now enlarged and furnished in first rate
style, and ready for the reception of more company. From
12 to 18 boarders can be accommodated with good rooms,
biy the week, month or year, with other company, on rea-
sonable terms. The above house is situated on the most
pleasant street in the city, and is one of the best and most
convenient locations for members of the legislature, of
whom he solicits a share of patronage, together with oth-
er company. NATHANIEL GALLUP.
N. B. There is a good and convenient stable attached to
the above, with a shed for the accommodation of persons
travelling by private conveyance. &c. d23-3n3m
TOWING-LAKE BOAT LINE OF
STEAMBOATS.


F .. .. .


are incorruptible, they never change their color, nor do
they absorbthe saliva orjuices of the mouth; consequent-
ly, they do not cause an unpleasant taste or fetid breath.
They can be supplied front one to an entire set, to cor-
respond with the living teeth, which, with human natu-
ral and all kinds of artificial teeth set and inserted after
the latest improved style of Dental Mechanism. His
method of inserting them gives to the wearer ease com-
bined with all the important objects of the art. Their dif.
ferent uses in mastification, articulation, and preserving
the original form of the mouth, without having to perform
any unpleasant or painful operations. Sets of teeth in-
serted by atmospheric pressure, without the aid of springs,
clasps, ligatures, &c. when fixed, they are warranted to
set on the unerring principle of adhesion; and from their
uniformity and adaption to the mouth, to elude detection
by the closest scrutiny.
OPERATIVE DENTAL SURGERY-The subscriber
performs every operation on the teeth, gums and mouth,
on the most modern and approved principles of dental sur-
gery, with the least possible pain, and correct profession-
al skill. Carious teeth filled with his cement; likewise,
with gold, platina, etc. Loose teeth rendered firm, wheth-
er arising front age, neglect, scrofula, mercury, or the dis,
eases of the gums. Irregularities of the teeth in children
prevented, in adults remedied. Teeth and the stumps of
teeth extracted. The treatment of children's teeth par-
ticularly attended to.
HENRY VILLERS, M.D., Surgeon Dentist,
No. 82 Hudson street, Albany.
Professional operations and tuition in Dental Surgery,
as usual deS2


DR. COOKE-The attention bestowed upon a par-
ticular branch of medicine by Dr. Cooke, of Albany,
(a regularly qualified medical practitioner, by long tried

experience and practical knowledge, as Physician to the
Lock Hospital in this city, as well as extensive Hospitals
on the continent) continues to merit as well as receive
the confidence of the public
Dr. Cooke reminds those afflicted with any of the com-
plaints, for the cure of which he is not unjustly celebrated,
that lie continues his peculiar mode of treatment, thereby
avoiding those consequences attendant upon the abuse of
Mercury-effecting a speedy and perfect cure, leaving his
patient with a sound constitution.
His offices are in the LOCK HOSPITAL, No. 3 Norton
street, late Store lane. Strangers in the city and others
desirous of medical aid will be very fortunate in having his
advice and counsel.
Hours of attendance from 9 A. M. to 9 P. M.
0z See Advertisement on the first page.JJJ ja7
CONSPIRACY-Citizens of A lbany-WVithout my
knowledge, consent or approbation, my office, at the
corner of Hudson and Green sts in your city, was closed
and shut up by Dr. Carwan, my clerk. This man no doubt
having been induced to do so by some gentleman connec-
ted with medicine, who thought that I should be so much.
injured thereby as to cause mte not to again open it; but
they arc woefully mistaken. It is true the time of year
was well chosen; and in consequence of the river being
closed and the difficulty of travelling, much time has been
lost before it has been re-opened; besides near a fortnight
had elapsed ere I knew so much villany had been enacted.
I have again succeeded in opening the office, and will do
all in my power to keep a supply of the BRANDRETH
PILLS always on hand; and from the high character of
the clerk, Mr. Bosworth, I feel confident that no such cir-
cumstance is likely again to occur. The high character
Brandreth's Vegetable Universal Pills have obtained
wherever they have been introduced, renders it unneces-
sary for me to say any thing in their favor except that
their cleansing, their purgative properties shall always
be maintained, and all which thie public have occasion to
do isto becare.61-u ""-,," ,,- L '. .. ...
To Br n.rtw1anin agents-The office of Dr. Brandreth,
corner ofi Hudson andGreen sts., Albany, is reopened,
and a large supply of pills is now there, so that any or-
ders will be promptly executed. The cash must be remit-
ted, as the present agent, Mt. Bosworth, is perfectly un-
acquainted with the sub-agents. He is in possession of
the Ledger, and will be able tc receive payment for any
amount of pills owing for.
ja25t-d3m BENJ. BRANDRETH. M. D.
N. B. No Druggist or Physiciau is authorised to sell
I)r. Brandreth's Pills. They can be had of his agents only.
,sm THE SUBSCRIBERS are preparedto
10V furnish to order at their foundry in West Tray
Albany county, New York, CHURCH BELLS
of superior tone and warranted to stand, with
approved east iron yokes fitted and fastened to the bell,
ready to hang; also, Town Clocks, Levelling and Sur-
veyimg Instruments, Copper and Brass Castings, &c.
mr23-dac MENEELY & OOTHOUT.
PERSIAN OTTO OF ROSE SOAP sold at
the Variety Store 392 S. Market st., by
de6 S. VAN SCHAACK.


INDELLIBLE INK-Francis Kidder's superior
ink, warranted good, for sale at the Medicine tore,
444 South Market street.
ja3L GREGORY'S.


PURSE RINGS-Gilt and Steel Purse Rings sold
at the Variety Store 392 South Market street, be.
tween Hudson and Division sts, by
de30 S. VAN SCHAACK.


I


I


P
de

)


INE WOOLLEN & WORSTED YARN
at 319 North Market street.
&20 EDWIN A. IHARRIS.
IAMOND PINS AND RINGS-A large as-
sortment, for sale by [se8] IH. RAYMOND.


SHEET IRON WORKERS-3 or4 good wor
ers wanted immediately, by
oc5 J. RATHBONE & CO.,47 State st.
CHILDREN'SSLEIG S sold at the Variety
Store 392 South Market street, by
de19 S. VAN SCIIAACK.
REOSOTE-Warranted pure, in small bottles,
for families, a certain cure for tooth ache. Price
50 cents. For sale at the Medicine Store, 444 S. Market-
street, by [fe7] GREGORY.
N EW BOOKS AT 0. STEELE'S Bookstore-
The Great Metropolis, by the author of Random
Recollections of the Lords and Commons.
Livy, translated by Geo. Baker, forming 24, 25, 26, 27
and 28 Harpers Classical Library.
A Home Tour through the manufacturing districts of
England, by Sir George Head.
An Elementary Treatise on Anatomy, by A. L. J.
Bayle, translated by Sidney Doane.
The New York Book of Poetry.
Dearborn's edition of Byron, elegantly bound, fel


SHRUB-Old Jamaica Shrub, imported in bottles,for
sale by jy19 E. R. SATTERLEE.


WOOD-From One to Five Hundred Cords of first
rate Wood for sale low, in lots to suit purchasers,
lying on the Poesten Kill and Berlin Turnpike, about 14
miles from Troy and 17 from Albany. Persons having
teams can make a first rate business to buy and sell this
wood in either city. Enquire at No. 377 South Market
street, Albany, or No. 1 Cannon Place, Troy. ja5


U-


EW No. 31 in the Pearl street Baptist church, for
nl* V l i lS flflrl Q I*XT


.5'

(


Af-LBANY THEATRE. STATEOF NEW-YORK, Surveyor General's MOIHAWK AND HUDSON RAILROAD- NEW-YORK SALES PUBLIC SALES. PU I1
ALB^j1ANY THEA TREXJ ^ office, Albany, February 13th, 1837.-Notice is here- 183S---VINTER ARRANGEMENT. N E -V UtK SA LJE S-1.1 P t
b y given, pursuant to section 46. chapter 9, title 5, oftthe THE A M EIA A AN COMENN.
MRS. BLAKE'S BENEFIT. Revised Statutes, that those of the lots of land he-eita.f- g 12 THE AMERICAN FUR COMPANY O E Y A
ter enumeratedi, or those parts thereof for which the in- Will offer for sale on Wednesday, 22d February, at 12 fAuctiont.rsand ouisi Merchant-tore No. 66 (Auction and Co
s Mrs. BLAKE has the satisfaction of informing her terest due on them to the state, together with the expense o'clock, at their store No. 39 Ann street, New York .tae *sreet.] Merhanis-
Sfriends, that at the solicitation of many families, the of advertising the same, shall no be paid before Thurs- Until further notice, the Cars will leave 115 State street their entire collection of FURS & SKINS, consisting of s Regular inlays ror ut-door sales Mondays, ed-
rgrand drama of GUSTAVUS, and tie last act of NOR- day, the 20th day of April next, will be sold by auction at Albany at 6522 lb Rocky Mountain Beaver ndsdays and Fridays. o. AT
MAN LESLIE will be presented, forming on the same the capitol in the city of Albany. 'The sale to commence 9 o'clock A. M. 1412 Northern and Lake Superior do AtPrvceeamnd cal
evening a grand combination of "splendior anti novelty, at 10 o'clock in the foreno'iiu of that day, to wit: 11 do do 332,207 Muskrats At Private Sal. o
which shie trusts will secure tlhe patronage of tie citizens In the township of Benson-Lot 361. 3 do P.M., 3652 Deer skins, &c. 50 dO blIack and wite wadding do clf
501 dozdboCesahookssandleyesrAadricannmanueactureop0ndoodoexi
of Albany, Troy, Lansingburgh, Vaterford, and their vi- In the Braut Lake tract-Lot 63. 6s do do Catalogues will be ready, and the Skins open for ex- oz oxs oos an eyes, m erican manuacure, bales blk. andw
cinities, and give general satisfaction to those who in- In the Essex tract, or Henry's survey-Lots 25, 220, And leave Schenectady for Albany at amination three days previous to the sale. warranted equal t those importeand w
tend to honor the theatre with their presence. 237, 239, 2143. S! o'clock A. M. L. M. HOFFM3AN & CO. Franklin & Son's Fire Proof Iron Chests, assorted s- s M
Gore between township No. 11, Tottcn and Crossfield's 11i do (10o New York, February 1, 1837. fe4-t d zes, single and double, constantly on hand, at the manu- 200 doz. woolle go
facturers' prices.
THIS EVENING, Feb. 13, purchase, and Dartmouth patent-Lot 24. 2a do P.MA. HATTERS, FURS, SKINSVOOL, &e. &c. facturer0epre ,swo lt
Will be presented the 2d, 4th and 5th.acts of In the Hague tract-Lots 38, 39. 7 do do until further notice. H AT U KINS, WOOL, &Oc. &c. 900 fancy cane seat chairs. 100 boxes firstuli
RICHARD III. In the All Long Sault Island, in the river St. Lawrence no29 P. L. PARSONS, Sup't. L. M. HOFFMAN & CO. will sell at auction on 100 maple do do
Richard, By a Gentleman of this city. -Lot 19. Thursday, 23d inst., at 10 o'clock, at the store No. 189 Wa- 100 Windsor chairs. REA
Richmond, By a Gentleman of this city. In the Jay tract-Lots 42, 4;, 71, 132. UTIIUA & SCHENECTADA RAILROAD. ter-street, an extensive and valuable assortment of Hat- 100 scroll seat nurse rocking chairs.
Buckingham, Mr. Blake. yIn the Lake George t raet-s Los 47,7 7 63, 61, 68. ^ 'ters' Furs, Skins, Wool, &c., comprising every article 77 do do large do ARM
B~uckingham, Mr. Blakr. Ili the Lake George Tract-Lots 47, 63, 64, 68. intetae haaousadsapeilb ed 0 undp
Queen Elizabeth, Mrs. Blake. In the town of Lewis, Stower's survey-Lot 33. in the trade. The catalogues and samples will be rendy 100 turned post French bedsteads. and highly ii
After which the rand drama of In the Luzerne tract-Lots (7, 156. the day previous. New York, February 3. 50 feather beds, assorted. thetownshil
After which thr grant] drama of 7the Lzerne trct-Lotsgh7, 156
GUSTAVUS. In the North WVest Bay tract-lots 2 B, 30, 45, 89. Until farther notice, a train of Railroad Coaches wil fe7-td A. W. BLEECKER, Auctioneer. 40 eight day mahogany clocs, warranted. equal distant
Gustavis, Mr. Blake. In the old Military tract Township No. 1, west division; leave daily, as follows: AS OF FUR SEAL 125 thirty hour clocks, arranted, atoa and Ballseon, a
Gutvs r lk.A EO U E L SKINS IN THE 2.50 looking glseasreVietepeie r w
Oscar, Mirs. Blake. Nathan Jones, .jr. remainder, and Nathaniel Sherburn's From Utica at 10 o'clock A. M. IT OF NE V-YORK--The subscribers 50 bushels red top see. dwelling house. TI
Arvedson, Miss Cushman. part of lot No 2, remainder of lot 14, lot 17, remainder of From Albany at 9 o'clock A.M. ,will sell at auction, in the city of New-York, on Tues- meadow land, a fine
Toncd i, th th t at f ,tlot 18' lot 21. remainder of lot 37, lots 39, 41, remainder of From Schenectada at 11it o'clock A. M. day, the 21st of February, at 11 o'clock, at their auc- il farm at present is oc
To conclude with the 5t act of lot72. Tickets to be procured at the offices, and seats taken in tion store, No. 89Wall street, 9000 prime FUR SEAL RErA A will gie any inform
Norma NORMAN LESLIE. BlInae old Military Tract, Township No 9, east part- accordance with the number andletter. SKINS, just received from barque Catharine, from Mon- sn can e had on th
Norman Leslie, Mr. Blake. Lots'17, '.0. WM C. YOUNG, tevideo. Catalogue will be ready, and the skins prepar- BY DAVIS & JONES. their particulars, addr
Louisemple, Miss Cushman. In township No. 10 of the old military tract-Lots 1, no30 Superintendent and Engineer. ed for examination 3 days previous to the sale. New- (Real Estate Brokers, Land Agents and Auctioneers
Miss Temple, Mrs. Blake. 41, 42, 41, 12i, 12:3, 281.913 S R T G &SC E C AD R IL Yok25hJnry187
jFor description of scenery, &c. see small bills. In township No 11 of the old military tract-Lots 103, SARATOGA & SCHENECTADY RAL- York, 25th January, 1837.& CO., Auctioneers.t
1322,2228.ROAD--WINTER ARRANGEMENT. ja30-dtd R .R. MINTUJRN & CO.. Auctioneers. Str o 6Saesre. __CilANCI
12.3, 222, 242, 081. (REGULAR DAYS FOR PUBLIC I ALES OF cityofNew
ECOND ANNUAL BALL OF THE AL- In theParadox tract-Lots 135, 406. m T T REAL ESTATE, THE 10TH, 20TH AND 30TH OF n PINE & MI
SBANY BURGESSES CORPS-The A. B. In the Peru Bay tract-Lots 45, 68I. TO LET. EACH MONTH AND AT ALL OTHER TIMES street on the
C. will give their second annual ball, in commemoration In the Roaring Brook tract-Lot b4. -- WHEN REQUIRED, ON THE SHORTEST NO-attwelve o'clock at n
of the birth of the FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY, at In the Schroon tract-Lots 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 40, 41. Until further notice, the departures on this road will be TO LET, and possession on the first day of TICE. l CoWdtey, master in
Stanwix Hall, on Wednesday evening the 22d inst. In the South Bay tract-Lots 62, 74, 78, 79, 118, 131. as follows, viz: ;a May, that two story brick modern built dwelling b o e tr
l S. st, TIMOTY SEYMOUR, Ch'n. Also, lot No.2 of the Marsh lots. Cars will leave Saratoga Springs daily at l|l house, one door north of my residence in Mont- CTtw.ee Cuyart&nelson, re cknow Dean street
Charles S. Olmsted, Geo. S. Gibbons, In the St. Regis Reservation-House lots 43 and 60. s o'clock A.M. Sl gomery street. The house is now erecting, and 1-.S. tL.a.t w n D en &Nelgoni rent G. Stts, north
8-1 o'clock A. M.ntists, hatree. Theshouse isunowrerecting an
Geo. B. Steele, Cornelius Wendell, In the St Regis Reservation, purchase of 1824-Lot 24. Leave Schenectady immediately after the arrival of the will be finished by the firstof May, in the best style, with -'8 day closed, the business nier Jacob Van Evere
Lucas H. McChesney, John Visscher, In the St. Regis Reservation, purchase of 1825--Lot 19. Utica Cars, wl ehrat
Lucas H. McChesne, John Vissher, In the t. Regis Reservation, purchase of 18 2, 25-Lot 19. Utica Cars,- marble mantel pieces, grates, &c. For terms apply to will e hereafter conducted by the subscribers, who have 57 feet, along the gro
Jacob H. Groesbeck, Ira Porter, In the Tongue Mountain tract-Lots 1,12,25. (say 3 o'clock P. M.) J. T. B. VAN VECHTEN, associated themselves for that purpose atthe office of the 11 inches in lenth o
Geo. Vance, jr. John Osborn In the Warrensburgh tract-Lots 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, Passengera for the Springs may leave Albany by the cars fe9-tf No. I Stanwix Hall. late C. & N. M r ige
James Winslow, Wynant Crannell, 17, 13 which start at 11 o'clock A. M. front the depot in LE wo stores, with dwellings at- l North Market street, opposite Stan- north side 75 feet 6 ii
Robert H. Vells, John W. Cluett, Also-Alexander Richards' bond for part of lot No. 9, State street, and can procure tickets at the office for the h TO LET- wo, stores, with dwellings at- R. NELSON. jaa-td
B. R. Spelman, George W. Gladding laid out on mile square, containing 505-10 acres, being in whole route. | tached, in the brick range, in Hudson, near Mar- A. NELSON. Thesale of the aboF
Manager. the town of Louisville in the county of St. Lawrence,being There is a daily line of stages from the Springs to the Also, in same range, a fine room, suitable for pleased that I have it in my power to recommend to my place.
Gentlemen desirous of attending the ball are requested the premises formerly mortgaged by David Hoit. north, via Glen's Falls and Sandy Hill, which intersects Ao, in same range, a former p atrons, a gentlema n in whom t he utmost conf -
to call on either of thIe managers a'ove named, who have Benjamin Wells' bond for lot No. 68, Jay tract, con- the principal stage routes to Montreal, Vermont, New- a lawyer's office. sty r g Va deu an pac al who n e uosona
books of subscription, and of whom only tickets can be taining 220 acres, being the premises formerly mortgaged Hamnpshire, and the eastern part of Massachusetts. Also, two three story brick dwelling in Washinton- dencecan bepla hi pr
procured. Tickets 3, to admit a gentleman and one or to the state by Ira Slater. de7 JOHN COSTIGAN, Sup't. street, south side. Enquire of B. KNOWER, services. In speaking thus of Mr. Alexander Nelson, 113 Washing
procured. Tickets 3, to admit fe6-d2awtf The conditions of sale will be, that one-fourth part of f South Market-st. therefore, as my successor, I do it from the most unques- .l Judge Savage
ore.hties, fe6-- wtf the purchase money be paid within forty-eight hours, and 1837-BOSTON, ALBANY AND CANAL TO LET-Store No. 24 State-street, now tionableevidence og his character and his skill at a Den- el that a desrip
ALBANY FEMALE ACADEMY-rThe semi- the remainder in six equal annual instalments, with in- LINE OF PACKETS. .. occupied by M. French, Agent. tist With regard to Mr. Robert Nelson, my late partner pll to [fe-dfj
A. annual examination of this institution will coin- terest at the rate of 6 per cent per annum, excepting the .I B Also, a new brick house in Hudson-street, a- I can bnly say that his reputation as a Dentist.s t weh elbORIN
mence on Monday the 13th inst. and be continued through mortgaged premises, the interest of which will be 7per Jbovel'earl. Enquireof RG established to need a w Ord from me. D r.T heoufcrie.is
the week, according to the following arrangement, viz: cent. WILLIAM CAMPBELL, RELYEA & WRIGHT. ER N OR CUYLER, Dentist tofrfsalti
The 5th and 6th departments will be examined on Mon- Surveyor General. oc1-m Office7 Chamber st., New York.ar
day morning-the 4th department on Monday afternoon The editors of the Keeseville Herald, Franklin Palla- The subscribers mot respectfully inform the Merchants TO LET-From the first of blay next, the 3 a twofor
and Tuesday morning, and the3d department on Tuesda- dae nmo T onda Heraldf te e vLa e nceR lankin arrnS and Shippers to and from Boston, Albany and Troy, and nd!! story brick dwelling house on the corner of Co- I f NCO B PTpI- f n dtw fo
and Tuesday mo ring, and th3d department on Tuesday- dium, Fend Herald, St Larence Republia, Warren tie interior, via Canal, Rail-road, &c., that they have lumbia and Water sts. Enquire of TBL ETH-- The Therea o b
afternoon and Wednesday Messenger and Sandy Hill Herald, are requ -sted to pub- mide permanent arrngementsWith the masters and VAN VECHTN & DAVIS, L
The examination of these departments will be condw-is this advertisement for eight aeeks previous to thewth the masters and i VAN VECHTEN & DAVIS, attention of those In- forgndin r ied
Led in the room occupied by the 2 department. w daye a owners, b ed formed the following line of first class fe3-t : 44 State street. P.dies and gentlemen is among the fany b
The examination of the 1st and 2d departments day of sale, ani send their first paper coOtaining it to the sthooners: who ar desirouofrepleting the vacancies caused by the qsfta
Theld eainather ion of the 1stan d department s the owing eSurveyor General's office, and omit this note in the pub- ORNAMENT, Captain H. Scudder. LET-From the first of May next, the losshofthle original teeth, is respectfully invitedato thme subibre at Osweon
hed in the roo of the st department il the following lEcation. fe l3-daivl aww ii three storyick dwelling houseNs ibsHuman hi s to oo 3lgr.t
order, viz: .... BALTIC, do L. Hinkley. set c l. lrat swe
Monday nirninzr-Arithmetic. Phivsioo~v.ndd ,inel- 6TATE OF l~iaNFWh-V ORd_ K unrr~vevr Gnral's OLIVER, do O. Fuller. ,,, iasret a.osor.bic-delin.hus, method and manqnr Ftt i ,;. ,, o.


SFOR SALE-'Three lots with the buildings
"iI thereon, situate on the west side of North Pearl
street, corner of Fox street each 21 feet nine
inches front on S. Pearl st., 6y about 70 feet deep.
aid lots are eligible situated for residences or retail
stores; hieing near the central part of the city. If not
sold by the 20th of February next, they will then be of-
fered atpublie sale at the Mansion House minthis city.-
T'erms easy for the purchaser. Title -indisputalble. For
further particulars enquire of the subscriber,58 Orange
street. January 27, 1837. .
ja28-dtfeb20o HARMIN VISSCIIER.
CHOICE FARMS IN SARATOGA
COUNTY FOR SALE.-The subscriber offers
n for sale that beautifully situated FARM called
WOOD LAWVN, containing 151 acres, immedi-
ately north from the village of Saratoga Springs, on
which the new STONE MANSION with COLLONADE
front, so conspicuously appears to the passer by, being
40 by 60 feet, finished in the most approved modern ityle,
with splendid Garden, a variety of Shrubbery, fruit of
the choicest selection, out-houses of every necessary de-
scription. The situation of this farm is such as will ad-
mit of a division, therefore will be sold separate or togeth-
er. TheMansion House cost 910,000.
Also a FARM of 22 acres, on the opposite side of the
highway, which cao be conveniently divided into two
Farms of sufficient siz,. As a grazing Farm there is none
that stands higher, i ad for ordinary farming purposes is
not surpassed by atiny. The Dwelling which is known as
the Putnam Boarding House, is a very good Frame Build-
ing, and exhibits considerable style, the out-houses are
good and sufficient in number and well arranged as to con-
venience.
Also, a FARM of 100 acres, which adjoins thie last
named, on the north, and.is well situated upon thle main
road, with good buildings,.-and is-alsio a first rate Farim.
It is a level plain and principally meadow land and will
afford 100 tons of- Hay annually. The soil of all the a-
bove named farms is of the very best quality and is in a
fine state of cultivation, well watered, and in good fence,
and a sufficient number of acres of TIMBER LAND.
The above are certainly very desirable Farms, either
for farming purposes or gentlemen's country residences,
being so very near to the must popular village in the Uni-
ted States. A gentleman may, during the summer leave
New-York at five in the evening and breakfast with his
family next morningat Saratoga. -
Also, a FARM, known as the Fitz Simmons Farm, im
the town of Saratoga on the west side of the Hudson ri-'
ver, and adjoining the Canal. It contains 240 acres of ex-
cellent land which is in gtmd fence, with one large and
convenient dwelling and suitable out-houses, and also a
Farm House on the rear of the farm. Thesoil is first rate
and in a fine state of cultivation. It htas a fine supply of
woodland and near a good market.-
Also, an extensive LUMBERING ESTABLISHMENT,
consisting of a STEAM:SAW MILL, .andx 1600 acres of
heavy TIMBERLAND, situ:a-ed in the town of Corinth,
Saratoga co., about 5 miles frtom-he rafting place of the
Hudson river, 8 miles from Jcssup's Landing, 12 miniles
from Saratoga Springs, with every convenience oftrans-
porting lumber to theAlbany market. Said Steam En-
gine cost #2200, which is now in full and prosperous op-
eration; the timber ishemlock, pine, whiteash and hard
wood; the land is allowed to be of the firstquality,worth
it least $8 per acre after the timber is off. The improved
ands ate in good fence, and under good cultivation, and
Pr soil and location are inferior to none in the country.
ere is also a desirable situation for an extensive TAN-
NING ESTABLISHMENT, as there is.abundant supply
of oak and hemlock bark, at 91, to $1 50 per cord-with
a good water privilege within three miles of the Hudson
river, and as yet there is not a tannery within tentms _of
i O raetnnrelTreleT, 4o SW0DCOBB,
Tayor J.ELSWORT, esq., Saratoga Springs.
The whole- or any part of the above will be sold on lib-
eral credit by WV. CUNNINGHAM.
Poughkeepsie, Jan. 16, 1837. jy23


S FOR SALE-A very superior Farm of two
S hundred and thirty acres, lying in the vicinity of
*ln" Nassau village, Rensselaer county. This farm
.J L embraces the fiats, being the greater part of a
farm which the subscriber has cultivated tor a number of
years, and the land adjoining the same on the west line,
recently owned by R. Merchant. As it is now offered, it
will rank, in point of location, buildings, fertility, state
of repair and privileges for extensive agricultural oper-
ations, with the best farms in the country. Three-fourths
of the purchase money can be secured by a bond and mort-
gage on said farm and remain thus from one to ten or
more years, to suit the purchaser. For-luther particu-
lars enquire of the proprietor, residing in the village of
Nassau. S. W. HOAG.
January 25. ja27-dac3mn
FOR SALE-A VALUABLE REAL ES-
Ii TATE, OR TO EXCHANGE FOR PROPER-
HB!I TY IN THE COUNTRY.-One three story
ckn. brick house and lot on the corner of South Mar-
ket and esterlo streets. The said house is built in the
modern style, finished in a complete manner, with marble
fire places, folding doors, and slate roof of the best kind.
The said house may justly be said to be one of the best
built in the city:-there is a full view of the river front
the east rooms.
Also, one lot on the corner of Dallas and Westerlo-sts.
adjoining the new south Dutch Church.
Also, five lots on Franklin-st. and one on Schuyler-st.
and one on Cherry st. all in the fourth ward of the city.
The above house is ts be let from the first of May next,if
not sold. The above property is clear of all church or
other quit rents whatever-the title will he undisputable
and terms of payment accommodating. Enquire of the
subscriber. BARNUM WHIPPLE.
sAlbany, January 24, 1837. ja26-d2awclawtf


VALUABLE PROPERTY- FOR
ItSALE-TThe subscriber offers for sale his resi-
1n1,dence in the village of Mechanicsville, Saratoga
,nL .county, together with his Farm, containing 57
acres, adjoining the same. The location is remarkably
healthy, and in every respect as pleasant and convenient
as could bedesired, being on the Hudson river about 1lR
miles nortf of the city of Albany, and in the immediate
vicinity of an enterprising and highly flourishing village,
with churches, stores manufactories, &e,
The dwelling is spacious and commodious, and its va-
rious apartments well and conveniently arranged; it -is
delightfully situated on the post road from Albany to
Whitehall, and commands a tie view of the valley of tIhe
Hudson from its front. In the rear is a beautiful oak
grove with several walks and summer houses, and ad-
joining the grove is an orchard of one hundred bearing
trees.
The outhouses, including barn, shed, granary,;carriage
house, wood-house, and ice house, are aill constructed of
the most permanent materials, and in the very, best style.
There is also a very large garden, well laid out,. and high-
ly cultivated and improved, containing grapes.in abun,
dance, and fruit of almost every kind. .
The-cars upon the rail-road from Troy to Ballston Spa
stop upon the border of the village for the purpose o.
landing and receiving passengers, thus a pleasant convey-
ance fr- Meclvahicsville to Albany is afforded daily in
the short space of an hour and a half. In addition to the
rail-road there are two lines of stages which pass every
day. : "


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LitC SALES.
UEL MO1iGA & CO.
mission and Wholesale Dry Goods
-Store No. 63 State-street.)
PRIVATE SALE.
ek boots.
do.
)rogans. -
'hite wadding.
ek.
atent thread.'
ves. ,
ty mould and dipt candles.

iL ESTATE.
FOR SALE-A very desirable
provedd farm of 169 acres, situated in
P of Greenfield, county of Saratoga,
re from the celebrated springsof Sar-
tfind about 30 miles from Albany. On
good large barns, and a commodious
lie said farm contains some good
orchard and some timber land. Tlhe
cupied by Mr.Jonathan Ford, who
itign respecting1he same. Posses-
e first of May. For terms and fur-
ess ISAAC A. PLUME,
No. 90 Broad-st. N. York city.
SY SALE-Will be sidin the
York at public auction, att MILLER,
LLER'S auction room, No.30 Broad
v twenty-third daty ofJanuary inst.,
ioon, under the direction of Samuel
chancery, all that certain house and
rd of Albany, .bounded west by late
t, south by a lot heretofore of Ba-
by Maidenlane,. and east by lot of
aine were formerly occupied by Ry-
5n deceased, containing on Dean st.
and of said Burneton the east 48 feet
n south side 77 feet 5j inches, on the
inchles, English measure more or less.
re property is postponed until (lie
'ebruary next, at the same hour and
ja20-2awtfebl5tdtd
&E-The large well built house No.
ton street, at present occupied by
The property is so well known
lion of it cannot berequiyed. Ap-
HENRY L, WVEBB, 51 State st.
ORIST MILL FOR SALE
Induced, by.a poor state of health
ouring- amd Grist Mill, situated on
Owego. It Ihas four run of stone for
gristing, geared diistinct from each
ic to.e oeOF baUi purposes, at.w ill.
ed with the eustoir mill, machinery
corn. .The flo&Wr,, made at this mill
rands. For further particulars en-
nd J. Lefferts, Nqw York, or -the
Oswego, October 11, 1836.
S" C. MeCULLY.


