Daily national intelligencer

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Title:
Daily national intelligencer
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Unknown
Publisher:
Gales & Seaton ( Washington City D.C. )
Publication Date:

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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 2260099
System ID:
UF00073214:00039

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4J|iiL


VoL. XXIX. WASHINGTON: TUESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1841.


No. 8886


PUBLISHED BY GALES & SEATON.
TERMS.
DAILY PAPER-l10 a year-Sl a month for any shorter time.
COUNTRY PAPta-$6 a year--4 for six months.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.


WASHINGTON AND ALEXANDRIA BOAT.
S ~ Trips of the 'steamboat JOSEPH
JOHNSON during the week termain-
l -"'L.. '..F i"r eating on Sunday evening next, Au-
fK:-- ~gust 15, viz.
Leave Alexandria at 9 and 11 o'clock A. M.
and 2, 4 and 6 P. M.
Leave Washington at 10 and 12 A.M.
and 3, 6 and 7 P.M.
ang 9-6t IGNATIUS ALLEN, Captain.

1m'FOR BALTIMOR E.-The com-
modious Steamer Columbia (a first-
rate sea-boat) continues to leave
fWashington at 6 o'clock and Alex-
fandria ot 7 o'clock every Wednesday
morning for Baltimore, and to leave
Baltimore for the District every Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock;
touching by daylight, both going and returning, at Piney Point,
and the various other landings on the Potomac river.
This line has been established more than twelve years; and
by regularity in the time of starting, by providing superior accom-
modations f r I .- r,, -, and by the employment of careful and
attentive I f... i-, iia Jihtost exertions have Leen and will conti-
nue to be used to merit the patronageof a generous Public.
july2f,-eM&TIm GER. GUYTHER, Capt.
IFOR PINEY POINT, OLD POINT COIN,'OttT',
AND NORFOLK.
ia!.SSSS' The steamboat CHESAPEAKE will
("' _._ ,," continue to leave Washington every
Sfr^ l t". Monday at 10 o'clock in the morning,
V=11-N=1dBSs' 40 and Alexandria at 11 o'clock, for the
S ..).. .'a..: ,, nd an.rrI iv Norfolk early the next morning, which
will afford an excellent opportunity for persons who are dispos-
ed to visit Piney Point, or Old Point Comfort, or Norfolk, for the
benefit of sea air, or salt w.-. r i. .i-.i,'., i n .:o ness.
Returning, will leave Ni..il'.lk I., Wi t.. '.t'" at4 o'clock in
li.: '.-n;i, ,.f W..in,.day, touching at Portsmouth and Old Point
C..11.'.nr l" .r (*i. 'in l'eri
Passage and fire to antd from Nomfilk for the trip, $8. Passage
only to or from Norfolk, $6.
aug 7-tf JAMES GUY, Captain.





