• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 About the author
 Back Cover






Group Title: Retrospections : November 1967, Gainesville, Florida
Title: Retrospections
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073650/00001
 Material Information
Title: Retrospections November 1967, Gainesville, Florida
Physical Description: viii, 172 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Jones, A. Quinn
Publisher: 1st Books
Place of Publication: Bloomington Ind
Publication Date: c2003
 Subjects
Subject: African American educators -- Biography -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
History -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: autobiography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Funding: Funded by the University of Florida Libraries' Department of Special and Area Studies Collections and the Digitial Library Center.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073650
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: African American Collections in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70160661
isbn - 1410797767 (pbk.)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Foreword
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Chapter I
        Page 1
        Early years
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Work experience
            Page 5
            Page 6
        Other college experiences
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Tucker Hall - Annex
            Page 9
            Page 10
        Choir - 1915
            Page 11
        Cadet military organization
            Page 12
        Socials
            Page 12
        Cultural programs
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        High school courses completed
            Page 16
        College courses completed
            Page 16
        Baccalaureate service May 23, 1915
            Page 17
        Commencement day exercises
            Page 17
        Class roll
            Page 18
        English normal classes
            Page 18
        College class officers
            Page 19
        English normal class officers
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
        Years of teaching experience
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
    Chapter II
        Page 25
        Teaching immediately after graduation
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Registration with Board
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
    Chapter III
        Page 36
        Experiences teaching in Alachua County
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Athletics - 1921 to 1957
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        Teachers and extra-class duties
            Page 45
        Administrative assistants
            Page 46
        A challenge
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Commencement
            Page 49
        Class night exercises
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Annual sermon
            Page 51
        Graduating exercise
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Difficult finding prepared teachers
            Page 53
        Death of principal's wife
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Experience teaching in Alachua County
            Page 55
        Beautifying school grounds
            Page 56
        Additions to building
            Page 57
        A story of library shelves for the library room and tables for the science room follows
            Page 58
        The principal and continuous study
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
        More opportunity for vocational education
            Page 73
        Music instruction since 1946-1947
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
    Chapter IV
        Page 78
        Extension and summer school instructor
            Page 78
            Page 79
        ALCOTE Credit Union
            Page 80
    Chapter V
        Page 81
        School bond election
            Page 81
        New Lincoln High School
            Page 82
        Committees on school evaluation
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
    Chapter VI
        Page 87
        Retirement and appreciation
            Page 87
        Plaques, awards, letters, telegrams, etc. were received
            Page 87
        Plaques
            Page 88
        Citations
            Page 89
        Other citations
            Page 89
        Letters of appreciation and thanks
            Page 90
            Page 91
        Congratulations
            Page 92
        May 28, 1957 testimonial banquet
            Page 93
        Mr. A. Quinn Jones in retirement
            Page 94
        Brief historical background
            Page 95
            Page 96
        Lincoln High School
            Page 97
        Lincoln High School graduates 1925 to 1957
            Page 98
    Chapter VII
        Page 99
        Church membership
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Addendum
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
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            Page 140
            Page 141
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            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
    About the author
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Back Cover
        Page 175
Full Text





RETROSPECTIONS


BY


A. QUINN


JONE S, SR.


NOVEMBER


1967


Gainesville, Florida


I


















2003 by A. Quinn Jones, Sr. All rights reserved.


No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording,
or otherwise, without written permission from the author.

ISBN: 1-4107-9777-5 (e-book)
ISBN: 1-4107-9776-7 (Paperback)


This book is printed on acid free paper.


lstBooks rev. 11/03/03








TABLE OF CONTENTS


FOREWORD ......................................................................... vii

CHAPTER I ......................................................................................... 1
Early Years ..................................................... ......................... 1
W ork Experience ............................................... .............. 5
Other College Experiences ................................... ........... 7
Tucker Hall --- Annex ....................................... .......... ............ 9
Choir ----------1915................................................................ 11
Cadet Military Organization.................................................. 12
Socials............................................................................... 12
Cultural Program s................................... ........... ....... .... 13
High School Courses Completed.................................... 16
College Courses Completed ................................... ......... 16
Baccalaureate Service May 23, 1915................................... 17
Commencement Day Exercises May 27, 1915.................... 17
Class Roll............................................................................... 18
English Norm al Class ........................................ .......... .. 18
College Class Officers ....................................... .......... .. 19
English Normal Class Officers .............................................. 19
Years Of Teaching Experience ............................................ 22
CHAPTER II.................................................................................... 25
Teaching Immediately After Graduation............................. .. 25
Registration W ith Board .................................... ........... 33
CHAPTER III .................................................................................. 36
Experiences Teaching In Alachua County .......................... 36
Athletics 1921 To 1957 ........................................... ........... 41
Teachers And Extra-Class Duties......................................... 45
Administrative Assistants........................................... ......... .. 46
A Challenge ........................................... ............................... 47
Com m encem ent ................................... ............ ............ 49
Class Night Exercises -............................................. ......... .. 49
Annual Sermon ........................................................................... 51
Graduating Exercise......................................... ............ 51
Difficult Finding Prepared Teachers ................................... 53

v






Death Of Principal's Wife ............................................... 53
Experience Teaching In Alachua County .......................... 55
Beautifying School Grounds.............................. ........... 56
Additions To Building ...................................... ............ 57
A Story Of Library Shelves For The Library Room And
Tables For The Science Room Follows:............................ 58
The Principal And Continuous Study ................................ 59
More Opportunity For Vocational Education.................... 73
Music Instruction Since 1946-1947 ................................... 73
CHAPTER IV ..................................... ........................................... 78
Extension And Summer School Instructor .......................... 78
A lcote Credit U nion......................................... ........... ... 80
CHAPTER V............................................................................ 81
School Bond Election ..................................... ........... .. 81
New Lincoln High School ............................................... 82
Committees On School Evaluation.................................... 83
CHAPTER VI ..................................... ........................................... 87
Retirement And Appreciation .............................................. 87
Plaques, Awards, Letters, Telegrams, Etc. Were Received... 87
P laques ................................................... ........................ 88
C stations ....................................... ................. ................. 89
O their Citations ................................... ................................. 89
Letters Of Appreciation And Thanks..................................... 90
Congratulations............................................... ....... ..... 92
May 28, 1957 Testimonial Banquet.................................. 93
Mr. A. Quinn Jones In Retirement..................... ............ 94
Brief Historical Background ................................................ 95
Lincoln High School......................................... .......... ... 97
Lincoln High School Graduates 1925 To 1957 ................. 98
CHAPTER VII ............................................................................. 99
Church Membership....................................... ............. 99
A ddendum ............................................................................ 102








vi







FOREWORD


Sunday, May 19, 1957, the Faculty and Students presented a
program in the new high school auditorium honoring your humble
servant in the cause of education on the verge of his retirement from
Lincoln High School and the teaching profession after forty-two years
of continuous service. To me this was a very touching occasion,
filled with solemnity and traces of joy and satisfaction. An audience
filled the auditorium to its capacity participated in this program. The
audience stood and joined in singing, Lead On, O King Eternal".
After which, the Lincoln High School Chorus, directed by Mrs.
Geraldine Y. Fields, sang "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men." I recall
the most appropriate prayer by Rev'. W. M. Ferguson, Pastor of Mount
Pleasant Methodist Church. Dr. G. L. Porter, Executive Secretary of
the Florida State Teachers' Association gave the occasion and brought
greetings in behalf of this organization, also greetings from a
representative of the Alachua County Board of Public Instruction,
Wilford Griffin, President of the Lincoln High School Student Body
and the President of the Alumni Association. "My Here rendered by
Miss Catherine Berry, Soprano and Mr. Julius Harper, Tenor followed
with Presentations and closing with a song: "Let My Soul Rise in
Song" by the Lincoln Chorus and Benediction by Reverend Leroy
Tillman.

After the presentation of this program and during the course of
conversations with Dr. Porter, he advanced the idea or suggestion that
I should write some memoirs of my life experiences. I had never
thought of writing anything about myself. My thinking was that it
would appear somewhat egotistic. Again, Mr. Eric Roberts,
sportswriter for the Pittsburgh Courier, visited Gainesville, his
hometown at least once yearly and always visited me, and on every
visit, he has mentioned to me that I should write about my activities.
But the latest suggestion was made to me in October of 1967 by my
wife, Mrs. Frederica M. Jones. Therefore, I decided reluctantly to
write these Retrospections with the idea in mind that they might be
somewhat of an incentive to those who might chance to read them and
that they might reveal something of the sacrifice involved by one who
sincerely desires an education along with the desire to render service
thereafter. This treatise gives a brief autobiography, early training,







and education including teaching activities of forty-two years, thirty-
six of which were in Alachua County, Gainesville, Florida.







CHAPTER I


EARLY YEARS

In the Southern Section of Quincy, Florida known to its inhabitants at
that time by the name, "Spring Hill", the writer was born on a two-
acre tract of land including a small cottage which sheltered a family
of seven children, Viz: Sarah J., Rosa Lee, Hester B., Simon Peter,
Josephine, Allen Quinn, and Disney Theodore. The cottage in which
we lived was comfortable and was equipped with the necessary
conveniences of that era. It possessed two brick chimneys with
fireplaces for burning wood and hard coal which were the principal
fuels for heating. At a later date coal burning steel stoves were used
in the homes for heating and ironing. Previously, irons were heated in
the fireplace to do the ironing. The steel cooking range which burned
wood, occupied a prominent place in the kitchen for cooking food for
the family. Few foods were left over from day to day for there were
not any means for preserving food as is being done by moder-day
methods. Later ice boxes and containers which held factory
manufactured ice were utilized in a limited manner to preserve foods.
Water for the family's use was supplied from our thirty-foot piped
well lined with pipe twelve inches in diameter with a cylindrical metal
bucket attached to a rope and pulley for drawing the water therefrom.
Later a metal force pump replaced the well for getting water.

The family washing was done in wood tubs used to contain
water for that purpose. However, later the tin tub came into use.

My father led the family in daily prayer. My mother taught
me the following prayer which I have never forgotten:

"Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the
Lord my soul to keep
If I should die before I wake, I pray the
Lord my soul to take This I ask for Jesus
sake. Amen"

The writer was the sixth child born March 3, 1893. My
mother, Mrs. Rosa McDonald Jones and Father, Mr. Joseph Thomas







CHAPTER I


EARLY YEARS

In the Southern Section of Quincy, Florida known to its inhabitants at
that time by the name, "Spring Hill", the writer was born on a two-
acre tract of land including a small cottage which sheltered a family
of seven children, Viz: Sarah J., Rosa Lee, Hester B., Simon Peter,
Josephine, Allen Quinn, and Disney Theodore. The cottage in which
we lived was comfortable and was equipped with the necessary
conveniences of that era. It possessed two brick chimneys with
fireplaces for burning wood and hard coal which were the principal
fuels for heating. At a later date coal burning steel stoves were used
in the homes for heating and ironing. Previously, irons were heated in
the fireplace to do the ironing. The steel cooking range which burned
wood, occupied a prominent place in the kitchen for cooking food for
the family. Few foods were left over from day to day for there were
not any means for preserving food as is being done by moder-day
methods. Later ice boxes and containers which held factory
manufactured ice were utilized in a limited manner to preserve foods.
Water for the family's use was supplied from our thirty-foot piped
well lined with pipe twelve inches in diameter with a cylindrical metal
bucket attached to a rope and pulley for drawing the water therefrom.
Later a metal force pump replaced the well for getting water.

The family washing was done in wood tubs used to contain
water for that purpose. However, later the tin tub came into use.

My father led the family in daily prayer. My mother taught
me the following prayer which I have never forgotten:

"Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the
Lord my soul to keep
If I should die before I wake, I pray the
Lord my soul to take This I ask for Jesus
sake. Amen"

The writer was the sixth child born March 3, 1893. My
mother, Mrs. Rosa McDonald Jones and Father, Mr. Joseph Thomas






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Jones informed me that I was baptized when an infant in Arnett
Chapel A. M. E. Church, Quincy, Florida. All of my early years of
church attendance and Christian experience occurred at this church
and in June 1911, I confessed Christ as my savior and was received
into full membership by the Pastor, Reverend F. R. Doyle. My
church membership was transferred to Allen Chapel A. M. E. Church,
Pensacola, Florida, October, 1916 where it remained until I moved to
Gainesville, Florida, September, 1921, when I (we) became members
of Bethel A. M. E. Church where it still remains to the present time.

To see snow fall and to roll snowballs out in front of our home
on an early wintry morning was a phenomenon to me for this was
during my pre-school days. Not since then have I experienced similar
weather in Florida. The children in the family caught robins and other
specie of birds that became disabled by the tremendously cold
weather.

Some time during this spring, my parents talked about the
Spanish-American War which was in progress. The Seaboard Air
Line railroad was not more than a mile from where we lived. There
was an occasion when the children were carried to the depot where
we observed crowds of war recruits riding the train on their way to
camp in preparation for fighting in the war with Spain.

I remember the first school I attended. It was located at the
private home of Mrs. Annie Taylor and Miss Emma J. Wise, primary
grade teachers. Because these two teachers were sisters, very kind,
sympathetic, and motherly, I could never forget their love toward me
and my admiration for them. They had such a great interest [in] us
that I wanted to continue as one of my teachers after I had been
promoted to a higher grade.

My elder sister, Sarah, taught me the English alphabets and
the early beginnings to read. She was a teacher in Public School #1,
at Quincy and taught me in two or three of the intermediate grades in
this school. My sister was one of the three teachers, whose principal
was Prof. C. A. Whitfield, a graduate of the state school, Tallahassee.
My sister attended Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia during one
term.






Retrospections


Reverend Mr. D. S. Selmore and Mr. A. F. Long were
principals and taught me in the fifth and sixth grades respectively.
The school term was six months.

It was during the principalship of Prof. George T. McDaniel
that I completed grades seven and eight during two* school terms. The
school term was seven months. Mr. McDaniel was a recent graduate
of the State Normal School (now Fla. A. and M. College) when he
became principal. He recommended me and my friend and classmate,
James A. Broston, to President Nathan B. Young for entrance to the
first year high school class of the high school department of Fla. A.
and M. College.























IttA-- r ..4





4 1. ;. I t .sui.n a5-f1t- srkaol 7 tffendeed
_--jZ -- T_ _






Retrospections
The Quincy Public School was possibly about two miles from
our home. It was necessary to cross a branch known as the Ten-
Yard Creek", between home and the school. When it rained real hard
and long, it became almost impassable for one to cross the main
stream on two logs about twelve feet long, placed together over the
stream on which to walk. The water many times arose to a point
above the logs. One can imagine how fearful we became if it should
rain hard before school dismissed in the afternoon. My sister and I
were small children and many times no one accompanied us back
home from school. I am reminded of a boy, Tom Roby who rescued
his sister who fell from the logs into the surging waters as she was
carried down the stream. What an experience for young children.

Again, I recall the huge gorge about fifty feet deep and several
hundred feet long that we had to pass on our way to and from school,
unless we went the alternate longer route.


WORK EXPERIENCE

My mother's and father's tract of land adjoined the A. L.
WILSON Company tobacco field. After school closed in the Spring
of the year, I was employed by the manager of the tobacco farm to
carry water to the workers -- keeping their thirst quenched throughout
the five-day week period. I was eight years old. I was proud of this
opportunity to earn some money to the extent that after school closed
each year, employment awaited me to work at times in the tobacco
barns and warehouses which extended over a period of several years.
My wages increased each year as I became older. Some of my
employers from time to time over the years until I completed my high
school and college education were: A.L. WILSON Tobacco
Company, Bruce Tobacco Company and American, Sumatra Tobacco
Company.

I appreciated the opportunity to work and do something
because my mother encouraged me to remain on the job, save the
money that I would make to buy shoes, suits and other clothing in
preparation for the opening of school each year. It was a glorious
time for me each year when schools opened. There was another thing





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
that encouraged me greatly, viz: I was promised and given a suit by
the supervisor, if I were a smart water-boy at the end of the tobacco
season. Over these years, my wages ranged from $1.25 to $4.00 or
$5.00 weekly.

My parents were not able to send me off from home to
Tallahassee to school. However, because of their encouragement, I
saved enough money to cover all of my school expenses through the
first year of high school at the college. As a laundress, my mother
could scarcely be surpassed in the quality of her work. My father was
efficient as a gardener. Surprisingly, room, board, and laundry was
eight dollars monthly for the term of eight months or $64.00. My
brother Simon had completed a year at the college before my entrance
which was quite an encouragement to me in making adjustments to a
new environment. During those days, the distance from Quincy to
Tallahassee was twenty-four miles by rail only. I had ridden on the
train once the year before for the first tine. My going to Tallahassee
this beginning school year was my second ride on a train. My older
sister, Rosalee, entered Florida A. and M. the same year at the time
that I entered but the term was incomplete by death in the College
Hospital resulting from pneumonia. My brother, Simon, withdrew
from Fla. A. and M. after completing the high school course at the
close of my second year at the college. He worked for a year or more
as a Pulman Train Porter before entering Meharry Medical College to
study Dentistry in 1911, graduating June 1915 as a dentist. The writer
graduated the same year from Florida A. and M. College with the
Bachelor of Science Degree.

During my freshman, sophomore, junior and senior college
years, my profoundest appreciation went to Dr. N. B. Young,
President, who afforded work opportunity for me to take care of my
school expenses throughout these years. I was employed as a table
waiter, and an assistant in food service to both students and special
table waiter for the teachers. During the last two years in college, my
entire expense including room and board were taken care through the
work performed. Summer vacations found me returning home to a
job in tobacco barns and factory and the money earned therefrom took
care of all incidentals including books and other materials that were
needed. Thanks to a mother and father, although they were not






Retrospections
financially able to support me in going through college, they gave me
the maximum amount of encouragement to save money earned to help
myself.

My brother, Simon, attending Meharry Medical College, at the
same time that I was attending Fla. A. and M. would write me
frequent letters of encouragement to persevere and remain in school.
My sister, Sarah, although busy on the job as a teacher, found time to
write letters of encouragement. She and my sister, Hester, not only
wrote encouraging letters but also included in them, frequently,
stamps and some other needed money. A quarter at that time, had the
buying power of more than a dollar today.


OTHER COLLEGE EXPERIENCES

One experience was striking to me at the beginning of the first
semester of the first year at the college in October when all the
football aspirants for the varsity team were required to run two miles
on the campus before the morning, practice. Many of the boys fell
out on the run. I practiced but I did not make the team. Weight was
against me. The faculty coaches included Dean G. M. Sampson were
enthusiastic.