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AT a court of chancery hel
at the city of New York,
member, onethousandeight
sent, William T. MeCoun, vic
cui
William B. Bolles.John C.
ham, receivers of the estate a
surance Company in the ci
berts, David Roberts and Ca
Field and Mary Ann his wif
Roberts, Amelia Rober
It appearing by affidavit to
that the said defendants, Da
wife respectively, reside out
of Illinois, one of the Uni
tion of Gabriel Winter, esq.
it is ordered, that the faid
datharine his wife, do respe
bill of complaint in this cau
date of this order, and in def
be taken as confessed again
as shall make default there
wished within twenty days in
newspaper called the New
printed in the city of New Yo
tion be continued in each
weeks in succession, once a
bar 20, 183.
IN CHANCERY-Before the
isa Cassidy vs. William Ca
browse Spencer Cassidy, Mar
Elizabeth Cassidy, and Die W
race B. Webster, Henry Ca
executors of the will of Patr
tit
In pursuance and in virtue
cause on the fifth day of Sept
one of the masters of this
public auction at the Man
street in the city of Albany
(1837) at 12 o'clock at no
All that certain piece of la
situate in the third ward of
ner of Chapel street and Ma
three feet six inches in fron
feet eight and a half inches
hundred and six feet five an
boundary line, and seventy-
east boundary line; the last
Also all that certain piece
wardof the city of Albany, o
(late Wolf street,) and west
guished on a map filed in the
and county of Albany on the
lot number three, and bounde
northwest corner of lot num
south forty-three degrees
chains and fifty links to Mi
thence north forty-six degre
long the north side of the sa
along the east bounds of lo
fiftylinks to Lydius street,
the same one chain to
Also all that certain piece of
of the city of Albany on th
dius) street, and distinguish
clerk's office on the second
six, and bouuded as follows
corner of lot number five an
three degrees and thirty minu
links to Mink (now Ferry) s
degrees and thirty minutes we
same one chain, thence north
lot number seven ten chains
Lydius) street, thence along
chain to the pla
Also all that piece of groun
the city of Albany on the so
street, and distinguished on
clerk's office on the second
eleven, and bounded as foll
west corner of lot number
forty-three degrees thirty mi
ty links to Mink (now Ferry
six degrees thirty minutes we
same one chain, thence north
lot number twelve ten chains
Lydius] street, thence along
chain to the pl
Also all that certain lot ofg
on, situate in the fifth ward
west side of North Market st
by North Market street thirty-
north by a lot of ground sa
two hundred and eighty-four
by Orchard street thirty-fiv
quarters of an inch, and on
said to belong to Charles C
y-four feet
Also all that certain lot of g
in the city of Albany on the
nearly fronting the last descr
being thirty-five feet one an
and about seventy six feet fi
Also the one equal undivide
remainder (after thle deaease
seized of alile estate therein
of land with the buildings t
ward of the city of Albany,
of John Meads (formerly kno
on the south by Steuben street
formerly owned by Abraham
Columbia street, being about
ben street and on Columbias
and sixty-fotr feet dee
Also all those certain lots
near the one mite stone,in th
and distinguished on amap t
forty-six and forty-seven,
street:, lot number forty-siX s
Sand street, on the west by l
east by lot number forty-five
street, being in breadth thro
number forty-seven is bound
on the west by lots numbers f
the east by lot number forty-
Fox street, being in breadth
Also all that certain lot of
ing in the second ward of th
and distinguished on a ma
lot number seven, beginning
running thence along Fox stre
and ofthe same width in the
and sixt
Also all that certain let of
ing in the second ward of t
and distinguished on a map
number four. bainnln nit a
ning thence along Road stre
es, thence north one hundr
ly thirty-one feet five inches
and sixteen feet to the plac
January 18th, 1837.
Jy20PSw..
IN CHANCERY,.iState of N
an order of this honorable
highest bidder at public aucti
auction room No; 30 Broad st
on the twenty-third day of J
at noon, under the directio
subscriber, one of the master
certain house and lot of groun
the city of Albany, bounded
Dean street, south by a lot o


G. 8taats ofthe city of Alba
by Maiden lane, and east by
John Burnet, as the same ba
ses were owned and occupied
en deceased, in his life time,
Dock and now Dean street fift
side along the, ground now or
forty-eight feet eleven inche
side eventy-seven feet five a
north side. seventy-fve feet
English me ,ure, be the same
all and singular the tenemen
tenances thereunto belonging
Dated New York,
delO-Iawtd S. COWDR
The sale of the above prenm
twenty-third day of Febru
and place. Dated 1
ja9 8. COWVDREY,


ATT a court of chancery h
York, at the city of Albitn
aJy, one thousand eight hun
sent-Reuben H. Wol
BarentVan Alenh, ys. Aaio
Manning his wife, George
Mllek," John Pric
It appearing by affidavit to
that process of subpona to
mad uudertheseal of this co
fedents, and that the def
a resident of this state, could
cen by reason of his absen
In t, tate, and ahlsoby rea
from the place of his resin
VWill.ird, solicitor and of c
is- ordered, that the said d
cAtuse ii appearance to be e
be served on the complainant
months from the date of this.,
pearance. that he cause his
bill to be filed, and a copy th
complainant's solicitor-wi hi
a copy of said bill, and in d
may be taken as confessed
it t further ordered, that
twenty days, cause this or
state paper, and in the news
Troy, called the Troy Budget
of said papers for eight wee
least in each of the said wee
itot be necessary in case the
a copy of this order to be se
defendant Aaron Manning, a
the time above prescribed
cause Copy.
ja23-Sw
AT a Court of Chancery hd
York, atthe city of New
of January,-one thousand eig
Present William T. McCou
irst C
David Brown vs Perez Jone


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A T a court ofclhmncery held
at the city of New York,
December, one thousand eight
sent, William T. McCoun, vic
cu
William Horace Brown an
Dudley and Hlelen his wife,
Burling, Jonathan D. Steve
M. Quin, JamesJ. SIewart,
'Trim,l Charles- Schenck, Fra
WVilliam Bull, James Free
It appearing by affidavits to
that the defendant David D.
state, and that process for his
been duly issued, and that the
reason of the absence of said
tion of Philip S. Crooke, solid
is ordered, that the said def
and answer tll bill wilhinb t
hereof, or in default thereof,
be taken as confezsed against
ed, that a copy of this order
days from the date hereof i
Evening Post. printed in this
cession and onceat least
de31-8w JOHN WA


A T a court of chancery held
at the city of Albany, on
December, in the year of o
hundred and thirty-six-Pre
chancellor of thi
Mar-ia Hicks vs
It appearing to the satisfacti
pendant in the above suit is
process for his appearance ins
sued but could not be served
his place ofresidlense and fr
meant within the saime-on mot
licitor and counsel of the co
said Edwin Hicks appear and
of the complainant filed in t
firomn the date of this order,
be taken against hinm as counf
it is further ordered, that wi
ofthis order the complainant
lished in the state paper ani
nal, published in Troy, and
tinted for eight weeks in suci
the same papers, or that a co
sonally on the said Edwin at
time prescribed for
JAMES PORT
E. Clark, solicitor.
T a court of chancery hfeldr the s
at the city of Albany', on t
cemnber, one thousand eight hu
sent, Reuben H. Wal
The New York Life Insuran
Darius Orton and Sarah his w
man Orton ,Zoheth Al
It-appearing by affidavit to t
that the defendants Dariust
Bronson Ortoa, Truman Orto
out of this state, but are res
-oUn motion ofJulius Rhoadee
complainants, it is ordered,
Sarah his wi fe, Bronson Orto
Devoy cause their appearance
thereof to he served on the ca
four months from the date o
their appearance that they ca
plainants'bill tobefiled, an
on the complainants' solicito
vice of a copy of said bill; a
within twenty days the said com
to he published inathe state
Republican, and that said public
of said papers at least once
in succession, or that they c
be personally served on tmhe
his wife, Bronsonrt Orton, Tn
voy, at least twenty days be
their appearance.
de2 -8w J


T a court ofechancery held
at the city ot Albany, on
one thousandeight hundred
James Vanderpoel, vice chan
Simon A. Veeder and Elizab
Brinckerhoff, Lewis Dunham,
Thomas L.
Itappearing by affidavitto t
that the defendant William
this state, butcannot be fou
- ry *-nuuli 0* ij -w w
Messrs. MeKown & Van IS ure
ylainants, it is ordered, that
appearance to be entered, an
on the complainants' solicit
the date of this order; and i
he cause his answer to the co
and a copy thereof to be served
citors within forty days after
and in default thereof, said
ed: and it is further ordered
within twenty days cause this
state paper and in the New
for eight weeks in succession
but such publication shall not
complainants shall cause a co
personally upon the said W
twenty days before the time
pearance in this cau
ja9-Sw


N OTICE is hereby given th
made to the legislature o
thie next session, for the inc
cated in the city of New Yor
and Real Estate Bank, with a
lars. New York, Dec. 31,


N OTICE-Application will b
of the state of New York a
the incorporation of a bank t
with a capital of one million
the city of New York. N. Y
Y order of'MIichaei Ulsho
Sthe court of common plea
of New-York, notice is hereby given, p
provisions of the statute aut
non-resident debtors, that
against the estate of L
ER, composing the firm of Kn
Massachusetts, non-resident
and that the same will be s
debts, unless they appear an
according to law, within nine
cation of this notice; and t
due to them by residents of t
them or for their use, of an
belonging to them, and the
ty by them, are forbidden
this 7th day of Januar
ja'20-Om Attorn


o T court of chancery he
Io A at the city of Albany, on
e one thousand eight hundre
. Reuben H. Walwoh
s Almira Barns, vs. Aarona
Sing his wife, William Donnel
f George Gould, Barent Van A
I Mminick, Joho Pri
I It appearinghbyaffidavit to
I hat process of subpoena vittota poestsuoeat
- and under the seal ofthis c
f fendants, and that the de
I is a resident of this state,
t process, by reason of his
within this state, and also
sence from the place of his
D. Willard, solicitor and of
itis ordered that the said de
cause his appearance to be e
be served on the complainan
months from the date ofthis
pearance, that he cause his
bill to be filed, and a copy t
plainant's solicitor, within
copy of said bill, and in def
taken as confessed by said A
ordered that thlie said comp
I .../ emi :p th ..- A- # -- A;r- I,


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Beginning at low water ma
Hudson river under the centre
now constructing across that
Saratoga Railroad Company
twenty-three and one half d
forty-five feet to a stake a
bank of said river Hudson, th
quarters of a degree west ni
o a stake, thence north third
agrees east eight hundred and
hence south fifty-one and th
815 feet to low water mark o
iver aforesaid, thence along t
hirty-four and one half deg
hirty-three feet to the place
res of land, exclusive of tha
:nd secondly above described
these boundaries. The second
els of land for the partition
vas filed, i described as fol
iece or parcel of land under
Vatervlietin the county of
f the Hudson river along th
nd is bounded and described
nade by Sidney A. Beers I
iousand eight hundred and thi
ary's office, its follows, to w
he south line of George Tibbi
he distance of 94 feet from
ihe aforesaid soath line, then
utes east 340 feet, thence so
'est 08 feet, thence south 14
south 17 degrees and 30 minu'
7 degrees and 20 minutes we
egress and 20 minutes west 2
rees and 30 minutes west 450
nd 15 minutes west 300 feet,
0 minutes west 2S0 feet, then
et, thence south 44 degrees
ence south 33 degrees and
ence aouth 25 degrees and 4
ence south 23 degrees & 45
tuth 23 degrees and 10 minute
degrees and 10 minutes west
grees and 40 minutes west 372
ees anl 55 minutes west 490 f
id 20 minutes west 228 feet,
5 feet to the wvest side of
ore of the Mohawk and up a
ver to the place of b
ja9-3mJAMES PO


TATE OF NEW-YORK.-
fore the vice chancell
Robert Steele, complainant
der, Abraham T. Rose and El
Van Gclder, Jonathan F. Seely
Martha Van Gelder, Louisa
Henry Davis and Isabella M.1
Steele, Thomas WVaring, Mar
and Esther Waring, infants,
dian atiIitem, and Martha h
der. who was widow of Abrah


B V" virtuin-ol a ,iu\vr cont
of mortgage be;nring dale t
the year of our Lord one thosn
ty-five, executed by Peter Fl
city and county of Albany an
man Gamsevoort and Peter G
ast will and testament of Ca
and recorded in book number
156,457 and 458, on th( 29th Ap
of the city and county of Alban
now claimed to be duethe sumn
Forty Cents-all that certain
situate, lying and being in thi
bany, designated as lot numbn(
lots in the said fifth ward of
to thie estate of Pater Ganse
February 1,l34 by George IV.
in the office ofthe clerk of
bounded westerly in front on
lot number twelve (12) on said
number seventeen and eighteen
her ten (10) designated on said
four feet in width front and
three inches in depth, be the
being had to the said map wil
pear-will be sold at public
in North Marketstreet in the
Monday of July next at twelve
mortgage then and there forec
to the form ofthe statute in
Dated 4th Ja
HERMAN GAN
PETER- GA
Executors of Catherin
Uansevoort & iull, attor


Irl-,IE people of the state of
I God, free and independent
tors and all others interest
Hess, late of the town of R
of Albany, dece
You are hereby cite to ap
our county of Albany, in our su
lay of March next, at ten o'
lay, at the surrogate office,
thereto attend the final set
vin S. Hess, administrator,
ap location of sa
in testimony whereof, we ha
of our said surrogate to
ness, Anthony Blanchard
L. 5.] said county, at the c
of February, in the yea
sand eight hundred and
independence t
fe7-4w .
T HEpeople of the state of
Godfroe and independent,
kin and legatees ofQuintin M
York, deceased,
You and each ofyou are here
so nalmv to h end mnnarion lwfhr i


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AT a court of chancery held
at thie city of Albany, on
ry, ote thousand eight hun
sent, Reuben H. Wa
William Sturtevant and Ha
vs. Polly Payn, Charles Pa
Electa Payn, Jehiel Hambli
wife, Moses Love, Mary Love
Scovell and Sarah Scovell
amnd Louisa Dingman his wi
phen L.
It appearing by affidavit to t
that the defendants Moses P
man and Louisa Dingmanhis
tha Love, reside out of this s
of the United States, as fol
and Setlh Payn reside in the s
as Dingman and Louisa Ding
of the state of Illinois, an
are residents of the state o
Mr. E. Clark, of counsel for
dered, that thIe said Mose
Dingman and Louisa Dingma
Martha Love, cause their appe
notice thereof to be served o
within four months from th
case of their appearance, tha
the complainants' bill to be f
served on tlhe complainants' s
ter service of a copy of said
said bill of complaint may b
or such of them as make def
dered, that within twenty
cause this order to be public
a newspaper printed in tha
that the said publication be
papers at least once in each
session, or that they caus
personally served on thie s
Thomas Dingman and Louis
Love and Martha Love, at l
time above prescribed for
JAMES PORTE
E. Clark, Solicitor for coI


AT a court of chancery held
at the city of New York,
ot December, one thousand e
Present, WVilliai Tr McCoun,
circ
Charles Kelsey vs. Jos
It appearing by affidavit to t
that process of subpicia has
the seal of this court dire
Brower, who is a resident 6f
cess could not be served up
of his absence from this st
lor, esq. solicitor for compla
said defendantdo cause his a
notice thereof served upon
within three months from the
case of his appearance that
complainants' bill to be filed
said solicitor within forty d
said bill, and in default their
confessed; and it is further
plainant within twenty day
wished in the state paper an
The New York Evening Post,
York, and to be published in
weeks in succession and on
weeks. Copy. JOHN
John N. Tayler, sol'r for
AT a court of chancery held f
at the city of Albany, on
cember, one thousand eight
sent, Reuben 1.. WV
Elizabeth Wait Tibbits a
vs. Georcge Tibbils. Jaco
Howard Tibbits, Tomn MeCo
Tibbits, George Griswo
It appearing by affidavit to
that the bill in this cause was
certain tracts, pieces or pa
scribed, that process of subp
titled cause, has been issue
this honorable court, direct
Tibbits and Tom McCoun Tibb
dent of this state, but that, s
on either of said defendant
from this state-on motion
oven, esq. solicitor for th
that the said defendants Ho
Tibbits, do each of them cau
ed, and notice thereo'to be s
complainants, on or before th
and in default thereof, that
fessed against then; and it i
der he published in the state
sively once in each week. Their
or parcels of land is describe
certain part of an island call
and being in the town of WatV
bany; anld botiunded noith ly
which belongs to George Tib
and west by the southern br
river, containing ab3ut one
excepting out of the same fou
land conveyed to the Renss
Company by David Cady and
by an indenture bearing date
thousand eight hundred and t
said pieces is in and by said
and described as follows, to
parcel of land situate on Gre
bany, commencing at a slak
Rensselaer and Saraloga Rai
the lHudson river, and extend
agrees and forty-five minutes
forty-nine degrees thirty-t
feet one and one half inch, t
and thirty-four minutes 'vest
inch, thence north thirty eig
nutes west seventy feet and ot
north thirty-three degrees
feet and one and one halfip
degrees and sixteen minutes
half inch, thence nor hI twen
nutes west seventy feet and o
teen degrees and finorty-four
one hall' inch, thence north n
nutes west seventy feet one a
four degrees and twelve minu
one half inch, thence north o
minutes east seventy feet one a
seven degrees and twenty mi
and one half inch, thence no
minutes east seventy feet ant
eighteen degrees anti fifty-
one anI one half inch, then
and three-fourths of a degree
feet, thence along the line o
ly belonging to the said Dan
due east ninety feet six inc
degrees and three-fourths o
hundred and thirty feet, then
fifty-two minutes west sixth
in ches, thence south thirteen
sixty-one feet ten and one ha
degrees and twenty minutes
one half inches, thence sout
minutes west sixty-one feet t
south four degrees and twelv
ten and ane hall inches, then
ty-eight minutes east sixty-on
es, thence south fifteen decre
sixty-one feet ten and one ha
ty-,ne degrees and thirty mi
andi one half inche., thenc
and sixteen minutes east six
inches, thence south thirty-
east sixty-one feet ten and
thirty-eight degrees tforty-eig
ten and one half inches, the
and thirty-four minu es east s
inches, thence south forty-n
minutes east forty feet, thenc
ty-five minutes east one hund
south forty-four degrees and
two feet six inches to the p
is described as all that certain
situate on Green Island in t
cing in the south lineofthe
road and at tht, southwest c
structing across the Hudson
south sixty-five degrees west t
to low water mark in the low
hawk river, thence north twe
two feet six inches, thence
twelve hundred and sixty-four
Rensselaer and Saratoga Rai
eightdegrees east ninety-eigh
ning. The third is described a
or parcel of landsiituiae upo
on the east side of the west
river and on the somherly sid
on the easterly Sidce orhti sa
Moha\vk river, and on the so
scribed piece or parcel of la
the south side of said piece
five degrees east four hundr
sonth eleven degrees east fo
thence south sixty-five degr
venty feet to low water mark
west or lower sprout of the
saiMd sprout of said river at
degrees west four hundred and
beginning, containing five ac
described as all that certain
situate upon Green Island af


,LTRROGAT
jTOTICE-Inh pursuance of an
fL e the county of Albany, n
thle creditors of William Duff
deceased, to exhibit their sev
ry vouchers in support their
his office No. '22 North Market
before thie thirt-enth day ofA
place ia distribution of th e m
dersig"ned, as administrators of'
atniomwthe creditors thereof,
11, is&8H.
ocl12-6m JAMES DU
OTIGCE-Pursuant to an ord
county of Albany, notice i
creditors of Ezra Ames, late
edl, to present their respect
vouchers thereof, to thIe subsc
41 South Penrl street in said
seventh day of A pril n
JULIUI
oc24-6nm ANGE
Nr OTICE-hi pursuance of 1
S of the county of Albany, no
the creditors of Michael Leyne
deceased, to exhibit their se
ry vouchers in support there
store at the corner of Ferry
of Albany, on or before the
Oct. 9,. 13i6.
oclO-6m
Xr-OTICYL -In pursuance ofa
.L^ the county of Albany, not
the creditors of Gardener Till
bany, deceased, to exhibit t
demands with the vouchers in
scriber, No. 10 Plain street,
third day of June next, attrc
that day. ) Daied
de2-6in G.
'II-IE people ofthlie state
SGod tret e amnd independent,
of kin of Romeo Walbridge, la
county of Rensselaer
Yolt are hereby cited to ap
our county of Rensselaier, in
twenty-sevenlh day of Febr
the forenoon of that day, at th
of" Troy, then and there to att
the account of JuliaV Walbrid
WV. Walbridge, executor of tlI
thie said Romeo Walbridige d
there be rendered bef
In testimony whereof, we hav
o f oursaidsurrogate to be
tL. S. ness, Job Pierson. esq.
ty, at the city of vTrcyv
November, in the year of
eight hundred
no24-3i.. IERSON .
RTHE people ofthet state o
SGoh free and independent,
kin and legatees of Margaret
New-York, deceased,
You and each of you are her
sonually tA) lie and appear befo
ty of New York, at his office
the tenth day of March nex
forenoon of that day, then and
lemnentofthe accounts of Ja
Jacob lirouwer, the executors o
of the said Margar
In testimony whereof, we ha
of our said surrogate tobe
ness, James Campbell, esq
[[,. h. -oiinty, at lthecity
of December, in the yea
sand eight huiindred and t
dependence th
del0-JCm
THE people of the state o
I God free and independent
ofkin of Peter Brown, late
decea_4ed, se
You and each of you are her
sonally to be and appear befo
ty of New York, at his office
the ninth day of June next a
noon of that day, then and the
ment nfthe accouimts of John
the goods, chattels and cred
dece
It testimony whteref, we ha
ofsaid surrogate to bher h
James Campbelil, esq su
[L. S.J ty, at the city ofN-
cember, in the year of
eight hundreds and thirty
ence thin-
ihO1-6nim
TTHE people ofthe Stateof
God free and iundependent,t
kin and all other persons int
phenJumel, a native of Fran
New YVork, merchant, d
You and each of you are iere
sonally to be and appear bef
ty of New York, at ii office
the thiitinerith day of .July I
of that iday, then and therto
of the accounts ofEliza B Bur
ministratrix of the goods., ch
phen Juitrne
In testimony whereof, we ha
of said surrogate lo be i
James (uampbtel, esq. sur
L>. S.1 ty, at the city of
Decemnlber, in the year of
eight iunodred iandi thiry
rice thie s
de26-6m JAMES
re^O the heirs .nfEphraim Sw'
I ers when i
You wit! please to take notic
ty-fourth day of February ne
the county ofAlbany, whereso
held, at teu o'clock in the fo
proof of anl record the last
witzer, laie of the town o
of Albany, deceased, pursuant
article first, part second of t
of New York. Date
Yours, &-.
jal2-6w An exe


J OHIN I1. WILLIAMS, noti
ber 20 1S36; creditors to
Cheever, first judgq of A
&c. this (office inI Albany
P137, at ten o'clock in the


D ENNIE SAYRE, of their ci
in his individual capacity
WVightand Dennie Sayre, l
namile, style and firm of A. W
January 7 1837; creditors toa
ard Riker, recorder ofthe ci
in thie city hall of said city,
1P37 at eleven o'clock in thi
1p0itO1MAS L HA'TNES,(t'
I published Januiary 30 1a3
fore hni Sarmniel Clheever, fi
court, counsellor, &c., at
twelth day of April, 1S37, a
DI

T O the heirs of Abraham V
Small others whomit
You will please to tnike not
the twenty-seventh day of
surrogate of thu county of
shnll then be held, at ten o
day, to take the proof of,
testament of Abraham Van Ve
Albany in the county of Alb
chapter sixth, title first, ar
evised slautut-es of tnhe st
uaryv 1
Yours, &c. AB'M


!Ce
in
elr
lar


jsut


JACOB T. B. VANVL
Executars in s


OTICE--In pursuurice of nr
L ch; having cluimsins against the esta
the city of A!bz !,y. deceasedI
bit thesamne, together with t
of, to Gideon Hawley, esq. on
will and testament of said d
North Pearl street in said c
fifth day of July next.
GIDEON
JAME N
ja14-fiOm AUGU


N OTICE is hemeby given tha ca
S to the legislature of this
sion, to amend the charter
ranceCompany of the city o
said company to divide thei
crease the number ot Director


J-TOTICE is hereby given t
ofincorporation f.or an ass
science and the arts, and for
the accommodation of the Mec
of New York, with a capital
New York, Dec. 30, lM0.
urOTICE is hereby given t
L I made to the legislature o
sion, for an act to Incorpor
of 91,000,0(O0, with bankin,
ship canal from Greenbush,
to some point below the ove
the banking house to be locate
laer, with the privilege of a
and to hue called the Rensse
New York, Dec. 241, 1836.
N OTICE,-The mayor, alder
I the city of Albany will a
ofthe legislature, for such
tled An act to amntend an actt
the Albany basin, passed Apr
work mentioned in the first
hl've been completed, that
in the said act may assess
any property taken or in anm
tion the same and the expense
and to authorise the collect
the same, until the other in
said original act shall hav
that the commissioners shall
est of all moneys advanced, fr
corporation, to Improve the
ginal or amended act, and appo
ner provided thereby, as a p
provement. Albany, January
common council. ja9-4w 1


conimniomi council. ja9-


I TOTICE is hereby iven t
1_ I made to the legislature
at its present session, which
Tuesday of January, Instant,
sate the St. George's Society
the said society to hold real
ty thousands dollars. The ob
afford relief and advice to
to their wivea, widows or c
York, and to promote soci
members; and the property a
to be expended
New-York, Jan. 12, 1837.


N OTICE is hereby given tha
S to the legislature ofthe
present session, for the exte
the deposition ofthe capital
Insurance Company ofthe c
paid in. New York, Jan. 1
N OTICE is hereby given tha
Sto the legislature of the
ensuingsession, for an act
styled the Exchange Bank
a capital of two million of
P PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby
will be made to the Legis
York during the present ses
time granted for the filling
Eighth Ward Fire Insuranc
New York, and also for redi
capital of said Company f
dollars to two hund
New-York, Jan. 18th, 1837


New-York, Jaim. 18th, 18-


tVTflTCE is her,'hv civetatteTn dR--


'
-
in
y
W
)
f

a





f
i


law, within nine months from the firDt,' o"bicatiOt h. o
notice; and that the payment of anydehts due tote by
residents of this state, and the deliveryto them or forth
use, of any property within this state belonging to t
and thie transfer of any such property by them, are fo
len ,vi law andI re void. Dated tlhe 6th day o(f A .ist 1S3,
N. DANE ELI,,GWOo, phcation and dim


- B Y orderofthie hon. JohnT.
f city and county of Ne
e en, pursuant to the proviso
I attach..-ents against non-resident
e nent has issued against the
f and JOHN I.NGKfSOLL, re
. that the same will be sold
, unless tihey appear and d
' cording to law, within nine
Scation oftlhis nice; and th
, to them by residlentw oftibis
.- or for their use, of any pro
! ing to theimn, and the transfer
. aire forhidlden by law and ar
- Muy, 1S3. -
S nmy'2M-9n Attorn
- B Y order ofthe hon. Joh
court of common pleass
of thle degree ofecounsellor
notice is hereby given accord
statute authorising attachment
ors, that an attachment has
WALTER J. SHEPHERD), a
that the same will he sold fo
less he appear anddischarge
law, within nine months from
notice; anidthat the payment
sidetits oflthis state, and the
of any property within this
the transfer of any such prop
law and are void. D
11. P. & S.
apiS--imn Attorney
Y order of the hon. Richa
city of New York, notice
suant to the provisions of
tachments against non-residi
ment ihas issued against
TINGS, a resident of thme p
the same will be sold for the
he appear and discharge su
law, within nine months from
notice; and that the payment
residents ofthis state, and t
use, of any property within
and the transfer of any such
den by law and are void.
136. A.G.
inyl(-n Attr A fto or
Y order ofhou. Richard Ri
New York, notice is here
provisions of the statute autii
non-resildent debtors, that
against 1te estateofi AdO' (,


St othe udrectionsos o tie t
state of New York entitled, A
sconfling und absent debtors, h
of ihe said debtor to be seize
and discharges his debts, w
notice of such seizure, all t
payment of his debts. Dat
IS36. GRAHAM, SAN
de3a-,m Attorneys
Y border of Samuel NV. Jones, es
J county courts of the cou of Sche
sellor, &c., notice Is here
has issued against the esta
or late of the city of Schen
sealed debtor, on due pro
against absconding, conceal
and that the same will be
debtors, unless he, the said
discharge such attachment a
months from the first publ
that the payment of any deb
property belonging to the sa
use, and the transfer of any
pose whatever, are forbidden
ted the 20th dny of
STEPHEN A
ja0-3tu Attorne


----
IJ OTICE-Pursuant, to an
A- the county of Albany, n
the creditors ofPeter E. Ehm
cily of Albany, to present th
proper vouchers thereof, to
the attorney of the subscribe
street, in said city, on or b
next. Dated Jan
PETER SAN
JOHN SA
fe?- Om
el-m Adminis
N O'ICE is hereby given
bridge Tlail Ioad Company
the legislature of thIe stat of New
session, for an amendment t
company power to change t
their road in such manner a
termination of the
January 16, 1837.
N OTICE is hereby given tha
S1 and Company oftthe Mer
thie city of New York, intend
of the state nt thIe next sessi
capital stock oftthe bank to
order of the board of irect
de2-6w Wc


-(OTICE-Applicatlon wilh


BY virtue of a powtt contain
of mortgage bearing date th3
pril in the yemir one thousanil
executed by Rubin D. WVickhlman
town of Coeytmmans and coun
New York, to CUonrzi i Ten
and county of Albany, and
thouiv Ten Eyck, of the tower.
Rensselaer and state of New
no. 23: of mortgages, oni pages
of November one thousandth e
in the clerk's office of thie ci
upon which there is,novw claim
huIndred and fifty-twvo dollars
tain piece or parcel of land wi
tiated in the town of Coeyman.f
lvws- beginuina at. the south
fobrs:iid Conrad Ten Eyck, n
Schermcrhorn, at the turnpike
nine degrees east five chain
degrees and fifteen minutes
eiriht links to ai rock lying i
Fretoric Hleight's east line
house in which Joseph WVin
thence soumtherly along the ro
iong the turnpike to the place
acres of land, be the same mor
tic auction at the city halli
eighteenth day ofMay tat telv
and the mortgage th"ent 'nd, t
according to the form of thest
provided. Dated
BARENT T
ANDREWV
Executors of Conrad
JACOB A.
ANTHONY
Frothingham & Lansing, at
TO EXONERATE FROM
[Pursutant to Revised Sta
V., title 1, art. 5; re]at
ments by art insolvent, f
eating his person fmi
AMES F. HOWE, notice fir
1837; creditors to appear
recorder of' thIe city of New-Y
City Hall of the city of New-
1937, at ten o'clock in the f
ALANSON IHUGHSON, notic
ber 17 183f6; creditors to a
Cushiman, recordt-er of the city
city, oun the twenty-fourth l da
clock in the forenoon.
SEORGE LANMAN, notice fi
S 1W37; creditors to appear
recorder ofthe city of New Y
hall of said city, on thle. sixt
eleven o'clock in the fore
,OSFtPIi tIARRIS, notice If
IS37; creditorsto appear befo
of the city of New-Y ork, at
in said city, on the fourth of
the forenoon.


,


Altornev ror atta,,:Ilina creeittons.


ja -


NOQTPICES Ts..' A .3.S, I .V order.of Ith1 frs-uefh
A,3'coU-rt Of conit pleas for
Y order of the hon. kJiahrd Riker, rc-order of thile Yurt
city ofNew York, notice is hereby giveni, pursuant tche
to the provisions of the siatutc iuthorisig.i aat' ucneh i'
against non-restdent dcttihrs, thiat an attachtenit a.has
sued against the esatc ofGr{hnGr BFshAig 11ROVN of U
LOVl,'~~~~~~~... in the county o nia n htIi aewl esl o
EI)WARI) ROVE DA WVSON, resileits ofLoudomn in l
Eungland,comnposing the now or late firm ofBrown, D iaw- tl
son & Co. of London aforesaid, merchants, amid that the '
same will b" sold for the paty.nemt of their debts uini'ses tti
appear ndld discharge ,. ch attachmnent,accor.:iHtofe to
within nine months from the first "-ii.a-ionof 'this no-
tice; and that the paymnentof any debltsduei hi their bv re-
sidents of this state, and the delivery to them or f')r there
use ofany property within lhis state belonging to
aind the transfer ofn ny such property by themacic fert.
den by law and are voi. lDat. d th '12:1i dutyof N eno ef
o36. F, 13. CU iJTIN, thecounty of K
n25-m Attorney for :attafLing fcrd the statute
B Y order ofthe hon. John -'. Irvin:;, first judge of the
at court of conimgn pleas oftl. c:'y andcoultv ot'Nc
York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to thie provisions of
ihe statu'.e authorising attachments ai;!inas lon--reshdat
debtors, that an atttelhnnent has issu.Mi aairn.st the CSt'ia
of JOSEPH BROWN and AN)DRE VBIOWVN, re-- appear
dents of England in the Kingdom of Great Biritain, ai(nd
thit tile same will be sold for the payment of their debts,
unless they' appear and discharge 6uch -tutchimtem.I, r
cordim to law, within nin. months froin the first ptublica-h
lion Q? this notice; snd tsat the payment of any debtsp
dule to them by residents off tlhi.' s.!te, a;nd t
to themi or foi their use, of any property withinthi
belonging to them, and the transfer of any property by
them. are forbidden by law and are void. Dated the Oth t Y o
day ofNovenber, IF36. HENRY E. DAVIF, IS. oft
nool1-91um *ttoruey for'attachingereditors
VY order of the hlion. Samuel Jones, chief justice oft the pr
S superior court or the city of New York, notice is abi
hereby given, pursuant to the provisions ofthe statute
thorising a't.chmennts against non-resident debtors, thabut
an attachment has issued against the estate of ABRA- in
HAM ,4LE WIS, a nion-resident of tlic state of NewYork u
and that the same wvill be sold for the payment of his de-s,
unlesshe appear and discharge such attachiument, accord- f
ing to latw, withiiiin iue inontilhs from the first publication
of this notice; and that the payment of aly del ts uae e1 a
himn Iby residents ofthis state, and ite delivery to him,
for his use, ofany property within this state belonging
hinm, and the transfer of any such property byhi, ar
ibidden by law and are void. Dated tie 9th day ofNo-
vember 1F36. CJIARLES T. CItOM\VELL, Y ordo
nolO9-)m Attorney forattachingereditor. Lb ofN
'\ orilder of lion. Michiael ti;sioeter, assoCmattjcmuheeo
_- thiecourt ofconmmonu pleas for the city and county gs
of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the p
visions of the statute authliorisig attachlm.ents ogainstno
resident debtors, tlhiat an attaciment hiias issued agitiins
the esta-te of DANIEL M. HBROADHIEAD, a resideiint of u
tlie state of Pennsylvania, aid the same will be sold for fr
the ptaymnu of iils dclbts, unless lht a.pear and disciar'c t
such attachment, according to law, within nine months
from thte first publication o( this notice; an.'d that the p
licnt of any debts due to hiim by residents of this stale,a r
tihe dilivcry to hiti), or for his use, of any pro
in this state t.,-i1.,1 1 to him, and thile transfer
such property by luin, are forbidden by law and areo.
Dated this first day of .July, 1SJ6. Y order
GEO. j. GOD)DARD, Attorney foraittaching 15Yo
jylS-!m c Y order of hIe lion. Michael Ulshltoeffer, associate nag
jtidu oftl court ofconmiIon pleas for ahe city ni sue,
county ot'New Vork, notice is herehy givetipursuant to
the directions of the staluate authorizing attachments sa
against nonr-resident debtors, that an attacliment las is-
suied against the estate of OLIVER S. D1MICK and of w
D)ANt1L MA. BROAD!AD), residents ofthte state of i
Pennsylvania, and that the saine willhbe soldforthe pay- de
nient of their debts, unless they appear and discharge
such attachment, according to law, withinnine niontis t
andasre void. Dated trNthe dyo eeme 86
from the first publication ofthisnotice; andthat tie
menitofanydebts due to them ibyresidents ofthis state,
thIe delivery tothem or for heir use of any property wit
In this state belonging to them, and the transfer of any
such property by them oJlyre forbidden bylaw and art void.
.Dated thi rstday of Juy, I36. Yort, o
GEO. C. GODD)ARD, Attorney for attaching of the statuteautorsia
jylS-9m -creditor ,SNassau st- New York. and
Y order of the hon. Michael Ulshoeffer, assochaleju
of the court of common pleas for the city and county of
of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuam't to the pro-
visions of the statute authorising attachments against ab-
sconding and concealed debtors, that an attachment has i-
sued against the estate of JOHN GOOD,, an inhabitant of
this state, lately residing in the city of New York, an ab-
scondins debtor, and that the same will be sold for the pay
ment of his debts, unless he appear and discharge such at
tachmentaccording to law, within three months from the
first publication of this notice; anlthat tie payment
debt, aidi l hie delivery of any property belonging to suc
debtor, to him or to his use, aud the transfer of any pr
perty by himi for any purpose whatever, are forbidden b
lawamidare void. Datedi the 19th day of December 1836.
HARRIS WILSON, gaitist abscondingan
Attorney for attaching creditor, mcnt lia
de23-3im 13 Chambers street. tock and e
abscotidirng debtor, residing, ntl iyo %e oka(
-Y order oftthe hon. John T. Irving, first jud.,e o' I
S time court of common pleas for the city and county ofu
New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provi-
sion-i ofthestatute authorising attachments nainiist no
resident debtors, thatan attachment has issuea-instthety belo
estate of JONATHAN S. FERRY and HARISON h isuse
BISHOP, composing the firm of Ferry & Bishop, residents h
of Warren i the state of Massachsetts, and
same will he sold for the payment of their debt,
they appenralnddischa.-rge such attachment, aecordt,
law, wvilthln iine months from the first pubatio
notice; and that the payment of any debts duie to them V
by residents of thi state, and tha delivery to them o
for their use, of any property within thisstate belonging
to themim, andilie transfer of any such property by iheino,
are forbidden by law and are void. Dated the '23d dat of res
June, lP36. BURR & BENEDICT, esta
jy2-gni Attorneys for attaching cremditors. re
will be sold for the payment o
BV order of hon. Michael Uishoeffer, associate judge
Jofthe court of common pleas in and for thie city and(
county of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to
the provisions of the statute authorising attachments a- s
against non-resident debtors, that an attachment h-is issued
againsttheestateofTUSTO PAREDES, a resident of mndt
Panama in South Anierica, and that the same wi;l be soh
for the payment of his debts, unless h
charge such attachment, according to law, within ni
nionths from tile first pbli o
thepaymientof any debtsdue to him by residents of this
state, and the delivery to him or for his use of any pro
psrty within this state belonging to him, ant the transfer
ofany such property by him, are forbidden by law and
are void. Dated the 3tst day of October 1836.
WHITE & WRIGHT, the estates o
n<,7-gm Attorneys for attaching creditor, resid
ofthorec f liouUllt. i!a .. .toefl.-r- ssocieutejuii g a
atecunt of co ton pleas far the city ando ywitini
of New York, notice is hereby given, pursuant to the pro
vIsions of the statute authorisiiigattalmm ontsagainsta, d
resident debtors, that am attachment has issued again
estate ofJOIIANN DAN'L tLADtACH'S LBEN thie ar
residents of Frankfi)rt on the Matne in Oermnnvandl
tnee sane will besolul forthe payment of their debts
they ap~p~ear a~nd discharge such attcmnacr


d EORGE SOLE, individuals
S oae & Sankey, notice fir
1837, ,-reditors to appear
jndge of common pleas fo
York, on tihe 14th day of M
City lHall, in said city, a