STEAMBOAT AND RAILROAD ROUTE TO
TUE VIRGINIA SPRINGS.
Night Travelling Avoided.
FrVRAVELILERS ire hereby informed that their easiest,
A most pliasaat. and moat expe(litious route from Waishing-
tan to the Virginia Springs, Natural Bridge, 4-c. ii by the
Potormac steamboat to Fredericksburg, thence by the Fredericks-
burg railroad to the Junction, and thence by the Louisa railroad
to Charlottesville and Stannton. The whole amount of staging
from the termination of the" Louisa railroad to Charlottesville,
being but twenty miles, and to Staunton sixty, over an excellent
road, passing in sight of Monticello and by the celebrated Uni-
versity ol \ "It '
Travellers by this routa reach the Warm Springs on the even
ing of the second day, and the White Sulphur on the third day af
ter leaving Washington, stopping to lodge each night at good inus
on the route.
The stage proprietors on this line are pledged to the Railroad
Companies to have coaches provided equal to he largest number of
pVt-na-er. which can offer, and that travellers wishing to go to the
\%u, l'. 0iI ,in- Springs by way of the Natural Bridge shall be
taken on without deention or night travelling, or may have extra
coaches to travel at pleasure if they should prefer it.
Returning east from the Springs, passengers leave Staunton
in tsie morning, sup and lodge at the Junction, and arrive in
W,.- hiF,:In between Sand 4 o'clock P. M. the next day.
Pare from Washington to Fredericksburg $2 50; thence to
Gharlottesville $6.
For seats or further information apply to
T. H. MORGAN, Agent,
july 6-eo7w Fredericksburg.
' *LONUI1, t OLT'S IHORSE-HAIR GLOVES.-
From the lMedics Ohirurgical Review for April, 1839.-
"Homas HAI R GLOVES.-Another therapeutic agent has been
lately added to the list, in the shape of Hrse Hiir Gloves' for
c.j-'r v ;g lI,.iman surface, when the skin is torpid, o, I I..4 li,
s I '!. r ait.r.l.- i a luxurious treat'to those who are -fi'.' J d ,%h.
pruriginuus and certain other cutaneous defmdation. atten 'ed with
tching and irritation. These gloves were invented wo believe
by a gallant military officer, and possess considerable advantages
over the common flesh-brush, both as to the facility of application
and the degree of counter-iriitation. The cases are very number.
ous in which cuticular frictions are of the greatest importance,
anti we predictthat this invention will prove very useful. In many
instances it is a great desideratum to give employment to indolent
patients in any kind of exercise, and that of friction is perhaps
one of the best we can suggest, or which they will adopt."
For sale by '
aug 3 R.S. PATTERSON.
j1 .oR SALE OR IENT.--The commodious and roomy
House on H and 21st streets west, with good stables, out-
houses, and large gar,'en, and all other accommodations for a
large family, in perfect repair for immediate occupation. The
*... . .i 1 viewed by application for the key at the carpen-
r ,'a .t.p.4 I Mr. Wilson, at the corner of H and 20th streets, near
hie pre]t;iea. june I- 3taw Itif
-jhESILVER'S PO(, k T-lIOl 1k ALMANAC sor
S 18tl, containing also a diary, ruled pages for prospec-
tive memoranda, (one for each day in the year,) an alimnac, va-
rious useful tables, &c. &c. combining, also, all the utility of a
packet-book. Just received for sale by
F.TAYLOR.
An additional supply of the valuable Boston American Almanac
for 1841 just received. jan 6
ENFLIELD'S ISllTORY OF PHiILOSOPIIY,
from the earliest periods, by Williamt Enfield, LL. D.-a
sew edition, the whole complete in one volume. London, 1840.
Just imported-a few copies only-by
iuly P 0 F. TAYLOR.
STAMMERING CUBED, and Instruction given
lIn Elocution.-Dr. COMSTOCK'S Vocal Gymnasium,
and Lyceum for Elocution, Philadelphia, is open from the first
of September till the last of June, July and August being vaea-
ticn months. All desirous of instruction, either for the cure of
F .-,,. .,,.. -Li* lng, or Defective Articulation, or for improve.
ri h in I_'t- .. .o,,. may learn the conditions of
ANDREW COMSTOCK, M. D.
No. 100 Mulberry street, Philadelphia.
n Dr. COMSTOCx's Remarks on Statmmering, Certificates of
Cores, and the numerous recommendations which lie tiasf obtained
of his System of Vocal Gymnastics, tire appended to his Girncular,
which shall be sent to any one who may wish to learn more upioni
the subject of his institution. Satisfactory references will be
given in the principal cities throughout the Union.
july 15-eolit
G ILDING ESTABLISHMENT FOR SALE.-A
good opening f)r a Gdilder.-Will be disposed of on moderate
terms, all the stock in trade, together with the tools. As it is tne
only establishment ofthe kind in the District, a good Gilder could
not fail to do well. The store, work-shop, and carpenter's shop
may be rented on moderate terms.
Apply at the old-established stand of I. COOPER,
Opposite the National Theatre.
N. B. All persons having left Pictures to be framed, or Look-
ing glasses to be repaired, wiil f lease call for them without delay.
joly 10--3awlin
i .L II N l |I ) U L J .,.- |...i l ..I .... I ~, 1. ,1 M t.lH I .
.L SON'S Bookstore, 4 doors west of Brown's Hotel, Joseph
Rushhrook, orIthe I'oacher, a novel by Capt. Marryat. Also, No.
10 ofBirnaby Rulge, and No. 9 of Charles O'Malley.
july 21a
rnpHld EPICUREAN, a Tale, by Thomas Moore, Esq.
-U a new edition revised and corrected by the author with
notes. Just received aid for sale at the Stationery store of
R. FARNHAM,
june 28 between 9th and 10th sts., Penn. av.
fegHI~S MOB LEY lies received three of thie beaiutiftil and
oL1 un'q'ie Neapolitan Bonnets1 of which there is only one in
the city. The texture prevents injury from comnoression, and
their becoming purity of color itas rendered them indispensable
adjuncts to the young traveller to Saratoga, \i bite Sulphur, &c.
July 1I-if
T'EW STYLE; (t GLASS INKlSTANDS.-W. P1S-
ii CIER hbs just received from the manufacturers eight
different patterns of0 glass inkstands for office ut-, some of which
are constructed for two kinds of ink and wafers. These who
purchase fur the public offices will please exaitine them at Sta-
tioners' Hall, where the most extensive assortment af stationery
of the best quality is kept constantly for sale at reasonable atid
naiform prices, aug 4
tI' KIaMlIIA ) ROOMS FOR RENT.-Mrs. EN-
X 1.1.'-Il ,,, eral furnished rooms now vacant which she
would be glad to rent ; there are two parlors and several bedrooms.
Persons desiring to rent good rooms are invited to give her a call.
Her residence is on the south side of F street, between 13th and
14ih streets, aug 3-eolw
lEj it. BEIlY, on P street, has several pleasant rooms,
.,YU souitable for boarders, permanent or transient. Mrs. R.
eol-sits a share of public patronage, having ne other means of pro-
si.t;,... f ." li r hi l|.....i f,. t. '. T.. ,; ,..-. I. rate. july 29- 5t
SITUATION WeANTED.-A young man, a graduate of
the University of '.-an._. is desirous of obtaining a situa-
tion as a teacher. Further ioformatian can be had by addressing,
post paid, X. Y. Z Charloteasville, Albeniale county, Virginia.
july 27--7t
rpO [ARMER?.--PATENT PORTABLE WHEAT AND
M. CORN MILLS.-Jist imported, per ship General Wash-
ingtun, six Patent Portable Wheat and Corn Mills, designed ex-