Over the years, I was a member of the Fla. A. and M. College
Chapter of the Y. M. C. A. The membership fee was twenty-five
cents a year. The Philomathean Literary Society whose membership
included all students of college status, met bi-monthly and rendered
programs.

The College Wits Club whose founder and organizer, Prof. E.
B. Jones, composed of college men, was a very active campus
organization. The club colors were black and gold, the forerunner of
the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity which had been organized and
founded at Cornell University in 1906. It was against the policy of
the college to permit fraternities and sororities.- The writer was one of
the first presidents of this club.






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
The following is quoted from The College Arms monthly
publication March 1915:

"Reflection reveals the fact that after
taking everything under consideration,
Mr. Jones as President, has done more
work with the Wits than any other
president. He has succeeded in having
more meetings and went as far as having
the "Wits" give a program in public
which the "Arms" hopes will be
repeated every year."

1914 and 1915 School Term

Members of the Philomathead Debating Society


Essie Robinson
James Reddick
Samuel Daniels
Quinn Jones
N.B. Young, Jr.
Irma Archer
Georgietta Mattox
Alma Rambo
Julia Eaverly
William Golden
E.E. Broughton
Sadye Hunter
Catherine Gardner
Frank Taylor
James Dixon
Albertina Edmonson
L. W. Black
Maggie Baker
Helen Chandler
Fred Martin
Emma Dawson
Eva Myers


Althea Nixon
James Armstrong
Oscar Lynch
Walter Hilyard
Ella Childs
Nellie Raulds
Robert P. Stewart
Norton Roberts
Lorenxa Richardson
Lesesne Howard
Marie Thomas
Estelle Bellamy
Grace Myers
Olive McCoy
Petrona Bonner
Maude Norton
Mattie Lewis
Samuel Holly
Marion McCall
Victor Postelle
Horace D. Goode
Benjamin Crutcher





Retrospections


TUCKER HALL --- ANNEX

The room in which I lived was typical of all the dormitory
rooms on the College campus. There were three cots in my room
during my first year. Three boys occupied the room including myself.
There was a closet in which to hang our clothing with a curtain at the
entrance. A wash stand on which was the water pitcher and wash
bowl, a soap dish, a rack to hang towels and wash cloths were there.
There was a mirror in the room. The mattress on the bed was filled
with cured rye grass which was sufficient for the term. One had to
supply his own bedding. There was a wood heater in each room. The
boys had to go to the wood yard to get their wood for heating
purposes. Electric light drop cord from the ceiling of the room
furnished light. This cord included a light bulb. There was a window
in each room unless it was a comer room. Bath shower facilities with
hot and cold water were located in the bath house between the two
dormitories, viz: Tucker Hall and Tucker Annex.

When I completed high school and entered the college
department, the college men were located near the North East
entrance to the college campus in the "The College Men's Cottage."
The surroundings were a little more improved and made us feel more
distinctive for we were more on our honor. Our rooms were kept in
order daily for they were inspected by a student representative from
the Dean of Men's Department.






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


Trud.1r EI& ii',ri'nrid 1: A F .CcIi, Fla
/ /-


' 4


BOYS' DORMATORY ------ 1915


Canlv-w


CARNEGIE LIBRARY






Retrospections


:,ihl Ifrll, Flnrida F. A. Sh. Collkgv, T.llahasee, PFla.
/r,- a'-


I...


I

Fir"~~


G Do.t.., A, .i


Girls' Dormitory, Assembly Chapel, and Dining


Ch.ir F. A. & O. CoUlege. TliJhBlsa e FIn.

Choir -------1915
Choir------1915


AM. It





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
CADET MILITARY ORGANIZATION

The young men of the college were organized into three cadet
military companies, in charge of a teacher commandant, Major W. H.
A. Howard. Each company was commanded by a cadet captain and
his fall complement of cadet officers selected from those students
who had most exemplary conduct and soldery bearing. I attained the
rank of second sergeant during high school. College students were
exempted from duty and military drills. Worthwhile traits of neatness,
punctuality, obedience, and healthy, manly bearing, a high regard for
law and order were engendered among the students. A course of
military calisthenics or gymnastics was given in the open air. A band
composed of young men of all departments using twenty instruments
formed the military band. I recall having had music instruction in
playing the comet, under Mr. Quintia Adderly. The student officers
under the commandant assisted in maintaining discipline among the
men students. They also assisted the college administration in the
enforcement of campus and dormitory regulations -- orderly well kept
rooms, corridors, wholesome and sanitary environment. Committees
or groups of young men assumed weekly turns in the care of
dormitory corridors, etc.


SOCIALS

Socials for the students were held monthly on the lawn of the
girls dormitory, Gibbs Hall. Young men were permitted to go to the
dormitory and ask to escort his girlfriend out on the campus for one
hour which was allotted to them by the Dean of Girls. Only girls that
were seventeen years old or older were permitted to participate in this
social hour. Young men were permitted to escort their girlfriends to
football games which were played on Saturdays in the afternoon.
Likewise, the same was true of baseball. Fla. A. and M. and
Tuskegee Institute baseball games stimulated a great amount of
college spirit and enthusiasm. I enjoyed playing tennis at times
during weekend leisure hours.





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
CADET MILITARY ORGANIZATION

The young men of the college were organized into three cadet
military companies, in charge of a teacher commandant, Major W. H.
A. Howard. Each company was commanded by a cadet captain and
his fall complement of cadet officers selected from those students
who had most exemplary conduct and soldery bearing. I attained the
rank of second sergeant during high school. College students were
exempted from duty and military drills. Worthwhile traits of neatness,
punctuality, obedience, and healthy, manly bearing, a high regard for
law and order were engendered among the students. A course of
military calisthenics or gymnastics was given in the open air. A band
composed of young men of all departments using twenty instruments
formed the military band. I recall having had music instruction in
playing the comet, under Mr. Quintia Adderly. The student officers
under the commandant assisted in maintaining discipline among the
men students. They also assisted the college administration in the
enforcement of campus and dormitory regulations -- orderly well kept
rooms, corridors, wholesome and sanitary environment. Committees
or groups of young men assumed weekly turns in the care of
dormitory corridors, etc.


SOCIALS

Socials for the students were held monthly on the lawn of the
girls dormitory, Gibbs Hall. Young men were permitted to go to the
dormitory and ask to escort his girlfriend out on the campus for one
hour which was allotted to them by the Dean of Girls. Only girls that
were seventeen years old or older were permitted to participate in this
social hour. Young men were permitted to escort their girlfriends to
football games which were played on Saturdays in the afternoon.
Likewise, the same was true of baseball. Fla. A. and M. and
Tuskegee Institute baseball games stimulated a great amount of
college spirit and enthusiasm. I enjoyed playing tennis at times
during weekend leisure hours.






Retrospections
CULTURAL PROGRAMS

There were programs given of a cultural nature during the
seven years that I attended Fla. A. and M. The following lectures or
sermons were given during my senior year:


October
1914
October 30


November 4


November 8

December 22


January 1, 1915


January 7


January 24

January 15

February 19


February 16

February 21,
1915
February 22

March 6


-- Rev. A. A. Hewett, Rector Episcopal Church,
Tallahassee, Florida....Sermon
-- History and Development of Human
Adornment-Miss R. O. Paige, Instructor of
Dress Making and Millinery
-- Recital Mrs. Martha Bradus Anderson,
Soloist Miss Cleo Mae Dickerson, Pianist
.....Chicago
-- Sermon: Rev. John A. Gregg, President of
Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, Florida
-- Lecture: The Challenge of Socialism, Prof.
John F. Matheus, Assistant Professor of Latin
and English
-- Emancipation Address Mr. S. H. Archer,
Professor of Mathematics, Morehouse College,
Atlanta, Ga.
-- Lecture: Hon. W.A. McRae, Commissioner of
Agriculture
State of Florida, Tallahassee
-- Sermon: Rev. Samuel Owens, Florida Baptist
Institute, Live Oak
-- Lecture: Mr. W. H. Tobias, International
Secretary of Y. M. C. A.
-- Lecture: The Negro Fifty Years Hence, Dr. M.
W. Gilbert, President of Selma University,
Alabama
-- Lecture: Dr. Brewer, Dean of Theology,
Talladega College, Talladega, Alabama
-- Sermon: Rev. S. H. Bamwell, Thomsville,
Georgia
-- Lecture: Sights and Scenes in the Old World,
Rev. H. H. Proctor, Atlanta, Georgia
-- Lecture: Prohibition, Dr. Ira Landreth, Flying








March 14


March 24

March 31

April 9, 10

April 11

April 16


Squadron, Nashville, Tenn.
-- Sermon: Rev. J. A. Brown, Bethel A. M. E.
Church
Tallahassee, Fla.
-- Lecture: Mrs. Carrie Steele, Social Worker,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
-- Lecture: Dr. Lymen, Secretary International
Sunday School Association, Chicago, Illinois
-- Lecture: Miss Josephine Pinyon, International
Secretary of Y.W.C.A.
-- Sermon: Mr. J. G. Riley, Principal of Lincoln
High School, Tallahassee, Fla.
-- Lecture: Dr. Oscar Dowling, President of
Louisiana State Board of Health.


The writer was a character in several Shakespearian plays
given during my junior and senior college years, viz: King Henry
VIII, Macbeth.

Opportunity was afforded high school students to appear
periodically on programs to which the public was invited. It was
quite an experience for me in my first appearance to give a
declamation entitled the "Tongue and the Sword." My English
teacher, Miss Helen James, did an excellent job in training a country
boy for a program of this kind, She was very sympathetic and patient
with me. I had appeared before this on programs and plays in our
public school but it seemed that my appearance or participation at
Florida, A. and M. was different for my complex was that the
audience would be more critical. However, I survived the shock.

On another program which I regarded important was my
appearance on the Senior Class Day exercise in which I gave the
Class Day Oration on the subject, "Abraham Lincoln."

At another time during my college days, I was privileged to
have witnessed a renowned violinist, the Grandson of Frederick
Douglass. Another program featured an outstanding soprano recital
by Mesdame Hackley. Also one by Mesdame Denby, and a baratone


A. Quinn Jones, Sr






Retrospections
recital by Saxton Whaley, a graduate of Florida A, and Y. College
were superb.

Sunday were just as busy with activities as the week days.
Noon day or mid-day chapel for devotion was attended by all students
while Sunday School followed by the regular eleven o'clock service
was a "Must." It was inspiring first of all to hear a message by Dr. N.
B. Young and Prof. E. B. Jones and at other times by other members
of the faculty or a visiting speaker. Weekly prayer meetings and
devotionals were held under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A.

It was during the 1914-1915 school term that Booker T.
Washington, the founder and President of Tuskegee Institute made an
historical appearance at the college when touring the South fulfilling
speaking engagements in several cities in Florida. President Young
called a special college assembly to honor and receive him and his
large delegation. This was the first opportunity afforded most of the
students to see and hear this distinguished educator speak. I regarded
this as being one rare occasion in my school career.

My college class in Geology, under Prof. L. E. Graves, made
trips to Lake Jackson about three or four miles from the college
campus, where we traversed parts of the lake to discover its depth, its
habitat, the nature of the soil, its probable origin, source of water
supply and its extent. It was novel for some of us since it was the first
experience riding in [a] row boat.

There were times when my class in Astronomy studied the
surface of the moon through the telescope during evenings when the
moon was visible.

Our instructor in Trigonometry taught me how to use the
transit or the Surveyor's instrument. There was one assignment given
me by my instructor, Prof. F. C. Johnson that I shall never forget. I
was required to draw a "Pipe Wrench Yoke", in [a] mechanical
drawing. I preserved this drawing for a long time for it was basic to
many other more difficult drawings. My free hand drawings were
numerous.






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


HIGH SCHOOL COURSES COMPLETED


1908-9
- First Year -


English
Algebra
Latin
Tailoring


1909-10
- Second Year -

English History
Latin Grammar
Plane Geometry
Botany
Drawing
Tailoring


1910-11
- Third Year -

Latin (Cicero)
Solid Geometry
Physics
Mechanical Drawing
Tailoring


COLLEGE COURSES COMPLETED


1911-12
- Freshman-


English

College Algebra
Latin (Virgil)
Biology


1912-13
- Sophomore -

English
(Argumentation)
Trigonometry
Chemistry
Latin Epodes of
Horace
Current Events


1913-14
- Junior -


Modern History

Chemistry
Geology
Astronomy
German


1914-15
- Senior


Psychology
Analytical Geometry


Advanced Physics
Chemistry
Economics






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


HIGH SCHOOL COURSES COMPLETED


1908-9
- First Year -


English
Algebra
Latin
Tailoring


1909-10
- Second Year -

English History
Latin Grammar
Plane Geometry
Botany
Drawing
Tailoring


1910-11
- Third Year -

Latin (Cicero)
Solid Geometry
Physics
Mechanical Drawing
Tailoring


COLLEGE COURSES COMPLETED


1911-12
- Freshman-


English

College Algebra
Latin (Virgil)
Biology


1912-13
- Sophomore -

English
(Argumentation)
Trigonometry
Chemistry
Latin Epodes of
Horace
Current Events


1913-14
- Junior -


Modern History

Chemistry
Geology
Astronomy
German


1914-15
- Senior


Psychology
Analytical Geometry


Advanced Physics
Chemistry
Economics





Retrospections


BACCALAUREATE SERVICE
May 23, 1915

Prelude ................ ........ ..... ....................... ....... Orchestra
Processional
Coronation
Invocation and Gloria
Anthem -- "Sons of Freedom" (Mundy)...........................Choir
Scripture Lesson
Prayer and Response
Anthem -- "Ethiopia" (Mundy) ........................................Choir
Baccalaureate Sermon ...................................................Rev. E. R.
Carter, Atlanta, Ga.
Solo .............................. .................................................... M iss E lla
Childs
Doxology
Benediction
Recessional


COMMENCEMENT DAY EXERCISES
May 27, 1915

Processional
College Song ...................................................................... School
Invocation
Chorus -- "M orning"...........................................................Choral
Union
Baccalaureate Address...................................................... Dr. C. V.
Roman, of
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn,
Chorus -- "A Perfect Day" (Bonds)..................................Choral
Union
Presentation of Diplomas and Conferring Degrees
Chorus -- Jubilee Songs
(a)
(b)
(c)





Retrospections


BACCALAUREATE SERVICE
May 23, 1915

Prelude ................ ........ ..... ....................... ....... Orchestra
Processional
Coronation
Invocation and Gloria
Anthem -- "Sons of Freedom" (Mundy)...........................Choir
Scripture Lesson
Prayer and Response
Anthem -- "Ethiopia" (Mundy) ........................................Choir
Baccalaureate Sermon ...................................................Rev. E. R.
Carter, Atlanta, Ga.
Solo .............................. .................................................... M iss E lla
Childs
Doxology
Benediction
Recessional


COMMENCEMENT DAY EXERCISES
May 27, 1915

Processional
College Song ...................................................................... School
Invocation
Chorus -- "M orning"...........................................................Choral
Union
Baccalaureate Address...................................................... Dr. C. V.
Roman, of
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn,
Chorus -- "A Perfect Day" (Bonds)..................................Choral
Union
Presentation of Diplomas and Conferring Degrees
Chorus -- Jubilee Songs
(a)
(b)
(c)






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
God Be W ith You .................................................... School


CLASS ROLL

Estelle Beatrice Bellamy, B.S.
Ocala, Florida
Allen Quinn Jones, B.S.
Quincy, Florida
Nathan Benjamin Young, Jr., B. S.
Tallahassee, Fla.


ENGLISH NORMAL CLASS

Petrona Cadace Bonner
Ocala, Florida
Ella Inez Childs
Gainesville, Florida
Mattie Evangeline Lewis
Tallahassee, Florida
Addie Blanche Masch
Pablo Beach, Florida
Olive Augustia McCoy
Fruitland Park, Florida
Grace Elizabeth Myers
Sanford, Florida
Maude Mable Norton
Tampa, Florida
Victor Leroy Postelle
Lake Park, Georgia
Claudine Louise Taylor
Tallahassee, Florida
Marie Margarette Thomas
Orlando, Florida
Ida Salina Wiggins
Roy, Florida






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
God Be W ith You .................................................... School


CLASS ROLL

Estelle Beatrice Bellamy, B.S.
Ocala, Florida
Allen Quinn Jones, B.S.
Quincy, Florida
Nathan Benjamin Young, Jr., B. S.
Tallahassee, Fla.


ENGLISH NORMAL CLASS

Petrona Cadace Bonner
Ocala, Florida
Ella Inez Childs
Gainesville, Florida
Mattie Evangeline Lewis
Tallahassee, Florida
Addie Blanche Masch
Pablo Beach, Florida
Olive Augustia McCoy
Fruitland Park, Florida
Grace Elizabeth Myers
Sanford, Florida
Maude Mable Norton
Tampa, Florida
Victor Leroy Postelle
Lake Park, Georgia
Claudine Louise Taylor
Tallahassee, Florida
Marie Margarette Thomas
Orlando, Florida
Ida Salina Wiggins
Roy, Florida






Retrospections


College Class Motto: "Finis Nondum Est"
Class Colors: Blue and Maize; Flower Violet



English Normal Class Motto: "Upward and On."
Class Colors: Crimson and Gray; Flower American Beauty Rose



COLLEGE CLASS OFFICERS

A. Quinn Jones, President
N. B. Young, Jr., Secretary
Estelle B. Bellamy, Treasurer

ENGLISH NORMAL CLASS OFFICERS

Victor L. Postelle, President
Maude M. Norton, Secretary
Olive A. McCoy, Treasurer

By referring to the outline of courses and curricula that I
pursued toward graduation, were strictly academic. It is interesting to
me when I compare the marking system used then based on the scale
50 to 100 and the system of letters used ten years later which were
based on the letter, A, B, C, D, or F (fail). The mark 60 to 100 were
passing grades, while 50 to 59 percent were conditional passing
marks.

There was quite a contrast in my graduation from college in
1915 and that of the present time, fifty-two years afterward.

I rented a used cap and gown for graduation ceremonies for
less than two dollars. I did not have the money to buy new shoes and
other accessories for graduation as is done for and by members of
graduating classes today. I ordered five invitations for graduation. I






Retrospections


College Class Motto: "Finis Nondum Est"
Class Colors: Blue and Maize; Flower Violet



English Normal Class Motto: "Upward and On."
Class Colors: Crimson and Gray; Flower American Beauty Rose



COLLEGE CLASS OFFICERS

A. Quinn Jones, President
N. B. Young, Jr., Secretary
Estelle B. Bellamy, Treasurer

ENGLISH NORMAL CLASS OFFICERS

Victor L. Postelle, President
Maude M. Norton, Secretary
Olive A. McCoy, Treasurer

By referring to the outline of courses and curricula that I
pursued toward graduation, were strictly academic. It is interesting to
me when I compare the marking system used then based on the scale
50 to 100 and the system of letters used ten years later which were
based on the letter, A, B, C, D, or F (fail). The mark 60 to 100 were
passing grades, while 50 to 59 percent were conditional passing
marks.