IN the matter of proving the
I MIles R. Burke deceased. T
. .. t(r%'. -_ "" y a tend wYrk e
ceased. _ecity a
Notice is hereby given that t
the last will arid testament
ceased named, intend to apply
ty of New York, at his office
the twenty-second day of Febr
the forenoon ofthat day, to ae the s
nment of the said deceased, d
gate, according to thIe statut
ed. Dated this 7th
C. BO
IROh'T
j.aGlt-fiw


Io
lo





11
d



I
e


rino
,firs
ii w


TO DISCHARGE
[Pursuant to Revised Sta
V., title 1art. 3; relating
mentsmadNepursuant to
solven iand his
ILLIAM RANSOM, of the
tice first published Febr
appear before John T1', Irvinf
common pleas, at his office i h
the twentieth (tay of March,
forenoon.


r




Daily Albany Argus
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073654/00002
 Material Information
Title: Daily Albany Argus
Alternate Title: Albany Argus
Daily city gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 62 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Croswell & Van Benthuysen
Place of Publication: Albany N.Y
Creation Date: February 13, 1837
Publication Date: 1827-1856
Frequency: daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Albany (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Albany County (N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- Albany -- Albany
Coordinates: 42.652594 x -73.757314 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Available on microfilm from the Micro Photo Div., Bell & Howell Co.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 3, no. 681 (Dec. 27, 1827)-v. 31, no. 9252 (Feb. 16, 1856).
General Note: Publishers: Edwin Croswell, Obadiah Romney Van Benthuysen & Thomas M. Burt, 1831-1834; E. Croswell, O.R. Van Benthuysen, Thos. M. Burt & Sherman Croswell, 1834-1840; Edwin Croswell, Henry H. Van Dyck & Sherman Croswell, 1840-1843; Edwin Croswell & Sherman Croswell, 1843-1848; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell & Samuel M. Shaw, 1849-1850; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell, Samuel M. Shaw & James I. Johnson, 1851; Edwin Croswell, Sherman Croswell & James I. Johnson, 1851-<1853>; Sherman Croswell & Gideon Tucker, 1854; Calvert Comstock & James I. Johnson, <1855>-1856.
General Note: "Republican," 1827-1833; "Democratic," 1834-1856.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02260077
lccn - sn 83045590
System ID: UF00073654:00002
 Related Items
Related Items: Albany Argus & city gazette
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1828)
Related Items: Albany Argus & daily city gazette, extra
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1838)
Related Items: Campaign Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1848)
Related Items: Campaign Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1852)
Related Items: Albany Argus (Albany, N.Y. : 1832)
Related Items: Weekly Argus and rough-hewer
Related Items: Weekly Argus (Albany, N.Y.)
Preceded by: Albany Argus & daily city gazette
Succeeded by: Albany evening Atlas (Albany, N.Y. : 1843)
Succeeded by: Atlas & Argus (Albany, N.Y. : Daily)

Full Text



DAILY ALBANY ARGCUS.;'.j
E. CROSVELL, Privrta tor sl t.
P. ItOSWVIm IL
R. i VAN t '.'^-T*Cl\ /


1800
ries w
83600n


)y with a population of 959,000, the
vere increased to $3000~in 181
0)--in 1816 to $4500-and at ti
remained until 1820 when they we
to $3500. The population of tie
then .1,37.2,000. Itieworthyofrei
his reduction, and fixing. the ,I,,
)) took place at the very next Be
few weeks after the Washington cc
ngwas held., The "equitable" stai
hhad been recommended, was co.-isi'
stabiished-"'by the lerislture; and
'h..slightest luuridanuri for saying
Savage ever said or desired.ia, thc
d be reduced below the Bur then pres
the legislature. If he 1 set the low
al in motion," he had the satisfactic
that the great bodi-of tile people
d with him in the opinion that $4500
ich; and after the subject had been
anvassed, it resulted in a reduction

Fw brief comparisons, and we 1ake.1
subject. In 1810, when the pol
business and rmwmee orther state, *1
an one half what they are atpresen.
s were fi.ed at $4500. Six jud
s received in the aggregate $27,000
. In 1823, when thejudiciary was
zed, the salaries of tie chancehur, ji
the supreme court and circuit judges
lve officers, amounted in the aggre
,00.0-or $9000 less for twelve ud)
iad been ,,paid, to .rx. At the pre[
f compensation, and including the v.
llor of the city of New York, the wl
thle judiciary amounts to $24,800
are now tAirltfeenj ni in ]ana vi
-o re,-r-i.,4.. 2'' '4) 1" th- an was paid
o only siz: and thjs v a period when
srof the courts has quadrupled, and
senses of living have been greatly ai

TOR THE OAILV At~iN O
IlNand PRACTICAL VIEr.,',, I
UENT8 Qf POLITICAL E C(i '.
CHAPTER L.
-Of the ways and mthods by which the g,
ent of a country can most efectually
zetion.
following, it is suggested, are among
GMcient ways and methods in which t
one: "
afford ample protection to every memb
ty, against fraud, force and oppression
ught therefore to be traded, securing
tiien the fruits of ML. labour;-and the
ght to be strictly and impartially enforce
r must be-protected against the avarice *
and the rich against the violence of ti
There must also be a prompt administration
e, so that, when the fruits, of a man's 11
re invaded, he may have ;t i n h poWjr i
mediate redress, The insecurity o-p
despotiU countries has been found to be 01
hindrance to production with-which tb
here. have had to contend. ins v
s atsy sa lrge part of ire oclinulinta t
Largop,:,rlion or ltl'ErtilepilUt A AS.
. idle, or are but :partially qultivated, fo
on,, that property- there isinsecure.
unequal legislation must, as far a poa
avoided. o'ap,.tnor cfl;;ins ou-h
be taxed for the bw rfv of another por
for the benefit of the whole. Neithe.
s whole 'to:be taxed for the benefit of
brought the people of one'-,.uoa to .b
the benefit of those resident in wotht
In direct taxation, no legislature w6ull
attempt this;- but in indi ion,
of duties) this has sometimes been done
designing it. "
be supposed that the moot of the cheap
iimported into a country is used byapar-
lass or in a piri7-7ular section, of that
a hea ul o1 11-1 article otheefoare
willbe p iruriouslyandun-
pon 'tle elami or se,_ ti -7- consuming the
portion 6pit. This illuithii.,1i i-iyr le reflections o:' Ihf rca i-r Jr bilch a Trai
may readily perceive tie numerous and
evils which result from unequal legisla
o0ernment that wishes fnuclly to ai
n, must cease creating nmnopoliis.
oCpoly may be defined to 1>,
row mke, oril a thing, or do an act
ae thus drTdfinc are, as is now rnrall
an e i ; la lhtoy ar- virlually, L-, Vlu
petnion, indirectixs oii I l % hol fo
1 ul'a few. A inonc-.oly /f hi; d.
e worst species of unequal Icgrldnion
Commerciaia rom ianitS uchl a.; hale t
to trad& t. a parncular ouniry or place
pronounced by the most enlghtened po
nomiits, public nuisances; and it is be.
t the-time is rapidly approaching, whe
ve pri ase to find favor wit
ghtened people.
he legislature wish to encourage produ
must not create too Mra7ny corporate, o
k, companies. Some se are a spe.
onololy, flr whiclh no good apolog ca
d. Such, Ior instance, as 0ji^ law"one
an easi -rn state, gini certain stag
, an escluiie right to run a stage on
road and ine,,rpoaig hmnt
Indlviidusl wealth ca slo ucs
pete with charter.?d B-~~,bogi
11 clubbing ofln.
re, Ihowever, some brade fbsns
10 the opinion ofuin eiiinisi
ohfiei lfconomisia, calrdom ni
proper tea~lrie.',onecra .Th
rig," thie ercoen o(' brdeuvrlr
ursnce 'against t~he pel 6thsea
s of fire; also the spligfctesa
ith pure and whoeoewtr
tering a few companiegatulcx
sometimes atta~ined;adueu ul
meted. : .. .:..
ietion can git ,'a i/ ra t epooe
Every, iridirddjdl liosuhaw
slhe pless
lal energy 'and entcpie arth e.
p in motion thebsie wrd
a few years, the suppreso h y
having most branchesobuiesfe
believed, rapidly icesd
he argument in favorofakn nligb
erepnon lo tili: ge-ne-a uri lto
*.liipftnnir ., i ir, ai ,.*nj .-l jr i t e f
s in aecommerelal countr.I seceig
ot itnpposalblft to. pr'ocreog fthpe
.to constitute-the soeculatn eim
al couont-y. Countrieslhr hr r
* behind] those that haete.Sani
untry, compared to GretBian hrv


m'ent has engaged it banking, it has not sue
1 when individualsa havendertakenIt-th
lave frequently suffered., Sixty private bank
one year in England. It seems; therefore
coates, of. banks) that we must do without
trust their management to chartered comp,
ffirmcd, that when banks are charteredwit
h properrcstrictions, and well conducted a
they; have imparted to country a prospertt
ld to. its-7production in an unparalleled man
uhijet,qeve, w e discussed more w
lbarq'uentsection. -
MiT8N s by~the Governorand Senat
3, 1837:
-David G. Lee, auctioneer; Benedic
Ransom Lloyd, masters and examine
ady- David Cady' Smith and ete
missioners:of deeds. .
-Llewellyn Jones, Henry H. Hurlbu
Hi Martiri,- public notaries. L
vws.-David McClure, of Franklinville
examiner in chancery.
.Ti/dl, Feb.
William F. Young ol'Gm Deva, noiat
place.ofWm..V. J. Mercer rtrnot
unty; Thomas Bealeb ol'Ca mina-
Charles A. Floyd.of Huntingoon, ek.
lanceiry '. '"*
-Hiram- Gray of Elmira, supreri
issioner.
-Richard B.' Fosdick, ineptor o
obert Dingee, ifnipeclur of green lude
-S.1ris R. Siow'ofTroy, notary.p.ub
y-Seth Greene of Amsterdam, auo-
he place of Timothy Dolvne; dece'd.
ivr.tr M. Wr tl~n; of Newburgh,
, in the place of Churles U. Cush-

ltu, n! are ouse, corner of Market m.
1ca few of Gracc o improved Fannin
rhi the attention of our faruwre, ulqt>
Ow Straw Cutters, Co>rri,S.ticllcr,DrI
Scrapers,&c. I
W.TOBUN


DAiLY ALBANY ARGUS- Eit dollar per annum,
',a 0ab .e hal B U'ealyP. i -42 Z

Tj'FjALBASNARGUS,-s A--w --Four, dolIar/ VOL. XII. A
per ann om, payable int adeance. .
n a y T. E R M S t .. -; '.._ __sits_ ___rt h ii st uoi_".o __- q a r t r_ _n e- e n e u n 1 u r a- _n r_ _o_ e p
DAILYADAILY ALBANY ARGUS, -SSrSSeSrsSSK^SS-
pe n to mubscri t eio n re ae vancr ess.na -mnre ." "Itchi Itae but af -l nrhes.fc he."
No paper wi'l be discontinued (unless at the discretion tle beautiful aminl lnourfhiog village nf Pooghkeepsie; Its Tiiainsitiluion (founded in the yems wd a Muudgr ti
of tae proprietors) ua n il all arrearage ar paid. location is unrivalled iu beauty an sa9lul-riv, and cannot aspaciousa tnd elegant edifien, rLBtAeYAd especially for isdops
E Advertisemeots conspicuously inserted on the eus- f;al to aitprct the attention and excite the a idhoiration of coucedtiionegraprisifieaticinsiveotofheclasescoiapo oe .
T If- nolvent notices inserted six weeks tor. 67s ten t. e Ichrof wile conducted oa philosophical prince oa f h .Fwhilt ei h anol iatin lafguucs K' ua li st^ on"t
....., I-E-, OherCl es r p ies efereace will Iavariably be ad to ie n rthe natunt of of. the ye n Journal on eh ,' e1
", :':' cw sw r ,-,o(o- s 'iH i o dl fo r..thc .n 'F I:K t :. the juve a le m ind, an d constant effort s w ill lhe em nployed w ',luch are subdivided, and the w hole un dner lh lI s < ^ o u r a o a l e a d u o u lc c n~ n e a p ( h p u t p n f p ^ A G v r o S 1 5 0 0 ,X )a v b
subsr.ipt. ion reeive ^ d for. esssia ......,Nervc them ill their relative strength. *le demeste ar- Ie be nom tte. o the ,oard el t T CE PRT o r a s I e .
NoT ,sp. wi bedi, e (u.l...t...... iscre" .. o rant eieneits and modes of instruction will be sdapted to The course of instruction i( designed to be u ini ly and to haie thought pron r t th e e w of t 5,0salpries
A ttotters ana communications most be post pad. youtl of every age, nd they will be instructed in such practicSl, and to eR I'aee allt the various b o t
barainclieasun may he rcquaie, either to qalaify th Pnt foi a co apliteter.lale etdu cearon. dial work which alludes to involve, nri cIi i1 ohi -h 08icelr, a 25 45 t oom
r I IA v (r VFm .l-c! .*1, _*',,,n r....ed......,,Jethea nment of a lier of C0hera0 vulgar abtse su-nh W ltlef Justis,, charts g5o40e;,
$igl .1 1\\J' \ -- U O l ^V. L iO ,, ..i ,,, wilw of~ 3 Ihei parnt or g r Sod ls supe0o clheatcs use plilOtpiieIi a pparans pre,,,,n ......s an that th lattehsl ofhltheirn parecontsned assults fo,"thp.quart r aboud Othe Judge, 1,87 3,500 4,50ntvirtu
its- fdian a, and, art eiensi library, mn addetunnto winch, i n ealch of pson tosit heirp son l i ntere n- lf n \tar 1 ,, arid And t resulinnr
aE'W A.ter s. P ENDID RUSSIA IRON Thoer whofmy rae designed ffr cooucreial life, will tho tree lower duemrtie. am t t lsa ala. erlnrary, ean illrl the grean ames we an- nocee d tary, ;eatuti ithorl
I_ s lenoi ces iTO se-rte- dx eed complete l ly t he !eaIoraklly oeetaught orthography, reading, wrltiug, r neotie sele:ted,0with relerea tc0tontgcapacitier t i f e c rneam
addilion o Ebe Ct Rohinoson's Pateipt Improved FREh ish -ranm glosophic al rinai l srth" Of e F nch an d in t iem. mono ofthousnd s. o. a n narranetorie recentittc of the Eve ninh y n Jnpn lo insrute of th I 501 14 19 I
wvcka fb, an w arh ner l uerg or n o tice sa e ha ge at y the rz e PI cq R efre,( n c will c ul ar ia I b e h adtor ofe o r w n a u e ouftry,) Chm istr fran iind Btslave leny six deprt i n s tu h ree u D r.i .. IV N doe ,o hee n th ts C m m l m n t a d C n d a m t e teaal .Y u co ite ob2,500 w ilorei; th olat an c att npd r
t.-..i'i,-l.,...te .,l,.. thoe juvnil m Iind, -mfin d fon r an clorgWll Iegia employred sin iil fire subdivided, fidtewoehnet0hl"clar e do i ntsigntuer ofl g and unPiforms ues' s iton, n s h propiet r ab vteroctathse exei e s ,00he f oried onto Cinge toapn. es and 6 ,50 ascaa


Scro. -,,', (o ",,,,oIrds) ,,onret hn w fihse Dtuv ee fat the use adlditins to mno st of tli boe dro tu des apl tlicin- l P loso ys f tell d L I v ljm i es hno o beirve atuion Withat peply stels te Elixir of ...L....,i fe l at h ie Jutc S V G. T t et I t R, ble b. e t s fro te a
ofnlrr,,' ,,r ,,,.,. and are made o a to be taken seves to tieBldy of the Latin and Greek languages. or te .abconmoaaion o ard oftruste e THE CAMO MILE n PRICW r v e p n aSDr
apatrt~l Sltd ea nied w without ditfi c nlty. T hey are dre sigae t ri ,, i,, .t -.. l.. i .. t ii, o el w ill be supervi adsonryn u re y a y uig l d orb a d an u to R V ,t at ae iltnndm p ie o tt toe- i e a tu e f o he n iH of h n r a d i r o h tclo W aixpnid W re, bes umquested byo youn offi cesarrEn~ t
t i in l orl e r u p p cr hl a ll s, ,< r lie d- r 3 i nm lia r 't i n n a r n i i i i i n i r e i l b n o n d u h icingag r e a, ,l .le.t. .s.a.. .i i h A c d myw ll...E.O I S A S S F ALK,.,in w e k n : o r0 0d"e rP w- h erinfl e c be e nj o i n e d st h e a t ua la rites tsps a a t t a o f lieoaf c e r o f
kcv t ai li ther rlatie srengh. tehdmesic a-ato b usntuduni




;*,.- ,, h e l / *. o t e t i w i h th yd[ i:o w l "o e j a o i f- c u a l "I w! ip rach n n h s st b~ b en h ( l e ti e o g n s n i ci i n on u p n^ w e 8 e s e fe l q i e u e t a the, C h iefei J u s eo vennyn Wa ndh e cro peey ed iot no f m ost eff ec u arl ,_ a.n ll a, _l..
i.re usedh thR air h,ng llnre and more (it for respirtion tend to cl0tlln the .orl se pevmea reesived the seaclar, eta t..r rsordidgnature
hati~,- I, ., ,i t I' \wliilhe flthormit in Imme daf ea dd l at tei ruos cotained inteS mp *iraiwvin", e1 any ofthe ornltneiilt, abtrancuhes e fe al .....ne "y th us of pugaivs in pas rhum o intsturbed bysadd at ot the ar m. 1ru01,n orn to inthe Sotil- u, "or sm "a l be e,,.a
allelpa ymewiti s..... rla ed, ar dvnsed t sre are n.m odetly conducive to the formation of mnor l e o ue d;^ nre unde ciably entitedtn thisenviablesse incidt to o
s e -.1 larncty r Ec in i :'. '. -' now inishig and pe toraitero slect portions theme o wier be il read theeir a to .al 'n ] ,~ pe
A let trs A. c _u [ I 'tion 173tbte street ?,yutaoevealtryt ainculdatedy and such familiar lectures d nuc prac lstiscalvunet to t lu lrs,,evarci gbre nches ofa themes al ority idlistene w ch deis itoug ever I "Phe lke whic that print appe o o the Chie f Thear. i
't'- -' corner of Deo an occnaiona ay delivered a ns ayebest serve to illustrate their Yontoefier|s|to If Iet maIChaet.e e aoe, 2 ,00, 2,5 00 e- r
"l' "oral a deign and tedenay, without havwn- ra tdth which a lluue ftoo oyit, a a ndeveryome dical r p hh he
IM PROVED .T, IE. mdnsasuero cemcl ndpilsohcarapraus toitI, rel -ckolegegts.an.00 ,00 4,0





...... .g. I,-, .: 'r,e,.,s of,,,ohei ,pu i ev," atten- donom ration^^^^ ^ Sabbath^ W mornings and eveninal wiol our present purpose.. and by ".. gn. las, "iah fhe addition m n 17 350 40
^^ ^^ m a drrp u ^ ',^ ^ ^ tl, ,r ,, ,,, ,: S ,^ c n ^ E D B ^ v ^ c M S 'h i-, ,t, ,. r ,t c e ,,,wd ,a"e r th e t h e d eeot ed t o th e'y biutl oa s th, 0 0 a ndpu r s w aslar wiv erl lc-r or t r sh unreo no s
o whicb, Ili eachOof Opposition toetheiropersonalainterestso" It." 2:000a2,000





-' '' Y tend crvt and" h at s h Seres et h rn r guarylaesary, t 3
N E tptIV n Dlroe aSPL tENDI R.Ste. ...,',,IA IRONh- ....lreetwh o n u r wllbe, aesig ed f t omm rcalbs ieth imslfl rt nletreeflower d et arl;itt ents, iu .t ilt.; ell lrra-!'ilm s entrb td w h l o e x e tdt rpy h ya, euyS ceay ,5
D U1p1r)e[13 a pst yVea r ciolnean n o m p,,-,eIte n by te- or [etvethe preV is s it r ho ut prmissy r a iong, wttin en sele ted vt h eeenct t.o the caat. l,, c to el ln t-cral,,s rv ti n"-en to s in
addlnei ti nofE iC : as unr ons at en il t I mpr onveni nead FIR .......ly n te aa, a dtientsthocha acte istc oftheeour e fani henethyteetnasersofnssem lyu2 S-ee OU 4-0





oo-.. ., mra ""' 'n,,",ate, ,'ai ddrense. to they undetri tandic, m anthemts Forf ,enern information s onernmger rite I actlh. mon o f e p ce s v b e
r t hee aro uis p ro ee sse sg o l o ilin g w tth lh re e b o ile r s~ r o a n- in ,-, a K c i n-d fo co d d e o t n t a d il e c n s uio n, ll e t u e s ( g e v e l r f r to L a l- u d b tforte t an faltr o do fe'tt trl an np e rfe ctn c u e &Tth ... .. .. s h a llc le a v e th e r eh o w hee r t o C ha yel b e o h+ 1, fr H \r n, ( n 8 o ~ n i g *v.
PLACEaridh warrantedeeu^ su periormtosed of at others ,to suny,," particulardtilehtoryof w nounstry,)r mp l eo r rangementsyof vew beno m l d under suc
ta e a l i o c s i p o e i c o t u t o a t m n T o nc-P ll.. .ll c u r a ll" -i e a s s.aH-fr n k ly a ndto non s h o nnl n g c u r s s t ob lith oy -It sser s lyu oa t thclasy le s io n o f te e v ,s tle .'or r d ucrt h
...ut i c o d w e t e a n- rp prnuatur l 1 do s pn o cdan u lo., u x c iv.l p o.ity, i; y.t t-p a e nt, I i . '~li d u le l c n e t" .. ... .. .i l a h i a t a tb y w lln t e a s u a n t





t |ntllnspe c-t sill naNilrt ec ....aihl acua gesw.,r k .eview of the p wbli- gthetrres wsae Abuny, oovse
'r.- -I,..,'- ., .-. nlent;r l rlearn g a va N'atura Philosopy,-asw llasisevera . AN i!n osendoushy eei byt he frien ds of Gov. to
t cr aeates ^i^Tu btRsl tedmthrefre tT thsa ,ars foloow BC nad.. o, sOe ... s. "s rel man ovf ahe nortune," tod cntam u.t
... -, ithrr I..., -.r .. ....I ..and are"madesoastoli et akoe pe-sons t he sLt whass an lean iapr oom cincenep a,,d hosa o...cer. erely because t yi r Tppen to S ,9in,




---- _" ; *' "n l-' ,mh,. o neg ge^cea n e. "^ ^ ^ rre lariSv ofi condc of "e:V" ., ..r !.o .,.e.,. .......pad .
,re Seal a long tens e ~whttouthave,, ty. onTheyr, t est ged tz ro. ;,,i. : --. to ... -.. r(ii a, .... o f t ilIesupr vi ,sory. arni d ., sexpe ,nseoni n acured nt young lady forw board andtiin R V, J t ha n eiiy a d i p ie o sitto s n d p ru efo h a h of h n ra d u iite fl abn In .n arn erq etd t s





for laulen t hubp c rianers ro-e 47ctate- a llany ,,e stu di estau-ht .......... emy, glt- t heir ,erts, au"n to onnoth i etal trusteese ould e
ar- ..... Orrin ....M" nsion os .1 .?.- M -:i'- o, "a e p.r-cheiseD .*S OF AL. L K.It,,, i weaan ta te C. W e Hel ha sure that the Chir ef the- 'l b
..- '"-,h : .^ S .U.. ", ;;: :*": :,- : : S p ll ent illrwhich mb s" t l v" ,^li Eiopy removal toy an ioware. ce and finally, ifa io g e, ..... A ^nI'ite seesta
are use.til ae u orbi gP .BV, re,.,.3, B^ it*, ft ;sa *lfom t ihesho o al.a" .- ir e n^- S ^ M r -.o1-' There are oly two ..in.. .... E. J. te cm esai o e
PersuadntethraC, Bs.n ," attend inwiduecashanedhyt h or.a r depa rt n -., usiodren, are .ai n l a, sy, ,heun atiee; 11 n 181 or to such othe sa orse advocated -
X ~ i r v i tW". u nu T[ 1r I n ota nt ov hf e m a l esaa r . . . . . .nR Ce v erV .c a s e rT ".Jo h n
t Butr 1. I O,,g,,,t--hamey od O adah .htsl Cv or ttUSoa dU'vtfa elel naie e....tnI state," [:'
See Id ` rgual o ~ arGe re~ a n n da" n kn... ...ltr hsi nculcrarterin l, faml iar th e tus'e of b~ a d sdiid dino o r ern, eo ., sii'iv tdie s ifc s br u h ilty i .










... .... .. ,'|P.I -hr"'ie*C'"; 'wi nW, ^ sttet\ priniuo .......^ S = .. A LS I. ., .. .."
-. h,.I,- ,,I 1 ,r;.1,|1 It. LlS. ahtestreeht, tems ith ,'eand a 3 weeksu on eachr m --t orn..ylAMEer8q arteANDFre s on in L. r







n .. .. .... I corn erLof D ea ocsnlltt e l e ina best serventotl u the, 151.it ,b ais steeho r ar or cived gread bd W hth th e g the la w of tt e 0
R IA nd<,rat. .. a T pa .. ...... OK "--"";, x, -. ", 3"011ated c O, withcua salyrres; and x,,l Sth "hat jd. "ar- c ation. o' wro4 5W0acc 60u .Water ow pnmnpmn of ri'h,
1HA 'I'l 110e,anangemen1 ll-FarucEN gso.h e- I L^ O .I '' h ~ing dep!exmi a rtio n tsJl i.n the dofoewe k Cl al, lif,!e agur, "clVnT h o asioal inbr.ei-,, in,'^ los ofar r- .g Ia hislebe7n Eoa .- J.r proced tt, whc it i s prpe to corret. Thesal- po I
m^Sw~iw emaAinlhs cii-, unde direc beain upon tileO peclarte ofVIT an chi t he R .M .Buios h ate tcudrD ly, pains to el\ ~(t nabled ioalln lmtoh s huside;a fro th edto r ro a notherqca nno bevr anrie sofl wh ach jd e S.tog ttohg ,ad P
..LI1' -I.. ... EL% l- ovene h e lose eruartr en ding the ,ct ........ terefor I of tlejudges Dn d 1 ow1, avfseT-
ITf ite-atiorno; ra soupirior to Dny ee n ,:av er tb l n.Ser abbap morninee arievnigs ilIl sFr"Dofntu_.,hc Chvudrniby e'o~ idcn l-To;n GREENE C.(*d .ROreN, ledce i? No, asthe our-
'-1,-"I -.I_.v... .... .. .- .11 .,t et- d vo eJot esu y o Hf t i .les rp u s. Schol ars w i ari- u ei h xe to h r u h E g l plh dacedi n.-ell L 'from the ad *tate ot hefudr m a e i l t ur p e e tp rp s .










..fI 1-1. 1.. il 1I T Snd T 'ALT iberal fotg orLoany of theiand o heta mayb -;- all thes n d in he I' by th B"e receive ?n 1"01, "l ow:`rwitht he i t o s.
tend clifnioelr at euch plaroar eaat nhostaparents D / I- '~ b oT T r T re m ofe r m n s vi h la s s oii o lc s n n io. ,h ls if(i cc i n ies h w t I t a t e s p l b l w s $ 0 n 'o a e i










a .*, .a^ on to bemmh&in this,,it y direcr ot. own No- pupil willITT- therll, ..d .noioen thhistlhhismeicin ,,,1E DO S," thsre dtre, s
e,,rtv fo r the past year, an wI e; to Af PATTERNS A. ANt not equali.ad or t o ei the of tle "N Ad, I I -Is neve r ae -
rmericnd them ashunri'vallbe inet rn how Oth Ind r te premises witEhoutPermissionTNaa esofane, itendaFo'ur reocnstruy weith hs tile whoih may be i t I
eeeastinfsuriortany ehaebeorebeen E- TU SEN Tde Frnh anguag' e isr^.n-'var~ou^^ taught^^ by~l'c^ ^eea~io^ any~u thingay tlh t regrltis tha i re e
isheopreisoure, cniapacit e o nco ianng. Rewr ansdCA uL N fro "toi ba r ustelseA s HolsteruAeea rn ,E En FA MILY PL Baprimnt -c bestrcanaNndn) Ito s l pbic in tel east s unty a dist8 ct-, 1
In ^ ^^t IVd Fo rur tover ofore pnroratiy than itn er pooibe r "ct tr- s .......... Eveihing le Bewiobtinuesesin.trncanrimortnanhi1
ti~on na weuh riesting. ]E MOT ane- ed ttR h NAC E raSnng .ani t te nts. f4 of a thae for r sonypy.ars bet g t n s ld l w t tardr as ou ii ecrr
a12 i c avof ElRATHinE.eP Co .e sHNoOP- institY(ion, toif ,t, : I. ,c" '.- asc es : Oto no re ^
Ling a.nd ba- .ing, firele Vr queret yl perfohrmedneertn thoeysa me .rt.y Rewr dsg, fort go d depo rtm e tandudl igtu e no re r .. ..t.o. usled h b nt f r airttrods ftile e fc u e hs w h l ea e t e a t o ,w o v r le m y b t
study rwl!11 lie ** Y r .. o ... r, te o -uti den e ,ndgo dwil fantt r uc tors rhepn tpflso he sity ofNew aY rk Re v.ow Dr.aLu dlowe r o- m c spa edb yniobee al e a ie l t ." e h ow s l r a li






^mtimeadthe ovein so iuproaedi con strutiob in as tovena apro,"t. ,,*c3 ^ tsN l & < iuste 0 ncre'oe rt^^^ ,on inlr'e~ Rev Ili,.ifa Feris a''ndies no"'hil osc ^ y ,)Itth Che J stc attet ete Sltemoet a h lf w titi at.r et




-t an and loveoS snrier oat a d o reaspto y m t r ve Rl- f eery e n on P lso MAl bo. aradwi y s t fet. l Pani fter lta s e would tn1ivenno fora s. mh po ) c on- w as forass hi s aoeable to der
ranatal i esap rfc"eu liy" la Iiev r art. .r' ntlew e orancneso, t su y w i e ucntieinc hl a ve ate-nc n ce to syrq e t o fd n e o i n h t h ," i s r e e h e il t r











thoedraiectandothers,itia hol tw e ind epposmtd n ol re-; f,5Ap .8wit eNlrlAc a ,n t b s nsaudvane u o i s hi I Albany
nmt~ s s v s a tf ,t ath eh s aad lsueh sn""rran,,filed R O ADflCASTInNttutio ; eoervda tinePrlieihere romha revie of t e-w ho e sub ect. o a h gherclays m an appro ing c nscie ce. N olan-dow n ornerofS
Ul~ ~~~~ t fo t forein sneed only addf ltothath m "life uenAo[ urMw u ar tT O N ICco nPeLn wS


















en s r h^^ ga ^^^ e tio of 1STTERNS of^ X ~ C t~: BI( IEI-Yi ^'-et eover in-tir o- wha the 'h e
Ing lifei nghm est imatio n it;n w hichti l teranionsCook S t h oves ed Statcs "te"ftar.aboeanoother;rGne Iso ; %vash tu n ipht
P-1eI..I er"rthe a ts asooaldeiw r odu ct Ohesw ihsisenc llntoAM LYeepingareath ega d t thronowinproio th t











stir eoldtincing those w ohnt rulf pses e eanno hanv, .%.. b...Iitydais Tulrt bo kpti of w e .too a s in ann to j. t his "wa s bj tn .e .. ... .. "r
a rT .0 r vf t hon1 Jacob"-111 New V ha t rd klpc. eb taused wholesaleenrnret tollat tu7 ge D o a t s
.-o mastntd eoiling ke-i~ n~nf reboil~ers t sva, ialtnde tthe rli aee o mandfunren_,she af..suhortnd t, a,1EW8 c.uOT teneeos o d ,pinstin ontoudaa e r d s nwuiru
tanh tie scnum, ,o oft a susciersy store 47a Sti^i e L sv Ala y. 'il rgt Norton eqis PE gTollt i.ittrute. ByO~ T; vison p~stfret wnerCh athasemlSquare, No w. Iriaconr. andwer 'o ah i Cm muia ti sa y any ofn.s,o e ea w hic New -Yoi srk T thad h



st S-. andbictcls, s ea: otherinfora in rtie h ou I A C IBAL o Mr. o tr a c P r toral Sience
The ubcriberpne s hpadt ynoper toog nng IV. 0gackhamnHCAr,,f1).rior --onarrls eAinery. t lower .... fi nd finally, -rt l t s of s. a
.he-,a L.-iie Chapin,, oFe A. f. N rt mp ve fo r fOTO tileNST Boil obtai catig ottT O A .O C T ,'M -*." it" '~ o, .V ublictiono ft e Cr esia' onden ace p was p ubic~ jus re so tomb te p o f d." c T the pr chi r- wh i on.



o eaooreint v an dtoak grea t le sesu oe s fer- Furna d e OfSth;Rschoo l A. RIICAID. T EN- Secr eta ry t, dhi s fo e'cu rerl h" hclto rresp W I 11 &I
Sarhak 1)i ito tepui c, Ira Ce deciedyte e Stri a ttenticordren bell ward to the a prth of the pupils, Treorutes. obeious B S Cnd. heLrTO a TERrS REu PLA.TE ton o eendi tn t t oy e a; p r t s -
Jareof the snd L. P akr.ng, John d rer n it ter te aaS .Or ders ay be addressed R ev. J N5L, for tema pn eferenslree n Toa alreer gen tr tl .S a" to "e vs
Taeudr Y-hounsoti sdur aber an sape nc n d t he willA V.e MA ratten edb a Akirf an eprincaceh ornls avsi .o PIDO WILLIAMCNIL K, Esq.ere liJosssion.Ca, of.. V N wilp Jl T n ow r r o r. to IC the p revaish ed c orr spondne. Re posen, nd jhuldgs weeive noa m ensatoi on vo rthoe d tormer ,


t Vrphticatia nand on se bt anave uee n thes ia di RICP4 RD V D W TT, ristees d ouh.e nRGNbs onPS *If North "ta h'twhese o Wsnh tie Ev. J -abor to p e a that the <- o anIyunsp
shouetwo ns of.witeiu oy roia eetidw ltPh fiefthe servnces rehdeved, bthe expenses inurred, ndcuheGOo at Pos T CO O ii ESCSAoHu t l ss'd"o c'n
Seel. A-reatiTe WingSalone Stair r b eoler Soluinokobreing- asoe .1 4C ~l W ~ l s t^X ile use or M l tA IA D -'ron eioso pr tl hafralnbam cebensfeig il i- mn-r a pe rtn.-Cad h ar csrir wfi ivm plwrm rn.d-
,10en 11t m t r. M Be11. ow l a. t ;re n ex d a t f o th s yV i O orse71lling 3 0 6 n 60 h ,VI I RA L SMTTS to h alh b si ga'e b tle f roE als i 8 an ,o e ofi er er l b c's he ap e t
C.I- h-4 uedtImIa. tisr.,06 % 1.. .,'~ R '....... .g :I. ,L ucs h r il' he ,t. ..wo ter sIit-h' .c .. .. qte ye ,ar_ ,,, vr, 2 w ek etl- Hg L IP S. VANtem iea ,NSo 75 rod f6 25. Tota l iefesalt ...r g i. .. Ist.ha n n s ce y ife r m u n r lton t h~ oiia q s
rl ELSA PA T he Isat. e~rin wil Pl comm ncell the frst Wed ~ 2prnesa i HOm. W CT, Ms atsTWtr teeTy sngto.oteso.. av o erAhtFhFrclssaseton fTED-l hv pse








Homr,~~e Cof Alu, I'~ am Iihl "Inse Iih pa tcuaa been^ ,greatly,[ er ym a~ a i ^ '' he efttd thaen land J. will outateg the 'explicit de lart o Elarne trety ev Dennis elachtpaits i. ,,headand ri eeanperienTcat hin W a an e ror, w s per onalln.now n sacrt'cesnCcess rily-.ela betterCOT ca
-bieDa iel "..t."......ra l 1t,--nt I..... "-- l--: IhI A CHI ALD MeI-- sq eas- "n s an p











no unth Orrin of everyy nrall. q ntitn ofuehl- r ireto ep l,- -oraleb lE & WARREN Inat 1anlihearly aso undey-would be like....oscFrhansgruth verigic)rrne hrthv
itma Ten'. Kyck. 8. Foldr M I 9E ZRA P. of PoRE NTMICEia, Air. poses everyd blotshes on N.> R.kin.mByrsHeinar ew of'yo"r Pilstf! a to!tie!,,,,entihieiJust1c,,andowasaslbeen be- (.' il;ysrrepania iy ,1 i *-not suffic1entlhcomeicf
1.': e ,s m i "r an 1i- ...... W I ..r.i .....l' oterw. .', country, "bpeentsstwhheh'ebruseeswhetherraiit b
P.Bria rd Li e vt olin ou pa ces nlph n %d to bake sreinf an oventi f i ast. -o










..a l a by '" arrival, n extensie Or"n.- be uherm m he th ea h wh. o .., b l 2 Ri -1 i. be ladin beding for students of aroaige in. it will ham and r PA E There M. only two pit in tte Ev. J. dy character. the r 'I lw s- o
Tul no ndaga rep c olrttfull, B H.nel Pealem ,_,i ..k and cotton 1r1-01. a 0.0lon, w1;ortdam;s &urc.nf ing toh wi shes ci tof p olaren s, for atre, i stubjctio of their Wea Qry- r will GROWN. andi ditrs n' th st e. L.. p ,' ." "b tn teta a a t;s fi in o c m a d i,
Win R 0.Farel. ',. :.!:I.. r-, aI`," 11 I, m.1-rof arnt orgur- hidrn. iidgesio, Lddzziiesi tle .. id- yuin-Dr W.whch e eem woth of noic : T e ne; laie" wic jdgeSaagead octed iha
a vo infrmedire bil hke *hdrn nt th -nnitini statly o han suprb trnspaent aintngs fr cirtaia, .,- ~^ S -'- 'laca I. "v"d ImnEvans,. .'oruiu ac aB g ii up afluePilols Wtheu:cutmptlBOntsfh hto everbeen
w rn lnad nrty arnea' a uatgie n r ast'inat i sse I an-, I" I F ct! e ter ms-by tilepincial In.t, r. h oa r jwite them. Pr forbment c l en ih te tan o e w ri f .
.eposesetrechat they aoreShowe er, be o the fact which he thoug tire e tnot9nshoerpotine
H. C. y oIJsue .alites ,A BAR TLp ET Prnci p o the tag e of No7 e Yrs a t pe r idwee tructedin"eh yw x s t e r e b c d 1 ln'
Tm pkin coun-it ty 1 Ihefo r nBo e r aook Groto n.ucia O C ~ i S- 0 ar a a ,8 do br s pte lling, orthe el mncop rts o of Gegaphoy pan y A ndri thmetic, find rs. Rap Midlto, Long Isad h bee cure o f taw cout andrUthe slat le t C if Js tic wh a s re ucd? thpc oimf tn h e l i dg hcru r tB. a 1 tin ,,ie afr i
s .. P. T L L I AG.. .y u s n g D r EnrtIsi l Hr.o m l a n t ws0y s I-











-lfer n pewratio s~ co okt-Eing l Raiont ebes Alvan e w ih Hunt, GT E OE& W R GE N OArgus wul i f r itihe .p Inp the mo re awing and -anufa ss sthrn ees e rs and ia- &ro lsa. ap o .t c ls.I ci7c~ gti i up"i toin dc t e thea leg sla ur W t oin ct re ae thei m y e r a i hdoi ow w e h ^6
tr A .. pach n c s nis m veI -i'J JOHN furFI LD tn I pus e t ,-v ~ rothe extlc e nt of w o als o f or g ak ng m achiery; tlo n Mrs Bla ckw ll K H 1 51. M dsoL H ~n f stree-, M nt s a te i a p i tm nte salar. recive gr a an an ua sa 4la y fixe by th l..a w o f a
""o h done w Norta berhW. WMTA r.Alept en lle and rb E dwar ds ari ea ch tea chr s in this b e b It was and Aperient Pils 18 6 of 4t


4TV^ Me^ ^ oPETER P~odo. HOTAVeE^ ^^nA judicial^*;aS^ saariwes; T ^ andtheothe the ^a^ judghtSaelsum
Rrtanhd,Andotv at itfl~ '; er a oo~~el~ rter..Aa Ti RRHiuUpNpIoG:,it -epartmen t. I IP e .....I. l













Agrcatnumade Rraof getement wfor oavur t c stigforvte Founde of The LreHoptlmanyi. f,\ning dpar tmnt, i. heCasicl un e at a. Stewa'~rdatT, of ship Wi liam, iv as I)Pcn e so fa re- enre ha f.45 0o g tt e bru h o nt o e ,
H, PARAprLrTet POTTER, ', stored to h t a e l f o a a had i msel f been ane-uate to tge ,upr .q al "adr T e" hg rditor of Gd i.pt ,whctjrgtogho'h.h d P .
sti- scaonto b urde i ths ciy, uderourown ll-GIDE N P HEW TTthe ev.Mr. ullons;the'PHOatiIAS nderDr.'Pen baTT, I n uableto o soforitlng7ime.ioi Cssnttowerte,












lpoiervsookng tovesd care, d provtheseatide forlitysure an rcch-andaELIro..a RishARnd ero Cldae fer all th ;fia- a ,0 )c and f privat e juds ou refr to b y he w s o I
Aom ericanitrontheepblle, beng n id t oe durne o sthrti- All avilg ordeed hn elforntrey to ane GA y pat n ofttheshopixc tPend Su.crbe o finsStruc ilo. tirPa rbn eoi sn o nve nderNtheSecessity of ere all e otherowhioeorifederaEournalvillae
s'oef aes tindforak io, ratoe J any we have (ad d edoree J. VAn to Te French language roortged a ndt eourd Urnite indige otion 9e14e retiring ffom the city, Order ofy bec bas ue padres JAMEI did h p to r i? N as t Jour-
wpataent e e nt will ib us also t t lstein. four h notieDr..W;EduraTenandasimplereboon-t W i e have 1. als as 1 got, Egre Ai ona Nn. alsay s S t o 0n as ter yret d were su m ofhaR
I-e in mkit and foiest wit e o oement Coour sn u to diro.r wthfeetoan ole attention but te sof Nua yewY o oinu wood asr instructorrin Colgmay nship t.h ar Pils. .,lb- anylucrtw e en t No one Willo es d v !
1t. Thd lo w ith icas t ying made atgie bIlat. funaes.mer .rumno A vr disorder thAGL #ccre FUo imruce A olND Mr. Israel Colat Smit genera partnerstio ofiieaes s"**'"' t^vnuch -h to Elen w hoeaffti i cn thie tirenor Induetiei s- $ ,500 whc wa thet ^'"1lo real cO t So t aPC-
w r, Prat- Thel imri oed thr Abolther oom sto k bnf etudemnt and fo tee c's an ol mutua cony s -ent. r e al-i Made nd-ei iT.h loss 3r las d ye ars of inreaeile jd icial toltreq. NolHtpun m f1a n pai
purJ~a d o yo, Ianth gy eaed ithparicuarl HTt~ u iN`ewarkandDr-N LTMI ANuYa (fure b"ra.n.ches rqi rela d by th e CvlEgrsn mn fs












Di e Orto &ntout o the ier t, lquan terity no dfculty require, au wi too s ariee te m S TE E se. t h aly h signed t hsa ptne o mtis atentt dy of s ee I ty Meoss hs stati ontp T ,. tha llau Co herabl
ily-origNh ie pupils of th. Instiutiomaa ente E y, co .ctu al a oal s f ad Mh n t wo p s in te y 3n s' Ty S n te J wa but tht C hi
INr MI..LLS &e u ; 'le' ..t. z.. .] P[ T.'I FOA C- advantages offAmaking aJuseicctiongeofn ahcebest locationshipndas toatity benP











S y o ne c a n a l a n d r a i w a y o fa tee p s a r i o t h e s t a t esab l a s c l a s iPju d c i o, t r t e nn siew r dd esres m r h i m s e l e u r e d h e*L E i sGA B c h o r u a n d l i e y -,Ina sw d oe f u l l ete e a b ot t il0 e r i a d e q u a c b of til e "" t q i a i c a a r o
S17okiug -toe. Y u bsr bre wo uledatosrespectflyin formT ORIES, "f"ve-y d i MALT II .













dwerfr ors It is eertae s, e omzo te, e t- t aa onn A ls eo inEORGEbr P.chesofstudywil Pl EN becomm ernwlesedhneoyrtendnn asee- to fr to te su r ve d in sy no tng or to s
these dealersaaged, and others anwhtre plyce MACHINES, cSoTEAb ca NE S, and ROIL C GA E he has notfe wel fovell y I of, gettay adaer atino In rill
inga fothese ntoveslatofall, athatlihafit'wIlclp chrormand R PAD E C HST INGS of -P d i I TilNehas us lyafert he hoiday. *IIep. oan one furngad.e cr p oth 3M xm.nto ohe-u-o um s h llb qut ljorba













ewandItha n ou for the oin ingve ntion.s w failagosecur e him t ion of e P nd E n RN rotrmcted ,-,, uincurable st equate o--d'f TheGel e OR COG TEneywpntstofaw arete a cian .t-mti'l entets^dige notonld h iaarules so pan tisly.,, I t
all Campletsup ply.Havio ne madr n g Je adfewealterati re ,red srabl e exidstec ja2Mlaww eJOHNiv COLGATEo i ofatno walk the- |no rr8 "t.vI -a y nn u. prepovrto the r es o curces th ofst lei." 81
te Uoursrespectualy, E .H. Pease. d tt es. and nighl b dade di st ressswature ofr e vd uT ..... wh have read the scores n we ve y oe are gr eatly mitkenow the a.ave,, itfa il
,fOwd.a n;y .t warmin hi to comp a ia ornaeg niats e in e and o tie paperofensi n rp astt e.r o 20,00, S witlccOnnow to extend tress. to T oi c -n A GVey P is. need n b t t .11 r is ntin g in iti na-
Thetfollowi ng of tritio er will Eurbpe. ket c l Sfo s al e P lo ante apicr ortile rend cony, iatena
recommen them, aswh eing p unequred byl a ny stoveer, ind a oprn CO ay re conshed thre f at all t ice, at POT ]]ao n06 of Poue bIt ni unnua"llyo iTr ds I v ot t tu nds of l nt i es t ihnp a W i nd to It in h "reub e d" the ti,
tehadis o nstant, uoethe r ugrke thei wesint egr. In pint of hist oAicSH whT FS i ngle anpry itd d pou darrngd obottomsI N il bemaeoomte5eg6latroof ," -ifi hefolowngby" yDr.ylt"W .1 Evans' t wlin t eymaeob enacest me.rwilMlwghcoiadhtecesntaens vl he .u .Slt.
11 m ,t -upse an ote ftv N aeee secnieta oslain onr ainsrsdn ta A atuale and Meoral Scwiencsesson fo natt i- r oad :Ife tBd T onwich Pi ls Iows .e the yJ rn leaste a cuolng ofveruth tonthe- rersetat ivwethe fromn his afl county a nviddsrict ltsn
n4?. ect caneato cand free for o kiU~;ng.s ar ad it 0sacg aall onsC theM~ r oi pte tw op bareels HA TRSwritieg i-cr ora T uitheoCL IFT n tRY junoCr departm en and l e AL oBaumnit t laorge, tof Canale tand Iahaveo been as ertion s of riio the lowJ. andlav characters of -w ele to n nafuneO.poet col l
Bt,, be angu b stove I e nnetmr pule rteaind SOAPf"OLERSKETTL,,"B g ,ro l n a Pe trea wi" a in studies, ... quater aln fo thesummeril la. -s v ly al lowed w ith to be ad e and he pros
tltre maei ,,l d a ....Ipurch -asers;tei .....iotyh. tn s antiou s s a o tsher ma StCReWs thv e ir g c e by ltter, ann.-" of hans tuperb traonsparev e deaisntingsvenrngur
.. Pe p.steooslceatdrcte EaPmn~,. M LL,,and, `lS; ... PL...ATES.. .,,sererr s; 425frothe iitresp qua r terns.tad gofthab,$6 oveta h ca ruh b ltltlIIt~)t hegnlm nasie w lw rsaf r












,on ar e o ruyrtling of ,the okin g.dH d de evUr gen oOeredD enhyonclo win d a remittan be f urtad instaca rptt, one. peaine a in t.t Jopal y toued t- "or u the ir9 Nonrt arenet-nr n ee- e
Oe rtific at sf o h s h h v s d t ee i d iff er noA S dif c yin sea nd in packal e s o a y p r F O R IN P U M P S W A G Jii ao ~r ttid i h a nd, a ec m m uended c to stak e D r. t W E v ns T o i ut wer a pn o a mpl e p ro etion ag ainst th e a k e ahf s- d uci ngt t h e sarfi l fnrT om $ 4 ,50, to ethnew e
ohnctfctri e cantars a ve be enUsent in,'andi cnlited Sa, C&e.. ...and e wndi eg. day Ir elV Ev e'POST COACH BOXEni i at I o h of the 4th dprmn s4 75 and W
seen n f t p MERic at S3 state Bt. ae a d a fw fm t ose Su r85 ,25ie. Tota l, 20pe e m N ,fr ann act to iPcorporltes, t o she lis dne t er cofre t o mindandre. et i ofo eh wmoea s to tlhng rinsacct medr
- -d toC theVheple p lace a rpp o r g. o LIFT N h aNUfA N G- r C a NYh p to es lon arepc flly, A MBowr s o 1f01













M3r. Prarkte'" tovh asath e norb inc chamber stove pue~s 'Offices-No 3 Norton --2tre 0 npairGreen-sted, 8Alobrasy s cthee otlfto, o r teincoro tond ony ttnofad iha h a ns wt hc O AN O Ilvrx 11oh rn rt ftpcrompaS' T 1 h te hspoiyh sis orgni Ut sy eav
ed Lofyou my f ily a nleasedistffe, dfo the .'- audsi, verTplated coah tame s, iotrAR saMte til j5 name on th$62ortwkoa to Mo gedera ,se to sompany, at. ut O il
whioer it us cu t h eom infor the bste m ner wi of the O no STE inc VAR A rgusBu in. for-the pr o f saw ing and ,phnu nr ng ,1,n c ofits p ubic tot ipted o oters, tieat feelae whi ch su b r 1 &j uso ine ot e 8 t
F; -tdapate, andcnsume~outvevlittewood orthear -zrid N TARAL r SEAL P' RESSES. ote"att'e F wood; lso form ingmavhl













monthsan doane C sstre bVa roiuht Dre.W. V.l .ohavings eto eonsiveut assort o, oatt ooh r ei cht t he m ty rua ddn V2icfhoancello. of td-eIntelfh
. to te1r" idayyoaesspehpn dos F -. 4 r .. wwortunte t deideup on t o s cmerit wi. A d w w t se r u rcs in i
li t h etatceta a vrcm i m bsr Patrnembe r acinghe- mo stl e veroP ys kindia n us e, keeps- ,o .hi". t y aos ihdu-co
a 1lo. Its p,, u lar ons trucion enables the serat he cnsa tl-- -n efolwig. P o gh, sin s vz OarTIC shetruse es g aveu t bt ain drfrncal e saton srtificateurdes withoundatonef"tFellow olthuseoOfegs ofRnpley Ohic w... .the m eet.. ...wastheld? Tp .... .....
t .ra ea tinmetorboiinf'ourntlae s, n d wh ohaeuodtstitainoven. ouderof h1-3 ekHos igtal 'lbnN.o .. 0 1 2& -j ed b n de ecr.o n o tero hetathrwh ondsgalr lifin oly aifato,.vd...rn..a ltl m r ha af h titi t rset
ttgoe adns ~ en duigt oses nshve F NowoL .h heylthy tihlnnttItlavLondnniseit'tt-ears.' The y-irn'i ==,.se(which WE"
wih n ve ad egla teanndtor insta'T"nce hcershpaar tndretfr isacepanewa
.b ignly'favoiretlyth po prie toire, wi thout theintrp osition of Prof. nthc Ro l aI an 2,3,&4.Hd sonsColeg a ) D.Pen11 hvoard tl a the m. Prfi ce for board,, fue2;l, ihs eepi:;hcet ekesi n teb snisad 1 eelie ftesae

era 1l th ardat ,T roretr ncnfdntyree ndc re Fo u n derse a n om laintsupplid enirmc hthP ex IRON,, ,- II N L sysreN .
huudervds ofciatifom tho iNformationofory similytarte Botipe ien gof urnyering andFnshnide etnde pallthes-rsen.rilOu allo wh M~ ESe rset saI o me. Knowhe flo igproshv io .l~il~ dcrda .It
ona ibraeasoo ecth e dh with e atnet s sr nddeultingto he n. tu J. ht e nformiy N.ttl C AMPBELL.onccern g ml,:,i t-ig t atthj sic s f he s prmeCo r
Arom wellan dcis dark o uesh'. all tile o ehtonse ofM aste Ors unitlfver complaintsiheadache, weaknesselyetoithe com- hudI w hephrtnaryhipt whoshewsubsdribers,1do certigyrt
Mroatnk n o ilig new f our bdoi n. l~ers atdtre sau e d tim e, ur..", l aso- fdiRse made he~ ee isavdryCREW S enut to le cprarti heeo eomd n or-duetedunder :,aint,nearancesa~ tsansan ohr lali)e a n ni ain ta ie .J o l n ]'t
L paet ):"der.lor iL too prevalent--T then1u6asalaries"ofor federalistsdand,11tloh thlarity",for
wihtea coneaudmpton favreyat smaldlqat ity o furso eee Wry. Al. bOeiotnguaprato icat l, Millwrigte ilntio n t h os wYoknhioETERn ~eG 0,,SH tO or ge cnp. laints frWihtUePlsties lir.anw rt hi o m ncain a nII.O
c hEldoifeu.i mnaigt. h tm er- tr tmentofe nder ydiotherthnoratioerfon min prdelai n t oI ns- R CHIBALD-Co ae arge rAIparte rsand J w aeerol h ubetofslis adte lin..."
Itill %an r .Wy t ek ne stU 1'n sY elrc et. rt -
Th'ewsbievryha sbird ingt ytewati nhirswh ithe nhi hor- whitndery htfueeoiteprne rIy te eog g TadoHt OM gt ASrF. specialY ', T e om iteeoew icsle aschir
w.~~~OT O ttAHI isIuSydsrbtdtrnl heiom t ep.lnfl iee t, ad-t ahyurobtifat ingse ,ed tlalh a ben dfsole ymutal s ent. MadeontT ATer .Gli, itn Use opy .V
theifirethrt ongthsoenght .Patdt 'sre Impro vediffiou r pubalicatiooon Ofarse herfrolThscorrtmespoynidedythceiwansrdtisiegnetdnthdy,,
aifeforoning siadigtovets and ta ikes Imrat ylesueinn re tomsay rnaceru m aen' ofin SostchsImperorm n. dRIHARhV.ouW T+,31rnegIect or17 Januasteetysanthe yearfopi on,"I ha" e'
mending ittotek p ublical k ig e cidedly scmotaebleas t judAl ric leso rdetredtme nt be frw ards sued oany peagrtvof.. e,. PHI[A IPES.COLAT'RE SEL, ) Jnra, --str:ucltar, e in Walterstee.. .fo o tie e dth n thrcfcorctngal
c le f he idfor2bhoas.ing, s teboiln n ost ingm thatbnevero- nted Stateodseaeor the oninga bse rerssyubee adra nnpesse r., GT o psnsre." e oe hs tn n a e ts t h u lc r
,muear tnerahs noicyaae.Iisd urand ble and simeplac vrresi on o fthcboAM V.Tne T, ps E ngsyhle i rs, urae ,N .CI. W L AM ILE ap.Jilrkosh efron
JAw, andD r r licIthanre aied to soeoxt ntfano" ho ld re ei e ,inventiono orio ed to -
s tom C a ndle osuTy mr, esq,,utea rkllqun ti y fw o d f r B a e -t e L Al a y rt t e c re f l s r R s, 8 s l t Ile ai g
RCHRDYAES Tnstes D. ~vns-i Tat1;, ublc ay ,mouwhchthef his-.alabry; 'td aperpeute hatintgien1 teservicesredethexnssicrd'
tile wor it doe.,'GCaleGN. Bem nt. Cltinan.n Co. wihth-la r tuge pyof the above vlari AerientPllsI oi ine nte C.,1J ; w s tma o 1 mpefotu e".i
I Co' H.,GA, N .LANDSr 11er so", desi.... )I- p. '. stantykept onhatfo di al,,lt tleIh av epprenrsuprice wholee is .
cseesaiyssane ncn o
Mr Pat-T e mpovd ior oiercDr.g toe COACHAND WAGhp OfesNg eXa svLytheEs o'TVudysng............ .... .. 145 Brinfried res i somachwna-6dos ai oveyhead Cind s ide, n Ol'n.h tti w sa'ro, a esnll ,k o n t
havltue ofyo useve a mhighly p lasto serdedith, particulpt-arly td ilesprio r th es wartiouandDr byomnain uatu'des ren' e LtU IUN vlDenns otdieilaosont
". ccu of ;hoes iveryedmallscientitoffi u e l' and mad estral o111rm2 isForiensaldte pby. iSE i ELEral, _in u'ieN.t h o sat te oundewYrksigw nedsessIo agntfor aa a s ruldwt agides oo.sqec f suh evc n rp
thampoveen"threurles ewitha Put av"ne hs rofssonadcartoe thathewarprpelynduate hi', oa e tsticFTOeIONand wANa wththe-
,f!,a~nyapaausirwr in oo stenoycmae anrg.a iitBeityvrbrnh fteusesning....". i pits 0ftour illsI foUsUfllybtllc tircrtylsoto extend the sathepeopeettoi.
fintl a re l aiacw it' o" .prve urb 'ler WAH, AL V ',39 chic, f"agod oi. Hanllreciv ode s0-o6 uew a ue.P s luiy urt ,P y
t~~~~~ H A K Ih Ia h'htheyr thought itand Dr.Cpropeyreonthat ththeo e am oltivest J100 en c
,ehad nenstnt setr'ogh hewntr I poito hi ofiee \;hil ae rop erlyfte IVA S asd wm e f Pish t Io purcha e f ranyqanettm i~ty they ay at. ."lrk ilie sret
'co ig tov. orpa recomm endstiovesI have everigse en; SouthMarenacoslton Cutrpaitseidg t a "t tae o Ne 4rS.o,, i'-esin di.ng spct ieh-o~h prcaino dpeitoo oe.
not erfectlyneaonrre;icertainly c noriesavryemauwt' dsach --o ohrptenswopeer writN D in- tornrtthe Clan ficeOby dep Dosiig rice pof vt nmbrofO, a ndthccomhmulryonp bicitcr soldb lbri
a e, oubr ndthe a mo ntoosp a he sratdowilpred formpre standJ erA PERsonalntErvGw---P.M 1R N Ehsu.tn S tllatel wk .. .. .... ............ I II,
tagea~mehou ou e rt cninw enistnas suces es esnoig iintel tnir assoyletera fts al of@100(Ioo w11.liber o.,to etn dthe delivery o- teti- wC ,. .v
andfo as yt higired m er fr t)kinstu td a se .overseen o 'f aired an dmossn ma r m ttressesorliveieeee a the smed scine T ee '0_' 4-
itspulic1 wleat non dopilffieulty &c-senill mackae sto anyrde r t o fte lts cie t o the rsetai"y rds andn f h bveS.... pigi-~ .PhnisFlthr t
on"i fs i ns. i do ..lso.. .- r.J s C lsee .r
-ianuahovredna as suctove ldre cm forwsle&c. &cStte. ,altm e tewl. b cc 'l pcs 1, PPICTe I ONw b nllot.gstueote asIe n r .lrelany reoverdm sal fihie, a lthN.7 v.ins a ot ob a on tc.W h nteC .a-- .J
RA CS I N, co tte t carefllyroectd romobervtinhyd entoibhet -wsitetfeNwnorino anaettterorprat"f gtoslod-theypai tsaeev
deal oie ftepbic n o N .L ivetgeehepl fe app others. m ond, ar an os 1VTCEITO ANUFiATUIoNwil COemPade to t be I 1o- a resnearchtfully quareOTT YorkVwe reTTia o h fiei 83,teslr a ie
r. ako' s tv a e nhcabrsoe.cOisueiesN .3Norq~lton-st e,,i n ear Ge r ees-m telpack ages ctll t dton Rc on ont'tae s.s ih a g' encesarereqes tdohem ebya ecstfrhtetue ep li ncedin eainto e
"H.O SC. ena ew to eiaof eret. _o tOf the tato of ew-Yorkat the pesent .sssion '." a-fit" it cact
1,ili, it i.cso ayt nor h'o h eit fte N .1 E 1,r 3 SlipRE, nar Atr-ustr Buildingr. "'N hA 0NcERf its Grt hha p,,n ... le, terwset
vca di ate. The bet era o n theis eatov mannebrought D .5 V A SITontinuesgt andconsiste as usaal a n afirs eirAu th... ...... .... .dcw......roeiot no .the
~o -- "ti,e c n v e li a!pp rant csI
li rr ii e r spto th fie th, a nd co nsu m s ob th ve r yeo o it tle w o e ad a ofu t i e I a]tel e trdi e a e ls e e ts st i nes T o f| I wo lo od a : '~ s.. .