There was quite a contrast in my graduation from college in
1915 and that of the present time, fifty-two years afterward.

I rented a used cap and gown for graduation ceremonies for
less than two dollars. I did not have the money to buy new shoes and
other accessories for graduation as is done for and by members of
graduating classes today. I ordered five invitations for graduation. I





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
kept one invitation for my record and sent the other four home to
mother and father and other members of the family. The one
invitation is in possession of the writer after these many years in a
scrap book. Along with this one invitation, it is also interesting to
observe my individual graduation picture in cap and gown and a class
picture.

In order to qualify for teaching in Florida schools, applicants
were required to take the State Uniform Teachers Examination and
secure a first, second or third grade teacher's certificate. I had taken
the examination June 1913, two years before graduating from college,
made a third grade certificate good for two years but was never used.

June following my graduation, I secured by examination a
second grade teacher's certificate valid for three years.

Since the writer graduated from the Florida A. and M. College
June 1915, indicates that he made satisfactory grades or marks
throughout his school career at the college. I am reluctant to relate
whether there was anything outstanding in his college career or not.
However, the F.A.M.C. General Alumni Association at the
commencement exercise presented him an award of ten dollars in
gold for maintaining the highest scholarship among the graduates or
the ranking student graduate. I had a profound appreciation for this
worthy prize because at the moment, I was undecided where I would
get ten dollars to pay the purchase price for my diploma and having it
signed and executed by President N. B. Young and Dean John C.
Wright. I gave the gold coin I had just received to have the diploma
executed.

I received two other graduation gifts which I appreciated
immeasurably: one a small pocket-size new testament Bible from the
teachers whom I served meals daily in the dining room, and the other
a booklet of choice quotations by Booker T. Washington from Miss
M. E. Melvin, Dean of Women. I read selections from the Holy
Scripture from this bible for many years to the children in school
assemblies. The favorite selection was the thirteenth chapter of First
Corinthians.





Retrospections
I quote the first and the last Daily Resolve from the Booker T.
Washington Booklet:

Resolve to live up to the high water mark of daily duty.
Whoever does this will meet with constant and unexpected
happiness and encouragement.

Resolve daily to realize that the surest way to lift up ourselves
is to lift up someone else.







A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


TABLE
YEARS OF TEACHING EXPERIENCE


YEAR MONTHS

1915 July, Aug.,
Sept.
1916 Oct., Nov.,
Dec., January


SCHOOLS AND
POSITION

Sawdust School
Prin., Teacher
Pri., Teacher
Marianna School


COUNTY &
NO. OF
TEACHERS

Gadsden
1 Teacher
5 Teachers


GRADES
IN
SCHOOL

I to 8

1 to 10


GROSS
SALARY

$66.00

$100.00


2 1916 July, Aug. Sawdust School Gadsden 1 to 8 $44.00
1 Teacher
1917 Sept., Oct, Prin. of School # Escambia 1 to 4 315.00
Nov., Dec., 44 Pensacola 5 Teachers
Jan., Feb.,
March
3 1917 July, Aug. & Roy, Florida Prin., Liberty Co. I to 9 $75.00
Sept. Teacher Grades 4 Teachers
7,8,9
1918 Oct., Nov., Roy, Florida Prin., 5 Teachers 1 to 4 315.00
Dec., Jan., Teacher Grades
Feb., & 7,8,9 Prin.,
March Teacher School #
44 Pensacola
4 1918 Oct., Nov., Prin., Teacher Escambia Co. 5 to 12 $680.00
1919 Dec., Jan., High Sch. # 3 9 Teachers
Feb., Mar., Pensacola Taught: Eng.,
April & May Math., Sci.
5 1919 Oct., Nov., Teaching Prin. Escambia Co. 5 to 12 680.00
1920 Dec., Jan., High Sch. # 3, 9 Teachers
Feb., Mar., Pensacola Taught: Eng.,
April & May Math., Sci.
6 1920 Oct., Nov., Assist. Prin. Escambia Co. 5 to 12 720.00
1921 Dec., Jan., Washington H.S. # Nine Teachers
Feb., Mar., 3, Pensacola Taught: Eng.,
April & May Math., Sci.
7 1921 8 Months Union Academy Alachua I to 9 $1,000.00
1922 Gainesville, Fla. County
Teaching- 11 Teachers
Principal Taught:
Latin, Math.,
Science
8 1922 8 Months Union Academy Alachua 1 to 9 $1,000.00
1923 8 Months Gainesville, Fla. County
Teaching-Prin. 11 Teachers
Taught: Latin,
Math. Science
1923 June, July, Teaching-Princ. Alachua I to 8 $180.00
August Arredonda School County
Taught: Grades 5 3 Teachers
to 8
9 1923 8 Months Principal of Alachua 1 to 11 $1,160.00
1924 Lincoln High County
School Gainesville











No. YEAR MONTHS


SCHOOLS AND
POSITION


COUNTY &
NO. OF
TEACHERS


Retrospections
GRADES
IN GROSS
SCHOOL SALARY


Taught: Latin,
Math., Science
10 1924 June, July, Prin., Teacher Alachua 1 to 8 $180.00
August Arredonda School County
Taught: Grades 5 3 Teachers
to 8
1925 8 Months Principal of Alachua 1 to 12 $1,200.00
Lincoln High County.
School Gainesville
Taught: Latin,
Math., Science
11 1925 8 Months Principal of Alachua 1 to 12 $1,200.00
1926 Lincoln High County
School Gainesville
Taught: Latin,
Math., Science
12 1926 8 Months Principal of Alachua 1 to 12 $1,200.00
1927 Lincoln High County
School Gainesville
Taught: Latin,
Math., Science.
13 1927- July, August, Arredonda School Alachua Grades 1 $195.00
June Prin., Teacher County to 8
Taught: Grades 5 3 Teachers
to 8
1928 8 Months Principal of Alachua Grades 1 $1,120.00
Lincoln High County to 12
School Gainesville
Taught: Latin,
Math., Science
14 1928- June, July, Arredonda School Alachua 1 to 8 $195.00
August Prin., Teacher County
Taught: Grades 5 Gainesville
to 8
1929 8 Months Prin. of Lincoln Alachua 1 to 12 $1,120.00
High School County,
Taught: Latin, Gainesville
Math., Science
15 1929- 8 Months Lincoln H.S. Grades in 1-12 $1,240.00
30 Principal Latin, School:
Math, Eng., Alachua
Science County
16 1930- 8 Months Principal Alachua 1 to 12 $1,160.00
31 Taught: Math. County
17 1931- 8 Months Principal Alachua 1 to 12 $1,160.00
32 Taught: Math. County
18 1932- 8 Months Principal Alachua 1 to 12 $800.00
33 Taught: Latin County
19 1933- 8 Months Latin Alachua 1 to 12 $800.00
34
20 1934- 8 Latin Alachua 1 to 12 $800.00
35
21 1935- 8 Latin Alachua 1 to 12 $1,000.00







A. Quinn Jones, Sr.



No. YEAR MONTHS


SCHOOLS AND
POSITION


36
22 1936- 8 Latin & Gen. Sc. Alachua 1 to 12 $1,250.00
37
23 1937- 8 Gen. Science Alachua 1 to 12 $1,250.00
38
24 1938- 8 Gen. Science Alachua 1 to 12 $1,275.00
39
25 1939- 8 Lincoln Principal 1 to 12 $1,250.00
40 Taught: Science
26 1940- 8 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $1,250.00
41 Taught: Eng. 12
Science 9
27 1941- 8 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $1,350.00
42 Taught: Sc. 9 Eng.
12
28 1942- 8 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $1,500.00
43 Taught: None
29 1943- 9 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $1,650.00
44 Taught: None
30 1944- 9 Lincoln Prin. 1 to 12 $1,650.00
45 Taught: None
31 1945- 9 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $2,000.00
46 Taught: None
32 1946- 9 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $2,250.00
47 Taught: None
33 1947- 10 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $3,600.00
48 Taught: None
34 1948- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $3,800.00
49 Taught: None
35 1949- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $4,000.00
50 Taught: None
36 1950- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $4,000.00
51 Taught: None
37 1951- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $4,200.00
52 Taught: None
38 1952- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $4,560.00
53 Taught: None
39 1953- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $6,000.00
54 Taught: None
40 1954- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $6,185.00
55 Taught: None
41 1955- 12 Lincoln Prin. I to 12 $6,385.00
56 Taught: None
42 1956- 12 Lincoln Prin. 7 to 12 $6,585.00
57 Taught: None


COUNTY &
NO. OF
TEACHERS


GRADES
IN
SCHOOL


GROSS
SALARY


Read table hus: The first year, 1915-16 teaching was done at the Sawdust one-teacher school in
Gadsden County, grades 1 to 8, and Principal-teacher of the Marianna School, five teachers, grades I to
10 at a gross salary of $66 and $100.
Taught during the months of July, August, September, October, November, December, January.


. r







CHAPTER II


TEACHING IMMEDIATELY AFTER GRADUATION

My first teaching experience and school employment
following graduation May 27, 1915 was done July, August, and
September in the one-room school "Sawdust" in Gadsden County. It
was located a distance of about seven or nine miles from Quincy. My
gross annual salary was $66. School classes were held in the Negro
church in this community. It required about two hours by horse and
wagon or buggy from Quincy to reach the school. I was housed and
boarded at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Goodson who were progressive
farmers and also parents of the school. My room and board was five
dollars a month. My stay with them was most enjoyable for
opportunity was afforded me to ride horses which they owned for
farming and at times riding in wagon on weekend trips back home to
Quincy. The Goodsons' produced a diversity of farm crops including
the cultivation of tobacco. They produced about everything that any
farmer did during that period: poultry, turkeys, pork, cattle, dairy
products, truck farming as well as staple farm products.

Picture one teaching children entering the first grade or school
for the first time along with a total number of twenty-five children in
grades one up through grade eight all seated in a one-room church
building without desks on which to write or place their books. The
school day began at 8:30 A. M. with a ten-minute recess before noon.
A noon period of one hour and closing the day at 3:00 P.M. Brief
devotional periods were held daily including the singing of familiar
songs, reading scripture selections from the Bible without any
comment to comply with the school law. Friday afternoon periods
near the end of the day, literary programs of some kind were given,
involving songs, recitations, spelling matches, etc.

The school curriculum consisted of handwriting, reading in the
first, second, third, fourth, fifth, on up through the eighth grade.
Pupils were taught from the Baldwin Series of Readers. Spelling was
taught. Primary children were taught numbers while children in
grades four to eight were taught arithmetic from the Milnes' series of
arithmetic textbooks. Geography, history, hygiene and physiology







CHAPTER II


TEACHING IMMEDIATELY AFTER GRADUATION

My first teaching experience and school employment
following graduation May 27, 1915 was done July, August, and
September in the one-room school "Sawdust" in Gadsden County. It
was located a distance of about seven or nine miles from Quincy. My
gross annual salary was $66. School classes were held in the Negro
church in this community. It required about two hours by horse and
wagon or buggy from Quincy to reach the school. I was housed and
boarded at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Goodson who were progressive
farmers and also parents of the school. My room and board was five
dollars a month. My stay with them was most enjoyable for
opportunity was afforded me to ride horses which they owned for
farming and at times riding in wagon on weekend trips back home to
Quincy. The Goodsons' produced a diversity of farm crops including
the cultivation of tobacco. They produced about everything that any
farmer did during that period: poultry, turkeys, pork, cattle, dairy
products, truck farming as well as staple farm products.

Picture one teaching children entering the first grade or school
for the first time along with a total number of twenty-five children in
grades one up through grade eight all seated in a one-room church
building without desks on which to write or place their books. The
school day began at 8:30 A. M. with a ten-minute recess before noon.
A noon period of one hour and closing the day at 3:00 P.M. Brief
devotional periods were held daily including the singing of familiar
songs, reading scripture selections from the Bible without any
comment to comply with the school law. Friday afternoon periods
near the end of the day, literary programs of some kind were given,
involving songs, recitations, spelling matches, etc.

The school curriculum consisted of handwriting, reading in the
first, second, third, fourth, fifth, on up through the eighth grade.
Pupils were taught from the Baldwin Series of Readers. Spelling was
taught. Primary children were taught numbers while children in
grades four to eight were taught arithmetic from the Milnes' series of
arithmetic textbooks. Geography, history, hygiene and physiology






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
were taught the upper grammar grade pupils from the adopted
textbooks in use at that time. Many of the children's parent were not
able to buy books for their children since free textbooks were not
furnished. One inadequate wood blackboard supplied for use.
Dimes, nickels and pennies were collected from the children to buy
white chalk for blackboard use. There were no brooms for sweeping
the church daily after school but instead of brooms the green foliage
from a wild weed which grew out around the church in the woods or
forest were collected and used to sweep the church. Children brought
their lunches with them from their homes in buckets and paper bags.
A water bucket and dipper were supplied for drinking water. Each
child brought his glass or drinking cup with him for his individual use
in getting water. There was no source of water on the grounds,
however, water was supplied from the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Goodson not too far from the church. There were separate outdoor
privies for boys and girls. To comply with the state school laws, the
county board of public instruction permitted communities where
schools were located to elect from their local citizens some man to
serve as supervisor of the school. It was through him that the county
superintendent of public instruction communicated with the parents of
the school community. Again, the law provided for the election of
trustees to serve or have general oversight of school property in each
school district in the county if the county owned any school building
or other school property. The county owned very little property
during those years.

At the close of this three-month school term, I was appointed
as a teacher-principal of the city public school at Marianna, Florida,
the county site of Jackson County. This was a five-teacher school
including the principal which was housed in a dilapidated school
building containing rough home-made desks, very little play space,
out-of-doors water pump for water supply, separate outdoor toilets for
boys and girls. The building was heated during cold weather by
means of wood heaters. Pupils supplied their individual drinking cups
or glasses for drinking water supplied in two or three gallon tin
buckets with a dipper in each of the five rooms.

Pennies, nickels and dimes were collected from the children to
buy chalk for the black board, for purchasing brooms for sweeping





Retrospections
the floor, and buying wood fuel for the heaters. A water pump was
located on the grounds.

The teaching load was as follows: one teacher taught first and
second grades; a second teacher taught third and fourth grades; a third
teacher taught fourth and fifth grades; a fourth teacher taught fifth and
sixth grades; and the principal taught eighth, ninth or tenth grade
pupils.

The subjects taught in this school were about the same as
those taught in the previous school. The daily, weekly, and monthly
activities were also similar. Monthly report cards were given pupils
to indicate their progress; however, there was not sufficient progress
to warrant or justify graduation exercises.

The deportment and general conduct of children were far
superior to that of children today. The school laws of Florida at that
time permitted corporal punishment for pupil's improper conduct but
it was to be reasonable. I did not experience grave cases of pupil bad
behavior.

However, the minor cases were adjusted by reprimands and
other means and measures at the school, viz: retention after school
hours, reports to parents, suspension from school up to five days were
permissible for serious cases of misconduct.

It was my ambition to continue to further improve my
education after graduating from college. My classmate, Nathan B.
Young, Jr., was given the opportunity by his father, Dr. Nathan B.
Young, President to enter immediately the Yale University School of
Law where he graduated with the LL.B. degree three years later in
1918. He immediately began the practice of law in St, Louis, Mo.
where he resides to this date.

Lack of financial support retarded me in my desire to study to
become a Doctor of Medicine at Meharry Medical College, hence I
continued in the field of education.





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Through Extension Study, I was awarded the M. A. Degree in
the year 1920 from Oskaloosa College, Iowa, in the field of English,
Psychology and Philosophy.

When I was principal of the Marianna School, I became a
member of NAACP and was recommended by Dr. N.B. Young,
President of Fla. A. and M. College, to the National office to become
the agent of the Crisis, the official monthly magazine published by the
NAACP. I served a small number of subscribers to the magazine in
the Marianna area. I continued to renew my membership in this
organization when I changed my teaching service to Pensacola,
Florida. This city boasted a strong chapter of the NAACP at that time
and through the invitation of this local chapter, the Negro community
was honored by the visit and the address of Dr. W. E. B. Dubois, the
Editor of the Crisis Magazine, and the Executive Secretary of the
Association from the home office in New York City.

I was secretary of the Southern Protective Association,
organized by Reverend C. A. Whitfield, pastor of Allen Chapel A. M.
E. Church and the president, This was a city-wide general welfare
organization. This was during World War I, when the community
was experiencing many pathological conditions, racial and otherwise
that needed the attention of the organization. I was not given any
financial consideration for my service as secretary, but I remember
there was the sentiment of some of the members of this organization
to want to do something as a gesture of appreciation for my service.
Hence, a motion was made and carried to the effect that this body
donate to me $50.00 to help me attend University of Chicago Summer
school during the approaching Summer quarter of 1919. I appreciated
this donation, however, I could not supplement this amount with
sufficient funds to follow through with going to summer school as
badly as I desired to attend.

The Summer of 1916 lured me back to the Sawdust School for
two months service and in the meantime, I was appointed as principal
and teacher of School 44, Pensacola, Florida where I served during
the regular 1916-17 winter term for another seven months from
September through the month of March.





Retrospections
The chart further reveals that I was principal-teacher of the
Public School at Roy, Florida during July and August, after which, I
returned to Pensacola-where I continued to serve for seven more
months at School 44 from October through the month of April, 1917-
1918.

It might be of interest to state that my sister, Mrs. Sarah J.
Bennett, who lived in Liberty county and had. been there for several
years, along with Miss Ida Wiggins, a native of the town and a recent
graduate and classmate of mine, were my assistant teachers.

Teachers like the children and their parents are always eager
for vacation days to end and schools to open for their children.
Possibly it is more peaceful at home when the children are absent for
several hours daily. Furthermore, teachers must be able to live or
have a livelihood. Incidentally, Negro teachers received less salary
than white teachers and Negro children shorter school terms than
white children. This situation changed during the fifties.

There are several important anniversaries in the life of an
individual and marriage is one of them. During my tenure as
principal-teacher of School 44, Pensacola, Florida, which had a
faculty of five teachers including the principal, one of whom taught a
class of primary children and served as the pianist for the school for
all occasions. She demonstrated her ability as a teacher and was
recognized as one of the better teachers of Escambia County, at that
time she also served in the community as the Pianist of the Zion A.
M. E. Church. This teacher was Miss Agnes Marion Smith. On
January 2, 1918, we were joined in wedlock and her name changed to
Mrs. Agnes Marion Jones.

She was not only musical but she possessed an unusual talent
and training as an elocutionist, having been trained under Mesdame
DesVerney. She played leading roles in Shakespearian plays during
Summer school at Florida A. and M. College.

Even though she was not a member of the faculty of the high
school at Pensacola, she volunteered her service to train the senior
class in the presentation of their graduation speeches, which volunteer






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
service was continued for the Lincoln High School graduating classes
of 1925,1926, and 1927, the account of which is mentioned in the
next chapter of this production. *

The 1918-19 school term began with my appointment to the
principalship of Public School 3, Pensacola, Florida, where I taught
English, Mathematics, and science in the senior high school trades
assisted by eight other teachers from grades five through ten. My
appointment as principal followed the previous principal, Prof. L. A.
Kirksey, who had served for several years.

Being a very young man, it was whispered that I was
assuming quite a difficult task in accepting the responsibility as the
principal of this school. I was principal for two years, after which I
became the assistant principal the third year when the county school
board upon the recommendation of the Trustee Board, decided to add
$40.00 to the salary making the gross salary $720.00 and set the gross
salary of the new principal at $1,000. It was not unusual for a
segment of the parents and the Negro Supervisor to register
complaints to the County Superintendent and the Board against the
principal in the management of the school and thus brought influence
to the Trustee Board in deciding on a new principal to supersede me
as principal. Under my two-year tenure as principal and because of
some improvements in the high school curriculum, instruction,
organization and science equipment, the seniors who graduated were
accepted in the freshman class not only at Florida A. and M. College
but Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee upon the submission of a
transcript of their high school credits including the recommendation
of the principal. Along with these requirements the applicants for
admission to Fisk University were also to present physics notebooks
showing that each applicant had performed in class with the approval
of the principal the required number of experiments. Comments from
some of the parents of the seniors whose children entered Fisk
thought this was a significant advancement. With the new salary and
the new principal in the 1920-21 school term, came the change in the
name of the school from School #3 to Washington High School,
Pensacola, Florida. The school had nine teachers including the
principal and about 300 pupils. The grades in the school were from





Retrospections
five through twelve. Six of the teachers taught pupils in grades five
through eight.

The two years as principal of the high school afforded me with
valuable teaching experience and insight into what one might expect
in a position of leadership in education in a community, the
perplexing situation in controls among pupils and cooperation from
teachers in the school and the parents who were more directly
concerned about the education of their children.






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
There is one memento that I have among the gifts in my
possession which was presented to me at the high school graduation
class night exercise by the seniors of that 1920 class, was a sterling
silver shaving mug. The following are the names of the seniors on the
card which accompanied the gift:

TO
Prof. A. QUINN JONES
COMPLIMENTS
OF
P. H. S. CLASS 1920

Mary Ellen Powerll
Janice Williams
J. Modest Thomas
Ruby James
Emma Hoffman
Janice DeVaughn
Viola Frear
Gladys Kelly

I cherish the memories and the small contribution that the recipient
made toward the advancement and the beginning of their educational
career.





Retrospections
REGISTRATION WITH BOARD

I was a Junior attending school at Florida A. and M. College
when war began July 28, 1914 involving, twenty-nine nations. Many
of the young men who were my schoolmates volunteered to enlist in
the armed service of the United States. Some joined or enlisted in the
army while others entered the U. S. Officers Training School, for the
Government was in the process of increasing the number of men in
the army. War was declared against Germany April 6, 1917. All men
between the ages of 21 to 31 were required to register in preparation
for conscription in the armed forces. I registered with my Draft Board
a short time after my graduation from college. I was classified in
class 1A since I had no dependents. There were tense moments after I
received my classification which one was to carry with him wherever
he went. Those with 1A classification were the first ones to be called
for induction. Before I was called, however, I became married hence
the Draft Board re-classified me and I was placed in class II. The
sentiment at that time was that every man was to be a producer,
preferably employed in production essential to the war effort. There
was not any excuse for unemployment for the shipyards in Pensacola,
Florida where I was teaching could use all the available man power in
building steel ships for the government. After my school closed the
April of 1918, I secured employment with the Pensacola Shipbuilding
Co. at Warrington, Florida located on the Gulf of Mexico about
fifteen miles from Pensacola. The electric trolley car lines were in
use for transportation. Thousands of men worked at this plant
performing varieties of labor in building these ships. Several ships
were under construction at a time. I was a bolter for I did nothing else
but that. Some men were riveters for they used powerful electric air
hammers for doing this job. It was necessary that they be in good
physical condition for this kind of work. Others were electricians,
plumbers, carpenters, etc. Incidentally, the pay was much better than
that of the teacher at that time. I worked on the job throughout the
Summer until the opening of High School #3 in September 1918. On
November the eleventh the Armistice was declared and the fighting
ceased.







A. Quinn Jones, Sr.









OLD GAmESILLE ALBeM

^ U~b iiiiuiipifliiiii~iiiun ii~iwiiii~a iii~mniiiiii~~ii~ia ii~ngii~iiiii~iflimniiimnniuiii~iiiuin~ininiiii


is? .9

4.r


:-.t 9~


(;aiuefville's Fr
This hoadsome bllildinc, ,nIi Norlhbee in flen-e hhnowinl In
Its er lscnit.ore. v, the cetnlr or \irr> erldur.iss.n in
Galnesiille lor mint YFlr. pndl auhn It ,rAs bailh, It t9' the
retller of mucn reolminl In tIhe ir.sn II aou callI Ihe iUnion
Arademy. nnd Ir-r many )ears funEliloned ti a srlared schnI at
Norlhwrecl lt Streei at 7th %ienos vear Indar's Carver
Branch Libran. Rperrds hSlw thbr stbcl.I ans baili I.' rie
L'niII Stais Goi reriimep shhrl alter t e end .f Lw Ci hll
War, and car suppntrid by a u(lrihiitlin frnnm NIorthrn Iriend..
the G(iorli Pahildy Fued ard the Bit.irri of Publhi Inlltrllion.
Eteln iltlr intsmflrtrui-tn. It refelstd r.etlrburllr front the
North, and it I1 sak l tiaiohrs, erep thler paid than Ihnre In
'hlle seemlel. The .,hrlwl' yetir wie longer Lte in t Ihr Hile
scheold. At Ihe time it nao insilt, reasnElmrpl abolu dcilcast~i
for cilndred tldrneni wna trying. Tir merly ltrjelrs. Hanie
HareR and C(ntfreriBe teso, Wrt sft to a Irtead In 1J that white


eemen's School
hn)q tometimej thrsw "rariilsM kinds i misliksl into onr slsol
rmm. In mome casC tilmlng dfllhratlsv at tlhe 1eachr and
'smrlimre hillilr them." In prlt. tie rrtniimrntl preollnhil
Illlnr'rd Ihim the i (ll War. dui. In Ifir nue l ttrlthoks In all
schrsnl w-hich eare btravfll proe-Norlbern. Cf(nr.e in the ochel
aere nfiered fur Ipeval from elnientan'r lbrligh high Arhlol,
aesd In It4. a rarnal department was 5fdrrd 1 Ii ioln tiEader
f(Sr Firrildt schnnLs. The balidlng, ariginalel drEignd fit ir0
ldflnlit, had IT7. -he II opened, and in IllS sq iewrided illh
mnrr than nfil srud'eno. a oldiiinnin n therr days allied
ocrreardiig. ddildenu wt r made in III rhishkb brlpd lhr
s. hnol irrtinlandale IL stiudrtl, hut t i as reported h a smnlll
aials li Iin l. When LInraln Sichnal was bull in IS, some of
the crowding 'na eased. Thi vinlnnge plb'agreph is from lte
Floridn Stae Minsanun college Uin.
















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LJNIVJ'J. 0:

AlI -* l *-. .







CHAPTER III


EXPERIENCES TEACHING IN ALACHUA COUNTY

The incidents mentioned in the preceding CHAPTER leading
to a change in the principal at Pensacola influenced me to accept the
principalship of Union Academy, Gainesville, Florida, Alachua,
County for the 1921-1922 winter school term of eight months at a
salary of $1,000. It may be seen on my YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
TEACHING CHART, that my tenure as a teacher in Alachua County
and Gainesville, extended over a period of thirty-six years.

This is a copy of a letter to Dr. N. B. Young, President of
Florida A. and M. College from Mr. Benj. F. Childs, a member of the
Trustee Board of Union Academy seeking the recommendation of
someone for the principalship of the school:

Gainesville, Florida, May 23, 1921
Mr. N. B. Young
Tallahassee, Fla.

Dear Sir:
Please put me in touch with a real Red-Blooded man for the
principalship of Union Academy. No one knows better than you the
type of man we are seeking.

The salary last year for the principal was $125.00 per month.
We had fourteen teachers and an eight month's term.

There is also a chance to place his wife at a salary of from
$50.00 to $75.00 per month.

Be careful to have all communications relative to the above
addressed to me, as our trustees prefer to have first hand information
in this matter.
Yours Very Truly,

Benj. F. Childs







CHAPTER III


EXPERIENCES TEACHING IN ALACHUA COUNTY

The incidents mentioned in the preceding CHAPTER leading
to a change in the principal at Pensacola influenced me to accept the
principalship of Union Academy, Gainesville, Florida, Alachua,
County for the 1921-1922 winter school term of eight months at a
salary of $1,000. It may be seen on my YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
TEACHING CHART, that my tenure as a teacher in Alachua County
and Gainesville, extended over a period of thirty-six years.

This is a copy of a letter to Dr. N. B. Young, President of
Florida A. and M. College from Mr. Benj. F. Childs, a member of the
Trustee Board of Union Academy seeking the recommendation of
someone for the principalship of the school:

Gainesville, Florida, May 23, 1921
Mr. N. B. Young
Tallahassee, Fla.

Dear Sir:
Please put me in touch with a real Red-Blooded man for the
principalship of Union Academy. No one knows better than you the
type of man we are seeking.

The salary last year for the principal was $125.00 per month.
We had fourteen teachers and an eight month's term.

There is also a chance to place his wife at a salary of from
$50.00 to $75.00 per month.

Be careful to have all communications relative to the above
addressed to me, as our trustees prefer to have first hand information
in this matter.
Yours Very Truly,

Benj. F. Childs





Retrospections
The following is a reply to the above letter:

May 25, 1921

Mr. B. F. Childs
Gainesville, Florida

My Dear Mr. Childs:

I think Mr. Quinn Jones, Assistant Principal of the Pensacola
High School, who once served as Principal of the same school, a good
man for your Union Academy. He is a college graduate of this
institution and has considerable experience in teaching and a man of
excellent character. His wife, also is a teacher, or rather has had
teaching experience. I am asking him to take up the matter with you
if interesting to him.

In the meantime, I will be looking out for another man in the
event Mr. Jones is not available. Hoping to be of service to you in the
matter, and with kindest regards, I am

N. B. Young
President

On June 18, 1921, I filed a letter of application with the
Alachua County Board of Public Instruction for the Principalship of
Union Academy.

On July 8, 1921, a letter from the Trustees of Union Academy
to the Alachua County School Board recommended me for
appointment as principal. The letter of recommendation was signed
by the following:

A. J. Parker
Benj. F. Childs.
D. S. Rays
S. H. Hendley
E. Martin
G. W. Perkins





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
John W. Gass, Secretary
R. B. Ayer, Chairman

The Alachua County School Board in session on the above
date (July 8) made the appointment.

Mrs. Jones, the two baby boys, and I arrived in Gainesville,
August 30, 1921 on the T. and J. train. We were transferred from the
Seaboard Air Line train at Lake City, Florida. The train station for
the T. and J. was located at the intersection of West University
Avenue and Sixth Street where the Trailway Bus Station is located. It
was a rugged ride from Lake City to Gainesville. We made our abode
at the home of Mrs. Debose, the mother of one of the pioneer teachers
in the school, Mrs. Mamie E. Bryant. Later in the term, we were
housed at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Hendley, Sr. where we
lived for several terms, following that, we lived at the home of Mrs.
Bellamy, Mother Mrs. Lucile DeBose, on Boundary Street (now N.W.
Eighth Avenue) until November 1925 when we moved to the present
location 1123 West Columbia Street (Now 1013 N.W. Seventh
Avenue).

Entering upon my new assignment as the principal I found the
community under the leadership of the Trustees of the school
involved in an organized effort to raise $1,600 to insure that the
school term might be eight months for the Alachua County Board had
only appropriated sufficient county tax monies to pay the teachers for
six months. The city was divided into districts and solicitors covered
the districts weekly and made weekly financial reports on collections
at the school each Sunday afternoon during the school term. The
teachers sold sandwiches during lunch hour at school along with
concerts, plays, fish fries, etc. to augment the collections. The effort
was spearheaded by members of the Trustee Board of the School, viz:

Dr. R. B. Ayer, Chairman
Mr. D. S. Rays
Mr. Benj. F. Childs
Mr. G. W. Perkins
Mr. E. Martin
Mr. John W. Gass






Retrospections
Mr. A. J. Parker
M. S. H. Hendley, Jr.

The combined effort of the patrons and citizens insured
sufficient funds, $1,600, for the school to operate for the full term of
eight months.

The teachers were as follows:

A. Quinn Jones, Principal, 10th Grade Subjects
D. E. White, Assistant Prin., 9th Grade Subjects
Mrs. Amy Davis, 8th Grade
Miss Lucille Brown, 7th Grade
Miss Ella Childs, 6th Grade
Mrs. Mamie E. Perkins, 5th Grade
Mrs. Hallie Q. Madison, 4th Grade
Mrs. Ida Williams, 3rd Grade
Miss Malissa Hendley, 3rd Grade
Mrs. Mamie E. Bryan, 2nd Grade
Mrs. Adrianna Ayer
Mrs. Judith P. Rainey, 1st Grade
Mrs. Bessie M. Brown, Primer

My previous church home and membership at Allen Chapel A.
M. E. Church, Pensacola was transferred to Bethel A. M. E. Church
across the street from the school under the pastorate of Rev. J. N.
Young. Several years later in 1932, the church was re-located at 600
N. W. Seventh Avenue Greater Bethel A. M. E. Church.

Gainesville like most towns lacked automobiles as a means for
transportation when I arrived here. There were a few Negro taxi
drivers with automobiles who followed this kind of business. One
had to do much walking. Automobiles were too expensive for the
average person to own one.

Having been assigned to teach Summer school in 1923 at
Arredonda, Fla., seven miles West of Gainesville, involved the need
for some kind of transportation. I went to my school on the early
Seaboard Air Line passenger train that left Gainesville via old






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Arredonda for Cedar Keys and returned late in the afternoon stopping
at Arredonda on the return trip to Gainesville and on to Waldo, Fla.
This schedule was very inconvenient, therefore, I went to the bicycle
shop the same afternoon, purchased a used bicycle, and I was on my
way to school the next morning and returned on schedule time every
day during the three-month school term. There was a hard surfaced
road the entire distance except from the railroad station off the
highway for a short distance. At a normal rate of speed, it required 35
or 40 minutes to make the trip.

The bicycle as a means for transportation became a necessity
for my use around town in the city. This cycle was my vehicle for the
four Summers following the first Summer of teaching at Arredonda.

Following the last Summer of teaching there, I began buying a
small Studebacker car for transportation purposes. However, I
continued to use my bicycle for an extended time thereafter.

Mrs. J. P. Rainey and Mrs. Bessie M. Brown assisted me as
teachers at this school during my five Summers of service. They did
an excellent job for many of the pupils continued their winter
schooling by going to the Gainesville Lincoln Public School.






Retrospections
ATHLETICS 1921 TO 1957

In order to promote athletics in the school at the beginning of
my service as principal, Mr. Charles S. Chestnut, Sr. volunteered his
service from his personal business as mortician with my approval
worked with the boys and girls in athletics coaching the football team
and basketball for boys and girls. This was done as a public service to
the school. He gave quite an abundance of his time in the afternoons
coaching the teams. It was because of his interest and enthusiasm in
athletics that by the end of the third football season in 1923, Lincoln
High School ended the season as the champion high school team in
the state. The players on this team were:

James Roberts
Andrew Philips
Clifton Aiken
Edgar Daniels, Jr.
Willie Stephens
James Mathews
Eric Roberts
Joseph Dennis
Benjamin Hill
James Ingrim
Waymon Haile
Alphonso Lewis
Johnnie Glasper
Alex C. Duval
Walter Daniels

MASCOTS:

Charles Chestnut, Jr.
Bubber Robinson

A. Quinn Jones, Principal and A. O. Jenkins, assistant
principal were the only men members on the faculty to give assistance
to Mr. Chestnut whose service will long be remembered.








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


-, .'i 1 I 2j




rrai~~rivlc, lor'id -' c ",
June 14, 1 ', .


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cfi inc U L I.JLh ,.'. ni,:l. 'in' '.2.unt J i.l I ITd d .F r i dii n t pr, -
v 1.1o f -.u ,'io to rir. '-ni ethl.etic. ':-j.n It t.%a in "I ur .t
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in r .'.-', ":u we-r- -ren dl-n .1 th,. .* .1-i -.r r-r of the
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on I-.B orca i-l-.rI,

SLuc;.r-ly msour;,
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A. .uirn J.omes
i Etird irjn.'ipd.





















42






Retrospections


Mr. Joseph J. Dennis, a member of the first graduating class of
eight members, a graduate of Clark College, Atlanta, returned to
Lincoln as a teacher of History and Mathematics and assumed the
duties of football coach during the 1929 season. This was the
beginning of a regular member of the school staff to be given the
coaching responsibility. After serving on Lincoln High school faculty
for one or two years, he was called back to Clark College to teach in
the mathematics department. He continued his education at
Northwestern University where he earned the Ph. D. degree in
Mathematics and for many years has been head of the department of
mathematics at Clark and professor of mathematics.

Mr. Simeon Williams and Mr. Gaston T. Cook assisted in
athletic coaching two or three years intervening.

Mr. Thomas B. Mcpherson, a recent graduate of Florida A.
and M. College, also a graduate of Lincoln High School, joined the
faculty of Lincoln High School as teacher of history and was assigned
the duties of football and basketball coach for the 1932 season. He
has done an excellent job in this area over the years as coach, teacher
of physical education, athletic director or head of the physical
education department as well as city wide recreation director.

Lincoln High School has produced several State
Championship football teams and a National High school team under
his guidance. He has been a faculty member of this school for thirty-
five years.

Several of the teachers working in his department were once
his students or members of the teams he coached. He has the B. S.
degree from Florida A. and M. College and Xavier University, New
Orleans; acquired the M.A. degree in Physical Education from
Columbia University, N.Y.