;er surfaceais atedon at ah time by the heat an, flan ei cers, and all impurities of the blood. Thedecidedpr fer- alsh Andre and H enryJ .W iliamsian d 'J ohnK eanp healt h ..... n a v en g v ispe n e tB p i
t--'Ile lire n salaries whih wasnmadenino823-tdoctrine wascoenforlataC'dJv'eo t"
he front ofthis stOve do n not project beyond the fire- en ee given him for many years, fully demonstrates his su- e xe e s the ire- enee* gienhimo Ssorh mans yeade, finyd monytratf rhty'uof Ifrthat"he g i doctrine .... It 'bp v l.p 1a
tub e r t h e r o a s t e r c a n b e p l a c e d n e a r e r t h e fi r e t h a n i n p e r i o r m a n a g e m e n t i n t h o s e c a s e s ( a r i s i n g f r o m a p r a c ce w' i e z d e c e a s e d a nC.. .. .italna n o t s ( uhic l of a n o r n o f ou c u n t I n p r oo f ot a t e ont ri b u e to r i n ao t h e -c o m p e n s a t i o n
se stove s having projecting fronts, and consequently vice of 37 years in various climates and extensive hospi- Pursuant to the nrovislon s of th e stat ut e it),, .11 .. u n e w ca." territ Co lonies f yom mand 1f the bes t 'I but not es a hi
,operation of roasting is greatly facilitated; a larger tale.) Dr. Evans graduated in London, and has been ac- made and provided, and of norder ofhd c. u f al numberios oew etth e d c tizen rtoOrelati
.0oeis operated upon by the heat at atime and the la- lively engaged in his profession eer since The very ervmaentheaove c n that they maybe sup. of the es, and therefore ous.t not to bp n te bt te ut nt SO g .
of tug eong the spit greatly diminished. The front of great succeeds attending his practice, induces ignorant pra- g tivn to alll nhnav n',i any ge el li r P eed beteitho and exceptiontes allyuage orcounto ry n o hea rd when he says what the Jou rnal itself caio of q ara iet ho u h t publt o f-m i ni ch w
oven isirotectetefrom thenintense neatofthefrebya teders to imitate his lode. Many valuablemembers f i, by d ent or oo i nyu.ivdedmtlcn.itsosp a with c apy a nd or c h w h
tin u ou s gua rd plate or s hield cov erin g the w ho le fro nt socie ty are daily falling g sac rific es b y th e halts h old o ut by o r"s h are in t e-'a nds a "c.i.. ..di cingpre ad w ith n th prp i d gaite d hree c at o sh o udgh a n p l th e ic
n p la te a n d e x te n d in o u t to a d eg ree n e v e r b e fo re a t- th o s e p re te n d e rs. S tra nge rs a re p a rtic ula rl mca ttio epd. "` i nt his, d isganu psre is e P Lr tu nt ny a s hat t hsde ep u sed, i n th e t re at mest o f Fe v e r wholl n a den tu e to t h e s t p o r t f pafy i ll
p eed ; it w ill be founn that this is a great help to the not to b e d received by them tto nled, and of w which nartitio n or sale is t heay u A lue a s Generan of eqp en i ncul d be as s e th e tual l t o R o wf
n, asIvymeansofitandacoldairflueformedbetweeen Dr. Evans' great professional expcrienca, in varioni oTpod'uceto..., i veuntdersigne d t o" ne ftisle r ,ty e t m,,..t 1e te s p, o ia tlmrlym incurred, not, as the Jun labo. Io proof ote h
itdthe front oven plato--thehealof thchovee-n isren- climates, wills oon convince those who apply to him of thiscourt, residingintecit y of-N e Y,nef e ith ti-e.disetefresing complai n dedwi ito is desiged, Co ty. pd tom of exacts from the o r th at Iug S wl *n i, re n
!d.equal in every p a 'rt,so that bakingcan be donew ith- his superior skill it torally eradicating the worst cases as th e twentiet'd M archwne x ty o4 ib- a t he most ra be m lans of or w hiich ot y r d s n ob
.w a w ell il every r spe et as io a hrick oven speedily as possible. T thousands are annually m ercurial- ery-street in t ie city of N e'w Y ork, poo f o r l ,c h t! of a mg o te rn te Ca
let never before attained in any stove within the ized out of life. by improper treatment; recant affection their Ilins'or i .m bran r i tt i ....... e re n of ahe roeort and ro lin s o f
wledge.oft"e advertiser. The oe constitutee the chief are, without mercury, eradicated in a few days. All let. Batistactory evidence of ile amoubtB 11 e rcon, t i n this *ntv and"countr Wale s ofe and retaisolutionsWasing on ouny, ooftloe aniond n e mr'1
'llencies ofthe stove, rendering-it althtcn be. 16- trs (o st p....naid) ....cribing thecaseavid eo sing a fee. i' li. naty e oft, .ad.. u tbanes adteu er dieo, spea.PYreealA et 81 ,a w iht eC if usiepeie .H
nacook g stove- ol og quler at ev erY noint wilhave te r emedy and directions sent to order 1,- whcs a l ds, ate.e ,h a
S any other Steve..ndibaking...ell-saesarrief en Tnob d the dboveDisptensary,..... Basd''-flloin And by Messrs.SND&SH had alsopresidedatapreparatory A ghaasledetd
x'wheninaddition toa~llthese, tecei r fu cn- I.pa fmdcn o theeaarsofantgwareAlofun_ rtaeontainnilgacomp an lo eteouANo.40ofme-ati Alanyebe ondthecnrimitso-which we- designed itw should p"a.blico
.ed. beauty, anti Navicsently strong to iusure their sta- certain in which the smtntomX,;h ..^. ,S Row par e whout which besammonh and wce w
y, what more call be desired It is nn1 t retended th at and treat ent of filedisel.se are notated Out with Btht-f,, i v ,:, e At,,,[ y-revam t,osituate.....h, Fifthn'a rdnuu o fter s even- y. o e o h c m it efo rp rng floe it l t


nm e n on thwrin g isrsacrificedhe otrl eso 'r n ed.. T.o.ma ey.y..., viortberly in .le. rear by a lot of ground E A W 01RD TO THE VISEa Weoroneree airing the he Journal for ardrop on th te '
lpht,, o ov ,nder wor ing mraces pr ar e promd n or Dt r. 11.9e offie s ar so arr anged~t htti patients are no n,%v or late ,the( pr*operty 6f'Thol"1a Sword,' and wester- 1NGLAND expect evr Plan to do his duty, wen these papers before the public. They not or, d [b si es bad]resorce of the~ state.-1" tl I"e l
)phe"ic stiplrii es te- b reity and appeaaey only tth a e ver pes r son i y n.A Bu partic ular to ybyalotofgroundnow orlateofOrrinThompson ,on- aid to live been the last words uttered by Nelson at til ey not o e court t
,e s It tak-.ity stand y ap ling competto or. r easnn f i-fnDrEvnlc sBrNo.1PekStinloIl.^^ taining in front and rear twenty-five Ilet, and in depth oil battle of Trafalgar-Physicians call not be, therefore, Coll- in 1792,s whe the euaino h ccs-l"" "^ ^0'--8 1 ttcutCm i
es~~~ ~ ittksisHttdb t Cope itors. In all casesthe most nviolaible secrecy observed. echil side one, hundred feet, be ft(,. same more or less.- sidered doing their duty iitliey willfully neglect toraions of tha prnt bu the se fot th tru fs ofI79,we the supremet 't were fhol"
1.1 No 17 State AUSrnroT-IN,' N.B. '*No connexion with any other. je$-Ef Dated New Yer~k, inunary 31st, 1B36. mend tip the. notice oftile afflicted cerain advanoft^tP"t bttaegsteothtstu 40,000, theud cou ift,18 e-o
1No 17 State of. corner of Dean AND FTBLTPIHEN CAMBRELENG, which willnot fail to accrue to them by adopting thea republican doctrine in relation to salaries, and i esr
-nche u aet crethASel11 esGOOS- onceasdeodtesnmbrtohfveand inpa"o
hati g% fetlenManteanyinunioncoery. vodceual'1130 y-ear.. ... .......ce""'sSyphiris-,i' uni-vesal"ly eallc


" ,W'" ..... thln f i saerm- ,l .pen. 1 v O p reve oiningat31v r orthM arketsc treelri -" rie. w eot of ror y che er ful ly prope y ofur aid ie "t t nr t
..... Inor acknowledged to be one arianMosttpainfulairksomeestit


tcd viy Dr. Sain. Shaw of I lt i city, r t table for par- le green satin and poult de sole, black and blue b nl nJr lt p e o a o a wx to b o o 2 a R
balls, countivvg-rooli, Atores, office, &c. for sale by satifn blue hik and cold siliks, plain arid fIg'd for Cloaks 1Y order of fill. honorable Sairluel Cheever, first judge equally agonizing disorders with which umankind is afflict- a wider circulation. The materiall part of th e w e i ^y 0 W O ,an.Rr lli-
A. H; pl asoi ,fa nd pe,. dr wivan" ,d st fe r lt s i thec'ty and 'coaunty tony imd, and it is nOt unfreqihenllY attended by consequermcp c cu to i. he mon-
es~~~g tha of...taile sosandb ts"rjousettrs" "......;IC750'e or 0"18l75re.berloie-f
Y PA. H1,AUSTIN Nd l 1 lise d tnhtc, fin d n til n v, ht slbl s upeo r kyo id glo-tf e n, puruantoe te paodred ifeel obe the s tateuto e a thr!ss- whiche m itr he itr aHof urlv s T e li ny ep t a d r s l t o s e c py r mt eJ u -M n


14 178tate-Bt.cor.on Der n. l''""'l rind shawls, t together with mtany other_-.arCe Sing eBit Cl" f '0r ., pag istonury31s, 1f l.e mtatend a t t- n this t y In po)twa s asollows er-rs75
.rS ]e 'Lockospi COAalmOVEn yrice-rse stpeahisn hed rh-itret, rie! rey--ew Bws Subsequent to this period,suprovision was often ,y


U.LOS' DurTONSEEDpCOpH-Tfiesb- grld wateldaa'moe sahskilvercard snenevry eorpublicaoois notiid t ym o -y civil neotice tauneta of roreiieloy, a l n e
e ai .t a t m a l a t u e ~ s p r e t e 1 A ~ & I O | ,a c c.q e r in te r q u ir n g ae a i Tr tst\I A N E P Oto v 11,Ra dV r es e th e e m af

t sericRsnreSNred,,t..e.p.. .. ..inc...ed.... Ohleantha sh o tf i have beenjudges who did not scruple to use
scril. rl,; aq t.an~tity ftliecelel~ratne,112row:erl~iDit- degastuocard barehken, osthv state andthse .v h alth rsrorin ,eufruit D .kCookeadehtsuldoe8 toithem neessariysidu,,tsd ifconseq enceaorsuchmelVhe
,oru'araie d yt Bao h -(;,,s el as- a n ep-ta~i, nie,'fork and spoon, waistles.gold peneiU elies, ry to themnorfor their use, of any property within ti sadrii h or fl .M tl')P .a d f ie adpootoe lot h blt ftl epei om
f-rn are "t "' "t......tes be .esiy ma e to Bpectaelea, ti.lbles, r :*nd nin I lar' a dagoe antl 6,lendidi state belonging to em, and the ranfcr of iny pucn p o- fie in th l*L k II^ ^t, No 3 No to^ >M *'., Al a r' to 0'1 t ao elk themselves felt thint'n r o ........ty wilo c uredee dnntheu--n.e ha lso the a uall o l l t
Irt'oul70.to90bushelA to the acre,,and, its early matu- aqgortment ofdiamrond pi-,Jandrings, plated goods ofall plerty, bythlem, are forbiddenby law and tire void. Da'ted N WYOk t Pl N
'ripeni^3^ ^ ^ ^^u^% ap tayti, bittannitt "S K ^ urns &r. itc 4thW0" (lay'-o- ofto February, IF.37 cit or deprcatin fmony.Thesalary ofon Wesal pekofteacul o-f^
r ,..rvng in uoutt 1%00 (lays firomutoettmeo, plntng,, kinds, hate~r tubs, japanh"l tay, brittannia nF esrL mosnut e d ndfffces holdbelierlbu otetha ag ntdayg of en atoFei cud ngthup ovsi n n1hesu pl7Pouh
} N\ arIJt V.*BURN,3,e5d'ni .-' Also verya rge ryl argeunit yndid m sic bx ,o Ht. C. WiH rPll"re m n e n a1]!O n Freshc gemteyh H
N. Market at. corner Maiden.. .ne, de30 -. ,.AYMOND, Argu Dnui,,ing.g f0-,n Attorhey for attaching creditors. o.o2 E. K. SAtTKHLEE, 01 Sate t cu ndt he bea talen t o f the a as ehd.i
State -B' faund nafueInceo npvryibtntae hte il a ela h etbihdslr.i


I iSB~vOc- -4&








--- -...---- ;- i- --~.-------- an~ari --


cess till the present winter; that, paltry as thie trial
might be thought, the nature ofthe country mig]
enable them to prolong hostilities for an indef
nite period "'and that several of the "surplus mi
lions" would certainly be consumed before the i)
noble broil could be terminated. These predi
tions, which are now almost history, resulted fro:
information acquired from competent authority
and from observations personally made while i
the region of hostilities; and it now seems to n
that public attention should be called to the who
circumstances of these Floridian troubles, to th
end that, all the peculiar difficulties being consider
ed, expectation should not be greatly disappoint
by the failure of future (as former) expedition
nor disgraceful epithets be showered on troops
officers for not speedily conquering an almost ii
tangible foe-a foe rarely found where sought fo
and rendering their own power most annoyir
from the incertitude where it may be, and the suo
denness with which it is, usually manifested.
The French question having had an angry a
pect at the outbreak of these Indian difficulties
it occurred to the writer at that time, while neu
the scene of hostilities, that the landing of twei
ty thousand armed-Frenchmen at Cape Florida
Tampa, strong as they might be in military in
elements and science with which our officers a:
also conversant, would not prove as annoying
the troubles occasioned by even half as many hum
dreds of Seminoles, whose skulking warfare se
discipline at defiance, and destroys the health
troops disheartened by the impracticability
bringing to close quarters the savage foe. Sue
a regular force, landed any where on our coas
especially in that quarter of Florida while our foi
or six thousand troops were in the Peninsula,wou
speedily share the fate of the invader at New-O
leans: and yet what have even the gallant rifles
Tennessee (so efficient against the British army
been able to effect' against the comparatively pa
try band of Seminoles I
But it may be asked, wherein are the Seminol
now more. invincible than heretofore? Are our
fles less .true, our bayonets less sharp, our soldie
less valiant, than when former forces fought ai
conquered those haughty savages?. The Semi
oles probably vary little from What they were--
the battle-fields are vastly changed! It should I
S.recollected that this tribe was formerly encounter
ed and subdued chiefly in Middle Florida-th
bur troops were probably scarcely compelled*
cross even the Suwanee in-puinsuit-whereas, noa
profiting by former dear-bought' experience, tl
Seminoles have concentrated their power in th
marshy strongholds of South Florida, where the
power can be rendered far more effective thu
could possibly be the case in the region where
their nation was formerly signally chastised.-
Those familiar with the respective sections
country, .will readily believe that ten thousand Ir
dians between the Suwanee and Perdido would 1
less formidable to the Floridian army than om
desperate thousand with retreats in the evergladE
and leaders like Oceola.
Itis sometimes said that this Seminole wa
which has already proved so disproportionately
disastrous to the white man, is alike "unimparalle
ed and disgraceful." That there may be di
graceful" features in this contest, will not be d
nied; but that the war itself is unparalleled,
is not correct. The Floridian difficulties have
striking parallel thus far in the history of one c
the West India Islands. It is to be hoped thi
the parallel may not be much longer continued
though, in the embittered feelings occasioned b
this provoking strife, a plan has been mention
of bringing into Florida from Cuba such fell auxil
aries as the British were compelled to employ inl d
sing their HUNDRED YEARS' WAR WITH THE MAROON
OF JAMAICA. Of this latter event, history give
these particulars,- and the closeness of the parallel
in several points will be noticed by all readers:
T The Marooths and the British.
"The most important event in the recent history ofJi
minaica is the final overthrow and exile of that formidab
"'band of fugitive negroes, who, under the name of Mm
roons, had formed-an independent and hostile common
"ty in this island, for the greater part of a century. 0
"tie conquest of the island from the Spaniards in 1655,
bout 15)00 African slaves fled to the mountains, beyor
Sthe reach of the invaders, .anmd maaintained themselves.
_ these fastnesses in spite of all theirefforts. Their nun
Sbers wer continually increased by the accession of do
Asserting slaves; and a harassing conflict was kept u
with the whites: in which the latter were the princip,
sufferers.. In 1738, aln accommodation was effected, an
L- a species of independence guarantied to these hardy ou
laws; but at length, in 1795, hostilities broke out agaim
The activity andskill ofthe Maroons rendered them s
overmatchh for Ihe great force brought against them. I
this state of things, the British resorted to the use o
e blood-hounds!-100 of which were imported from Cuba
"and, under the direction of experienced huntsmen, wer
"let loose upon tlhe mountaineers, to seize and tear th
e- "unhappy fugitives! Thus hunted down ike wild beasts
and hemmed in by a force too powerful to le overcome
es the Maroons had no alternative but submission. Thl
le expulsion of this brave and unhappy race was determine
"ed upon, and finally carried into effect. About 600 o
n "them were transportedto Ithe cold and bleak shores o
"Nova Scotia, where many of them perished miserably.'
Personal acquaintance with many of' the fear
less southrons who gallantly -volunteered for thl
n Floridian service, and some knowledge ofthe coun
'- try wherein they had to operate against the foe
E impel me to present these remarks in addition to
al those Iseretoobre communicated for the Argus, &c.
A -with the hope of contributing to awaken proper:
I- attention to the subject-so that here in the north
e remote from the scene of hostilities, and where
the circumstances of the case are not so readily
- understood as they would probably be were thi
- Seminole country like this region in climate or lo.
- cal features, injustice may not- be unintentionally
s done to the southern character through the troops
Y employed in the war, from want of information
Respecting the difficulties (different from those com-
" only experienced in Indian wars) which have fbil-
ed all efforts from repeated expeditiens-the troops
in each successive expedition burning with ardor
to efface by their own bravery the disasters which
r marked the marches of their predecessors-disas-
ters which have unhappily become in turn their
I own fate.
When the calamities flowing from the Seminole
contest are brought in review, the recollections of
t the Maroon war may serve to excite more consid-
eration respecting the difficulties experienced by
our southern fellow-citizens, on whom the burthens
of this most disheartening service have chiefly fal-
len. Such recollections too, may serve to abate that
feeling ofnational disgrace which seems to be grow-
ing in the public mind, as expedition after expedi-
tion returns dejected from unsuccessful campaigns.
Ifthe Seminoles have braved our troops for a twelve-
month, owing to the peculiarities of their local
position; it is equally true that the Marooh bands
of Jamaica tor about a hundred and fifty years
(two-thirds of which long period were spent in ac-
tual hostilities) defied the power of Great Britain;
and were at length conquered, as it is hoped the
Seminoles will not yet have to be conquered-by
the employment of such ferocious auxiliaries as
aided the Spaniards in subjugating Peru.
Rochester, January, 1837.

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT UPON
MEXICAN AFFAIRS.
[Made to Congress, February 6.]
At thie beginning of this session, congress was
informed that our claims upon Mexico had not been
adjusted, but that notwvithstanding the irritating
effect upon her councils of the movements in
Texas, I hoped by great foibearance to avoid the
nhcessity of again bringing the subject of them to
-mnr fnOt/e_ 'Phat h lnnhn hab en di tnri.tei -


Having in vain urged upon the government th
justice of these claims, and my indispensable obli
nation that .there should be "no further delay ii
the acknowledgment, if not in the redress, of th
injuries complained of;," my duty requires thatthb
whole subjectishould'be presented, as it now is
for the a action of' congress, whose exclusive righ
it is to decide on the further measures of redress ti
'be employed. The length of time since some o
the injurieshmve been committed, the repeated amn
unavailing applications for redress, the wanton
character of some of the outrages upon the pro
perty and persons of our citizens, upon the flag o
the United States, independent of recent insults
to this government and people by the late Extraor
d.inary Minister, would justify, in the eyes of al
nations, immediate war. That r.:..ld,, hc.., 'r rn
should not be used by just and generous nations
confiding in their strength, for injuries commit-
ted, if it can be honorably avoided, and it has oc-
curred to me, that considering the present em-
barrassed condition of that country, we should act
both with wisdom and moderation by giving to
Mexico one more opportunity to atone for the
past, before e take redress into our own hands.
Toavoid all misconception on the part of'Mexico
as well as to protect our own national character
fronmreproach, this opportunity should be given,
with the avowed design and fill preparation tc
take immediate satisfaction if it should not be ob-
tained on a repetition of the demand for it. To
this end, I recommend that an act be passed, au-
thorizing reprisals, and the use of the naval force
ofthe. United States by the executive against Mex-
ico, to, .enforce them in the event of a refusal by
the Mexican government to come to an amicable
adjustment of the matters in controversy between
as, upon another demand thereof made from on
board one:of our vessels of war on the coast of
Mexico. The documents herewith transmitted,
with others sent to the House of Representatives
heretofore, will enable congress to judge ofthe
propriety of the course pursued, and to decide
ipon the necessity of that now recommended.
If these views should fail to meet the concur-
ence of congress, and that body be able to find in
he condition of the affairs between the two coun-
ries, as disclosed by the accompanying docu.
nents, with those referred to, any well-grounded
seasons to hope that an adjustment of the contro-
-ersy between them, canbe effected without a re-
ort to the measures I have felt it my -daty to re-
ommend, they may be assured of my co-operation
a any other course that shall he deemed honorable
nd proper. ANDREW JACKSON.
VWashington, Feb. 6, 1837.
This message was referred to the committee on'
foreignn Relations,


nFor Vice-
For .President. President,


S t

o, states.

t I

o 10 Maine, 10' 10
S 7 New Hampshire, 7 7
14 Massachimsets, 14 14
,4 Rhode Island, 4 4
8 Connecticut, 8 8
7|Vermont, 7 7
42 New-York, 42 42
* 8 New Jersey, 8 F
30 Pennsylvania, 30 30
3 Delaware, 3 3
I n
* 10|Maryland, 10 10
231Virginia, 23 23
S15 North Carolina, 15 15
11 South Carolina. 11 II
11 Georgia, 11 n
15 Kentucky 15. 15
15 Tennessee, I15 15
91 Ohio, 21 21
S Louisiana, 5 5
4 Mississippi, 4 4
S 9Oindiana, 9 9
5 Illinois, 5 5,
7 Alabama, 7 7
4 Missouri, 4 4
3 Arkansas, 3 3
201 Total, 167 14 731 26 1 144 77 47 2.3
Michigan, if counted, 3 3
170 147
After the counting of the votes was completed,
and result declared,
The President of the senate proclaimed that
MARTIN VAN BUREN was elected President of the
United States for four years, commencing the 4th
day of March next; and that for Vice President,
no person voted for had a majority of the whole
number of votes; R. M. JoHNsoN and FRANCIS
GRANGER being the two highest on the list.
And thereupon, at anl early hoi'r, the house ad-
journed,


be Twenty-Fourth Congress...2dse
fi [From the Courier and Enquirer.-
1- IN SENATE.
|- Wednesday, Feb. i
e-
m The CHAIR laid before the senate a commun
y, tion from the Secretary- of war in relation to
in Indian department.
ne Mr. WEBSTER presented a petition of 1400
le 1500 mercantile houses in the city of New-Yo
he praying for the establishment of a National b
r- in-that city for the improvement of the curree
ed It was accompanied by a short communica
i, stating that the signers were of the most respe
or ble firms. He said that his opinions are what t
n. always were on the constitutionality and exp
r, ency of such a bank. If congress had the po
ig to adopt, it has the same power to create such
d. situations. He liad determined however no
move on the subject until it shall be demanded
s. the united voice of the people. He anticip;
s, that a change would soon or late, take place in1
ar opinions of gentlemen who were now oppose
n- his views, and they would then most properly
or produce the subject.
n. Mr. Monais offered a petition from Lor
re county, Ohio, praying for the abolition ofslav
as in the District of Colurimbia. The reception
n- objected to, and the motion to receive was laid
ts the table.
of A message was received from the Presiden
of the United States, enclosing a report from
ch War department, on the subject of a treaty w
t, the Sacks and Foxes.
ve The bill to amend the act to establish brani
ld of the mint, &c. was read a third time and pas
r. A message was received from the House of
of presentative's, announcing that the House
y) ready to receive the Senate, to witness the cot
.- ing of votes for President and Vice President;
the .Senate accordingly, at 20 minutes past 12
es paired to the House.
ri- At half past 3 o'clock,' thelSenate returned
rs their chamber, and being called to order, _
id Mr. GRuNDY, from thejoint committee, appo
n:" ed to consider and devise a. tnde of examining
lt -counting the votes fborPresident and Vibc' P
rbe dent, reported a resohition 'that "i comihlitti
r. one be appointed to join the'comnmitteeoiP two
at pointed by the-House,-to wait on the lon.. M.
to TIN VAI. BurLN, iand nfornd'him of his election
wi which r-_.hluti.n was agreed to ..
he ELECTION OF VICE PRESIDENT OF THE U.
he Mr. GRUNDY offered a preamble and resolut
at The former set forth that whereas it had I
an 'found on counting the votes for Vice Presid
in that no person had a majority of the whole n
- her of electoral votes, it had devolved on the
of ate to make an election, and as Richard M. Jo
n- son of Kentucky and Francis Granger of N. Y
be had the highest number of votes, the Sel
ne would have to choose between these two. The r
es lution was to the effect that the Senate now ]
ceed to the election, and that the Secretary
r, over the names of the senato.e, in alphabetical
ly der, each senator responding the name of the i
l- vidual for whom hlie voted. The resolution -
s- considered. and agreed to. -
e- Some time elapsed before all the senators co
" be collected, when the Senate being full, the i
a retary proceeded to call over the names, and
of senators responded.
at The senators who voted for R. M. JonB
d; were Messrs. Benton,. Black, Brown, Buchan
'y Cuthbert, Dana, Ewing, (Illinois,) Full
wd Grundy, Hendricks, Hubbard, King, (Ala.,) Ki
i- (Ga.,) Linn, Lyon, M'Kean, .Moore, Moi
0- Mouton, Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Par
is Rives, Robinson, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange, T
es inadge, Tipton, Walker, Wright.
sl The senators who voted for FRANCIS GRANG
were Messrs. Bayard, Clay, Clayton, Crittend
Davis,.Ewing, (Ohio,) Kent,- Knight, Prent
i- Robbins, Southard, Spence, Swift, Tomlins
he Wall, Webster.
i- Mr. Calhoun, Mr. Preston, Mr. White went
in from their seats, and did not; respond when t]
a- names were called. .
Zn The PRESIDENT then made the following
n- nouncement of the result. The whole number
s- senators is' 52, and 27 of these are necessary t
ap choice. The quorum required by the constitute
,d to be present is 35. The whole number of vo
t- given is 49, of which 33 are given for Richard
n. Johnson, elected Vice President of the Uni
' States for the term of four years, commencing
of the 4th day of March next.
a, On motion of Mr. GRlUNDY it was ordered, T
fe a committee be appointed to wait on Richard
, Johnson, and to notify him of his election-
e, the chair was directed, to appoint said commit
c On motion of Mr. WEBSTER at a quarter pas
f o'clock
3f. The Senate adjourned.

r-e HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
- On motion of Mr. E. WHITTLESEY, the quest
of privilege under consideration at 'the adjou
o ment of the house yesterday, was postponed
. the purpose of proceeding to theusual business
r the morning hour.
By consent tihe SPEAKER laid before the hIOUs
e message from the President of the United Stat
on the subject of our relations with Mexico
[ [The same as sent to the senate yesterday.]
The message was read, and with the accom
nying documents was referred, on motion of 1
C CAMBRELENG, to the committee on foreign affai
and ordered to be printed.
The SPEAKER also laid before e house a im
sage fi'om the President of the U. States, trar
mitting certain information called for in relati
r to the exploring expedition. The President sa-
"that he trusts all facilities will be given to ti
exploring expedition that congress can best
and the honor of the country demands."
The SPEAKER also presented sundry other or
nary communications from thle executive depa
Sments.
Mr. CAMIBRELENG;, from the committee of wa
and means, reported a bill to authorise mercha
dize to be deposited in warehouses as public store
and for other purposes.
Also a bill to repeal a provision of the act
14th July, 1832, entitled "an act to alter and
mend the several acts imposing duties on import
and to provide for the limitation of debentures
The object of this bill is to repeal so much of t
act referred to, as authorises the collector to sa
goods for duties so soon as those duties are du
The bill revives the old act, and gives an exte
sion of time of nine months, besides one mon
for advertising: or, in other words, a credit oft
months for the payment of duties. The two bil
last named may be considered as one and the sami
the one involving the warehousing system, an
the other the extension of credit.
Mr. CARMBaaELR did not move to commit tl
latter bill, because it was very important that ea
ly action should be had upon it. On his motion
therefore, the bill was read twice, and it lies o
the Speaker's table to come up. for consideration
n the order of business.
ELECTION OF PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED
STATES.
The hour 12 having arrived, and messages t
that effect having been interchanged between th
two houses, the senate in a body entered the hal
preceded by their president and secretary, an
were received by the inembers of the house standt
ing uncovered.
The President of the senate presided, the Speak
er of the house sitting on his right hand.
The tellers, Mr. GnUNDY of the senate, an
Messrs. THomas and LitcoLes of the house, ha-
iig taken their seats, the. return of electoral vote
from' each state was opened, read and recorded, th
result of the whole number of votes being as fol
lows:


* from being in any manner interested in any pilot By Mr. MACK, to provide for the construction Areport was received from the commissioners
boat or in any portion of the earnings of any pilot. of a railroad from the village of Hempstead to an- of the Land office, on the petition of John J.
booacoasting vesselt of75 toean ngs oru nder, t other village iu Queens County. Campbell.
No coasting vessel, of 75 tons or under, is require. By Mr. WiLLEs, to amend the charter of the Bills read a third time and passed: '
ed to employ a pilot, unless expressly desired and North Hempstead and Flushing road and bridge To confirm the official acts of Eijah Phillips, as
actually obtained by the master of such vessel.- company. a justice of the peace.
Any master ofa vessel of 75 tons and not exceeding By Mr. MACK, to authorise the Utica and Sche- For the relief John A. Ehle and John Spencer.
200, is permitted to pilot his own vessel, by obtain- nectady railroad company to carry freight. [Mr. Authorising a loan for finishing the Chenango
200, is permitted to pilot his own vesse by obtain-. M. stated that the petitioners were numerous, and canal.
ing a license for the purpose from the Board. the committee, although not perfectly satisfied of Bills introduced on notice:
The whole number of licensed pilots are to be bi- the propriety of granting their prayer, had conclu- By Mr. RUGGLES, to amend the revised statutes
vided into four classes. Each class to have for its ded to report a bill for the action of the senate.] relative to the duties of commissioners of common
use and in actual service two boats, to be approv- THE UNITED STATES DEPOSITES. schools.
se and by the Commissionervice, and to batse owned be approv- ne Mr. PAIGE, from the joint committee to wilich By Mr. RomssoN, to increase the salary of the
ed bythe Comnmissioners, and to be owned by one was referred so much of the governor's mes- Treasurer of this state.
or more of the class. A reas6ioable portion of the sage as relates to certain moneys belonging to the By Mr. ROOSEVELT, to enable all persons who
earnings of the pilots who are not owners, to be United States, to be distributed to this state on may desire it, to obtain justice by arbitration.
paid as compensation to those who are. Each deposit, made a report, and brought in a bill.- Notices of intention to introduce bills:
[The report, (which we shall publish to-morrow) By Mr. CUTTING, to amend the act relative to
class to divide its earnings equally with its own states that the committee approve of the recom- limited partnerships.
members; and each to have four apprentices; two mnendation of the governor that the income to be By Mr. TAYLOR, to amend the revised statutes
to each boat. derived from the surplus moneys of the United entitled of the regulation of ferries."
No more than half pilotage to be demanded or re- States to be deposited with this state, be devoted By Mr. PADDOCK, in relation to coroners' in-
to the purposes of education," and that they have quests.
ceived from any vessel, unless boarded or spoken also substantially adopted the suggestions of the By Mr. S. SMITH, to amend the charter of the
by a pilot at least one league to the eastward or Secretary of State in relation to the distribution Norwich and Ithaca turnpike road company. ,
southward of the White Buoy; nor any pilotage of the income of these moneys, and the sugges- By Mr. WILLIS, to modify the present militia
whatever to be allowed on any vessel which shall tions of the Comptroller in relation to the manner laws.
have proceeded inward as far as Flinn's Knoll of the investment." Recent movements in con- By Mr. PORTER, to extend and continue in force
: gress towards a reduction of the revenue, howe. an act relative to the Oneida and Seneca rivers.
without a pilot or without a pilot having before ver, have induced the committee to look forward By Mr. VAN TuYL, relative to sales by auction
offered his services, unless such vessel shall then to the period when the state would be called upon in the city of New York.
make a signal for and obtain a pilot, to fulfil its fiduciary obligations to return to the Mr. CAss called up his resolution fixing the
The bill prescribes the fees ofpilots; and re. general government this lund, as one not very ret time of' the meeting of the house at 10 o'clock in
e bill prescribes the ees pilot; and re- ote. This consideration has influenced then to the morning.
quires that they shall be paid to the Commission.- recommend that a larger sum than recommended On motion of Mr. RUGGLES, it was again laid
ers, for the use of the pilots; to which is added by by the Secretary of State be annually added to the on the table.
the commissioners, a sum equal to one-fifteenth capital of the School Fund, and less distributed. The committee of the whole, Mr. BELDiNGein
part of such fees, to constitute, with th fees for Thie committee have forborne to recommend any t lie chair, took up the bill for the payment.of Ja-
part of such fees, to constitute, with the fees f other appropriation than to the support of'common cob Trunmbour for his services in surveying the ca-
licenses, &c., a fund for the payment of the com- schools and to such institutions as now or hereafl nals of this state. [The new bill, authorizes tie
missioners each $1500 per annum, [aud to meet ter mlay share in the income of the Literature payment of $3,717 87, in full of all claims of the
the expenses of lent, fuel, &c. and a reasonable Fund; leaving the question of the extension of the petitioner on the state.]
compensation to t secretary ad mesener public benefactions to colleges and other institu.- After a long debate, the sium proposed by the
compensation to the secretary and messenger, ions to be determined by the legislature, by their committee was reduced to $1500, and within that
Tlme Commissioners are required annually before special action upon each particular application.- amendment the bill passed.
the 1st of January, to report to the Comptroller, The bill provides that thefuinds deposited shall be The report. of the committee was agreed to,
a full account of all fees and money received and apportioned among the counties according to their ayes 53, noes 43, and the bill ordered to a third
paiu, &cc population, to be loaned by two commissioners in reading.
Pi '. eqch county, appointed by the Governor ald Senu Adjourned to 11. o'clock on Monday morning.


ss. DAILY ALBANY ARGUS. On the 4th ins., Messrs. Peyton tind Wise, ate. These commissioners are to draw-for the
SMONDAY MORNING FEBRUARY par mobile fratrum, rose in their seats in the money and loan it out in certain sums, the inter.
Sest to be paid annually, and the loan not to extend
MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 13. house, and attempted by bxplanations, to re- for a longer time than five years. $80,000 of the

3. We refer to "Notices of the War in Flor- move the public impression in relation to their interest is to be annually appropriated to the bene
ic- da," from a source that ill ensure erusar in F conduct in the committee of investigation, fit of common schools. $16,000 annually for the
the So much at east is due to the subject, and to a when R. M. Whitney was under examination. education of common school teachers. The sum
the o much at least is due to the suject,an to a footed b Messr Garland Gilto be given to the common schools is to be increase.
Sor right appreciation of the difficulties attending lTheywere followed by Messrs. GarandGil-ed $10,000 a year, until it shall reach $110,000.
ork, the Seminole campaigns. let and Hamer. Mr. Wise pronounced Whit- $9,000 is to be annually distributed as the present
uank ney's card "intentionally and emphatically literature lundis distributed-the remainder of the
ncy. Ourpaper of Saturday having been nearly false:" and he desired the house to under- income to be added to the capital of the common
tion illegible, owing to bad printing, we re-publish stand that he spoke in italics! Nothing could cOn motion of Mr. MAISON, ten times the usual
e several articles of that day, on our first page have been more appropriate than the expres- number of copies of the report and bill were or-
edi- this morning. sion of such a desire from such a quarter: dered to be printed.
wer Though, we venture to say, that the sugges- Mr. PAIGE moved that the bill be made the spe-
cial order fbr Thursday next.'
iin- We publish to-day the Message of the Pre- tion of Mr. Gillet, that a statement of the Mr. TALLIoAnD E hoped a later day would be as-
t to sident, of the 6th inst., on the subject of our facts of the case, concurred in by the entire signed. It was probably the most important sub-
d by relations with Mexico. The Message, it will committee, and reported as such, would have ject on which the present legislature would becal-

the be perceived, recommends reprisals. A Wash- been quite as proper, and would have carried led to act, and a week, at least, was necessary to
d to igton correspondent expresses the doubt, with it full as much weight, as the individual mitteeanvass and refrect oming tohe suggestions of the com-. He
Yin- however, whether the present congress will statements of the persons involved in the fra- now thought that he should be opposed to some

aine authorise them; the session being too near its cas. It is proper to remark, however, not- of their recommendations; but he desired time,
very close to enter upon the discussion of a question withstanding the speech of the noisy Virginia after the report and bill should be printed, to exa-
was of such importance, and tending to hostile re- Bobadil in italics, that his account of the mat- The motion was modified so as to make the sub-
d on sults. Meanwhile, we may count upon seeing ter and that given by Mr. Whitney in his card, ject the special order for Monday week, and car-
t of in the 'opposition journals, not only all manner do not, so far as we can discover, essentially tried.
the of apologies for the conduct of Mexico, but the vary. Even in his hands, the conduct, lan- Mr. PAIGE reported in favor of the bill to incor-
with usual degree of disparagement and perversion guage and bearing of his friend Peyton was as briefly stating the objects of the association, mov-
in relation to the course of our own govern- gross and as passionate as it could well be. ed that the bill be ordered to a third reading.
dies
sed. rent, whatever it may be. Ld Bill Mr. Loomis resisted that motion, but would not
Re- CONGREss- Thursday.---The Land Bill object to go into committee of the whole to-day,
was We have the gratification to-day to an- (limiting the sales of public lands to actual set- or whenever the senate pleased; upon which Mr.
unt- nounce the result of the counting of the presi- tlers, &c.) was read a third time and passed by P. withdrew the motion.
and dential votes, in the presence of the two hous- the Senate, yeas 29, nays 22. Another entire state a r export of the trustees for build the new
re- es of congress. MARTIN VAN BUREN, of the day was spent in the House, on the privilege tee on public buildings.