Lincoln High School was preceded by a much earlier school
known as Union Academy located on the grounds of the present
recreation center. It was organized in 1866 under the auspices of the






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Freedmen's Bureau, afterwards came under the control of the Alachua
County School Board.

In 1897, two year of junior high school above the eighth grade
elementary school was offered as a part of the curriculum of this
institution.

In 1923, the school moved to a new site when the name
changed to Lincoln and in 1925 became a four-year senior high
school.

During these early years, the school did not have a full time
music teacher, nevertheless, music activities were emphasized
throughout the school. The school took advantage of the music
abilities of faculty members on the teaching staff and assigned music
instruction along with their regular classroom teaching duties, and
therefore, directed the choral class and related music activities.

The following are some of the teachers who were chief
musicians who directed the Choral Class and other related activities:

Mrs. Judith P. Rainey, Primary Grade Teacher
Mrs. Mayme T. Cook, High School Teacher
Mrs. Daphne A. Duval, High School Teacher
Mrs. Frederica M. Jones, High School Teacher

Since the year 1951, these teachers were appointed full time
music teachers on Lincoln faculty:

1946-47 Miss Lorraine D. Hawkins
1947-48 Miss Naomi Britton


Mrs. Wilhelmina W. Johnson and Mrs. Geraldine Y. Miller
and Mr. Jerry C. Miller, Director of Lincoln School Band and Head of
the Music Department.

The department of music at this institution including the
choral class and the band has made an excellent contribution to the






Retrospections
cultural advancement and appreciation of music and fine arts among
the students as well as the community.


TEACHERS AND EXTRA-CLASS DUTIES

A teacher well prepared in piano and other skills in music has
always been an asset to any school faculty. It was not until the school
term 1946-47 that the schools of the county and the state provided for
special music teachers to conduct all the music activities or
instruction in the elementary and high school departments.

When I assumed the duties of principal, Mrs. Judith P. Rainey
and Mrs. Bessie M. Brown, Primary teachers, did all of the playing
and directing for the daily school devotionals exercises, school
programs of various kinds, and school closing programs. Their
services in this capacity extended over a period of several years.

The Music Committee was one of Lincoln High School's
important ones since it was responsible for the music activities
throughout the school. Mrs. Lucille White, a teacher of English and
Latin, and Mrs. Agnes M. Jones, eighth grade teacher, became
members of this committee.

Mrs. Thelma Gaines who was well trained in piano served on
the music committee and did much of the playing for various school
activities.

Mrs. Frederica M. Williams became a member of the
committee when she joined the school staff in 1929. Miss Daphne
Alexander and Mrs. Mayme T. Cook were appointed teachers on the
Lincoln High school faculty and served on the same committee. The
principal relied on these individuals to be responsible for the music
activities throughout the school.

During different periods of time over the years, both Frederica
M. Jones and Mrs. Daphne Alexander-Duval served as head teachers
of the Elementary Department of Lincoln. They directed the musical
parts of elementary as well as high school assemblies and special
45





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
programs; trained children in connection with preparation for musical
activities; rehearsed pupils and accompanied elementary school
closing exercises in music and high school commencement exercises.

Again, it has been stated on previous pages in this document
relative to the various capacities in which Mrs. Frederica M. Jones has
served Lincoln in connection with other duties of directing the music
until the year 1946-47 when a full-time music teacher was provided
for the school, she headed the High School English Department for
more than twelve years--until her retirement in 1966.

By attending Summer school and taking Extension in service
courses, she was awarded both the B.S. and M.S. degrees from
Florida A. and M. University.


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS

Immediately following her graduation from Lincoln High
School in the year 1926, Mrs. Thelma M. Williams-Jordan began her
career as teacher in the public schools of Alachua County. She taught
in several schools and through in-service training, taking extension
courses in winter along with Summer school attendance was awarded
the B. S. degree followed by continued Summer school attendance,
was awarded the M. A. degree from New York University. She came
to Lincoln and was given the responsibility of Head Teacher of the
Elementary Department. In the year 1943-44. She rendered effective
service in this capacity continuously to the 1956 school term when the
Alachua County Board of Public Instruction appointed her principal
of the A. Quinn Jones Elementary School (formerly Lincoln
Elementary Department) when the high school moved to the new
facility. She has been principal for twelve years. The school has an
enrollment of approximately 800 pupils and twenty-seven teachers.

It has been mentioned on previous pages of Mrs. Daphne
Alexander-Duval having been a high school teacher of mathematics,
and teacher-training courses. In the year 1946-47, she was appointed
to assist the principal as coordinator along with some counseling
duties in the high school, all of which were previously performed by






Retrospections
the principal. She performed in this capacity to the year 1956 when
the school moved to the new Lincoln school plant, she became
coordinator of Instruction and Dean of Girls. She has in more recent
years become an assistant principal of Lincoln High School. She
holds both the B.S. and M. Ed. degrees from Florida A. and M.
University.


A CHALLENGE

The school and community were jubilant over the designation
of Lincoln by the State Department of Education as one of the first
two Negro high schools becoming [an] accredited four-year senior
high school in Florida in 1926. I recall it was a rainy day before the
holiday season in 1925 that Dr. R. M. Sealey, State Inspector of High
Schools, made an official visit for the purpose of making an
inspection and study of the operation of the school to determine
whether it met accreditization standards. It has met standards every
year since that date, even though at times, difficulties arose in staffing
the school with properly certificated and otherwise qualified teachers.

It occurs to me momentarily that Lincoln encountered grave
obstacles which were surmounted in the year 1925 when it became a
four-year high school and graduated the first high school class. The
teachers, high school students, parents, and senior class, worked
throughout the term from its beginning, by sponsoring projects to
raise money for the library to buy books in sufficient numbers to meet
standards. Book showers were held.

A science fee of $5.00 was paid by each member of the senior
class along with financial efforts from other various sources enabled
the school to buy science equipment that the senior class in physics in
particular might be able to perform the necessary number of
experiments to meet standards in this subject and to permit
experimentation for the class in general science and biology. The
principal taught the physics class and headed the science department.

It was shocking to everybody when the Alachua County Board
of Public Instruction announced a shortage of funds for operating the





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
schools and ordered the Superintendent E. R. Simmons to close
Lincoln at the end of the sixth month. However, this was a challenge
to the Lincoln School and the community not to let this tragedy befall
us. The Advisory Board of Lincoln High School, the teachers, the
Parent-Teachers Association, and the community accepted the
challenge and pledged to give their full support by subscribing the
needed amount of money to pay the teachers in full for the extra two
months to maintain the full eight-month school term. The financial
goal was achieved by payment of subscriptions from parents, patrons,
and friends of the school and also from monies received through
school programs, selling on the school grounds, solicitation from
churches and other community organizations. The financial drive was
overwhelmingly successful. As a result, this enabled the first and
only senior class of eight students to graduate from Gainesville's first
senior high school for Negroes. This is possibly one of the
outstanding achievements of my years teaching.






Retrospections
THE COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM FOLLOWS:

COMMENCEMENT

LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL
Monday Evening May 18th, 1925
8:00 P.M.

Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church

* * **


- CLASS ROLL -
Joseph Oliver Acosta
Benjamin Franklin Childs, Jr.

Edgar Rudolph Daniels, Jr.
Joseph James Dennis
Carlos Earl Haile
Emmette Alveo Londy

Eric Biltmore Roberts

Claronell Gloria Smith


- CLASS OFFICERS -
Joseph James Dennis, President
Edgar Rudolph Daniels, Vice
President
Emmette Alveo Londy, Secretary
Carlos Earle Haile, Treasurer
* *
CLASS FLOWER Pink
Carnation
CLASS COLORS Gray and
Pink
MOTTO: "Rowing Not Drifting"


- CLASS NIGHT EXERCISES -
Friday, May 15, 8:00 P.M.


Chorus
Invocation
President's Address ................................ ...
Instrumental Solo.............................................
Class H istory........................................ .............
Instrumental Solo...............................................
Class Poem.......................................................
Jubilee, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"...............
Class W ill....................................... ..............
V ocal Solo .................................... ................
49


Joseph James Dennis
Julius O. Acosta
Eric B. Roberts
Claronell G. Smith
Emmette A. Londy
Senior Class
Edgar R. Daniels
Benjamin F. Childs,






Retrospections
THE COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM FOLLOWS:

COMMENCEMENT

LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL
Monday Evening May 18th, 1925
8:00 P.M.

Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church

* * **


- CLASS ROLL -
Joseph Oliver Acosta
Benjamin Franklin Childs, Jr.

Edgar Rudolph Daniels, Jr.
Joseph James Dennis
Carlos Earl Haile
Emmette Alveo Londy

Eric Biltmore Roberts

Claronell Gloria Smith


- CLASS OFFICERS -
Joseph James Dennis, President
Edgar Rudolph Daniels, Vice
President
Emmette Alveo Londy, Secretary
Carlos Earle Haile, Treasurer
* *
CLASS FLOWER Pink
Carnation
CLASS COLORS Gray and
Pink
MOTTO: "Rowing Not Drifting"


- CLASS NIGHT EXERCISES -
Friday, May 15, 8:00 P.M.


Chorus
Invocation
President's Address ................................ ...
Instrumental Solo.............................................
Class H istory........................................ .............
Instrumental Solo...............................................
Class Poem.......................................................
Jubilee, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"...............
Class W ill....................................... ..............
V ocal Solo .................................... ................
49


Joseph James Dennis
Julius O. Acosta
Eric B. Roberts
Claronell G. Smith
Emmette A. Londy
Senior Class
Edgar R. Daniels
Benjamin F. Childs,






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Jr.
Oar Oration ...................................................... Julius O. Acosta
Response .......................................................... John F. Jones, Pres.
of Junior Class
Vocal Duet....................................................... Misses Smith and
Londy
Class Prophecy................................................. Carlos E. Haile
Class Song
Benediction






Retrospections


ANNUAL SERMON
Sunday May 17, 3:00 P. M.


Preclude
Processional
Coronation
Scription Lesson
Invocation
Anthem, "Arise and Praise Ye the Lord", (Hiram
Simmons).........................Choral Class
Annual Sermon.................................Rev. H. M. Collins, D. D.
Pastor of Bethel A. M.
Church
Anthem, "The Lord Is My Light", (Hiram
Simmons).............................. Choral Class
Offertory
Music (a) Instrumental Solo
(b) Jubilee
Benediction
Recessional


* * *


GRADUATING EXERCISE
Monday May 18, 8:00 P. M.


Processional
Chorus, "Lift Every Voice and Sing", (Rosmond Johnson and James
W. Johnson) Choral
Class
Invocation
Chorus, "To Thee, O Country", (Lane and
Eichberg)..................... Choral Class
Oration, "The Patriotism Of the American
Negro".........................Edgar R. Daniels, Jr.






Retrospections


ANNUAL SERMON
Sunday May 17, 3:00 P. M.


Preclude
Processional
Coronation
Scription Lesson
Invocation
Anthem, "Arise and Praise Ye the Lord", (Hiram
Simmons).........................Choral Class
Annual Sermon.................................Rev. H. M. Collins, D. D.
Pastor of Bethel A. M.
Church
Anthem, "The Lord Is My Light", (Hiram
Simmons).............................. Choral Class
Offertory
Music (a) Instrumental Solo
(b) Jubilee
Benediction
Recessional


* * *


GRADUATING EXERCISE
Monday May 18, 8:00 P. M.


Processional
Chorus, "Lift Every Voice and Sing", (Rosmond Johnson and James
W. Johnson) Choral
Class
Invocation
Chorus, "To Thee, O Country", (Lane and
Eichberg)..................... Choral Class
Oration, "The Patriotism Of the American
Negro".........................Edgar R. Daniels, Jr.





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Oration, "The Test of
Greatness"...............................................Carlos E. Haile
Jubilee
Oration, "The Negro's Contribution to
Literature"..........................Claronell G. Smith
Oration, "Self
Help"............................................................Benjamin F.
Childs
A ddress,........................................ .................... .........
....Dr. J. R. E. Lee,
President
Fla. A. and M.
College
Presentation of Diplomas
Prize Awards
Chorus, "O, Hail, Day of Rest" (Mrs. Adaline H.
Beery).................. Choral Class
Benediction





Retrospections
DIFFICULT FINDING PREPARED TEACHERS


Some times over the early years, it was difficult to employ
satisfactory prepared or qualified teachers to meet the needs of the
school. Lack of competitive salaries and a shortage in the supply of
trained teachers graduating from higher institutions. Earlier, the
principal recruited the teachers mainly from those trained at Florida
A. and M. College. After students began graduating from Lincoln
High School in 1925, the principal began to advise students furthering
their education in various colleges to do their major studies in college
areas where demands were greatest for employment in education.
Four years following the first high school graduates, the principal
began recommending the hiring of some of the recent graduates to fill
positions on the Lincoln Faculty. For several years, college graduates
who completed high school graduation from Lincoln were employed
to teach in various grades of the elementary as well as the high
school. Moreover, Graduates of Lincoln High School could be found
teaching in schools throughout the city and the county. As the years
passed, teachers' salaries became more attractive and consequently,
teaching positions became easier to fill. The beginning salary for the
Negro teacher in 1921 was $40.00.



DEATH OF PRINCIPAL'S WIFE


February 15, 1928 culminated in death the life activities of
Mrs. Agnes M. Jones, the wife of the principal who was a member of
the Lincoln High School faculty, a dedicated and ardent school
teacher for a number of years, a religious worker, a member of Bethel
A. M. E. Church, active and interested in young people's activities, a
religious, a staunch Christian and a devoted wife. She left four
children: A. Quinn, Jr., Oliver Hugh, Lydia Alveda, and Vera
Hortense. A. Quinn, Jr. died February 13, 1996.

Mr. J. Franklin Jones, Jr., a graduate of the second Lincoln
High School class and a student of Clark College, Atlanta, completed





Retrospections
DIFFICULT FINDING PREPARED TEACHERS


Some times over the early years, it was difficult to employ
satisfactory prepared or qualified teachers to meet the needs of the
school. Lack of competitive salaries and a shortage in the supply of
trained teachers graduating from higher institutions. Earlier, the
principal recruited the teachers mainly from those trained at Florida
A. and M. College. After students began graduating from Lincoln
High School in 1925, the principal began to advise students furthering
their education in various colleges to do their major studies in college
areas where demands were greatest for employment in education.
Four years following the first high school graduates, the principal
began recommending the hiring of some of the recent graduates to fill
positions on the Lincoln Faculty. For several years, college graduates
who completed high school graduation from Lincoln were employed
to teach in various grades of the elementary as well as the high
school. Moreover, Graduates of Lincoln High School could be found
teaching in schools throughout the city and the county. As the years
passed, teachers' salaries became more attractive and consequently,
teaching positions became easier to fill. The beginning salary for the
Negro teacher in 1921 was $40.00.



DEATH OF PRINCIPAL'S WIFE


February 15, 1928 culminated in death the life activities of
Mrs. Agnes M. Jones, the wife of the principal who was a member of
the Lincoln High School faculty, a dedicated and ardent school
teacher for a number of years, a religious worker, a member of Bethel
A. M. E. Church, active and interested in young people's activities, a
religious, a staunch Christian and a devoted wife. She left four
children: A. Quinn, Jr., Oliver Hugh, Lydia Alveda, and Vera
Hortense. A. Quinn, Jr. died February 13, 1996.

Mr. J. Franklin Jones, Jr., a graduate of the second Lincoln
High School class and a student of Clark College, Atlanta, completed






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
school term and the class work left by the death of the Principal's
wife.

After graduating from Clark College in 1932 with the B.S.
degree, he again became a member of the Lincoln faculty instructing
students in science. He was head of the science department for
several years. While in service as teacher, he continued his education
attending Summer school, and was awarded the M.A. degree from
Atlanta University. He has served on the faculty for more than thirty
years.

Several years later, Quinn, Jr., and Oliver graduated from
Lincoln High School and Florida A. and M. College with bachelor
degrees. Daughters, Lydia and Vera, attended upper elementary and
high school at Davis Street Elementary School and Stanton High
School Jacksonville, Fla. Lydia graduated from Stanton High School
and Florida A. and M. College with the B.A. degree. Vera, graduated
from Lincoln High School, Gainesville, and Florida Memorial
College, St. Augustine, attaining the B.S. degree. Previously, she
received a diploma in cosmetology.

The two boys were born in Pensacola, Florida. Although we
were living in Gainesville, Lydia was also born in Pensacola and Vera
was born in Gainesville, Florida.
Referring to the previous paragraph on the training or
education of the children, it might be mentioned that Quinn, Jr., was
awarded the M.A. degree from Atlanta University and has practically
completed requirements for the Ed. D. degree from Pennsylvania
State University. He was employed as principal of Lanier Junior
High School, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Later, he was awarded the Ed.
D. degree, Nova University. Oliver was awarded the M. Ed. degree
by Tuskegee Institute and has done a great amount of graduate work
at Indiana University. He was principal of the A. L. Mebane High
School, Alachua, County. Later, he was awarded the Ed. D. degree,
Nova University. Lydia was awarded the M. Ed. degree by Tuskegee
Institute and has done additional graduate work at Northwestern and
Temple Universities. She was employed as one of the instructors in
the Department of English at Central Florida Junior College, Ocala,
Florida. Vera has acquired additional courses at Jacksonville





Retrospections
University. She is employed as a teacher at the Bethune Elementary
School, Jacksonville, Florida.

I was joined in wedlock .to Mrs. Frederica M. Williams,
December 19, 1937. She was a teacher in the school for eight years
before this date. She had been a quality teacher in the Duval County
School System before her appointment to the Lincoln School. She
died October 14, 1994.


EXPERIENCE TEACHING IN ALACHUA COUNTY

The 1929-30 school term was another year that was very
arduous for teachers, parents, and students. The county school funds
for operating schools for a full term were not sufficient, hence tuition
fees were required of all the children to raise funds to operate school
for two months to maintain the regular eight-month school term.
Money was collected weekly by the teachers. The following is a
sample of a week's Bulletin Board Poster or Booster Report displayed
on the Board in the principal's office during the campaign:


Lincoln High School
Information For Teachers

1. Let our slogan be an aggregate collection of $100 a week.
2. Get out among the parents so that the collection of these fees
might amount to an aggregate of $100 next week.
3. The collection for the first week was $37.85.
4. Miss Adger led the faculty this past week in collecting more
than ten dollars.

Week Ending October 12, 1929

Mr. Dennis and Mrs. Days led faculty in collecting tuition. They
collected more than five dollars each. Aggregate collection a little
less than last week.





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


The collection of tuition fees for the past week ending October 25th
was low, amounting to about $20. Let all the teachers re-double their
efforts during this week and continue. We must collect $1,000
dollars by Christmas. Mrs. Days led in collections last week.



November 6, 1929

Miss Alexander led faculty in collecting $18.00 last week in tuition
fees. About forty dollars collected.

BEAUTIFYING SCHOOL GROUNDS

A Lincoln High School Advisory Board composed of five
patrons replaced the old Union Academy Trustee Board of eight
members when the school moved to the school site at West Columbia
Street (now N. W. Seventh Avenue). The first effort to beautify the
grounds was made through the Advisory Board by planting three or
four oak trees about ten feet tall on the East and South sides of the
building. All the trees died except the one on the East which survived
and grew into a massive oak which stood for forty-four years before
being destroyed by the city in making way for paving the street East
of the building in 1967.

About six years passed before a gigantic effort was made by
the teachers and pupils with the cooperation of the patrons to begin
foundation planting around the base of the building.

Plots were designated and assigned to each teacher and her
grade to be responsible for beautifying with shrubbery, nursing it until
each gained a foothold. There was never a more enthusiastic group of
people working toward a common goal. Most of the shrubbery was
donated by solicitations. Sidewalks around the building were
constructed through the cooperation of the city of Gainesville by city
prisoners. The materials discarded from the renovation of the Seagle
Building and other sources were donated for the job. It was through





Retrospections
the efforts of Mr. Charles S. Chestnut, Sr. and the Advisory Board
that this project came about. Now, more than thirty years afterward,
these walks are still in use.

In 1942, National Youth Administration work students in the
high school department under the supervision of Mr. Thornton
Roberts, D. C. T. Instructor, constructed the walk from the South East
corner of the school building to the street. The athletic department
supplied materials for building a concrete play court on the South side
of the school auditorium. These were monuments to all those
teachers, Mr. T. B. McPherson, and pupils along with Mr. Thornton
W. Roberts, who participated in making these conveniences possible
by their efficient supervision. It seems a bit interesting to writer when
he recalls having lent helping hands along with interested teachers
and coaches of athletic teams in basketball to build courts back of the
building to the West for games, and later a court at the North entrance
to the building, enclosed first with sack cloths and later with pine
slabs with over-head lights for playing night games. Spectators at
times standing in the cold weather were not deterred nor were the
participating teams for the general interest overshadowed the
disadvantages. These were the play facilities until 1956, when the
new Lincoln High School was occupied.


ADDITIONS TO BUILDING

The auditorium to the building with a seating capacity of 825
was constructed at a cost of approximately $27,000 and the
auditorium chairs were installed in time for the 1928 Commencement
Exercises.
The seven all contained Class-Room Annex for elementary
pupils was constructed about 1950 but nevertheless double school
sessions were still necessary intermittently until 1956-57.

SThe cafeteria was constructed and occupied in 1955.





A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


A STORY OF LIBRARY SHELVES FOR THE LIBRARY ROOM
AND TABLES FOR THE SCIENCE ROOM FOLLOWS:

When school opened in August 1923, the regular toilets in the
building could not be used because there were no sanitary sewer lines
in this area of Gainesville. Therefore out-door toilet facilities were
built for the boys and another for the girls. They were built with a
very good grade of lumber. They were in use by the students for
about a month, while the city was extending the sewer from
University Avenue, a distance of seven blocks -- to the school and the
necessary connections made. After connections were made to the city
sewer line, the materials which were used to construct the toilets were
salvaged but were not discarded for there were other needs for it. The
room designated for the school library was minus of any library
equipment, no shelves, tables, chairs, nor other necessities. Hence the
principal with some of the eleventh grade boys used this salvaged
lumber from the wood out-door toilets and made several stacks of
library shelves and beautified them with golden oak varnish.

Throughout this school term and the next term when the
school attained a four-year senior high school status, efforts
continued. The principal with the help of the eleventh and twelfth
grade boys and other miscellaneous help from the teachers and the
children, by the end of this school year, one library table was made,
another library table along with four or more chairs were purchased; a
large table was made for the science room, sufficient for mounting
experiment equipment in general science, biology, and physics. The
principal taught physics, solid geometry, Latin and trigonometry
classes. The library was under the supervision of the English teacher,
Miss Eloise Perkins. Webster's International Dictionary was among
the first new books purchased for the library.

Mrs. M. F. Days, a teacher and president of the Excelsior
Reading Club, presented the library with several volumes of literature
by Negro Authors and Writers; viz: Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson,
Booker T. Washington, etc.





Retrospections
During these years, the school and community had to rely on
self-help in order to supply the children with some of the most badly
needed materials. The County School Board through the Trustees
appropriated $125 which enabled the principal to purchase a
compound microscope, and certain other standard equipment for
teaching general science, biology and physics. Science fees were
assessed the students taking science to increase the supply of
equipment over the years. More than a decade had passed before the
science room was equipped with gas and a sink with running water to
permit the teaching of chemistry.


THE PRINCIPAL AND CONTINUOUS STUDY

Even though I had acquired the bachelor's degree, I felt that
the changes taking place in education in Florida and the South,
generally required one to continue to improve one's self while in the
teaching service if one expected to make it a career. My salary as
may be seen in the chart was very meager for Negro teachers and
principals received salaries from 20 to 25 percent lower than that of
white teaching personnel with the same qualifications. In considering
schools where I might matriculate for advanced study for several
weeks during the Summer, I discovered that Hampton Institute,
Virginia, was the only Negro institution in the South that offered
graduate courses leading to the M.A. degree in the field of education
and related areas. The Summer of 1930, when I entered Hampton
Summer School to begin work toward an advanced degree, Negroes
were not accepted for study in Southern White colleges and
universities. I could not attend the University of Florida located about
six or seven blocks from my residence. Therefore, the Summers,
1930, 1931, 1933, and 1934 attendance at Hampton permitted me to
complete class attendance, courses, and academic requirements and
during the school term I completed the writing of master's degree
thesis which enabled me to meet all requirements and the M.A. degree
in Education and Social Studies was awarded at the regular
commencement of 1935.

Ironically, as it might seem, I could not use the University of
Florida Library nor withdraw books which I needed for research in






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
writing thesis. I cannot forget the generosity of Dr. A. R. Meade who
withdrew books from the library for my use and also the late Dr.
Alfred Crage who gave helpful suggestions when I was in the process
of writing. Both of these fine gentlemen were faculty members of the
University College of Education. The secretary of Dean Tolbert,
Dean of Students, typed the three copies of my thesis that were
required for presentation to the Hampton Institute Graduate
Committee.

The Summer 1936, following graduation from Hampton, I
matriculated in the College of Education, New York University where
I was admitted to a planned program of study with emphasis in
Secondary Education leading to the Ph. D. degree. I attended the
Summer of 1937 also. The war in progress at this time interrupted
and I returned to N.Y.U. the 1952 Summer Session. The intervening
Summer of 1944, principals in Negro schools of the state of Fla. were
given aid to attend a Graduate Workshop at Florida A. and M.
College. In 1948, a preplanning workshop for teachers preceded the
opening of Alachua County Schools. More than half the required
program planned was completed. The Minimum Foundation Program
of Florida Education adopted in 1946-1947 required school principals
to be on duty for twelve months which interrupted further pursuit of
my planned Program of educational improvement at N.Y.U. I
submitted my planned course of studies, with the approval of the
Dean of Education and filed the outline of courses with the Florida
State Department of Education with the view of qualifying for the
Rank I Florida Teacher's Certificate.
















Commencement Exercises

of

Hampfron institute

OGDEN HALL

Tuesday afternoon, May 29, 1934, at 2:1 o'clwk


Prngram


OrRan I'relude
IrKmation,
i h, I LVok Like Me1n of \\W
I Hirk Ji-tmei 1i0 tl, I ruIr I t iEr .
[h,., .,.il f... *' jim r. r
ip'l 7i.-.,it riC.hu u nd 11 .." Ii li-,unit
t..h Ii 1. c. i nr, .-, r


RFE.\. S. ARTHIt.m DE.VAN


JI rl rl no h' h rt quill hL a flarve.
\ .-:, iler Lh.,, i.e 1 t ,
I ill nliau, Lirrl nn nin anrm,
,,,I firht f'-.r liiLClv


Ti,.r ,C II r am', I i.. c:o'.ard, in our .and
' ,ih rj l,j it, h,...|.J 1, '. l.., l TII,l ii 11 ;r c ,l.,r.. 9 ; .
":,i[iTui -1 i, ial --i l n 1',r cIirtu-Ii-rpTd ciftn,
SiF .ii r.-'I it II, 'L.. Ir,, r:- hl r,1 ".l.ri 'l rli die
R* w, ,
RI I I 1
T hc li-k hIk .-- i,i ihr loo k like rmen
l h ; I ,,l, hl- ih ..i ,r,
\II n.1 n r i- rr, -eld in uniform
TI,,r e I ,~l k. rAiR I r. 1 i[ar
'11 i L


MPs. MAR Mro'LEo BFTHlINE
Pi'r:derrt of B*thinc.-Cooknann Collegi


\\c .i Climlingf JId:n 'a L iddr
A.i PlE'- F -I.T1,idlPLg
-'iL tni.ltion of I'll .;iil Award-
1It- i I, f P'riz. in .\Alp i Iture
I .~ ] r.pr L II:i i/ ,,'--w wt i F ritr
Th.- I.ii.1- I (;,'ri Fr.:e-
TI Ge-.r:e Fr.,r ':,I d, Priz.
rT I ill, I M hli..hll Sp-:'ci.l Pri/ in H'nmni F. -.rmir
S CI..,,-,-I f I.i [ \ ii a t-.' r1it Y' u ng M '.| n .t ri- i l i \1 I-
siOTI o' H-, irrl,iirjn In-firl ic
\nn. iii. n-rcnt f Hii ir. S-holatr-hip-.
I ,,n'Frrrn -f rJiplrni s .rind DPprtts
PT:PrclltFT ARTIII-P. Hnwr
11I.1 N1 11 .r '* ll .. 1 i- ilia it. n Il L.-r thi IF.-t pdag

,TL" .di i inl p i i. ria l..ih 3 tihe prb c-l sirn lr ir
;nd a- it )r,.r- ill, ball


Retrospections


A.-ddrf-








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


ORDER UF THE ACADEMIC PROCESSION

Marshall
President and Sperk'r of the Da)
'huapl.iI, 'ru-i.:e.-, DirectJr jrl f A il S.:thols
Adminisirative and Educational Board-
AMistrant Marlhalls
Cullege Faculty
P'lenl. Schrlil Facully
I r:'de Scdi'ol Faculty
Aluumni
jnd t>he- full-,%irig
I L, J' c'. rj d idipl'ain.a I r 'jI.A Ac "t .I ling .i1 L al t
CANDIDATES for DEGREES and DIPLOMAS
THE COLLEGE
C:' ndid, al-t fur DI.:gree if L .1 t rrr L. A i R


tl.hrencc \liILrr G'.llij""*i
B '4 Uilcrberrce Uii..st), 1 '
t.Eir Tl'hodoei. Hlu.'kin's
B MI...rfen L..lih-, l''n


Sh:l' l~in, ;b.rj


C.ndidudairs fur [Degree of B.ACILLOR OF SCIENCE
Degree v..ih Di[tinclion


Gialrade- bllnl bill
i ifj llia ...r -nig, Fl i,.I E r
l..i b-- H ill.n ..i,, ., Jr
Hl.hla ioiabka Hill


Lh.lli H a= Iin
:Lnni I- ?.! Kin
La ..i n ,'ihn. N ardill
L .uil .-ij.- ii br irA i


School of Agriculture
TIh,,na Frtlrsrick Cultr I .'k,'.' \
koht- Thci.na Cburc.h thc-., Ga
lai.acl Hiu-ti. Lr., Bt,purai, Fr ilklir. Ganr3r Luibri OiL
iro ";l'a- Gi,...:r iket 5 I.
f illliir, I.:. n H.: 'Ii... Jr i i l li s il irt M ii-
L3f-w'n S':.iins nidjal H.unpi.. Itlitie. l's
l I-i Ci-ephiji r,gf-r ........ Z-bul.i.. N C
P-hilip Trtr- SrIt'rook Filogi -r.' S.
\i'.ll. r L'o \ cLa ... .. l rinoil, ,rk
.:riiir i 'r:,r-, WL al i Tr. L r. i A..1.
M.r~lnI Mllif.id ii,.-.dP-.r. Lyr.chburg,. V'
School of Business


HIr. n E jllt i. Arr in
\i.'iu.ii '.rn iiii. Bra l
W ilGlal i H1r4iirif i l t irrifId
Fred Herfiniumi bi':-.V3
1 1i .11 bro nri
I.i.Lhrr Hilrl FrAlr, Jr
aI' il (C-r'. inE Gray ..
%ritimi S'iil-s Har.jin
'ah Ehz'Ltll HuriA
Audire. 'ie- C( rei.l Hill .
Wllliam Pir Inmarr, ...


Pine Bhluil, Ark
Minor, \'I
I.,cuLi lle, K y.
M :.'and., 'ikl'
H iil. t-ii Vi
Pet ril.ifr \'i
.jiallimr.re M.
Budmi,,rn Ky
N'.cport N'e s., \'i
Bdlliinotr', Md
Knox vll.. T rnn








Retrospections


Prsil Wildoa Lone
Regina Joa .u M7.nro .
T.dor'r Bird Oglel ,y
F.la L-uiise I hillips .
iMarti Annit Ann El;?.lirt. Ridd;rk
Thd.lra Mar) Kirpy
.IrhIi H.:rrr.n Iftitr. enesrik- .
L i..~l bIsL jllerbrani .
lIv fluhi.btll frortkin .


..... A~hlle, N. C.
.Tulsa, Okla.
-.....Durhbn N. C
... ru nswick. Ca.
.. Janipion, Va
Brooklield Center. Conn
savannah, Ga
S. Thomas, V. I.
.. Hampton. Va


School of Education


*1-illin .\dedjde 'Cs,.rr
*"Thelrin L-IL, LIuncan ..
HrJuI Lee Fregftl .
HJJ.i L h l HIi. l .
.* lraince Pl'irfiliJ Huint:
H .F ,r L 'ru% Mfir. **
Repiia Lerni.a Jack-.ii. .
*' rC'., Viola '-r'.',irl J-nkri, i
Major hbyd Jon.i .
L(.A in CG-orge Lasmrubn
MI.lirn Eds,",rd Lar-:.er
'. ilhaia I ',' I. ,', .
Eliz' J'r-ir slli LemLn
.Autin Altkinder T.e,.i .
I.nrna I ..J. i ,
El.-'phn N ihuniel L... vis
*Xlvi Mciser
\inne Eliza MicKnR
I. ih Coris.ut.e Mitcbll ...
Mar> Cordcl,; MA...re .
F' hn L..cvacr Paigt
:.Fry Lyrn Saurndlr .
N inn.- Fu-arl c.il.i
Floriirnce r lesll Srrilh
litc-Is Gerrpctrra Snih .
H lmn M ,!%ne St-phcra .
Cl,,rtan Ac-lri-.r Terrell
Lacr% l.rui- "Tri lehirl .
.Allen Ei.ler W .'.* , * Fl rrrce j crsmon \VrWhb
*I.hlie Alice ,M ol,- \'Vil. n
tleph-n Junius \\'riplr
ilin j"'-r N. I- Z


....Phoebus. Va
Huonplon, Va.
..Greenmluro, N. C'.
... .. Louiaville, Ks
V'iiningion. Del
....NCaprt Newrs Va.
...... Norfolk, V'a
..Neaporn Nes. Va.
Gum Fork, 'u.
... Baltimore. Md
W ashington, D C.
Sc.if.rd, Del
. ... Columbia, 9 C
..IMaihes, Xa
irnaton-sal-min N C.
.. .. ar.k onville, Fla.
............ W eldon, N C
. Fayelieville, N. C.
Gaesvile. N. C
Detroit, Mii.h
.. Gratfln,. Vi
Sden Va
oanoke, Va
..Wilkes BFarr. Pa
Nrn. York, N Y
Tampa, Fla
HerAndLron, N. C.
...Haimpion, Va
CharlIilvsllle Va
.Dcrm.-it, Ark
Sno. Hill, Ala.
... .Brookln, N. V
Philudlphia., Pa


School of Home Economicm
.inia Ilnli n Dis;s ... .. W'asliringon, D. C
Glund.iar Ion-. DuggirL Jamesville, N C
Muirlrnonr Rorman Hihhblrr ....... .. Jascksn Mil.
i:..crg Min Littl .. .....Mobile, A.l
Altitrl Elaine Mt'bii ........ ..Alachua. Fla
Lu.nrnu Cril MIil:l. Leaksi.ile, N C.
Uiaili Rert.i l P rs... l iahirmore, Mid.
7h.lnm(a (_le. Po..ell .. .... ...... Tulsa, Okla.
Elli Mar Pira ... .....B. Btinmore, Md.
Zilema Prh:.n SF.mii . .. ............Alrc, n. Mhl a
Irene Parrr Still ... .....Brooklyn, N Y.
Canill' Sophronia lValshir,in ... Baton Rogue, La
R...sa \'Vrginia \\'t while ....... .. Nse port, R. I
f.louise W'illiamsi .. .. .......... Norfolk, Va.
Brenda Hazel Ya'.n.c .Alanta, Ga.
Charity .. T. Zmnelo ................. Kta, Gold Coast, W. A.








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


Library School
FravLce Ehlibl'th Birwn .. ......... .. Cleeland, O
A It (CI ..'iliril. ,Vuen Re. i-r.-e ii.rs ih l'_32
1,. Mae Hl,rkl-v Enorprir, Mit
A 0 T iugali:.. I ill.lgr. Ir!'t.
MuTidi Viola Curis ..... rhIilI. \'
I..n,- t,,rr' Lul.. ..l M l ~rli l. 'lr
A II Ut.I.- wii -, I'V 1
L.urll H kinti ... Dai.,un. 0
H P \3rrih.r., I r.i'ri .,, ,'33


M.,ud Rut..ci Hill
Armn l.aPrrl H.,jar .
'i.ll' ...e an J,...k.M.n
}l.nmM GCrland Mirrgucr'ce lI.rll
A. h 'A iley I l-',:l .- I') 1
ArS ir I hi,l'rc P'.nj.iri-
A F' '.l.dlt (-..-11,p Wi (
Mnlirni Lliturlh Prndfrgfiim
PR..- LirA-Lib ".Ilyl
.\ B \ irai. LI',rr I piv..r-i .v
cl .i LULi.' \% jrrii
A B H o.iard ( ,ln :|I>, I',~ J
J'i, ),ii,.- \Vam
.A it ptiEn r, I ..'.len-, 197.