A to state of New-York, is elected President of the question. It was brought to a conclusion by Sundry memorials heretofore referred to the
United States, by a majority of 97 votes o- the aid of the previous question ; when Mr. joint committee of which Mr. PAIGE is chairman,
int- ver gen. Harrison, the highest candidate of the Patton's resolution, declaring that any member mo referred Mr.to the commit e bill for the ap-
*- opposition ; and a majority of 46 votes over who should hereafter present to the house any pointment of commissioners to digest and report
es of all the 'opposing -candidates. RICHARD M. petition from slaves, ought to be considered as judicial and equity system for the state of ew-
ap- -J9QHsoe, of -Ky., lacking one vote of a choice regardless of the feelings of the house, of the York, was re committed to the committee of the
IAR- by the electoral colleges, was choDen Vice rights of the southern states, and unfriendly Bills read a third time and passed
on'. President of the United States, by a majority to the Union, was rejected, yeas 92, nays 105;- To incorporate the Glenville and Rotterdam
'of the votes of the senate. and the second resolution, declaring that Mr. bridge company.
in Adams having disavowed all design of offer- To authorise the executors of John Ireland, de-
teen We sympathise with the editors of the Dai- ing any thing disrespectful to the house, there- ceased, to become purchasers ofhis resolution estate.
ent, ly Advertiser. Notwithstanding their patriot- fore all proceedings in regard to his conduct callingon the Comptroller to report what money
rum- ic and disinterested labors for months, and the do now cease, was also rejected, yeas 22, and property has been appropriated by the state
Sen- transmission of documentary proofs to their nays 137. to the several Colleges, and other seminaries of
'f" friends at the seat of government, not a sin- learning, independent of the appropriations from
ork, gle member of either house of any party rose The Eve. Post justly says :-- the Literature Fund.
eso. to enter his protest or his vote against the ille-. "The fault of Mr. Adams was in allowing the The committee ofSURY LAWS. -
pro- ga and unconstitutional elect of Mr. Va r debate to proceed on the idea that he had asked to he committee of the whole, Mr. H. F. JONES
call and unconstitutional election of Mr. Van present a petition from slaves on the subject of sla- in the chair, again took up the bill to repeal with
calor- Buren Alas, for "the country and the con- very. He knew the excitement which such an idea certain limitations the penalties against usury.
ndi- sttution" would produce, and he allowed a wrathful and use- Mr. DICKINSON resumed and concluded his argu-
was less debate-to proceed, when, by a single word of ment against the bill, speaking until the hour of
was It. seems that Messrs. Calhoun, Preston and explanation, he might have set the matter right. adjournment. Adj.
would White left their seats in the senate, when the There is surely cause enough of strife between -
See- election of Vice-President was going on, and different parts of the country without getting up IN ASSEMBLY,
the thus avoided a vote for Mr. Granger. Call We deemMr. Adams highly reprehensible for Petitions presented and referred :-y Mr. GL-
soiN you this "backing one's friends"? What say this neglect to inform the House that the quarrel RT or s preb ed ank d ref Chppeburgh rrByMr. G
an, you, Messrs. Whigs ? which-he saw going on was without the least oc- STOKEs, against the removal of the Chenango
ton, casion. But when the truth came out at last, the county buildings. ByMr. S. STE, for the re-
ing, Tim Pi OTS.-On Saturday, Mr. HEfT- debate should have ceased. The mere exposure oflease of citizen of Sherburne, from a bondexec
STELL, ro ...et .... ted. as ^ the trick, for it does not seem to us worthy of any ted to the canal commissioners. By Mr.He.
r from the select committee, reported, other name, should have been suffered to carry LL f Calvary Fremn, fo r legislative relief.-
ker, the result of their deliberations, a bill for the -with it the degree of reprehension it deserved. To y Mr. H vary remN for legislatthive relief.-
all- appointment and government- of the Pilots of continue the debate for two or three days longer, fractures' bank at Morih. y Mr. C. 0. S anmnu

GER New York by way of Sandy Hook." The to waste the short remainder of the session in talk- A, of inhabitants of Lenox, Madison count or
en, natural impatience of the public in relat ing about the conduct of a member, while the ap- the more effectual abolition ofslx, Madiveson aiounty, for
den, naturmpaenceo epl retono propriation bills are not yet passed, and other im- By Mr. T. W. TuCKER, to incorporate the New-
tis, the subject, and the prevalent excitement, have portant business lies unfinished, is unpardonable." Y d er t copan y
on led to the impression and to the assertion als ork an Southern steamboat company. yMr.
t tohau eipel hsi tnded the a rsseioa IMPORTArIOLs.-By the ship England, 15 pk-VAN TuryL, to amend the charter of the city of
out that undue delay has attended the progress of -lPOTTIO Pc Troy; of the Canaan and Union village turnpike
heir the.question in the committee, and that it was ages for E. Corning & Co,: 6 Humphrey & Co. company, relative to alterations of the charter of
regarded with apathy by the legislature gene- CoAL.-The North River Times says that anex the Albany and West Stockbridg railroad .scw-
rof rally. We believe any such impression to be tensive bed of Anthracite Coal has been discovered manufacturing company. By Mr. P. TuKR, fo
o a erroneous. The subject was one with which on thebanks of the Hudson, in thetownofHaver- the Syracuse and Rochester railroad, By Mr.
tion the committee could not be familiar,'and the straw. FITCH, of Phmineas Canfield and other inhabitants
otes of which of Mt. Morris, Livingston county, charging the
Simportanceof which would not justify them in ELECTION OF PRESIDENT AND VICE- Livingston county bank with having applied its
ited jumping to conclusions. With the conviction PRESIDENT. funds to other uses than the legitimate purpo.
on that the result of their deliberations would pro- [Correspondence of the Courier and Enquirer-Wash- ses of banking, &c. &c., and asking an investiga-
bably govern the action of the house, they have ington, 7th February, s137.] tion. [Mr. F. stated that the memorial was en-
at felt the greater solicitude to attain correct con- For about two hours this morning, I attended closed in a letter to him, received this morning:
M. cl. an t h endea ttvioet do the House of Representatives while they were can- and that upon the suggestion ofthe delegation from
and clusions; and they have endeavored to do so passing the votes for President and Vice-President. Livingston county, to whomhe applied topresent
tee. through a patient and laborious examination, it is a tedious operation. The process simple.- it, he had concluded to present it himself, as it
t 4 daily, of the ship masters, merchants, pilots The President of the Senate pro tem. the hon. was directed to him. The memorial was referred
and others in attendance That the question William R. King, of Alabama, handed to the can- to the select committee, of which Mr. TALMAG(F
and others in attendance. That the question vasers the returns from the several states, first is chairman.]
was one which could not be disposed of at the breaking the seals of the envelopes, commencing Bills reported :-
instant, may be inferred from the fact that the with Maine. The canvassers read the names of By Mr. RUGGLES, to incorporate the Bushwick
bill contains forty nine sections, the general the electors, certified by the governor of the state: bridge and turnpike company : To authorise the
in- features of which are as follows: then the result of the votes, given by the electors, raising of money to repair a bridge over the Ron
Irn- I a rvdeso which result was announced by the canvasser dout creek in Marbletown. Mr. R. also reported
lbr It provides for the creation ofa Board of Corn- reading, and taken down by the secretary of the against the petitions to repeal the law for laying
a of missioners of Pilots" in the city of New York, fbr Senate and clerk of the House. Having comple- out a road from Skaneateles to Camillus. The
e a the appointment, licensing, regulation and ghv- ted Maine, the process was continued, proceeding report was agreed to, and the petitions defied.
geographically. By Mr. JENN NGS, to amend the act incorporat-
es, eminent of the pilots of the port by way of Sandy The assemblage of beauty and fashion was bril- ing the village of John stown.
.- Hook: The board to consist of three persons, liant. A resolution passed to admit the ladies -By Mr. ZABRISKIE, for the more effectual pun-
-" experienced in nautical concerns, and skilled in on the floor of the House during the canvass, ishment of crime in the city and county of New-
Mta' the management, sailing and navigating of ships and to occupy the privileged seats. To this mo- York :-Relative to the police of the city of New.
Mr. an teti ad nIvan ofa o conceived that I heard a feeble negative; York:-[These two bills were ordered to be print
irs, and other square rigged vessels on the ocean:" To but a gallant friend near to me, said that it was in ed]-To enable the corporation of New-York to
be appointed by the governor and senate, immedi- the gallery, among the gentlemen, who were un- raise money by tax.
es- ately after the passage of this act, and to hold their willing to be deprived of that society which, un- By Mr. WESTLAKE, authorising John C. Clark
S offices for two years from the first Monday in der all circumstances, and in every change of to erect a dam across the Chemung river in the.
p officer tw yers in th citdy f scene, gives a zest to life. The gallery, however, town of Chemung.
ysMarch proximo To open an office in the city of remained crowded to overflowing. Mr. MoRRISON reported in favor of the bill from
his New York, where one or more of them shall be in The Senate elected the hon. Richard M. John- the senate to authorise the establishment ofamed-
ow daily attendance, with power to use a common son Vice-President for four years, from the 4th of ical faculty in the New-York University ; and
,. seal, appoint a secretary and messengers, establish March. The votes were for Richard M. Johnson on his motion it was ordered to a third read-
33-for Franregulations of pilotag and enforces Graner 16. Judge White of ing, and subsequently passed : ayes95, noes 0.
,t- regulations of pilotage and entobre their observ- Tennessee, and Messrs. Calhoun and Preston of PILOTS.
ance, to cause telegraphs to be established and South Carolina, not voting. Mr. HFaTTIr-L, fm-nm the select committee on so
ys maintained, one at Sandy Hook light-house, one much of the message as relates to pilots in the
on the highlands on Staten Island, and one in the IMPORTANT FROM FLORIDA. port of New-York, reported a bill "for th ap-
oNeYraes, on e nd o kee aIs t[ of the [From the Mobile Mercrantile Advertiser of Feb. 2.J pointrment of New-York, reported a bill fots in the ap-rt of
city of New York, and to keep registry of the li- The steamboat Champion, Capt. Murray, brings N. York, by the way of' Sandy Hook.
of censed pilots, with residences, &c. open at all the following intelligence, derived from passen- Mr. BADiA e moved that tie bill He made the
a- times to the public inspection. gers on board the cutter Jefferson, at Pensacola, special order for Monday next.
S The Board are required to proceed, with all con- three days from Tampa Bay. The intelligence is, Mr. CUi s said that it was the desire of the
he venient speed after their appointment, to license negro Abraham, have been captured;, and that andcommittee publisthat a copying order that the bill house go to Nmight
ell without examination as to their qualications, all Osceola himself barely made his escape, with only beY aided in its deliberations, by stch t comments as
e. the present pilots and deputy pilots, and also every five followers, in the direction of the south. Ge- it might draw out. For that purpose he was
n- other person of full age and good moral character neral Jesup was making every effort for the cap- about to move to make it the special order for Fri-
n making application therefore, who shall have serv- ure ofths bold and persevering chief day, and that double the usual number of copies of
ls ed fiye years as an apprentice to a licensed pilot by L ilature of New York. the bill be printed.
i; way of Sandy Hook, and who after a rigid examp glSeo 1sl O aW- r. This modification of the motion was assented
; way of Sandy Hook, and who after a rigid exam to, and the bill was made the special ori'der for
d nation, in the presence of one or more pilots, IN ENATE. Friday, and double the usual number of copies or-
e shall be found qualified; and to continue from time Saturday, February 11. pered to be printed. .
r. to time to increase the number of1 pilots until the Petitions presented and referred: By Mr. SPRA. On motion of Mr. C. ROGERs, the present-
, whole number engaged in actual serviceE, proceedings of a public meeting relative to meant of the grand jury of New-York (embracing
n, number engaged in actual service by way of the erection ofa bridge across the Mohawk river a history of the losses at that port) was alsoor.
S andy Hook shall amount to one hundred: Li- at St. Johnsville. By Mr. LivINGSTON, of the dered to be printed.
censes to be renewed annually, and to be suspend- Jackson marine insurance company, for an amend- GfEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE STATE.
aed or revoked at any time for negligence, disobedi meant of their charter. By Mr. McLEAN, of the A communication was received from the.Gover-
ence of orders, regulations, &c. fire company ofi Union village for an act of mncor- nor, transmitting the report required by law, from
In addition to his examination, c pilot is portion; o inhabitants of Union village for a law the persons appointed under their act to provide for
to In addition to his examination, eac pilots re- authorising the appointment of a supreme court a geological survey of the state, accompanied with
e quired to enter into a recognizance for the diligent commissioner at that place. By Mr. Dowmse, of a communications from the surveyors.
and faithful performance of his duty, in the pen- Thomas Parr and others, executors of Thomas On motion of Mr.-COUTTING, 500 copies of the
alty of $250, with two sufficient sureties: and any Gould, for leave to sell real estate, document were ordered to be printed for the use of
pilot convicted ofhavinglost a vessel throughne Mr. M o repoted agins the bill from the the surveyors, and ten times- the usual number of
- ligence or carelessness, shall be deprived of his li- ety of Cadiz to sell real estate, for tlhe reason that A report was received from the comptroller,
d cense and be deemed forever incapable of acting as the revised statutes already provide for the case. embracing the annual statement required by law',
Sa pilot. Mr. EDWA.Rns reported against a similar bill to of the moneys expended on the several canals, du-
.s The commissioners, their secretary, messenger, to sell eal estate, for the same reason. i Also a report on these bill relative to the state
e or other person employed by them, are prohibited Bills reported: -dredein p machine..













-~--.. -*,LI.. Ps I ir~ ,.-- --n Lr, u L-


-: -i. l -1 INN' -_-. ... . 2 .
*'s:'"- --' -00 -1l,uI t ALBANY I T1P TlRt.o ff'rATE OF NEW-OR
SN l .I office, Albany, February 13t
.-.. -.' . I th I 'r. tiW l t by given, pursue as tto s tios
,, .n. e,- .e.is, ith, t it th o s e t he.h a r o M Bm-lo t
... .. ..... ,, -t_ ttt M>B >> e no- ... .. ... .. ter ennur er.led, ite thi ose partslti l f
O...Y i.i'. I .. I I .I. -,,-, i;..o Ile opinion-as Nil I, I% l. i 1- n1 ..i, i'. il t.' iu, cit terc tret st dnlm thto u l tiu nto l St ir
S, I I i' in .i.,v, and as o t rm ( t I ;.,,. i t .i- I,, ,, ,. m ( i tli nu V i ,,11.,- thi e -,r I, 1 ,,; I. .. h, ,it
', ," ',, ; ,, e v st ,,', iud suucb t tllir
.... .1 I. ,.1 h: rilt upon tll inl er ,i i . ,I1.- 1 ,,,, ilm in' tact t t 141 No-h m sa
I I.', i ,'t II i1n ,, h 'h0 -in. f uI Itgo; Ituesau% III ,, h- ,m .I,,Ih I
\ I ,,* ,,',;I. I i- :',1'- I,. ]. 1 ,I', U ,-' .* '" i ,,,,,,I,',:,, ,,,p, 'o' 'splendor n d.. novelty, IN ,
I .... ; i .' ., .. ,1 h 1 I 1 I II I. ,. I. ,,, l f tle c zel s ."
II 'i I .. I. i. I. kI -,. it-u ut 'i h t n ,,
I. ; ., inh ,,-..] t i ..:.,ru : ,. .. n i t, 1 ,i, ut.., and t.icir vi- 1. i. I. t" I d.1111.' i n.
s,]llItw. aso tetha t the chair airi'-u "" ',-.* ....I_ ,, n. .I sai t. a ct sfact ion to those who In.- II. l- I -r, : I- I .
'onith \6 wi thelse h ui rl oan ,I i I I I i,' .,I r i."' ll i with tllcir preseIce. t. -, A4-Ih
..... ...........nr-s, .tbI I I ..I (vikll gild ,C to Ii i ,@
%?u, ti, s expressive of' th le '119 a' o thtlm i' ti ,,
Welalion to the suit, I. ,, ,.it in,.1 ,,.-, ,, THIS EVENING, Feb. 13, I,, li,,,, ,, ,,,.
inhlt Iemeeting. A% i. ,rr,,,I,- ,, ,htI .I ,' I,1i l W illh epresentedritlme2d 4th1 midltim.act t Ith I ,, li I
i >1.- persons -,..I ....".i....i' .. t I It l ARD Il. i n. ...... .- RD
I V I,,N. Nt l s, h i C l ,i. .i, it .-,I ,, .1 u 1i m ,ard, B y G entl ,c nLIti o L "us" n, ,: -
't, Gideoo S rph'uI .. n I il '..I- T .~ N l .i'htl oon<, Bya t.ntelniaioUlII Itl -. i --.I i
-'iiv ,1 ,u ,iito I betih I ...,... -

cre ss it is om.I.... of the Aie ttiabl ue m tefits enjoy e, 'ter w I -. ., i' I.. \ .... ; .. ..
people tomeetia pri .irtlry ansse...tlot u xpresstheir nSttu" iu. -. 1 ...t n I ,,c, ,,ghr
ss in relation to te acts of heir gents wbieo may Ot Qu e -aIIll ...... ,, .
'for. Ilvc, 0,,- 1" My-fint 'i. 1 t-1o lt I ht1, yuo
form of legihslu tion bear upon the general interest: r,- II I.'sn. yh *i. .'t,.- -tnlaia o t
.f o rr A i i w1 I, L e d, .tr t 1
olvcd, Thrat while we accord in tIe main with the 'i ,..,, ', ,-.
nerts of the message of our excellent ChiefMais- -" .. Nin I. ,I. 'I,,, it, i,- hi li.hl ,I Tract,
we are constrained by a regard for our own opli n- tNoieuia, t d.,C YO NG'.,' tev.i.e.o 'Crt'
to disagree with him i some of his views "i1 rela- .. I' '- ,".-''"' i l tot 'sit ip Nt, tin rof Il ti lt r
.0 the subjects connected with the currency," espc- 11 ,... a" .' ',thi li
'those relating to a repeal of the usury law1. I- Vf s uq ike w 5qbtti ii:0tf i+-k au H" iWa Wt' I .w1 hp NItll h etiy a -oNt
solved, "Thi t there is a broad distlnctioi ll e .. t--is "' 'n -- ,
tradein money" and theunrestricted trad' .i 1 itl( lk U I i Itmi t ll (do.
r y. ., ...1- ..- IN %-Illt 11 1 i, al I I
noditics, for the very plain reason iI t t .. II 'i -
them all, as t e representative ,t -`' '. ",I '^ s-I .'. ,, .
nevercannot lecontroleu or rem lat I 1it,-' ,, ,I. In %II( i t n i,,L ;,t t \iN nnIIh ,, m Illt ,-.I.li tr -Lots 12, 11trat-
atUto ; ,'.q .., 1. it -. %% .. I. I i. I ti
ntroPI. ouchttot -e repuestedhv x, .,,, Is-, -. --- \ --..-..,, ,, tts Sul Bay tract-L t 8 t
*j'. ri n ,-'' '. ... ". i '" Also, ht NA o h oft the Mao
Iu1 it'ie I-tri i '. Ii tue St. l.i. Ra sw llamepIIS ris
1,, t- .....f l n; -11 ,, CtI., I,, .' '. ,I '1 rr *- .. i ,, '..I-. -,I I 1 Inl tsl t lIe Re-rv
)I .,J!"u,,In....... _e t -I _,,ig" "igie,,tvatiom, purchase of ,,,L'h24. Leavegchenec
1.1 f ,1 ,;,,I .l l .' .1 ; CI -.- -. '- -- *" .I I, ,,, ,, I, ri ms 10
I I ,.,,, ..-... ... ':. -...- i Pursi er, 1inttn T u gm MTta
.-,r..,: ? "' .... I .. .. i i lln O inorn lt.e W arrensburgl ra -L s 1,,
-' _. .' I. '" '. .. -'. I I-. ',,.. VINv .m C rIane.l, 17,1 .
-. -' ,' '' .' ., ". .,, .l,.,i. -. Cluett, Also-A alexander i
I I- . . . e1r4e W G a tdn- la Iouton m ile squ areong
. '., 1 nManagers. thetown ofLouisvillein.theounty oSt.
i.n.'. u, .... ... ... .. ... ,,,, the all are requesed eprem eso
,;I ..-. It,-h- I I -"'L. I
i.. ,,,i i i,..]i, ,it- r arovenamled, who hIave ejain Well
.. ... .. II-1.. I"''" J I. .. "' ," .. hap- . arni22 cr s ben t
I.- .' '. ". 'I ...,. m r ,,It ki,..sIciaI.,,,. .,,e ai'mgl., -i n oa rett' ,et cap e ie taining 2 1g20 acr
1.',,.- ,, -, .. -,1! "'. ...j. .,-. '". -.. ,,', L ^ gentleman and one or -a' I
I 'I. '" --d2,,wtf *he conditions of sa-I-fCI
-,I .I .'. ,,I.'-I.".. .:,,.'. I ,'r. -. .. __ the purchase money be pai
u-... i. i-v .','. .- .-.. -'.. ... .-,- '. 1 i'. l.FEMALE ACADEMNY-Thesemei- the remainder i
; .-'...... ... -. A-"'-, I 1 1 t il tI exaniimttin of this institution will comn- terest at the rate of p n
S...... .. .. I .i.- :... mi Oieno Oe l Moillaythtl3tlhilst.and be ontinuedthrog mortgage
.1 ... ,. 1.. J. \ l %. .- l% ;,L :. 1. V rl o
-',i. .....t. .. -. i n.,. -!tiin.,.i, ,, *I.-- I.L,, .w a,','rduins t to the following arrafogew gent, vir: cent.
.,- ..,, ., ,- .......- It I! -, ,\.. "t' .* .i.'I'I' ,, i ;i'l t i, ,t tnc ts W il be exa n e i
,,, ;. .- I ,\ The subscribers nl ,t artrnooect
," ... '... .-q ... "... ... "1.' i i -.N.' i I .-,.4lle l ultl.,,h'tu.,.I u,,n A 1-l.. ., -afternoon 'rb, E.i
;' ..L... : ... t --, ... .. .t'.'Ii i !t 1.. i n"i nI .f I' i...n .... i.. ... .ti 'lim i ',: I
.......".- ... .. 1 ,I" ." :.".... I :I 1,o 'll -/ l .\\ I ..I '.. ... '.." ..... .. l l .
"I' "- .. -,I"-," ., ,'- ,,I- 'I *, I ....n ,, .. I ... i .. o da..- i %%.I[-
..- ,I in u It ,1 t ,' II m ...i- in 'rr 'n et n...t. ....
I.urveylo, r Genraleo ,li io, nigh oit ti atwnteeu- OR A E T
-. ., no ... ......... ,, -. 'it rii i in i.' -, ,. tri". i,| 'l ... I '. h.i I ...n. ,n .'i' of 'I inn I
,[ ---.'.I' ... .:;', -. t i i ,u/....i.. ,.:. I ,N I :. ., in i l i 1 -
-, .- ,-,: --' ,..1 I, t, "tm., ."',, ......IN-- N,,,, m ii ., i,: nd tel- T A '
-.. -' '"- -- i "-u V n, a i'o '. f'fice,1,, ofie, Aibany I t
.'-...- '.. . .. ":, -".- I--'I 1 ,... .. ,,,OIr l 1 ..I.I I ul1,0 e.s. i -. .. .. .1 ,1 ,,, i uttin'e
s- m, d -. s. o u.ix o hu it- l pf. up;, .tt on.io St int \esu sts I,--'-i- -t m ti,,
Orts'5 T -,Iuhady%-muturng-A-Atlstlnncti, At-tott's Physics aisu n 'u,... .. ,.-,
Resstuouul That s-n. hinte more c nsild't-nu in ne Phy~stiloty. dlue out uhun t~o testeog hr
,t s ,,'-W t It .u- ', ... ,: ,, .. ..m .,I- |i ,- i,:,, o l-, I
..... I .- r '-.- I "11 ..-1 ,,....,, .,-r 1l P io.'hv r in d B vi den ces I ni tt rIe Cap si pntol,
: GANGES, do


I i'nr i z t -i .n i .. i. ,.1 aEi',i t in psart
".'.... ... i. i- ; -, -tl i ..i t t h ahRIo seit)tEa
..' ... -,' ... I-I- ,- ',J-.-1'.--.. ... ',i.-I '.U .ini -1.,l ..u.. .I I I t. 11C. .'Ir. nIM I, -
mm '-.l in,-" 's 1,,"s 't f 'e ,t ', -',I,- 'i' "t i Tiee.xin sint ions will I t eoinu ienced a d ayat 1o'- 1., ,1,'... i.i .-
-- '. 1 -mr'" ,- ,,', ; ,.. .. i t u ,, .- ,, 1 t ..- .-. ',,,,' ,i,,'h A. I M and" o'clock P M. lit 11 .1 C F.1
--, ,'' ," ,' t .. L I O ut F ri n dav n n it, : i r-, t ih ''. ,i n I ", l,,, eo m1s ph sioio n.s 'o m r.
,' Tat.. r 1 "*- *will be -readl i, I I ', Ii ,o ,.,' one ,o Statesteet st a
-. ;'.'..", .r "-,', r-,. ,, r '., ini... ..,-. i ... i All who fell i interestiinfimalee tlint narerespect- J me s
'". -. I ,- I: i.'Iin U-...m ..-i-- fu.!Iytnvitedtoattend Th- conditions of a
.- ... .. -.. ,. ,, -. -,, .,i Pi.. '-. By order of thc Board of Truate, thiae purchase i o y be paid
.,'.",.;1 -". I ,.','. '" s nI-, .: ..l.. 'l "% .r T.W.'OLC 'OTT, and the re aiuder ia six equal
N'I .':.:0 r,-'I '. 'r .e. ..I .-. IRA HARRIS interest at the rate of .per cent per
'y 'ft.--" Mtt MS IGS, lime promsisesfrel arg~
.. I, T. W i-.I a prudent exenston of -.Co- ummittee of Arrangemenets. interest of whi willbf r
"a w l ge fa N. B.0 Th n ter ofthe tituton wihom ee
_._1iin- urIt's ofIRIA Mtad., mtl ui^ em- onitor of f Su rvey or Genera.I

u .'t TI init" n ihie Snifet "h'nn : i! i" a "1. 't- is,' 'uin [ Ii li', nftt'- ,a iny+ "- sellasirfirstpaner n
-I tIh o ,P.I -1V .- tot- p tall rI ,' ',, n116-'"u'' ''-' "il m od tl eoral w
-.,-., .' -.f ..,.L ...... ... ..,II... .. ,o ., .. I,. ,i I l...I.,,: .1-M. ; ...... ,..,,, .-. ,,., .......... ..I

t .-, .. 1t 1t ,i-. i 11 .. *" ,4). ..'1-.-,-Z It .-I 'i -.T i i p r --in- n nitcuhinL

,! 'a"- -.a "ri`,--,-kD- "''re..'an Lrulml-nlirisI-tel t" It.GENN RI.
.'-I"I, n i I.u It',-"sIq-n -I '.- I 1--1A .

"^y ^ Vt .. ...^;;^.^
-.:-_'. ,,- .. "' : u.-ri.Ii.v ph, 01- xueriencd21Cook. No tXe need ap- Iterm aer .......... .tofl o t
. : I,, 1. ''., I w ile e n i I I . ....; I l. .






,; _"T ni,-.-I. 'e,-,I ,r -. ,I r_, ,- .. .withIotlnt good reeommmfenditationss. Enquirer at th.e uset-cit due o s
k 'mut .. .. -` -.- ..... .tI .- ..1.. ,= 12I 2: I i- ul nate-street fell- T h the ex.pnse of alver ising ,te
I ;. .-- ,,, .' 1; ,-..A !II"1 1. % .. p **i. I,."^- -" ? ,-







, ,n ." ,. ._ :.*- _.l .' '- ",...... IrANTED--Togoin the country to work in an fore Thtursday, th
1-7ro -S.- i .'L.n,Z I .. r 1. i n.-. I.t.I ., .n Foundry, two Blacksniths, one Machinist, sold by auction at the Capi
m e. T' 5-4T 1 '. u. 4 .'. r ,- ." t four Laboring met anud six boys. None but A ierians ieneet at ten o'clock
l.-m.'`- n it,.- ',.r ...i...--. -. :-a t '- .. .i need aply Enquire of In the Cayuga Reservato w taie Ro
c^i,.2.;.-+ ,u -':-' Oe ., 1~ '.^ r,,,.... "". '," "- BACKUS, AMES CO. part of lot 6-i. "o
I .-. r ....i .... .tI- -f-e -tMnos 3 No. 8 State-st. I telte Cowe asselon tract-L
-Z:.:. ,ThItwelies .pathiasth olie vblls a N R In thnhe township of Ceto- So
an. If tbatateg-ioeuade re-,mae ateach o OST-A-lMrge BRASS KEY. The finder is request- In the township of Cicero-Su
I,:-q. IJP 'i!!,Ienwllr~ttcu Tshe Edtownshipof Cie room-CutySubds isio4ofht t







ochm- ,raum's ir r, ina d iatriit', -"-'--, ,t .-i mu,' iiuto .B ed-o teave it at thre Post-office, fellS-t In the township townsh
.--iei ..-. -,- .., -2.:.-=".-i,' ... 'u 'i '" "" Tt.iiuc R TRCEIVED AT 0 STEELE'S Book- In the township of Galen-So
obec- i '-' < t 1tO the store
.tA.u -in.RICTERtA M. be








.3 ,- ..i'. i,. .--.. :..,i're, g themstosaddentainc The works of Beejamnin Franklin,ts-ithalife asdnotes In thAetownshp

s~n a he oses dsn.meano njyd yth oa- ?eit erew an English Lexicon, edited by E. 15nieosnlsip o Purius-Sotes .arso o
m .Mi Intgeneral, andwtA'e pray the l nytatuthtohpass Rabnnsan n& Wihittonedograndya
anh_ ta ..f. e, resen s is. new nlversal Atlas, contulrnung maps of thI e various Net S gock -ri,-
...-d, T t our ystem- ofe Dtcation te ectiall rhart Kipngdo s, States and Republics of the worldbyH. la a rtl
.nemna nLS, stands frentat in e ran of e Tanner Nets- S rgeMiletract-
tfhI ostriL..ncre ofI the e r an To .mo ..Ii ,Al I .. New 01oorido purchase ofnoSdg, anohn Mord
S ..oi......s. agte.hto uogt to bCiBttolati abl", held for Mineral AnalI-ss a-, as oh. & c. & fel3 paro r of l8
W1in LW.. ..1Oneida purchase of I0"--Hanyost Klock's part of lot
ttia... 'TEW ENGRAVINGS, &..-The Shaklspearo 18. -. t fin
Bneinohl TiBn wedje 00t consider a legislative agree- *1^ Galteryspartlto1, e s Oneida purchase, 1802-M
a tmres mor sa'ie in relation to a public question of The Byron Beauties, Byron Gallery, and Gallery of the' lot36
g nt tce and importance, to be binding, if the Graces, for sale by IV. C LITTLE
, .e meisanl treiresderturefr'om it;" and we fell 67 tae-r tA In the villeageo mrmeir
.~~al w Iw "!O 2P R T or ^ t o tr o^^. L_ r .7) 7.- a!Ier,.Cva'







MOSu- :. -".. '. e3 ... T.tt-sN, Not. 1ieege or uelloa sblton i le lot f
.ae-,I I a eTc. ma relatont-o-htri- 1, ..Ib i mm HOS -Th e xsubs riers ce China ene hasorm enti m f ln
m iy luy cagressOires et toelon diy hakeers s-,tmet of f asin rniureOna bots4, t Froftbloukr, lot t ofhblok



PUBLIC2 SIEeuINGCityofe Albany. r lyona naa ,,* h .- .r^t~ In thesouth har of Eathvlae Oswg-
c .msonIof the uitpien, so as f leb ae a uelsupuient e- N eN Sate-streeto c te sll ho ta Lots y ee5 t of block
r -- r .1'I t.' pl wih.u .oo .reommn datis .pon.s erytim a vv arcMade ln











isenuefor-shezuse of gos -ramaIen, and no' more, a general -o.t!nt ofCabinthemniddvert
e olved at we hall the approach of she period AT i tr po r In th nodaf Resotchr ulf-rl
v ten aft-e trade shall exist betseon nations and people, fe l and goods of all kblsck s ..... to
t rs rted y proective syte me otfiany rhirtd th i s P01-IN.e sa. t
',ise of publicasI privatrihts. "URA PIR -or sae in au and hu. t q s Sal Srn
p-3eeda. aing, be published 13 State-street, by ""'.-, 90 ,
Labe ,a, eaas ixr oys.N oneb utAm.I t m "-cn tnte village ofaccapablelhuoe
aItosra STnd-rONs. Chn fell F.. THOMAS. hlneb. of87 LiverJunolb
H. e Sec'y" ....... -~f io JI-A enerae assortmeniit of n- t The dsitas o th e -Lots min
.... F ." orII7.IEJ3I-.-L'-A!ginuo, ammuart-I












t"e usnes o obbinart i cl poonr,,t aa y the thaet, k t t s t t Stan ar block41 ot9 oflo
PULIC MEETING-Cty of Alby. y on hand a tie VarietStoe 2 Saket-St, n In the ulage of East Oweg- Sn
r I i he C rs e ontr ct L o 9













s.tmoled Tagf the cmitizene of AlbatTy lhed pursuant to fell3 ". VAN "A Lt o f blhochs a
pnbit unaisee, at thc City Hall, on the 10th instant, th U acRInhe rese ofnt Cale, aR RAspLct
- saelmtttsse. appointed to prepare resolutions expressive t sOAD-aNodic us given tss a of th e 1 oftblockg71.m
of- te sense and objects ot the meeting, reported the stockholders of t me Auburn and Rochester Hall-roa roof ck ref7. y
allowing, which were unanimously adopted pnssy, is-ll be held at the Franklin HOuse in tme vihe p i an
Besolved, That speculators in he neessary articles o Ge least on Thursday, cthe ile sat y of Millarch nct, a1 TI he o nsi oalw l
-oaiumptioa are niikingthemse s richer by mating the otedock A for she purpose of choosing hirteen Di-he t u h ate nim
?1-HE fi:1t-resasoilstock of aretail DRUG ANDL itE-

poor por,r p ,..and that theY I cv produced a state ofthsings rectors of sail company, andhaitlo the polls of the -cc- the remainder in six equ
which renders t i p ossible for the i ones, idustri ous, tion ill ie wkept op n t i
etnomical, ordinary laboring man.to obtain a supportfor P i. e Intorder o of thefrar o f3 o sa lsto
Hess.Is-e, Th at er ose banks r edthat are in Ite practil-e of Feb. 7, 1Sa7. AoML. Pl s AY ArD, iii o
F ai Sg of large sus. of money n. speculators in the ,ta- fell-- te,, fGR EG RYS T],te .p. th l ai
plccommoditiespof life, thereby enabling then toecarry o-TO LET-eButidings -oH. 0 andg Green- anLe Recorder, U"edb sen
and RecorernUgeneralrerandowe TeleraphhOno gi l-I














an their business of e robbing the poor, arc a cUrse to the tn street. daga Standard,
eory, sodah ourl symetmitthe ateofheBi ha Ing Td o stores on Pier LoteNo. 6. Seneca Observer, th
AUGUSanTUsSJMhouS A-gsldameLyonsanfdremostheraksy nIDcTn-SetieelAUGUTUytAMmreArgus-Citizoen'sidgea yeentract
R solved, Thnat a cmminteeg e appeoft eiteo prrescute N the manutter of prolong the list twil and testament of quested to publish this adv
act"id hsningtyof n c1 ar flt2.













a nge t punishment aecord in vir11 lall dfore A I William esAelyss,0 decreased To t i
e rosser; suds-c, hary edge mtrseves to said Wiliamni Newvon, a ethin cmty antI astie ofNew York, apneyour cpo ftof tervlybyth n oihs
ts ite to sustain Ithem against all the power of all time deceaseld. -. .....a w
eeaw Ts itithe city. a Notice is sereay given that thme undersigned, executor in
I niaprhs,10 -lri albsn wac u. .... .haicu.t'














Betlas-ed, That wei-niul meet in out- resieeive wiat sthn lasth illaindtestamuna urthesaid 'VillianiNewson, ILLIAl I
I -I0rm associaions similar ma principle to thme -Allnusy deceoased nuned, ittnds u apply to the surrogate of tie ., O n gr essfHll
,tuire p l .' urI .














,in... ,_. in 1' i i' lbrt us the necessaries of le, omi- tyNof s-ewforkU, at hit s oiieit h iy o fkw-2
=1 ebrE... I a etRaSEof duties beHOUSE-The sub













I 'lirnon .einu.'p: tin:d. pork, tnt dfe h ofnalee Fu t-cu tmet sat t'
Thov meo'clock h e forenoon o tnthat day, o.lTveORheUsaidMlatt L pceeegt- ateC
TesolASd,.tGAYNbRtthewoilc htandrtaient of tme said decreased, duly lit-sed hue- f.et cot. N. Ma 'rke-ct,- md Made..n ae. tioasfor
w e.afre Pese r.oftilt.kmin d.Id nti-.-oond a,.ten,-di .e in, ms iaina ut el,


MARR
In ewq-Yt-rk, on Wednesda
4'donk, Tons.tJ. MAuvix, es
SIs. misslrr Fassis
In Essex, on the 6t iast
lsgay I. NOBuE, of Elizab
CoEtL.iA, daughter o
DI
In-Te Eryra!,ct4s L. BUOSLEY, oft
Brother, in the 29
In Troy, no Saturday morni
Mattlew Lane, and daughter
tlateity-alhighly esteemed
in cw-Yerk, in the '2nd y
geringgilness. WILtIM HAEI
sulting Physician of iie
,Professor of the Theory and
CutnicalMedcine in Columbia
Qf Physicians and Su
At Greenbush, Rensselae
february 6th, PETEy. V*S V
s'rT. PATRICK'S
At amecting of the Society
,an Wednesday evening, Feb
Ilemcit were elected offi
President-T
First Vice Preside
.Second Vice Presid
Treasumrer-Jo
Ifecording Secreta
Assistant Recording S
-Corresponding Sec
Flianc Committee-Thom
David N
.Execttive Committee-J
Hugh ,Ca'lhhan, Henry Smi
Moran, Williami Hutchin
earns.

j3r FARMERS SCHOOL B
itained.the highest pnssibl
AgriculturalConvetiion, hel
of.thelcaading agriculturist
ingTesalution was
Resolxred, That we stron
HSehool Book, by J. Orville
recommend its use as a re

Mile book can be had at
tory," Albany-price $25 pe
bliy the dozen; and 371 cents
Sbe atte
V YOUNG MEN'S ASS
:SOCIETY.-Thc following is
ining's
"" Has a state a right t
Meeting at 7 o'clock
'fel3dltt W
Albany,
'be:GrandJtary at the pr
'Couist,'have visited the jail
utents Ian remarkably clean a
;ly evincing the strict attent
'prison, to the health and
number of prisoners is re
long, the inhabitants of A
floors the placard of the E
11- to let-for the keys inqu
sr H. A. WfIL T
L L-rr.

,("REENBUSH PR
kXf -All that valuable prop
*.of Grenobush, known as tile
ing of the brick stores now
V. Warner, with several vac
'buildings were burnt last sp
*sBle. by the firt of April, the
Ale auctio
fc"- -


case madeand provided. Dat
18
fel3-lw
T O the heirs at law of A
tlit.wn of Rotterdam, in t
dece
Please to take notice, that,
rogate of said county at his
tada, on the twenty-fifth lday
in the aftesronoon, for the purp
testament of said deceased p
pursuant to chapter sixth, title
cond, of the revised statute
Dated the 8th day
JOH1N F.
fell-6w Executor named in
T HE people of the statf
and next of kin of Willia
county, in the state of
You are herely cited to ap
esq. surrogate of our county
the village ofCanandaigua,
March next at ten o'clock in
why administration ofthe go
of the said WVilliam Davis,
ted to William S. Davis, o
tlme state of iPennsylvania,
with the will annexedl, have
authority in the state of Pen
pliciiation for the same, and p
ters test
Given under my hand and sea
[L. S.] rogate, at Canandaig
4th day of Februa
11TM JARED
EFORE tithe Chancellor-N
ham L Swits,
Pursuant te the statute in
and ofan order of this court
tice'is hereby given, to al
lienor ineummbrance on any. u
thic'premisesaought to be pa
hereinafter described, by j
to the undersigned, at his offi
on or before the twenty-fift
all such liens andincumbran
tively dui thereon, The said
to wit: All that certain lot or
and being -in th.e second war
common y ealleld fie Jack
ning at the old bridge where
bnly read, anmdruni from the
the souilltwetterly corner of
by Walter Chile, and runs t
fifty-nine degrees east six eh
Albany turnpike road, and t
nlacen of beginning, contain
DatedFebru
FLATT POTTER, Ma
A. C. Gibson, Snl'r.
AT a surrogate court held at
town ofRome, in tlhi cou
day of February, A. D. 117,
roglate of s
Whereas, on thepetition a
offers asd Anasa S. Newboer
tate of Isaac Jeffers, late oft
cou nty of Oneida, deceased, i
ly toappear to the said surr
ot tIe said deceased will be i
is therefore ordered, that all
tate of the said Isaac Jeffers
pear Lefore thie said surrog
the town of Rome, in aid cu
day of March next, at eleven
shew cause why authority sho
administrators to mortgage
the real estate of the said dec
pay his
11T6 HENRY
TO DISCHARGE
IPursuant to Revised Stat
V., title 1 art. 3; rela
mentsmal r pursuantto t
solvent and h
ENRY VANDENBERGH, a
i a.s one ft tie late firm
published Februmary 13, 1837
lion.Jacob Lausiug, inudge o
seller, &c., at his ofli e in th
ty-nitth D
J BOSWORTHj-PfliTR
corner of Green and Hl,
ses warranted at.t10 and .91-
portraitm. Specimens in
fe(-,


FARMERS' SCHOOL
has received the highest
The late agricultural convent
ded its use in all the comm
Common School Depository,
$25 per hundred; $3 pe
LAMP SCISSORS-Made e
lamps, for sale at t
S. VAN
fel '
W C. LITTLE'S L
rec
Influences of Democracy on
Happiness of Society consider
ly a member of
Synopsis of the Famimly
Thq Periodicals, &c.
ALBANY FEMALE A
S term will commence on M
plication may be made to th
Trus
N. B.-The Trustees take
Lhat the attendance and stud
ters, are taken in the accou
dals, &c. ait the
A. CRITTENTO
The Trus
Rev.1JOHN N; C
GIDEON HA
RICH'D V.
RICH'D M.
EDWIN C
ISRAEL SM
Hon. JAMES.
-PHILIP S. VAN R
THOSE. W OLCOT
IRA HARRIS,
Hon. GREENE
ARCHIBALD Mc
EZRA P. PRENTICE,
LBANY PEARL
A -The next term of the A
day tle 1t
In .consequence of the dang
of Mr. Janes, th e superinte
present, devolves upon Mr.
Slawsin of Union College, i
Misi'C. L.' Sharp in thle cha
Boys will lie instructed in
edge needed to prepare them f
for professional s
The terms made known by
my. Albany,
E. N.
F.HUMP
M. T. IR
S.VANRENSS
IRA H
JOHN W
V. R.
A. McI
J.O.
J. GI
A. MA
A. D. LANSIN
STEEL PENS-Thirty diff
d del3 It.
AMERICAN ANTIQUE
,.COVERIE8 IN THE
de2 R. O'HARA'$
ROSE BLANNKETS-A few
JL Blankets on -hand, and for
84 South Market, corner
ja30l MOS
PIG IRON-300 ions Scotc
land and most approved b
sale by
INDIAN BEAD BAGS fo
Store 3112 South Market s
Division 1ts. ja6
PLAID SWISS MUSLIN
del 'D WN3
SILK VELVETS
A. M. SLI
de29I .
JOIt SALE- Counting
S ters. Enquire at 371
W %AN4TED-A Journeyji
TV workalan at plht

MOSAIC PENS-A fine ass

L OAF SUGAR-Double an
itmil superior White Ha
de22a E. R. SAT


ges of.51) var
felO-tf -
PRENTISS'S LIP SALVE,
or single box, at t
felO S. V
NTEW AMERICAN L
I MERRIAM, Springfield, M
cd an original American L
ALYTICAL DIGEST OF T
cided in the Courts of the se
ted States, from the earliest
in Equity, in the Courts o
England and Irelhmand, and tih
Lords, front Hilary Term, 1
third edition of Bridgman's
of all thie American, Englis
down to 1836. By 0. L B
and E. B. IIarrington,
From Chancell
Saratoga Sprin
TimeEquity Digest of Messs
of which the first volume is
due is ready for the press,
boots in my library, and em
ty Reports, and all the Engl
subsequent to those contain
Bridgman's Digest. I have
refer to the work In manusc
very tally the volume which
itation, therefore, in recom
as a valuable Digest' of Equi
very useful to those whose
the reports, and findispensa
profession, who wish to bec
cisions of the various Equit
England in a c
R. HYDE
R
Froti Judge
I have bestowed consider
bour's plan of his Chancery
by supplemental cases, ofth
proved Index of Mr. Brigma
necessary, ofnew heads. I
ofresearch, his ability and
tate to say, that thle p
cuted than it has been by h
comifideice, beciuie I'liav
in the course of judicial
of very great assistance.
necessary to the chancery p
chancery reports are numero
work of the kind lihas alre
August 11, 1831.
Prom Chief J
Albany, Ma
0. L, Barbour, esq.-Dear s
for the first number of your
From the pressure of office
the Digest lias necessarily be
been sufficient, however, to
ness of such a work to the p
and industry with which, thu
With the abundant resources
reasonable to expect a ver
I am, sir, very respectful
JOHN S
From Profes
Baltimore, S
I have examined with sonime
published, of the Equity D
E. B. Harrington, esqrs. Th
gets, when faithfully exec
they greatly facilitate resea
extensive practice, iare almoe
analytically arranged, and wi
its cardinal and minor divis
sive series of British and
Such labor-saving auxiliar
practitioners, and can neve
philosophical student, who w
no other light than as ftiith
for a further and mor
DAVID H
0yThe entire work, in 3 v
for sale by N.
fO10-daclw Law Bookselle
ENGLISH AND-)
.1FINE LETTER PAPER.
R. O'HARA'S Book Store a
No 5 Green at.
W41TINTER HOSIERY-A
So fgentlemueu's, ladies',
rimbs' wool, merino, mohair
Market st. noil
BOMBAZINE S
P STOCKS, at 381 S. Market
j42 MOSE


JIEliJLt' street, formerly th
B. Slingerland, esq. Enquir
bers, A
-feBe-d3t
STO LET-The store
Misses Mott, 28
ERASTUS PE
fe6
SFOR SALE, the modern
i i_. house, No. 16 Lumber
Ill two vacant lots adjoi
JIlllreplete with every
ply to -
fe6-dtf 1
LAFAYETTE HOUSE
'i ington street, Albany-T
ll ly informs his friends
ja house is now enlarged a
style, mtld ready for thie re
12 to 18 boarders call be ac
by the week, month or year,
sonable terms. The above ho
pleasantastreet in the city, a
convenient locations for me
whom lie solicits a share of
er company.
N. B. There is a good.and c
the above, with a shed for
travelling by private conv
TOWING-LAKE
STEAMB



The Steamboats 0. ELLSWO
MOUNT-PLEASANT
HEr'RY ECKFORD
will be employed exclusively
ing Lake Boats, daily, be
de~thi f
A.-'. SLOOP P
SALE-Tlme said sloop
l atwo years ago thiswin
om from her ckel to he
cr.
Albany, Jan.2-1, 1837.
NEW LAW BOOKS-With
Sbe issued from the press
dents and Practical Forms,
Yates, esq., counsellor at
only the usual proceedings
but also several valuable
querela and prohibition, and
sance and account-also, pro
cutive order), to judgment b
ment on verdict, forms of pl
ings in the action of naccoun
debt, ejectment, (and proceed
nuisance, partition, replevin
dings by certiorari, habeas
likewise given; and the w
forms of bills of cost, an
judgment records. Besides,
great variety of proceeding
(2d ed.), interspersed with
ces, and several valuable ta
The revised statutes and th
sed,and Graham's Practice(2
progress o
New-York Digest, 2 v'ols., i
New-York reports down
WM. & A. G
Law Book sel
GOULD, BA
ja35-dac Law
CAUTION-LAWRENC
-The subscribers having
above Lamp or Chandelier, t
public against the use of ce
recently introduced into the
same principle, and intended
sive privilege. They have ins
court of the United States,
Middllctown, the Assign
so called, and others, for m
They consider that as a pla
their rights. It is known by
servoirs for the oil are, gene
es. Their duty to themselves
have granted privileges under
their rights, conferred by t
should be protected: anti
make, sell or use their Han
from them, under whatever d
will be adopted for redress.
SNATHANIE
fet-lw


I



(


PUBLIC SALES.
BY DAVIS & JONES,
S(Au'liitm rsantiinCommoissioaaMlerchnmits-StoreNo.66
Ststnesureet.] he-
K Reghllr tdays for -oo les, ito
Ijulslay at nu Friday. A
At Private Sal,, -
5f i.', l ,,. I, ni ,h1i1. u ldtig
601) b, I.. -. I., [.,.. ,I, m ,., Ain r
"rI IiriL.,- I .I -il. si t ho se tl ie por nt ,
im'm tin.1, n's inr10ttbaleseinc
S r,,,w.,n A r,,n'9 Fire Proof Iron Chents,
ff, fillmgle and double, constantly o hand
Oh-iv lir n f t'i rir~g i -
nescat0_boxes firsjultm
n11111 I .'1. ise Seat chairs. 10
mi I in IW i 11111 t o do "E
tut h -,\',:i-.,,ch ir h *
tll) scroll seat nurserot kingch tMr
77 do do large ,i,, i
100 turned post Frenchli ldlsteauds -
S60 feather beds, issorteidl.
40 eight day mahogany clocts, warranted.
125 thirty hour clock, warrantd. a
250 looking glasses, assorted sizes a
50 bushels red to p seed dw i
e adow lsand,m fine orcha
lrP'T "r A Tf armaTt present is oe upuiyi
JlREAL ESTATE SALESj. will give y in
sion can be hailonrtiterfi
BY DAVIS & JONES. tlcr wtr
(Heal Estate Brokers, Land Agents and Auctioners-
Store No. 66 State-street.) -
S' REGULAR DAYS FOR PUBLIC SALES OF ss ci
REAL ESTATE, THE 10TH, 20TH AND 30TH OF Ii
EACH MONTH, AND AT ALL OTHER TIMES J st
WHEN REQUIRED, ON THE SHORTEST NO- at twelve o
'rICE. Coit
S, lot in the third ward.
T.. .-riHE Copartnershtip be- Dock now Dean st
'-S-. tWveen Cylesr & Nelson, renit G. Staat
g .._ gSas Dentists, having this Johnlm Burneta
day closed, the business nier Jacob Van
will bie hereafter conducted by the subscribers, who have
associated themselves for thatplmIurpose, atthe office oftlm
wlate C. & N., No. 19 N orth market street, opposite Stasm
-ix Hali. H. NE
A. NELSON. l e sale of the ab
Int.ending to remove to the city of New York, I am t
pi lased that IL have it in nMy power to become
former patrons, a gentlemami
denee can be placed by all who may need his rofe
services. In speaking thus of Mi. Alexander Nelson,
therefore, as my successor, I do it from the most unqu
tionable evidence of his character and his skill as a Den
tist. With regard to Mlr. Robert Nelson, my late partner


I can only say, that his reput
established to need
VERNO CUL
oc-m Office 7


attention o

die's andi
who are desmions-of repletin
loss of the original teeth, is
subscriber's HumIan incorru
u.,.i.,I.. l uI.t-. ntn l -t .'" t
in-r 1it ,,ira ijm ih -', i.-y i'
Jii d- i "I.- it, .l a i n .1 .. i i
I. I, .I--. r.i i ji- -' in. iJi
lit,, -, In i,. ',i[. .1 ii,.n.
ripond with the living teet
ral and all Iinds of artifieim
tihe latest improved style
method of inserting them gi
bined with all the important
ferent uses in mastification,
the original form ofthemmou
any unpleasant or painful o
serted by atmospiherie pressure
clasps, ligatures, &e. when f
set on the umerriog principle
uniformity and adaptioun to t
by the closest
OPERATIVE DENTAL SU
performs every operation on
on the most modern and appr
gery, with the least poasilhe
al skill. Carious teeth fill
with gold, platina, etc. Loos
er arising from age, neglect,
eases- of the gums. Irregular
prevented, in adults remedi
teeth extracted. The treat
ticularly a
ETENRY VILLERS, M.D
No.-82 Hudso
Professional operations and
as usual
DR. COOKE--TIhe mttent
ticular branch of medicine
(a regularly qualified medical
experience and practical kn
Lockt Hospital in this city, a
on the continent) continues
the confidence
Dr. Cooke reminds those af
plaints, for the cure of wihih
that he continues his' peculiar
avoiding those consequences
Mlercury-effeeting a speedy
patient with a so
His offices are in tihe L
street, late Store lane. Str
desirous ofn medical aid will b
advice an
Hours of attendance f
B3 See Advertisement on


rIONSPIRACY-Citizen
t knowledge, consent or appr
corner of Hudson and Green
and shut up by Dr. Carwan,
having been induced to do s
tedi with medicine, who thou
injured thereby as to cause
they arc woefully mistaken.
vas well chosen; and in con
closed and the difficulty of t
ost before it has been re-ope
had elapsed -ere I knew so mu
Shave again succeeded in-op
all in my power to keep a
PILLS always on hand; and
he clerk, Mr. Bosworth, I fe
eumstance is likely again t
Brandlreth's Vegetable Uni
vlherever they have been intr
sary for tme to say any thing
heir cleansing, their purga
be maintained, and all which
.o is to be e
,11..-,tNa"ents-T'r offh
orner7o "tdson andGreen
and a large supply of pills
ders will bepromptly execute
ed, as the present agent, Mt
Tcqnainted with the sub-age
he Ledger, and will be alil
minount of pills
.a2&-d m BENJ-
N. B .No Druggist or Physi
Dr. Brandrethl's Pills. They
-B THE SUBSCRIBER
Furnish to order atthei
Albanycounty, New
of superior tone and w
approved east iron yokes fitt
readyto hang; also, Town C
eying Instruments, Coppe
mr23-dae
PERSIAN OTTO OF
the Variety Store 3
de6
INDELIBLE INK-Franc
Sink, warranted good, for
14 South Ma
ja3l. "
TIURSE RINGS-'Gilt and
at thile Variety Store 39
veen Hudson and
de30
]INE WOOLLEN
at 3t1 North
de20 EW
DIAMOND PINS AND
Ssortment,.for saleby
IHEET IRON WORKER
era wanted im
oc5 J. RATHB
CHILDREN'S SLEIGHS
J Store 392 South
de19


KREOSOTE-Warranted pt
for families, a certain c
50 cents. For sale at the M
street, by (fe7]
NEW BOOKS.AT-O. S
N Tie Great Metropolis,
Recollections of th
Livy, translated by Gen. Ba
and 28 Harpers Cl
A HIomne Tour through the
England, by Si
SAn Elementary Treatise
Bayle, translated
The New York
Dcarbmorn's edition of Byr
SHRUB-Old Jamaica Shrub,
sale-by jyl9
W OOD-From One to Five
rate Wood for sale low, i
lying oni the Poesten Kill a
miles from Troy and 17 fr
teams can make a first rate
wood neither city. Enqui
street, Albany, or No. .
PEW No. 31 it the Pearl
sale. Enquire of
fe7
N"EW BOOKS--W. C; LI
'Louis on Fever, translate
on Phthisis, translated fro
of thie Indians of North Am
plates; Three Experiments
Miscellany, the great Metro
edition of WVordsworth's Po
Louis:on Bloodletting, trans
of making Sugar from Beets;
the French; "Nature"-" Isl
&c.; -Works of Benjamin Fr
tragedy in 5 acts, by Those.
icals, Penny Magazine, &c.
5 Dearbornt's Byron
BLANK SCRAP BOOKS
J. for for sale at
jal8 Book and Sta
PIG AND BAR LEAD-5
Lead, just receive
jy30 BACKUS,
CROW BARS--15 tons
h.lest Salisbury iron, jus
a30 BACKUS, A
R ED AND BLACK
at 381 Sonuth liMarket, co
j M5 MOSE &
DAY'S POCKET ALMAN
ed by wholesale or retail
Miaricet-st, between Huds
ja2 STEPHEN
ENGLISH THREAD
AND INSERTINGS--A l
widths just opened as 3l
oc3
HIE LIFE OF COL
P i. Davis ust rec
jalO R. O'HARA'S
GENTLEMEN'S FUR
Market
ja16
RIRENCH MIRRORS-A n
J article for travellers, rec'
Store. no25
3 DOLLARS REWARD-
lided front this village, about
Edward Pettit, atin absconding
5 feet 8 or 0 inches high, somu
a saer on his face, speaks wi
Irish or WVelebumni anih is
ses much piety, anil uinler ti
ors., The above reward will
tion at the office of tIle Itl
caln be found, if il this ste
PRENTISS' AROMATIC
it-rticle possesses ill the
and is offered at a much le
riety store, 392 South- Mnr
Division
fe7


]I4LOURING & GR
' -The subseriberis induce
to offer fitr sali his Flouring
the Varldk Canal at Oswego.
flourinm,taaid two for griktin
othTeraUt'hmay lieapplied o o
There is also connected with'
for grinding kill dried corn.
is among" the fancy brands: .
qiuire of E. Benson and J.
ubsetrier at Oswego. O
e. 0 17-If


SFOI SALE-Three lots
thereon, sitrate on the
street, corner of Pox s
inches front on S. PearleR
a lots are eligible situated
tore.; being near the central
sold by the 20lh of February
feared it public sale at the
''erms easy for the purchase
further particulars enqnireo
street. January 27
ja2S-dtfeb20
CHOICE FARM
J COUNTY FOR SALE.-'
I..t for sale that beautify
WOOD LAWN, contain
ately north from the villa
which the new 5TONE M
front, so conspicuously app
40 by 60 feet, finished in t
with splendid Garden, a var
thile hoicest selection, out-
scription. The situation of
isit of a division, therefore w
er. TiheMansion H
Also a FARM of 221acres, o
highway, which. eae be- co
Farms 9f sufficient siz,r.- As
that stands higher, t iad.for
not surpassed by tiny. The
tihe Putnam Boardingl House, i
ing,, and exhibitsconsiderab
good and sufficient in number
venience.
Also, a FARM of 100 acre
named,'on the north, and.is
road, with good bhu-ildings,.a
It is a level plain and prin
afford 100 tons-of: Hay annu
hove named farms is-of the
fine state of cultivation,-wel
and a sufficient numbers o
The above arecertainly ve
for farming ptitrposes or ge
being so very near to the mus
ted States. A gentleman ma
New-York at five in the eve
family next morning t
Also, a FARM, known as t
the town of Saratoga on the
ver, and adjoining the Canal
cellesnt aHndwhich is in gt
convenient dwelling .and sui
Farm House on theirear of the
and in a fine state of cultiva
woodland and hear a
Also, an extensive ti
consisting of a STEAMzSA
heavy TIMBER'LAND, situate
Saratoga eb.," about 5 miles
Hudson river,; 8 miles from
from Saratoga Springs,-wit
porting. lumber to theAlban
gine cost 02200, which is n
ration; the tiniberiisheinlo
wood; .the land is allowed to
at least $8 per acre after t
lands ate in good fence, an
fQr soil and location are inf
There is also a desirable si
NING ESTABLISHMENT, as
of oak and hemlock bark, at
a good water privilege with
river, and as yet thoreis not
_i ) Frtito",rs r
Alnaiiy,-or J. ELLrSWORTH
* The-whole-or any part of the
eral credit by .
Poughckeepsie, Jan. 16,


aSI FOR' SALE-A very
tin. hundred and thirty ane
Ill. Nassau village, Ren
JB embraces the fiats,
farm which the subscriber
years, and the land adjoini
recently owned biy R. Merch
will rank, in point of locati
of repair and privileges fo
nations, witlthe best farms i
of the pturchasemoney can l
gage on said farm and rem
more years, to suit the pu
lars enquire of the proprie
Nassau. ,
January 25.
SFOR SALE-A
... TATE, OR TO E
[it TY IN TIlE COU
bI hurick house and lo
ket andVesterlo streets.
modern style, finished in
fire places, folding doors,
The said house may Justly
built in the city:-there is
the eastroos
Also, one lot on the cor
adjoining thIe new
Also, five lots on Frankl
and one on-Cherry st. all
The above house is ts be le
notsold. The above prop
other quit rents whatever
and terms of payment a
subscriber. .
sAlbany, Jainuary 24, 18
.. "VALUABLE P
i" SALE-The subscriber
|! denee in the village
9t -county, together w
acres, adjoining thIe sa
healthy, and in every re
as could bedesired, bei
miles north of the city o
vicinity of an enterprisim
with churches, store
The dwelling is spacious
rious apartments well a
delightfully situated on
WVhitehall, and commands
Hudson from its front.
grove with several walk
joining the grove is an
trees.
The outhouses, including
house, wood-house,' aid i
the most perntanent .mater
There is also a very large
ly cultivated and impro
dance, and frilit of a
Thesears upon the rail
slop upon the border of
landing and receiving pa
antce from Meelianhicvi
the short space of-'an ho
rail -rua i lni, I.-' ia e tw
.Is .
-I-at' I
'Il'l- teti (f -ri lr ,a w ill
.of Albany-.will be take
tietulrs, g tquire o
212 North Ma
DANIE
'- +
fel-dat&A-pit "
'S CINTON HT0-
v l'-9iii ; recemitly cr
!!il pad Beaver street
l the s(ibsrjibers hav
style.- he .... ildin. c co i
eonvenientlytc-ommodni
Their iLarder and Bar.w
ihe beattaic country af
paid st-bhe cohveniene
their location is in a p
in the centre of business
Capitol, Public Offices
man of business, the leg
pleasure. Their term
neighbors, and they imnd
a share of public
HAZAR
N. B. There is eonne
a large and extensive
their customers -
4,TEELE & WAR
I Hardware, guiis, gu
and dealers in eliptie
coach lace and furnitu
&e, conttinue business
Market street, Ag
Their assortment emb
feared on thIe usual ter
continued patronage o
WiTILLIAM BAGL
Associated with aS
the wholesale DRY G
York, and is now open
at No. 100 William-s
the variety with a vie
e buyers, a complete
York, Marcht
Et On the first of
str
P RUNES--Fresh Pr
R0no29 R..
-LATE BRUSHES,
J A92 SoatliMar
sel Pil
BROADCLOTHS-31Jm
B ,mct offlne and l
menit of Casineres
South Market, corner
nola
RAGS-3 tonsa of 01' lu
..rags, for sale on l
Il + ROBERT
WINTER STR
frstquality, fo
deo3l '










ofchncryhed o te tae f -e A 'k at tire city of Albany, on tire thirtieth day of Janina- oflincryhod orth sal wo rk,^ onte.t _y OTICE-In pursuaceoano eroHe rr ato pii eeirnloiodi tlu rrndw y-i i .,'1 ^ 1 n rihrbv i r ? tl s il a lufcisat>h elagi5.>Boligal
,y of New York, on tire seventhi day ofe huan ih ude Decembyseen l' e- t' i^r, one t ousand eigh hiiund ed lo avi th cirsty-hsonyoilay oiei eeb ie 1 i xctdb niD ika an rn n ieo lA .to\~ y knt^c~iri.L aiclddbos.lii~nnlcietla sudaan
loiwiriof~ r cu touad eight hundred an hryaxP -r awrc ancellor. ysvnPe ., K i IIOIv h reioso iimDy,1-poftwct fAbntw ~ CRubian aD. W couanty or Albanys N%~ t;,<" ellerv80' ^ tha1ic~ih hundred :lai WILLIAMi Pre-E X an Pres
*.. iW WilliamPolySturtevarent and Hansnah S Sturtevant his Wife, lia r vocher in upvottPolly toPPaeyC, Charles Paanyconty MosesnyaPdaycobA.CTn116ckSeth "'a1,n1" Charlinets Keltyey vs. JonasephthiiBroweilr efindfo
Bolloa.JohnC. Halsey and TlwvaralW.Don Eleetal'aynl.Jehlifl Hatublita anti Betsey Hamblin ayoe os o~ ^oadudrhsofc o a NrhM rnsre nsi iy no hn e ~eofletw fcidcileon o ," i> O h^^^tepiiei fhsd.hs nesh hl peraddn
s of heli Lsate and effect of the! To ^ wf.MssLvMradry Inv ndMraLo ,S te h atpocs of1 subpou has bee issed l d feandant Joepd e freI Hisfi e tieNo.. Couty of~ri nextVAR RnlV DAWSON limeew andonin tCseac aand slaeU, twhe city ocrde >fbok'.^".ew' York11 are iilialaci acorinft lwwiMiosre
pany~~~ ~~ wirec Pohiwnok erMryt>,s e Hatch :and Ste- To tile ill tle Ol lvd ucievs in thditrbtie f h mnesinth l ha ofneds-no off orgge, npae the.R un-h coddiy oloo.ofLndn fe9.d""^a"8;d ^ \,"r onhsfr2 t1 isopufiaio o hi ntie ad a
ftory And ChiwfeEdardn R".." e ^ an d L, tilsa Dingman IliswfPiea Htc n Stes cou'ldnot b'e srvedupnsiddfndnbyraondOgnd s diitrtrso ie sal fsiddcae.,ofNvmtroe huan ih hnrd ofsaid deceased h re ^ "i mn co w h r-"""'*"yd". n l~ A.^ "'"* om
iry nn ha wie, Jdwar L."" Viel. of hi abe nce ii.n froma this slate- on motion ofjohn N. Tay- arnon the creditors thcreof, will be ulde. Dated Octobrinhecekso c f hctyadou yofA iy _ni P "*Llull ?-.'u ;*m,^^^ bon ngoscheb roIi;orohsuendtern
bye afida vi toe t hesanRo rtisfaction ;..., o uti rt, It appearing by affidavit [otestsato fti onrt esq. solicitor ir cominaenat,, it is ordered, that tiele ,1 Op .. n FFwhiPch thereee s owcliie t bdn oe unclaimed lunm tomhahobe titlep M Elieo a 'Crbomm oran p poetialvrar
\ebyafiavt10th~atsaeon0 iscui "'. .'i pyni Seth Payn, Thomas ning- a',~^,r.,. to be ehtred and- tca6 tAME defedant Mosesstatrs hunie aid defendant.- dolar cand his appecir-All totcr l.e entertedimetoan Un ls fbd1yl n aevid -td6e1hdy f o
ively r esid;~ oftisi staeor i th e o slaiantsde ma n an d L us la ts D aersdns oflo s one- n^i o tin-ce8 theeo s"pearvea pnc tlihe. com lia nt's solicictotrrl zaA e, .l o i it fAbav cca-?OTIGE e blwad r oi.Dtd Pu2l ur[\oc!cr rYore f h w..Nsa B Aose is jdeo
ne~ h e ntu fend2ants, of v Am beric aa withinh three mo~ertett^ ho~^ a^e o pa nths fo bl t hn e d a te of thisorder, an d I tco uresn t heir respetive ca s oll h herope) aforesaid, boundedpiA;rFll-drsensaliepropertyihIS30.ate B. U7INig, to Lei Winter, esq solicitor foti, the complainanuruat
'iwftd rseciey pea ndas Erlite.. as Dingman and Louisa, Dingmn hi'Wifrn Mare h resi en. saild solicitor withiin. forty days after s'erv~chr hrot tesbciesa hi eieneN .nnd rcs~ pcc' S otitet-Hr.- n.3S~iAtre oataln rdl"r otn roiin ftesttt uhnin tlcict