School of Music


II '*iii'ib, ,\il
H.F.,pr'., \'a

AI ljIld. GjA

Or.ise*L.-ui S L.

lpI I.Kl"i'l'J III
Ri'.hbi.,r..d "'3
I n I
Iurl i.a, P; L

Atllint. G]


'Re'L.t 1 lal'cle Cilua.. Ed,-ndall Na. il, 5' A
j l 17er ('artur I raird..i N
hlIurrr.,: GtriJcdine DLtndi G:'-. 'e.J. C
l b:ll .Lian Fhr,-.h-r I .nrinn .-ll- ill-, P,
L.imonii Luw.'- jolu,-ir AdJir,, S. V
Idi PH. N:)rtihrn Nr' '.irk, N V.
tl.nli:ui Pbhilhlp.. J Hin4rpl':.r, \'l
n.I tr Jor.r. n ii I, i-11 Jr. IlaiM.- :.r., Va

Trade School
Building Construction
*RuIAt I.l.u Dilari:.n Jair. D ik, S I
N.uhis.'il N-L-jn K i ..-i Ci> "..
Ijdai. ] Eiuei rc inltb d.lntioln \a
Cail Juliu, Wht .. nnsi..ic, Vj.

Trade Teaching
*Wallcr Plamet Al'iins ... l ]pr NCew. \'
*Chir l.-r CiLa ll I. jterc Hunrin trin. \'. V% '
*Iv.ar EdriuJ Ci,,r New Vor N V
*Allril Philardl- Firrn-r Jr CEI!n4'. l., IndJ
*iTimi beniiid P-I-ru.n Hikcs.iii, Del
*Rubn Fjl.ian - hort Hjlilrinir.r Aid
"Hentr, illian. Grunri...od, S. C







Retrospections


Candidate fnr Diplonma in TmREF-Y[EAR CotrRs-

School of Nursing
*Lul' Catlhrrin J-rdln Ne'-port Ne-s. Va.




CandidmtqI for Diplomas in TWO-YEAR COURSES

School of Education
li-irihy V'irgin' rrc'n Roann:e, Va
rHavir EILt BIr..-,n .Pirtsmith, Va
ii. ,ilI Chq.r.-ir "'nldig Nrrfr,l:, Va
LiPe.rl K Dridpig Fick i Knoxuille. Tenn
LdinI Giv.-ih.. H ll .Nnrlnlk. Va
Nannrif 'lrahith H Irrion Phoheb'i. Va
I.ucir I, rinng Lillaikln, N C
Ilijli: B lM.arnimn Hi.L i Norfolk. 'Va
ir rile Ml.nrllomtr Iliver NranJu. V
NMary ChLri..n Holliri tawillr. N C
\vrella H rn.lt In.ran' Nc, port Nr.-s. Va
C i,: G .lIhn-.nr Frriklin. la
Anr,,i: El.L,~t Fdl. irla Kinp Wa\hirinnn, D C
*'liv I 1 -1i lh Knight Robrr-onsill,. N C
( i.r]rud.i V ,.n hbl Ml..l,:y Hamlpiln \'
firur Ills I.uhiiilir.ii MN ulri LyniLht urg. 'a
i..:r \.hil( Murpt.h, P. ,rlain. ll. h. Vs
I. 1. 5 .' MI :ri Pha -us. a.
r:fi1e L.voui Riddirk Norfolk Va
t;.irv's Comr.ll Soi Neponr N-' Va
Crili'rs Vireini ?lirr.p ird .. Norfilk, Vi
Fi'lii \'ra Sunnirmier-t hilivile N r
n.it 'lrin., W'rflina .; p-.rl N iaq. 'a.
4arlir Thcrrnmaeaii l \Vil.n Rnxhuiy; Va.


Candidate for U[iPi nltA

HAMPTON TRAINING SCHOOL FOR
Fl .'Il l.n, la H n-ioni


NURSES
Da,. W a'


'*n ean.uirln fn -I nnrk '~lurihnir th sllrri r








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


Candidates fnr DrELOMAs

THE TRADE SCHOOL
1-iplr ma ritii D I'tirlt;r. n
F'hilip H ..-vi 1.-'n.'.i-l 'll<- t.hipnmi

Philip I-h i' Drollrs e -hi l-iln Til.. nnIl
'm;,,-o Hli.,y rf: llin-. Pi;r,] ing
-n.rh]l W'llhini I '.'lill .. Pri-m inir
-er' Jqv- '- rpilil-.'.'. ( i
'- ,er; 1.l.< rlullrr,rr rrh
I n. i Th-.-h','rc H.'rndr'i; r, I'rirl.I .,iri
'i h ,n P ro, i H ill "'!. h.i. "i, l."- h n ,r
i. j,,: -.r, H ,...,urd .. \ul.I-. -. 1 il -., hini.
id. ~ -h ill l|i|'lrn Ti ..rn-L,
.lun u' I.cr Th. mi T'- riri I. I l.-r ir,
r,.r H u.',- -.nr: nn t_-ilsi,,,
K'nn'ill (~ 11 Janr.; Frrrir.i e
IC h il,- ilh ri M id.t. \ ,,T.,n -...I' M'lih .. .
'- n -, lph N In,- .: l rI,rl.I..lI Mi-'h .ni-
L nnr.h I. ,-h ,.. N r -' n1ic li> n,.
lII i.-i.irl r,-d Printil,
S-rt ll', R-, ,. Pt 1t-. ,ilp tLir..r
r r, r, n l I .-'I ? .o11 i rpr' I.., '
ri 1.11 V s l-- ,l| ( 1. rp .rpt
1';,.-, 'hn." Tn' I0 i r..,ir.
i,.l', I llr,-td U'a.-h n,r.p Iri,n l
lb ,rl-= F',rr'i. r F .n lin bhia. 'l inrim '
\lil.,m Kal, ]b Youtn Rrikli ,,r,


U -liiiii r.n Del


F 1;', N Y
F ,' .r l ill \'.

\Wilrv-... n, N
l.tl. rr.ll .'Ill.- \l'




8. 11 A l,'
in'..' ln \'T i

lI'.'n ill. K'
_.. ..- I I .,II I.
l .i ,irr, E' .
H ih ,n,.r,. . [.1
11 \in. ,s r I

H r.vrrr.11 A
S1.-l,;rr_, n, r. rC
A.i.,e.;ll' \ (r


ALMA MATER SONG

I H.mpin a iH.-:.I s.- nt Ir.ir h- ..n ab c,-
T F ;j R isf I u I I pI I Illrn
aing thit th e'rI' ir ri I.r.-. han ir. 1 -.
Ehe 'hiinn: 'f in h'ii' -i. l i. In
1 h% fr 'iid'a ,rn firm, arid ihy rii.-, r -I.il-r. .,
'ir.1 ii-', rr.-'1 *tlir hir- t[--rr1iu1
1 hr 1." 1 l ir- rllri: r'l r U l i,11d 11,, i ei .-. ,r I, "rI
Dr. r Ha tIia.,ri Lh," g.il' rf *-.ir - ;rnmg
Ch ru.i
I- H nripl'I-n rr..r n r',il... III i! ,- n,.
F'rr'pr ,1 r r Ii.i; 'ln tIh. -iancin
Ini i i,- il i[ 1 r1 II h l i- :r

K lind n-.ilh-:r 11 un.. ,iw fl,.- d r r l i.ip y ih '
%r \ .p-,ii --r- in lh!, p.IT,-r i... .i

r l r. ic -.f -. ind ..nr n. ,;...n

r l '' ir .n l ...- rr. ill i -h,
\ I.-.-, Ih f.r I .. tar fr iI I l h li
.A lo iitl iba.t na'r c'ari prf ilh








Retrospections


T heS tv-n.i. f 'Cnommeuc nen

of

Hlianpton insidukit.

OGDEN HALL

Wdns T lternoon, M y 19, lay 29, 1955, at 2:15 o'clock


Program


Inii~-tionn

I he H1t IIFrtj .Mn' Il:tAlarin M
I I,. l n.s r ihi. l.'-1 i ii h m thr L .rd'.-,

I ,r. i,. h 11 ,ll r i I I I .r I .. i


ri.l i -i .. i vrJ* ,
I i. ,liiry hr, Hi[ rn li.hrs "i'

11, ill: II,. ini r, ril,,' .iT,li [.ihrii .
H iti Il* un fr-rni Ii night-

S iii d'~,l'.r- Kh, i ,c f I" in .
1 ri ,i ed.ir-. | ti of i '


RI-V S. .k rMtFi R I.)L\ N

bchrl/hz .-t

% vii.m niand or.Jr.
i, li rL't-. inir-ty plan unrri'. r
'Ili,.' 'r,'u sr -inr limn I., iiis uiil.v'i
L.'rdi. r,
.\\% I r % ...r,r.i- f ..- lid IDA 1tli Id '
l[h. rrli. i4 Hi.., nrJ ie, h:..,oiz
.'cer ;t hrnding.
Tl,. Mial r ;.i Hi. ri .r.r- bh.r.1.
I 1- i- nd *ill I-L. hr-sagh lijr
utIlli itllli.
\ i;'.. .1 f c iiri lli, jr i li.... ii l, I.
I \ .m rmf i.r.litill a l*J I ., ujll.ir
Jr'rr


\i|r.p- Op FRFnDrc.I K T PATTEP-OF l
P r*-Id. Ti-r[,>'t ,', T ,r-., I', II .M'TI|I"
] 'nt "'.L. L i' ir A .'ii
.L D IFF l- I -- 1.illi I | I, \ Illi iT.' 1, A -r ll'r .I
['r,'r i~lion ,f Prin-
l'-ri Hi r Prizz in AvculIllre
7h' Tin'r.: r (rr;. Prir-
PI'h (,.- Fl-I. r pralhrrd Pr;i:
T I. l l.- ..- .1 j ,,- T r.,]il,
'\nii.iirfr, i".nl '.,! "1hIn' Mrcrik- .r M nmoriIl S.i-hil.r-liii
Sr i, rrin"l 01" oDlpi,]i- andl Drrecs
T'i.-. rnFvr T r RiirL HOInE
Ir', i i r i" u il 1' rin. d rn Ihs i h- F' rLp :

i h a'l.jI'l i r ill [I r Ir .r 'irl h..,s.h r ,1'-i .r i :rt ri Inri I rh*? hill


hi-h -ill ,r h'1,l rI, i ," cihuich li'.p








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.






OhDFR OF THE AC.:ADDMIC PRU(oESSION

M arh al
I'r .-.Jl nt anrd ,[.Iakt.r of the Day
thr pl.in, I rrlti. t-. Presid,.nt ol .Alumni A.4--u.atjan
DlirIc-ios uf tht S.h,-ujl
Adiminiltrajivr: ,ilI. I-iJLJu itl.-'l Riard-
A-i.-i rltn M .arhals
( ,,1i:'.E J l'l,.-n,', h, ,[ .p. l I a ,., ti[ ..
] r.' i- S, h 1 I F S'r ul t


Alumni
and Ih-e tilIming
ib. det ,.' r .Jr l.I ,nts p'r.....I ...,iJ ing tj jilrigli I

CANDIDATES for DEGREES and DIPLOMAS

THE COLLEGE

Candidrlatd. Ifr I)legrtl ul MAl~aIr. r Avr-i
'-rif,rd I'iajl Brad.) AlLrr,. S I(
H H tn ..n ,l-,r iuu 1' i
l'iri, J.lin fbrrr.r Norfalk. Va
SIt lS 1.i l. ri-,. r II i .r l l .i. uiin, 1' 4
All-a Quiinr, J..:n:w (iGliniillr, I -I
I: H i,,. .-. r. ..u l u .i l J '. l ..a I L.i n I,i
.ih,.1 r 1. RP..-.I, ,-.n tlend-Irsrj, N C
A Bi. In..r r I(.|;.ll, 1 t 192.1

('3hiLJti '- t,.r .lg'cr-i f(-I UB.L HLL R i..f Si t NCF.


LIF. I0ll S }i ;.I -- 1llll 'l. ti0Jda Nt ....
Ldllanr, a 1,1 1
I hol of Aricul., Itur l.

School of ABriculture


M a11 ..r ,' l I il i' rll, r


l h,.', Ed- ir.l ,bnI .n
.h- l.School ofTn.n 'Bu~r.i
School of Business


EItanuini \.

.. L.Gra i
*. mr, O tille .'d
1.. 14r m I Ln). M lo


Li ls 1.1 e L.im cn P '.-,r
.u.I ..i ,t F ,iJ, P.lrnd

Lat.re nr r.ir.i. u I Bu'r. k k rh.tr
!1 rt'ia .; I. LrL.-

lu II i .rl' F.L j ir
I Il-ri hnIn T 1. i r

Si ,r..Id ill rnn l rt .?
i i r'lh, I .rinri.c WVv.be


Pine Bl.iff. Ark
\ar ibingin. D '
i !piil i lia \ jl
McK-rrporl, 1}
' Mill.-r Conr

.N .,rl.-.il. L.i
ITariplon, V I
CIr'.rl ] Id 1i
I ynchl-urig ia
F.--,Hm.'id MNi.
.uirrlv. VI"









Retrospections


School of Education


U ,,.,h ,. I.sit t i. r...
'j ,ii. I i.-r it l I-.A-l.

1 1 r ''. r i l. 1. li ,r [o




S. li. i rt 11..i r .
,. .l I. r| 'l. I-n Ud.II u p
I I.-. I :i' ..r L..,l i
I,.1 i 1 A1 r l la [I r:,.1 .I

IlrI rl i. I .'ir. r, Jr 1.
I,'l. Il ..bn rt I lr .rl .r
I'. liit,! i H.nri 'Iit Coupts .
1" I r'l ', n .,.3'Ji ]')un i n r
I r.ii, 1 1 I li; F .' It.ri .... ..
I .,,l L srl 1i1. hkle .
" 1. i i i-.i H .ckl y .
I,.Ih... li rr,..,. !i.-r[ j
I'.[ ) m .J..l.ri n .n
m:la. at1 .I...r r r
im I I I/a.I th .ine. .






.1m .t 1 in pr 11 ir e '
.I ,m., i Z-ll.I'\ i.l 1 rl, .- ji.h

"Ai,. I r ink ,' rlin

I -'..r ]ll ..lbir, ..r;r, -r. Ir
l 1, .n F Pmr.i .n l .
I n .. i l.i.rl F.I r


ri I- I l. .... .l I




.l F.r ;. i, h Fr.nl,
I Jm ,, YilZ 'n.. wr II i.!r1.1,

'i r 'r i i". i ir- Io n

1. h ja 1.1 1 Wi-.l 'I ol
I ...l. II I 1T l ilh cm
r i,.- [l -. T 'u.'



i ,,,r ,I *. j ..ir.l\ n W i nlli n s
-* John \i.'IharTLs..on
[1 .11 11, .ll .'l 11 l.rrlln-11
1T [rde ',l'' ita r .'lla'.n


t .il -. l.
Zin-ll. lJI, LI
!e'B pun Ne ..:. \'V.
Ntr.purt Nt.j \
.Clinlr, n, N I


Hi131lplI, V.
.. -Orrngi.burLr. i
hl rlottt Hill li-.
..... .. oui ile, KI
.... ..........Chcnevy i le .
.. Narion Sutuon Md
T Itipl.rt \'..
.... .. Lincoln. III
... .K nuike, V%
....... ...Roanoke, \'t
F.- II. 11 ,
S .. He.rtlen. N' \
UBlrhanmion. N '.
...... .uii as- r, K
.. Baltumrr, Md
JNorlnik Vi1
S .. .. r ilsburghl. Pa
...Lca3ksillr. N r
S .Ralrinmor, Mit1
..... Philhd lr.hia, Pi
Ro.L.,kr \'i
S \\ in r.n- -.,I- m. N'.
...... .M iCall I
N.r,rfoilk, Va
l i.....i.. M r,.
.... Pr.inale, Va
... 'Hampton, .'a
La r'ncrvltle Vi
Hampin 'a
lJe-pori N'. Va'
Oklahrno Cily, Olka
I kill .ina I ui. O kl,i
hbristianstld. V I
Ril.K M7 .111i1i. N C
.Philadelhbia Pa
.vynrluhurp 'a
\ilmintirtr N
Nenhets. Tex
Anrnapola. IMd
.. .... Phildrlphia rPa


School nf Home Economics


N i .I F a1,- Pu'. iille
Ml'. Eirni I'inch
II 11 l.-il, H ill .
1. l' l H Ir ia
nr mi I r r.ia, H. 1. l. n
I- rit I R.- Il, ll.nij
I riv ("'1tn lHurn
r FIn T hinrtL 'J.rl:.a:n
I-i'. F li;za Kath.nor Jones
M M .l Fii.ru: I t .....
L., ih. !. lie Nr aitt .. ..


W'a..hingtn, 1) I
arise K.
LTchhurI,. V,
rukeR'e Irntillll* Ala
-'1I'chinrnd. 'V
Hamn,ll P: C
.. h stler, Ala
Downingl.ivi. Pa.
Raleigb, N (
Io. otsvrllc pj
Durlirion, S C
.. ...... Florence, Ala.








A. Quinn Jones, Sr.







I'1l,1 F ipgr'.I M ijr. .r ,3\
I 'l ill.p-rl i r Pr..elr rI.r.,

Library School


II !4 iltlirir: lit ir- a ,i'. i0m i
| P.: L [ I* 1 n- F.d ,t ,,J-
S[ fr IIlJ,.:g L C ,Iret 1Q :
II I ll.rra..li 1L 0|i-
'. 0 -. i, 1 i, r.-I late 1, i -.i1 lge, I'nl i
I .I. I .rs U .,.n
i3 11iirp- r ,',,,,, Institure. 19 -
Irha Ik il-l'l .Ii. irT.-w
b lu'o, jr Ud niri, r 10-'4
I .. !.T. ,, l N.-ll N I. n .