orderandion dnefaut thee oftht tnea hwek cm- ^ blto efledan sai bill confessed; and- it" y is further ordered sthat te 'f c old c yvuhr nsp otteeon-t h ndrine.a i deighe a iteent dav f att w esat twelven chains at on nestly ap a n icag uh Kic m n! c .."1 .
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r F 2 e ~ l e o n l i t s l c i o w t i i o t d y a A T a c u t o .da y c a u s e > c d r t f o ^s o eath i o r d e c o m e b e p i l l, hn e t e t n t ety n l lin h o U a g r o c ey n g in d t h e e e d g e c i o f a sm al l b r o o k i nd i t c o n f s s e w ilti t h e m o rt h s u c h~ i r t i b i a l s sa u ,
Ice d Yefaulth~ elo -Pace~ u l "eredthtEleeoa opsaid Moes aFinseaht eroFredheric Height'syo o oreastlv linvoei ex acodn tahefrmo lisatl n uhcaemaead o of hsnoie;adtra~he amcn fnydlrs ^ ^V S ^
^^ *l^& l~a^^sW Sve and ied in lS ~ e ^ the6 state~c papered ande inA^ NE the^ ^^ nesppe enite oc,24-flm A
Sl~~~y~~y~~an~~s'lork andb^^n^~edvS|^^^ toepidse nec o adppr o g OTICEIn^ pursuance of.an order ofthe surrato xcootS T^ kead. ^ S ^X ^ ofhon li le^
inning,^ed continin Lv ,Pl BROWN il([ Ia;!SitS^ S Ice^ ad^ ; ?J 1. %^N ;11!^*"rl3^~^ ta~~S he Ciyo^e okadthth si ubia ntc te esevdontecopanat'soiio

ntnudinecho tesadpaes o ,eight-- ^ O^, wihnfu intsfo h at fti r er; -andS S Sse inopwoeksst Copy. JOHN WALWORTH01 Clerk


t. a n a i e n h fi e o h dler k o f r vh e o nt th^ ^ eorn fil a n c s B r t^ cl;i v.a r a c u r o e la nc e yhe e l d fe r t ilel r c s p s U i d Rso W u b i l e d c e s d h c il h n a d c o c n t e f r e o n 0 g ^ u e o l o c i e ^g ny i o s d i l e l r l a a 0
niyo lCE Ybanonr the Chne llor-Fra nces Lay u-10 by. seric Ora^ J^ ^ copy^"^ .?! ^ of Baid"" bill witd all defaut thereoe heredee bfoetthsedsrrgacityO GKL W Nntie irtpulihd anay X lleotl. t'r1hei thirty-feireofT OM S Ea eidnto
Micorner ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A oeriotr oumbe th us n eigh hundrednce and-~tD ^ s a r sd nto h s S '1"**"* the cr uty-i Pr ofAl bany on oursnbefo r roe t ohe clve th I d ay ffpilnx t. t- ac cording tofte form of tcive orKatl hinsuch ica em dei n h th c i on oy th. ni' o tie -,a nd t~ ut the payymient offhis delrty vs.es Weippalaniamc
C a ssd f y an dk s W ito Cv l ins to n C ss id, n d 0 -a b ee nr t i sed th t w i h n d t h aety t a y ss a he c o a ld ~o m p la in a n ts El iz a\ ,b e l ogtoh. ,. IW.a, c a t b u d o n e r t" i u"'r i. t e t -ebn by il o k i th oto o .E s p n p-an di n l i Me w '1 1 o d { m f o 1 l c f re i b icgi n o f t i n t c a n h t ti e p

le ~~~t a th e s aaid p u li a t o b epl c c o n tin u ed^^ ^ h re f, o in d e a l h r o ,t t es a cdhil o f tc m l a n em a y y Dsa idd n d M rg r t C d y h s ib, A G d r e n i d p n d n o tGe o r g er a e t f ; t G ria2sw o ld av o h n o ^^ e h e S th d y f D c e b r P S
alltmee "? ^ 1 and takn vitu cornehse agairse enteeii this pei ir re-iy anrind jtrebalny dt IefasfdfofSitdavoiti adlea eto gaetBreslacofhe ct satisfaction' g" ofn n l im^'i il i~i S o- n W I E .WRG T
.hefith da of? Se pte ~ amber, 18 6, cessa i one othat Ia 'oy o h order he p bi h d w t o tw ent th oua ndgt th ili~ hi cau e w a filea d t firty-i e he p rti rti n of tw ic d em ands orit the vc hersd s ind suppoti g tE R G SOEendeioflan a toeo then o i t n s ^ti t ~ s ~ l n t o n y f ra t c i g c e i o
I, the^ Bubsribe, t ast nce n eahdwe I t oreig t we s i su scriber, No.^ % 10 PlainW ^ street,^ ^a in said ci
.c' o a h eMan siono^ ^ Heousrei-heia Noft Marke Lordlll ostouan ribh ;ed, tand fortyfiessol'sub swes t wo cappa insIhne oth Jco, booe, h eeuerso Iel-twitanhirdmn T IS H RGdaRy E T. unyolNe ornoia shee nextiruat o sawteodbt0^
he city f l ba~nye aon the sixtsth d i s Love aicl laroftha ee atir leasut, fee ono lac nxsbfr i e ansoe af nhbhne otl eryn", iessuedn he fouavtaue Iesalo ofce o.ftti atf3inatd t *vlntr asundgietno-rsdn dbor htileta set isis ^ "~ h' ^
oaM~ eceoftime taboeprescribgoed aif aio n ftiscutta th is de- inch, thene nrtf, diretdt o tih e degfeendan-t gts_ es JmsC Howar.durgl n di "enhre^'DA 1LM BiA HE lrsiet o h saeo ^ sf s ^ d
^ n tc e t in p ie c e of l n d m ^ ^ ^ w it tsh eo ^ ^ b u il in g thiere o nr e dA Ar e8 a n d R e is e r i n n u e s w st s e e t yofsc e b e ,in dh e a oTuo no doi t i u XML Ici Ro uOno l i e l to- T irbn bo fih i d b t uns h ea p a r anc hs h o ft w h o~s ^^ ^^ ^
v ar^ s cy d S i ^ o fe th e1 c itld o ft A lbey sor e th e r e a s o o fhi be n- e f r d en t dof e t i t ate o n eh a lf s u c h th e nces s r h ecyovu la d egd u d e d dno t-b e a d o o r n i c i s p b i h seearv, 9e dc e i o s o g e a t c m n t c o d i g t a w i h n i e m nt l ^ -/ ^ i ^ ^ l d n ~ h ~ o !
t^i deti d ^ E.uis Ceinn lle o larSlc itofre for hisil's coca-dfee it enminutes wetsvntyetoe n n epnrceasonfrs.-aparbfr oh .Ivng rtjdg teoorfffomtelrt ul tthoeirnoie nthttepy-adi~ id ne helh^ ^ ^ b ],t
i xnlloM s n frnto il^ ^ Chape street eihyfor T cur appeb ar adasch ilo cmlit te ere ndfryfu ire ey svnyfe n "J helddnn nte d~ ?-m pf frnon 0 i tt eonigt h m n h rase fay Yodr fti in onT rvnfrtjdeo h
B et adahr talfic es nfoto M i e a e o fe A a t ire c linaty o filew Yin oil Elie, fouteenthre onda oeya inofe c n r hiin d geeodffv-ihte fknflr esq. solicitorotc frtpu lsh dOee ul po eryby fem r forbidden bylawirits -it. is void. Sd courntf ofm rila ofnsear deeaed greeitg and count in thew
l~etine, nd e~atyretrisn feety tlinchs t o n Wo lzi(ow etknaanthm ofse ndfu teef and f~ rou dereac ;dthelim causes wes t ap earance -set one anl ofFebruaryanex at en o'clolpvr isid~^o layM nycut cusloG O .G D A DAtre o tah g o tesaueatoiigatahe saantasodn

adrlie telstmntondlie eng irregular. Cult- -ell, and notic theenci~t b served Sn^ oiln theeo solicit^ S ^'^ic S^ ^& ^;p^d ^ ^s^ K

Iyf nt in tha c ertain piec e d lof o Orharrsurrd 'situate in the first : W illiam"1 Horace-tBr.owndl and' Leonard Lee ovtscou selor,&c. tHienryc cinombplainnantstyby im or ny urp se oat v rearofobidetiyle ciy o Ne Yok, otidayherby ivtrpirlu ntt
ig th eir ty- ofi e f act r on te soutahu sinche ofro m i s ud e and rea ,le^X n ills S a ir e Dah h i dw D onField on iie r an it .n e f eea t te n a nd tha seaid n e h n e s u h se e bi .' L. t ell a f A rl 83 ,a 0 o c o R i h o e oo -- w a d a e v i D t d t eIl h d y o e e b r1 36 h r v s o s o h t tu e a t o i i g a t c m n s
Js h n ~ alnd w iest ofRoinfthareto ant estate Buin ngl Irrillain,'Jame on half ih s ai i tc isofurth fn er re Jonathan A Gd re adineDndnt oStevedlons( esofitlreyfo atahngcrdiainstn ia isudhem; tieetae f H RL S ON S
lneratre li eQ oaeo Elzaeilliam w oia H1 H.^a^-'~ Stion ei rahUs, El !iza e. wea ityo e rfee t hren o e milfnhs, lec ki adal ther lasn itrste inwil saeo t- ,p h er fA rhmV nV etn eesd and tes23-3n of city Cha ber strelt twnt-ockliha aod February broker atihaiai teate Ili on
zpofalieesat leen~ ndtoal ht e T rin mo Ctllt ls h .e de endn S.iru Brown John ^ B.laii Bull, sively ~onci deachreeskndtelemiT esestexl-nefeirstJue aniieofFanf htlasaidct f llohe wtriac>tscr ''. apcniniebceidneishectyo tiYr, n
of loo~ t nu mbes r t wo,^ atutlan t It Ls Idrd thae lion saidnr Rikertn nd 3 -11vee tnnmonialnicusttecesot westy f e Y rkleii ffcei ethatf e tirne defendalnta eno'lckii Daovninoftatdin o telaut u oDsn.iilField,-intno. li isia aa ratesayeident et;an hedei
ei rty -tn e ed egl re sa n tha i rty a" ^ S a .y .nd dei g rees U .. C, rt min ute east si t-I rlcn.h h r cen h d y o u y 1 3 a w l e o c o k a oo rSa ^ k t e l e 'd b ~ 3 t ~ a -~ c ^ t r o n r p r y b l n i g t u h d b o ,t i rt
inibiatret binEab ~thrtyfeein-ran. o lateu Dvyand- tha rfeisfr b appe a eaob ran e Ilit,.tnds ]fie bamone; hand bo ndchc,- thnc l outhat ct-eendgeao apateaadtlrt oa n tl ia etlmn etannoorlii a ehtn aeoftect-f t11 fJO AHhe.FE R n A R saisdsadtetrnfro nypoet y i o n
In d e lty links o Mik'street^^ (noweo Ferry stret, hall''tll of-'h said city 'in1te i~b sixyeen Marhe 1S37, fiiton feeltite f AN E Al. and0A I-1 D oneI such eel lll a icttile Cfliay i o r ro rl tile h d Abtwennt o~ bn^^^ o B K P cm oigte.fr fF rr Bsoreiet irp~ htvraefride ylw ad-r od
forth for?~teT r^ lety^ ofwi Fieldbs f romth daeo this ord tera nd file-o -inchestl by tile ry he eges n womnis niiitrsiofhgodolallinrrdtofhdeerti branchfis ore irtprts'nd fhe o are i li tteo ssapreosut-t oteft dth ~lidy fN vebr 88
AIBS n ior eth ide oof h eas e one d ch inth c nonrtherhly resnothe" a bsear nce hette as terase otlecm it-nefeMeonhnawkfic ,thnesuh pe Jue eesd .gi'l?..iue ?tctteN wY rt nte a-s ew"heal o h ayeto hidetines- js .L A R N E
.rhe es o unaeflomumerfurtn^han ad tlion aftlbillpS rolke oied tandac or therefob evechryegt ere olymoi iuesel it-nefe anteimn hrofnoav auenlet o fies"a ^ ~ ~ ~tet-e lrt.idc~a ip perad icag uh ttctetacrigl. e ritore o tahigceioa
idts t yi us tred o a atthenc alongv S a l n tien sout side hoff i'c es ordered toutt the,-ou degree de en an D avid D .nog t F i lo -ap ea excepting affi xed.e sam ess totalT ~ c cerStAaiC f E ,l w it i m m nla r m h; -l p b c t o o l us^^ tj d e 0
rty-six-an2 fodyeenabtw enSwdstee a d ox V 'billd within three months frome life-ne (latendon al J me C nTlandq s rrgae fou CionvneyeCOdT B V N EC I EN ntie tno tthe ay en o a y etsdu t Reenssco moepcalfrer ty ananou ty o
re s lotnumerai to thepa ce of bo deginnng.dtr, next oftl iby saidd city" her eor or in V 'tc 3 rt thereof that theh sai (Joinpa tlle"^ David" Cad~y and~ fila"'tit-lre [^ v ttect fN wY rti wnithdy o ~i s'rlr nsi iln md eiet fti sitad h pieyt te r y y ^ ; ;,i^ p run ote
treo~yeCt, nd itinguished on am p ie d i te st id s"e ssn thattthyca a copy Off ti ore bep lshdwthin rerl nhe oth lceo egnig.T eseod de8fm A ItSO MP E L S roatuhviscai saais heettlo ilieightlaeo je 18.BU R&BE Ihundredf bc th tte fM in n t~ hesm
ofPfi eol t heseot n d day of illay be pesrsom h,(al te here of in ll he s ta te papriu arndind thea h s dacibd a lltace ai o r pieces isiodb si net re butt ed ofin bou nde V on ad, ,c c tecyyo lboudeesd are hereby reruire -lei athi TITO" Atrtorneys Evein Postngceior. S i "

9 an d th irt m in u te w est a lof ,h c ty e no rt A l an i:a de k o w n th L' -* i flelo City o fn aAsslbean yor v o nn e xetilen e h, f ~ b n v w h re o e eri ia corDBh ll I e n beSe l ^en t h d ay o f Elteieo is o s f h e st t e a u hoIs ngWt ahlntsao nd e riv erst le nd h e d einry t t e m or fo t
>l e cha~id n, the nce norterly ap,,rlon h east bo und of- D ece ber A at -th le year o f o rbany, on t e. se thd yofuJand aryh t o lr e fnow rt y-ier mrk in utes l w est r w s p o tfw oM chain^ I ^ W'ag i s h ~ st t f T S O A E E a re i e t o n th r n f r of a y s c ro e t y t em r o b d
.nin rn- lugF,,i it irn-n. r ni hu.i.., ndedhouandegth dedad thirty-si-rsn, uiesVanen Jrpsoo l, vice foy-iner h en t wnt-w degrees tit-he iue west forty-eight. ofte^^ ^ ^ ^ ol A ERhN .-,,.- P-nn nSot m rca n hateBm wi esld dnyla adaevod ae the~lt saiy Marg~flO
dofte saev widthains th.eand ftylink deto Wonelndef amsVn(no%%vccacllroftethriru toee i Bce tecenrh il-fv cgescai9) stre~ w^ nHImAU U lteJ~ -. et,mos o therc alyong til hishid debts, unless lle Chanelar andh third circuit fee oHA LE ha06CONNERthncnrt

and d istnusedo 1mapoes o i rplicurrain^ cinB idcue ha es m r rc ; ^n .^ been dail is-ue narth thry-he degree wiin. twoy^^ ^ up ~ ot'a~'o minuS~ ,gn^ ,; tiet
afirc onth scoaiayo May,10.yl ot, n number. sited bte coupldnantsbe servedibyresowtn ofhiseabsence from. c efe c rprelo etaadendd toneln h atwlladtsa eto h si ie .Bred-scec n h rs n frteeeto fBbulig~r r ~ re~flilo~~cieliiele~suiieig -er-iaashreBC tacmnacrigt a
^61V ,. .. .~ a th noth his place oflhlsioder;e and frcaeom t his s a pparte, oha fh southfit-umere said running thence sout parce wihi thed northo motion ioascnamed Bn.ndtClarkohesurogtthfeh so- ic acomoatonofth Mehaic3 nsitteoftreeiyeS fdeecgrtefesm onpllsfo te ctyan cuny itinnin mnts ro weesrttpbltaion tf
N H A M U l l 3 ~ i N w V .- sP ui ds l ..i R i e k a psw e ar a n d t e c p l nans t se -bi l l -o h i e f v e r e a t f o u r m iutd e s a n d s s e v e n t y f e e t a n cd H E p e p l o f t h s t r o ffi e i N e wt v o YY ron ofrw Yrk ,t b a i a f f o m 1 O 0 0 t 8 i ) ) 0 0 r e o r t w h r b y P P r t i e p o i e ; a d t a h a ye to n et s de t hmb
Ics toi Mr ink a (n iowaFery st uree, thllnce north il- an a o v h reft b ere o h ompla inatsplin teenh degreves nd degrty egrfoacenre adofvn feln;orthnu-Bcodd voderu ofn twilre c.3t I3 j7 roe monthsestiueath nstiaoneim ntag intn n- reidni o tiatthadenedeivrytotort
u n o n e c h a in thn c e nOH o irth e r ly a lo n g ( lie e a s t b o t n is o r fo nt, ti re d ae ofa l th i o rere Io r thai d s aida b il oak e c o paie n t. vnu te w e s t s e v e n t eryr fele ta s e l o noea i a n d m e lia lfT C E i h r b g v n h t i1 a p ic t o n w l b e s a e fnc h D A G A B C H S F B N i e a d th r a s e o n y a d i p o e r y b y t e m o
us) t re ttency- lh d o in Jt n sout sien o t gam e one^..* ..h e n iti further ordered, that tw ent dasai from plaindants e s one b l o wc h ner noro t h of thre M o a w find r th cn e a ogielc -f'oty -f a e t h eg s a u e f hsoa e tt e r n xt a s e i e t o r n fruont e M i ei erry n i a ny p r o e w a ev r r o d en b a n r
moon, uh derlace direction aim p ernenec ot the s border t iren dy cmplainans crder thi re o be publ b-e I T til cai.spot seven e tlw wtrmr olieevn "**)-,n.,^ ~v f ni-rvS1 i" o natt noprt cmay wt aia h aicwl eol o h amn fterdbs nes od aete2t a f oe br 38
9 cri er tain lot otge'n a nr aof : the buidcut alng there fisednthe ctienaer and in the New Y orkTi es Suit c oniur ed v degrees fetfin udedn evnyfe otepae f tw"" i'"""i <.n L O {ii1<,0,wt b nin rtlgs ocntrc hyapa n dsh resc taenty minutesn eas seet fee D.f M O D .Y
Tteacitny thef ffthany, .-o thecity ofAlbany i ll< tii, i led non et, w~ published i on shyiallnod 1 h e e earti a saidpu lc to be C f- an crbd o as h alf ln h thatertnc ter pec rpa clonlnorthy thirteen oi tb lo h p esau ont eHdegriereoieea dtst le a me to a yd b ;uItndm y ^y., ,.,,,,n i,, ...nri~ fth l
ensideet aof oth by ar stret and bo unddol Eccll lu .i re east ninue o ight w e s i nl suc ess i o n, o nc th is order towesek i s minutes cast Greven L.1 Isan af rea id nh,bou ened north-ll ow; J"-on of~u hat day the and thrfot banrkeg streee to bey-in locatt mhe~nhs toe tilet the samese papersnt Or, th*is sla copy ofo deivr to tha orde for servir per heff~r a l Tit oh N
h b y aa lo f t h c it y g ou l bnd i a f o rbel o n g t o R o e rc at D n b art n s o n a l l v yn eoa d W l i m W h s e a c s e i n n t l o a e m r n t e w s a k o h S i u o a i w r c n t i e f i i e l i n e t r a r i h t e p i i e e o a b a c i i h i y o ~ b n u e f a y p o e t in til es s a ie E d w i ni n t o l e a s t t w e i t d a y b e f o r e t i l o
Made an, n eat i alo f ron, el ti me to. esc rtidybedfore theis e a bovppearance.fo is a n-Hdso e ne three-(Treott thewentyeihundoteride fSomrgg edrn aetesxeet a fA rli deeaed sto le canldti e f r esearCut CnlBak adternfrofayuhpoetyb h maefrid ,ho nt alip ,'mi
s r h r streow e t andrt -1 o uped fee sevn i ne s Ja o and three- P ra nt sca e. JAM ES PORTER, Clerk. feetthenc Railrong the an li ne o bextwend n the lncd B th y-I e x c t db e e l n n a yh s w f ,o le ,, .D N L I G O O ,c ~ aA ,r
tiers of.anlinch, and e~on the south byraloto-re o~urn.-i R Cl ark, solicitor. detiic su, le l y dbnelloereswntgingnrd n ita.dcut o lbn nd too tYokhe e- W 0 said, Daniel'"'''"".^'c^lo"'-v f au-mAlonv oata~ncrdlrs N' Y

,too.all that certi~nv Klo dt .< and sniae IJL.inthe fifth w ar d Re aler Estae thuandwt eigthoftv hundreds eaand ude ndffyeih et oasako e iyad onyof lay ndtt hihtee s wr mnlnd nthfii ertno h yi c sil ttcietsaant-nnrssetubtr hiaxP"tiro uc eere l heett wl-esodfrh

.KIO-lia- T .rWR V 3ir,,.n,-n *hae ~ ^ thNe-wre York Lifee Insuace andgn ig otiig] lt n lcsi ffhw r ft ect Trus Company vsri n tand oaunselors & .at h is colle cti t eeo win h u Alb any. n g thr dingt thity-iv feeti nin nionina huff incle front andli rear count tyurts fee ten count of-s thencesouth seven
eab eoutseve t abov prf i e isai pondne Patril the.v degyo ~ w Y k N re es land x liitw enattri n ott e l ndyr ty ot e tme oinutese oo t c awest.d t e a e ntlI e ot e m r ve e t en i n 1 h asn l h s o ~ e a ^^ 1 c n ti ei er b i e t a n at a h n n
eniv~~~iird dOrFe r en^thetoi w or.M y K.a on Z& an v boed soute, hil iontiereained t ihn Hr F pebo GogpWlep tronfnwonfl thergia ctsal aebenn uStA d iartttimheodctoliraNe, ^ asise aant h stt fJoi eGafnw
zej f il e bsat s. uwth i ~aerei)iad oaltatcattnB y, o f t ittewdefendanotsc Daius Oerton gavnd Sarsah t his W loi nutiedis W est r dasflowtswtilxty-ceoinlen m fteee(2et ad a, ttryinpenblt croaiot poeam bonaenudr h n- Ithi*IC"'> lwa. r oti aedti Tidy f aans bcodn, ocald riinrilen dboc

U~fli~ih uii s. eori G oudJ ln W.aes by -, l erand notzhopliant s ith isa odee d til he at the s ayid n Daiu O ton i and uan surrgat hundre cound ofry-i e Albaed inrstee ois court- Builrtesoull be soldbe atpSiaacinrtah a ohise' wife, Bronso nail.aplct'^v ^ ei h rb ivn oorigt tl roiin o h p o et -blnin ote addetrt h o i

red s ix ty-f ifu r-e t d eep ro mld ntr eet s tree wt. foupro meonging fro m them d t f t i r e, and Ili t a s e of ny i c as p oper- chest5 6 f e, thence s out thir .14re degrees we t6 0 f e ,ti n eH i M N G N B ORand tw o tmousaed M iolaratrhe ob ec of the goods.y chattel and cre it of sc^ ln n oniido ^^ Ste- find ^
M yresn f i asnc rin rcoc-amn wil- y their ap arane forbiddhey cyaus ahilnd aire voi. ath e d ,o utldg'eam30mme.et0fetlec it _OT/L AN R O R capterd sitele f dnvirst, rniet ntvso nlno ye-~ wfei^^f TC usatt nodro h urgt
li.at t e, o nedit stlle~y Bn life c it f bany beinge absnceto .7ha fJnur .137hSIirBtKRy- eightree ga e forty-i ghtes minutes feet, sthnc e lou th 3 I T tetmn whTeu reof, e a vhe ciaused otheeati- ofif c o te ir wied wloaotlllni lh iyo.N w ^ "^ r^ eie onino o i'f ^ ", "",'^1?,; "l i "*eyg ut l
d distigshe d pl n a ma hi8 rei en fa radon lotio so JohbnD. J2- Atore fo tahn rd tor enr and one hafinucBwesth20fetlence southfort-fou degee oan ai d suro gate tol hior e hrut fixed '"Wites lorawan wihi pnonoe moilitrorea ogtis f" n o nh fro the firsttr puliato oftp E.id icend f deeaad copy of
s- rd re ha th ,ReipufebaliArocannn, don tha said0",; ^ 1 ^ publict'l'ion b o nitlid- fn iued v i a nd Ity-f minutes e ea3st t h n e s uh doenade" e pe ft esae o e o k lyt e g a eo oh x en e nc aiy o l .t1,,"al! .~ y^ nii l B 0 f r "i'b p o e o c est e e f o i h r a e ~ a req
tot h by ppumearanferty-fieened, and onth e no th eryeadox (ft sai paerstle ast^ ^^ onei ecee o weight weeksC~et thnced tkituth o f3e eee esi0ghGd tr adInehd nt ten x o kn crd Nwurk a .1,87.jlnl d ilr l ed- "l>d A 1p1a H N teatre f h usrbrs hsofceN .4 lt
ree beried in r athe i c omulaina t's oicfitr wt inthare e e oiettlots n i h u d e n ttii -e e r s outh fort-fou (]agreesi a and ee or nd a fifteetrn e n h ettiofJ li ic n,, i" minutees sr tWeBlstlv n rbe e he frs ayoe
am lber fo ld rty a e < opy t ire so u~t h b y S anv d on be perso^nally ^ served oiu th sai Dariusnhu? Ortoonaeheeb i itoaperneordur Srgaeoarahnt e twoot eete feoett i e filn of .S it f esY rkiotc i incyghe ,pu-esN A DK


ioxstoeti b rein in br e a e vdt pero g o nallyh upoy- thr e saidet Whir ilpard, olc to an f Co gnse for ti c m l i nt, C< Air the s uhlne W -Of Re; -nssle Hand Saratoga R be- Youb u rint ey a f ou od n t o wlweillt h L g apeolteeasef e a d h ra se fa y uhp o et b i ,aefobd N T C i eeyg ve h t h rsi et ie

Tann n Cor~tr of Ca ncr y hF ld for ch ate of, onew- bl tho ubsfl ,and ae copy thun re of a d to be served on t escorit- haw kyriver, ant s b ll .hh ieeae s b la S cerenfnd p n e to h rei o s n x frt1h1 0 Twenty-tw o k oic s e en i e ,pu s a tto t w own l c ^ M e m lv a
d York, sameWithe ityo Nhew-Yr kl in deth oe hundeldt Ja me Vlandsslciowili orydysatr eve o tclThm sW rigvariainL usaWreg knan eachanceMiln alote iyofN wdllaor toth thir circuit.osan dolwro feet. psoiiox inchestut thencesin northm nt Salainsii di-" *gm"**^ "'-ea
AnJan llrymidnecthoun and eOf hgro und lr itd an ,td th irty-seve, cop of s id bil, und hn eam lt W h r o ,sdilla IV. bli er and R en ss tl er anW ar atog a Rilfan as theay W rnce othei sixokt e sasnrreigt w io n 111 I IH w .ji n i -ei e t d b o s, t a n nt cn r t i a i~ i d T J T CE A pi ai n w l e a e t h~ e i l t
re in tb W i am d T A [fit ea V ice Oir a ny lo a nd th e tak en. L c n ies ted y s i A r n M n in ; a d i fu t er iglu degre m ca st M arnty iha W feele ,la e M rt a V a e -,othe.ch o ou a e h e e IieTa d re u r d e casen 'l< h r o f betgtipn-v n for g a n t Ih s at l' A T .M O E O Z E J l of t l E a e of N w o k tisoetre sok o
d cinr ipa is onaCircurb Aaam 41it, rderedta figeb said comp laienant wisathion otwhtydas cu rt wI a io fArh mV nGlcti y u sial ob n perbfr u Yoursat c. HENR SWITZER al' -so,' ,i:n, n v i~ l M arin IKR ,arsdn fR oG adi rzl nS uh icroaino' akt ecle h tatcBn
Do vidr ow ---Lz ones irop ad wiir th Jon cais, ithi order WilpliamW he s i tle epaer, i a rsdent or er daceased, andsisit upno Gree n I slan ao resaid, and fNe ok t j fie ntectyo"w ok, -' ',8 ,,.,.^'" n',,.i A1ia ndta le a Bw lbesl o tepy et h ivofN wY r, ihacpia foe wlo
jigp adohr .,a i newspaper prite inteoimofTopcaenlyToy fr'dcasd efnattoohecgildaiovuisdexae eetocohenIeir surplus prooIifebitnls e per n dshrg uh tali udrdtouad olrs ohelcte nth iy f
Lnradic n g andflo ng R h -fi au of Ja e III;nt, wut; -Ii.cannd t be foub dl e ered withc o said pap er a fo l th earsuat sieo f the n woesion or tlower sprout. otinrec as ornonoftaadytwnak heehoatedmle inlreaioimfaorbiddenilonirm rirflm ie bya odlatw ww tannienodh ro he Yo-1 l


letin frt tat hedeenan, fre Jne, a~rsi-;eihtwees n ilaesie. ndone t eaa i echofIli m dean povied ad f n ode o tiscout, m de setle en ollo ccunt o Suat ollnsuviin ex ^' ,,.,^^ ^ fra puliatonoftils olce ad hatth pymnl of T.rni~w ,,,i,,,n,,, ..iii,, ......th iri
deniof hisslat, tat roces fr ha apearncehas air weks; ut uchpublcaton hallnotbe ecesary hillieaboe elill'd aus-notce s Hrebygivn, o al ectorof te lst ill nd estmentof he aid ~ui~i ^ "tinot~ ra ~ toloco ^ f n Boton "" debs de t himby esientsof hisstal, edaIetern termination of T its reion~
beendul isuedn tin ~l;andtha th sam cold ot n cse te sidcmplinatshalcase coy othisordr prsoa hvinganygenrallie, orincimbanc upn an Mllcr, dceaed.. ^, ??Bcra~ne~^^^ deivey t himor or is seof ay popety ithn 1^1;or; teof ifc^ t nri.?ptll
beeveb eao o i ~ ran ez-,qpfrm lhs cstate; al)d tob sre p ersonal 0po t e sadArn annatudvdd hr rineitintelnsdecie n hInt dmn href ehvecue hesaofff an ordecr^^^^^^thssaebeosn o iadth rnfr faysch ^ ~ ~ hpor ^
on ~ t moio o J eo and aet, eoiiosfrcm li- lattet asbfr h tim4- abovc prsrbdfrhi ilo oplli hCcasai eeiatrmnineo adsrrgt ob erut fie. ins, liy"r,,,-, ain ,~src ote m e~yh imacfridn yInadar od .-tn W ~~lwm *t"c"i1 ,7
ans ti rerdhaihsad eednPrz oeapaanei hscue. Cp.o nrar teef yjugeto ereta hyponJic Ps toq urg me u adcun o d aur 1) S7 a86w {dlc dyo Aii,13.temo he ersfo h is dyo a et


A T ac sit of cacr hi beld e f ro m th is state;o e and, two be ndrved ploinn ollasil te ntyd Aaron Iilanni t u dvdd shares or1"' intte rs in thefo tenh lands lh w rdo de secocrgeeig auay1,S7. .jirw ,iiotebnde fFdce n ht h eiiln; j (lltn^r t.toi -iM ona

on ollsonavdKn,tsotlesators clforcomplan-,lest wnt ."Y.S the^'^ ^W ^ tinlS;liiio^ cFl^ ietr on C oa ^I S^ P"-- --- ^
an i s orerd hatth s id ^ S S defendant, Pereatttenets on
S^ ^ ^s~l e~^[e^ ^^S ^^=i^Stys^^ a^ ^.n^ 1J;:nes A.anpel esq surgt of.^ ,'s ou-^ ^^ sa0,mAto^^c^ ^,.*

fr o nth d t he of atei o fd r thd is o rde r o r th at tire sani dc I W l"^ U v oA bND B R O O K L Y C O A L u t av o C 0- "' D V D C D IS M s s n h n e y 1 8 '- s can w t i p w r to h l e l s a e f r h ob w i P Ad i a n i l ie e i l f ANS N V a r s ^ i ,f r a c Ir or t n off ce ano iaiuo b
bilb. taken"- ^ ^^ S S S I as Gornifessed Aagainst ]l7int; and it111 is1 further y N o^ ^^O^Sif^eoth leg
oreed h attis orde epbihe ihnten ty days 114 Notice, ishicygse hta eiinwil epe-Yrpo f f ^ % or^ ^ ^ S ~ 1 -- 1-^^ S^ all^W^ KT inc thei repctv lin orS
icn paper publisd hed in'tenn Sitar, NepYr k, for: eigh aI a Tri hv ato ^ ledates there Jaof,13. < respectively.Thms .Cler Tirueolhi landsiinl aial" ^ '*'"^^ ^"^n~o*. s~liro'ryh in",-.^!^ thct o-e Yr-,adt; estld Tnd
fa.^^n^^rurv iusancd^ ?^ .J 'ight hundred iahneygied^ aptibiberty-seven, imaSereay. peopler of they staa.eo~.Due^^^^ ,=^"^^ua
cue Copyftli JOHN to hes Rved Cler k.nll too b'i^ l o' hebl l ,111,icoriporiante The Nrew- tncrpost thnaFyteBn ihcto~ w^ok o ice nie xt;of kobe inve onf h cmlannsooictr to3 rretrioo, o a c n ncrorto t n-ra odr non ihalrmolates oatfmi tfolen n vrysirhthn..rtina" 1"


SSS^ W^' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e (10 rinceHFstreet, hWoundd rtherlyin ^ ^ ^ ^ ~ Sa^ frn by ,eeb givn ,t the redintor felgb,^S d;;t~w S i :a ^
resenOt, I llnpn T. Mc~il., vi ce chancellor of tl e l edi Nf e w-Yor k,^ 12th day ev n fro n Ba aiilthofueo h i ice o ,ortaovemberB oyli rd rt b fh td y o rd c a d pov honev rl e a d ,thouitisandsaeh oi;i:l l~ ,a d h ral- c"b ^ ",'t
dle eihtunded ndthitysix all Picesret ea^^^stel ylt nmer^ z? ^~^^ ^ ^ ~ ^ (895)^^^ ^g eighthunded ane
^d~i^^'Yrk"'^^^ ^ ^'still there'--- tobepreetf',O sAee POit.R, attiestr? ?-^ S ^^SO final^ or^ H acon Pa yo to- buidtee an
U fyD uB37. ri tolO % "JM SPRT Rn~ae. t30 apea -hasH RD been.gte isue Garl, Soliitt sor .8 ofth estae-8 1,13f V O IElicw Prsdet DLircos a~nd curom ae a,1,<