I 'nht...r-: l.
I' :l A llj \. ,
it l hui 'ch ;



",-, a ,a, I



rI. i i t
".rh al I 1


AIl...I I L-


i t iiirii -, 11 -0 I rn i ..r- I'
i..-i-inir 1- Fl i : n t .n 1N-i. n I".
11 F ri i '.. U .nit ri l I1 r I

l ii' -i .i r i l l .I.I l hAniri i .I r.ll d N
1. lr', i ,i in R m y .. I. .l.:i i p ,.l,. in.1
'. II, _In-lI.i n Cn nh- l ll-c C
S, I A ,I 1 I n
.A F .\ l..I.- I ti., >rr. t I1-.11

'-... I 1I001-r il h
h ;..I rll ( rolir.t i..ile.r l..r N r: ..-i, I .
I .... '1, .1 :'h'Palr D h:b n,. '. i
i' FI I i.i er.,ily P i,,
1 !, ** .. I-I r .r r .:.|]-tf.' s 1 1h m 14
i -r,I T .-h.r- ,I II-kq lOil

I.ill., .r., l ',l f 1.School .u-,r, u c

School of Music


a ll. I i l th I. il' .. l

'|* l 1 11, .: l. h tr, ,, H ,:r,,.l- [ .l,

I- l..cl L.... I i I, .
u .. M l llb il 111 ,I,
* .A Fr, ii Ril-r
* 'lii- in' I hi irl l inl : .llp i'. i
:,[ r,' L ,: hlu ...-J
Fl .r, I.in h [ bh :,, ,.
M, Il, l- FIl ad lil, h.li.l, ,r


R. ir,L .
; i .11 I. 111L.



.i ..i .

I l i r '

hlu,- 11 'II


Trade School

BuildinR Construction

R l,. h rd \l t l,.i ,,,A .I
l i| .. u.u'l -.l] .. I I.'.. j l
l.- .ll, r ..lliar. Ih rl l, r


a .l ['.lw : I . ji.- i J,
'ii-r-r Ii.AI.1 I AlAi 4ds J
h ,ir L, m ari'ari \\''-hr.rr
ljl M rN.I- .ih-r ". ',Ih rni -

Trade Teaching


For r', A I-,
l ,,. i.r,, .'.,


a. r.
i kr,. it::

\: ',..- r. i
\ l. iiI 1. 1


* Fil R-l~s! leni V


*F.lli, Ri.l- Ii l Il iei n
*Vi.;llam F-altb Yur.'









Retrospections


C rilnls fror Diplomna- in THPP.E-1\'FR COUrISE

School of NursinE


'.1' i I i'1111 11'

41 I.., I ~,'~. ~111


N'.rrl NtC', Vi'
Finmror- L
\V i-hinal...li I .1
Iarmplori In-liiule. X'\


(' irnll al i frr flil[nroai In T'i -1 F..R COUR'SE

School of Education


H1lli 'rr nhan. Hrnia ntii
HLitic il W' Ri .
fil ll ,lui. Ir llrldh
'nroI' I % :I'-r' Hon
-Ir'l F p I' .111

frlih .i hI'alri,: Edw.rd'
Lp 'i H. .u' t ;.l-.i
\,r, ,=..r b [li 1'I,. -
Silljn .. .1j hh.
It,r .- k ri '.-r I-.j.
FtIhrl 4hfr'i Pirker
Fr-.jd F'rClli Rarndill
H.';nrlr. \ i irnm.- rmlih
1 L. 'iran I' re' r

I nni P. rtr .in
1i, 1 .C ".i. ialri
'. \, r'- i : i ,l,-n
'l .Imrc l, I '.nllan.,..


(- apt,.lle, Va
.... H mp.i'.n. \'.
New.pon Ne, Va
Pooermrl:r Mrl
N' py-1n -., ..
Ncaport Neos. I .
... Yoricrown Vt
Phoebus. VI
Sr, hb,nrn 1
Potlmrtrsuh V'.
H iviF'i in ini'Irue Vi
Porirmouhb Va
Horrisba .b le V.,
T.ynchburp V
S L.ncrhhuri Va
N'orfolk. 'Va
S H.lliand. Vs
[1invill.-. uV
Nermponr Nv.- \'I,
Kism iir %&


* .' 1 i '. ',T. I':r ,o ,i rv urri rle c Au'imrn r rI .'









A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


THE TRADE SCHOOL.

C(ndiddtes for [lrl.nt.oA


TI. l 1bert A is, 'II
I''.hl Lr Clintpn RriC..
Nri:.- n ,'ahin'ron Pr. an
-am,-Il \rth-ir Irv,m i ,1
I '.- ir Dsni'l Caiprnier
Alfqn-o rhbibobi
t ,rimt Nelfon D.iv, .. ...
Jamn' Imn Tir'nni- Ir
\\'illiamn Henn Fulo',d .
* ." 1,1. tI L.fl'.I F uill-r
iarch Mark Gamhle
Hurold Okilcllirpr G;ri.ne
lth.bnnIE C.rLrin
PIIl \'' 'l .rI l .'
(;cnrc: Frr'rm-p IIjmili .
Rorersi Smu-1 HF11nih.n
I: ndall Burn.tl' H I '-.* i
rLemn.l;, Adthrrt I.l..I-..
c'h.ilfrs R v,1 I.,,.i Ir
F rdin 'r. l.'ivmin J. hnh.i:.n
Heln- LI.r .Irljhnd n
lanii rnucluaiid J nr,
lihmTl Gn Gr;'p.-n II-h
linvqi Ed'rad Kno,
' f.t,.-.n ( u'l-r-ti'nr- IoIl
filon rlint Llp1.u,.'l'-
"t.-r0 I. Inr.In It ui i
Rnhri- lill M unr.hi--., hi
I 1.1.11- illin. 'Pr .r1
I iliarm Chi' .lnl r 't.J.1l .
',' illirirn \V lforJ R i.:L,
I oloni l W i.-h.,in.L.- I. ol r,,on
'f .rp, Chnrv Robin-,,i.
I'hirl. "' lll a F .-
Hice Ruew\ll. Jr
Lilhi Eln-irr Si er
H- ri an I I.flord t..'iIl
\'illinm Gari'-.d r'l-..mr .r,
RIf-rrl (Liland % V. 31kr
Rifui, Conr.d n i'r Ir


.Prh1 lon io I I
T ai.l..r ,


i. riliit
Tailo, ri '







i's' -llsl '
[ i.klT il I I i
I .I., %It .. i 1 1. l. 1. ,
Dr, ke~kl Di Ir d I,-nrrt H
.i..' Il I l. ie Ii I .-i' r] B
ri. ;.lu',n a. l ier g

.I. I i -.
1l,. i M, I I \\' ,k


%iii l iI In
\*Ot. ..r ii lu ,l M .' M ir.' -





I 3111i I 1 .L
I ~ sir in ii
\;'rn.i..I.il MN..rhit
r\i ,l.mil.Il- l hal d," .



-I'[li I I in n. d I -, I1.-l'.
'.1. ,1. .'. 1., L



S1 i r., rini .
-., 1.." [;ll: r, .,
\,= ,,,,..i, lr. M r ;. ,,.
I 11 ,. rl r.




'.l. l ,'I.l I,,, I~ r~r. n
S I I.r IiIll: I.lo Ii'l,' inglL
S.,, ,.r,.l.il., '.f, .h ,_,.i.


N.r r.il 1
b t ij l l. '

Koci .:, .[I,: \'a
R.-.k H1il, C
I'rA F, "1 r'i
PlV .. \*n Md
Bil Iunr, Va
F. I.r ,II'. I'
Minning i

',na-Ji.i.n, D I
I 'h h I i .i, l,. i 1 i
). .] hliln,.-',n ri ("

L'. .is ..Ill-. K<





I' hr..'-Nr. 1
h'an.ll 1.' \'M d


i 'i ,l t
r;r,- i .Inr.. M -1

i ., r I. '. \1
\ .,,n i, n I.
F' 1,> *ill, N <*

mI ,. '.t.Ill... "T In

'n,... tl. i3 D I


Sdhlr,il F.
Fi, .i T-P


I iitlir.i.i F-

I 1.,irr I I


ALMA MATER SONG
I H ul npt.h. I, Il ., I' l ,n h. s l- .
To I- :i pri. a i s'ul l' irn .iirtl -lI

Tr'- hr r, f i...i. hfl i -n-. lrl,.
Thb f ,joioJ .I* -'r, linn 'iiI ii., r,..,f r F r.'1 r,. ti
%n.d IE[, % c, d ii, ri Er,- lo.-rn u.
Tbi zl ,',rc>lim! *inl J lb h,- --i, 'i ,."r hII- -f I
jl[I H-n rt'.n hr r -'..lI '- j .ir 'r.,- h'rii
I hnnn
r'i l- ii.i ', rn o -r i .1 I. il.'. thr w o mI
F C- -pl | a ir1 li r lr r'ir 11.."- .i pip1i1';
III mr, r th i %,I ,11 sv vrr.il -pirn p .ira.,*,
',rd it liir.i' rrn"' i- ringing

2 KN ,nd mnc-thr vr'll 1i -, rh, d.,.ir i',-lr-, d

t ,zr. mi h l rl -v l- ir"n iir rh--n *
Of fprI r f Inr 1 ar." '.ur nalr r,
',ill ,tir i n our .'Ol Ir thih I Ir "ind ir ,i .
\ pT .-'d ,h1, ,-,,.r frr..l h- rlt *Ill *h-ri-hl
\ loi. ri.i--h IJ..[- r ihr- -. i ni'. n Ir anr' Irl, ii
A Ir.ilf ihtl n- rr ;nir ri n h





Retrospections
MORE OPPORTUNITY FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Mr. Thornton W. Roberts joined the Lincoln Faculty in 1941-
1942 school year as D.C.T. Coordinator. He was the first trades
instructor. He was very enthusiastic, efficient and a relentless agitator
for vocational training in Lincoln. When building space was at a
premium, he gave his time and energy with the cooperation of the
principal and County Board of Public Instruction for several years and
built additions to the old vocational wood shop and other additions
about the school to make it possible to give instruction or to begin
instruction in carpentry, cabinet work, tailoring, agriculture,
typewriting and business and auto-mechanics. The typewriting class
had its beginning when the elementary school or grades were on
double session permitting Mrs. Terrecita E. Pinder, one of the double
session teachers to instruct a class in typewriting in her third grade
room in the afternoon session. This was during World War I when it
was difficult to procure any kind of equipment. As a beginning, I
permitted the use of my office typewriter for instructional purposes.
The teacher used her personal portable machine. The few students
taking the course were required to pay a fee for the use of the four or
five typewriters. These fees created a fund along with money raised
from other sources made it possible to buy old used re-conditioned
machines.

Mr. Roberts assisted in the preparation for space to inaugurate
cafeteria service and renovations in the homemaking room.
Incidentally, his wife, Mrs. Maggie Roberts was the first Lunch Room
Manager and seller of school lunches from a Concession Stand in the
corridor before a room was used and a cafeteria was built. He
rendered valuable service as a consultant in the planning for the
Industrial Building at the New Lincoln High School.


MUSIC INSTRUCTION SINCE 1946-1947

It has been stated that it was not until the 1946-47 school term
that special music teachers were added to the Lincoln Faculty. Miss
Lorraine D. Hawkins instructed music in the Elementary and Junior
High School while Mr. Jerry C. Miller was the instructor of Band





Retrospections
MORE OPPORTUNITY FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Mr. Thornton W. Roberts joined the Lincoln Faculty in 1941-
1942 school year as D.C.T. Coordinator. He was the first trades
instructor. He was very enthusiastic, efficient and a relentless agitator
for vocational training in Lincoln. When building space was at a
premium, he gave his time and energy with the cooperation of the
principal and County Board of Public Instruction for several years and
built additions to the old vocational wood shop and other additions
about the school to make it possible to give instruction or to begin
instruction in carpentry, cabinet work, tailoring, agriculture,
typewriting and business and auto-mechanics. The typewriting class
had its beginning when the elementary school or grades were on
double session permitting Mrs. Terrecita E. Pinder, one of the double
session teachers to instruct a class in typewriting in her third grade
room in the afternoon session. This was during World War I when it
was difficult to procure any kind of equipment. As a beginning, I
permitted the use of my office typewriter for instructional purposes.
The teacher used her personal portable machine. The few students
taking the course were required to pay a fee for the use of the four or
five typewriters. These fees created a fund along with money raised
from other sources made it possible to buy old used re-conditioned
machines.

Mr. Roberts assisted in the preparation for space to inaugurate
cafeteria service and renovations in the homemaking room.
Incidentally, his wife, Mrs. Maggie Roberts was the first Lunch Room
Manager and seller of school lunches from a Concession Stand in the
corridor before a room was used and a cafeteria was built. He
rendered valuable service as a consultant in the planning for the
Industrial Building at the New Lincoln High School.


MUSIC INSTRUCTION SINCE 1946-1947

It has been stated that it was not until the 1946-47 school term
that special music teachers were added to the Lincoln Faculty. Miss
Lorraine D. Hawkins instructed music in the Elementary and Junior
High School while Mr. Jerry C. Miller was the instructor of Band






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.
Instrumentation in the high school and taught mathematics. It was
during this time that the groundwork for a band was laid. Mr. Miller
had extensive experience with bands and band work in high schools
and college as well as in the army. Miss Naomi Britton served as
music teacher in the elementary and high school for a year.

Since the year 1951, these special music teachers instructed
music classes including other music groups: Mrs. Wilhelmina W.
Johnson, Mrs. Geraldine Y. Miller and Mr. Jerry C. Miller, Director
of the Band and head of the Music Department. The Department of
Music at this Institution has made an excellent contribution to the
cultural advancement of music and the fine arts among the students
and the community.
















A.,U1IN N .JONES ELEMENTARy SCHQL






A. Quinn Jones, Sr.


The School 3eal Was Designed And Adopted in 1946.


This Seal r7as Designed And Adopted in 1946.


COMMENCEMENT ACTIVITIES




APRIL 29 to MAY 6

NINETEEN HUNDRED FORTY-SIX

'rcu ore cordilly ninviled to ritend all these? c:eir-,-se
{.. i* ..








SP LE ID i


7 I ". -

F,- ..I Tr 3-


I-.. -


t ,F r


P I 1 :r :- : : -rn- t .-





AINUP.L SCHOOL SEBI1ON

PROGRAM


COY~l _I~CE1NDJ PRO'-A P1-I


Ti-,, I


I' .1,.. 'Iii ii 1


. TI.- ,11,....




i .i ,r .l ,

i, I. u..,,


CArDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS


p.tir I. I Or,
i^.'TirH n .-.: r


..1 1 -..v,'
\itI a -. -
ill. v



.1..

Aria


_,,nJ (.nt Ti., L.IL h'l,,. O.,,,,.,,j
.ih Hi,. .. S..r i .i, )l .,.lc .l,
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CHAPTER IV


EXTENSION AND SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTOR


It was a challenge for me to have been appointed by Dr. J. R.
E. Lee, President of Florida A. and M. College to conduct the
Extension Class for teachers in the Gainesville Center as one of the
instructors for more than a decade, beginning the latter part of the
twenties and extending through the thirties. It was during this period
that there was a very great need for upgrading the training of teachers
generally throughout Florida. Some of the Negro teachers in Alachua
County had not completed high school while others had completed
high school and junior college and were pursuing these extension in
service in winter and Summer school attendance to meet requirements
for graduation from college and to qualify for proper teaching
certificates in the various fields of teaching. Teachers were cognizant
of their needs for improvement and responded enthusiastically to the
opportunities offered them. Some teachers sacrificed some
necessities of wholesome daily living against a background of poor
salaries and short school terms in order to accomplish their objectives.

Bethune-Cookman College through the President, Mrs.
Bethune, also offered a challenge to me by appointing me to assist in
instruction with Dean James A. Bond, Director of Extension Courses
in the area of education. This opportunity was offered during a few
winter terms on Saturdays.

A salute goes out to those teachers who had the courage and
ambition; patience and endurance; hope and faith to attain their
objectives. Many of the teachers in Alachua County survived the
'storm' --- advancing themselves and some represent the best
prepared teachers in the county and other have migrated to other
sections of the state. Some have reached retirement age or years of
service.

Especially do I call to mind a very small group of students
whom I tutored privately in an evening class for several terms until







CHAPTER IV


EXTENSION AND SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTOR


It was a challenge for me to have been appointed by Dr. J. R.
E. Lee, President of Florida A. and M. College to conduct the
Extension Class for teachers in the Gainesville Center as one of the
instructors for more than a decade, beginning the latter part of the
twenties and extending through the thirties. It was during this period
that there was a very great need for upgrading the training of teachers
generally throughout Florida. Some of the Negro teachers in Alachua
County had not completed high school while others had completed
high school and junior college and were pursuing these extension in
service in winter and Summer school attendance to meet requirements
for graduation from college and to qualify for proper teaching
certificates in the various fields of teaching. Teachers were cognizant
of their needs for improvement and responded enthusiastically to the
opportunities offered them. Some teachers sacrificed some
necessities of wholesome daily living against a background of poor
salaries and short school terms in order to accomplish their objectives.

Bethune-Cookman College through the President, Mrs.
Bethune, also offered a challenge to me by appointing me to assist in
instruction with Dean James A. Bond, Director of Extension Courses
in the area of education. This opportunity was offered during a few
winter terms on Saturdays.

A salute goes out to those teachers who had the courage and
ambition; patience and endurance; hope and faith to attain their
objectives. Many of the teachers in Alachua County survived the
'storm' --- advancing themselves and some represent the best
prepared teachers in the county and other have migrated to other
sections of the state. Some have reached retirement age or years of
service.

Especially do I call to mind a very small group of students
whom I tutored privately in an evening class for several terms until





Retrospections
they completed their high school courses, and because of their zeal,
were accepted for enrollment in undergraduate courses college
courses. Finally, I recall two of these students who not only
continued to complete requirements for the bachelor's degree but
have acquired the master's degree in education, viz: Mrs. Lottie Irvin
McPherson and Mrs. Lucille Frasier-Childs. These students paid fees
amounting to about a dollar a week for three evenings two hours long.
If the walls of Lincoln High School of those days could speak, they
would reveal many unheralded stories of heroic deeds and
accomplishments of many boys and girls of this community.

I quote the words of Hughes Mears, Every Child A Gift."

"Though few children are geniuses, all children, I
discovered, possess gifts which may become their special
distinction. A thousand talents await recognition in the able
ones who decline to pull into first place; in the slow workers
who eventually do a superior job; in those with special interests
beyond school demands, like entomology or stamp collecting;
in those with a flair for decoration or design; in the natural
house-keeper. The young inventor may be so absolved in his
work that he neglects important studies; the skillful user of tools
may need adult appreciation to protect him from snobbishness
of the book learner, including the teacher."

Responding to the invitation of Dr. W. A. Gray, President of
Florida A. and M. College, I accepted an invitation to serve as an
instructor in the department of education on the Summer School
faculty in 1946. I was assigned to teach undergraduate courses in
administration and supervision, adolescent psychology, child
psychology and Ethics. This experience was quite rewarding for the
majority of the students. In each class was composed of teachers in
public school and were making efforts to satisfy requirements for
extending teaching certificates and acquiring degrees in education.
They were largely an interested, conscientious, enthusiastic, and alert
group of individuals.

After having taught students over a period of time, one
wonders if objectives and accomplishments have been attained by




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