piessly for the use of Farmers and others living where it is in-
convenient to go to mill. They are worthy of attention, and have
been highly approved of in England. Apply at the store of
LAMBERT & McKENZIE,
aug 6-eaft Alexandria.


highly probable has forged a pass to Baltimore, with intent to es-
cape out of the State.
Also, on the 22d July, yegro man HANSON, who calls himself
HANSON FREEMAN. He is 22 yearsofage, and about five
feet nine or ten inches high, well made, andof a dark complexion.
He is acquainted in Annet Arundel county, and is probably en-
deavoring to escape through that county to the city of Baltimore,
with the intention to get out of the State.
I will give one hundred dollars for either, if taken in Calvert,
two hundred if taken in any other county of the State of Mary-
land, three hundred if taken in the city of Baltimore; and the
above reward of five hundred dollars for either, or one thousand
dollars for both, if taken out of the limits of the State of Maryland,
provided they are delivered to me or secured in jail so that I can
get them again. THOMAS C. GANTT,
july 29-5t Prince Frederick, Md.


in Ohio, and will be sold on favorable terms by
GEO. LOWRY,
feb 27-w6m Georgetown.
nOAL AND WO)OD.-The subscribers are receiving An-
.)thracite coal, a superior article and will continue to receive
a large supply, which will be sold low for cash or to puntucal
customers; also, hickory, oak, and pine wood. Orders will be
received at our stare near the Potomac bridge, and at the corner
of 10th and E streets, opposite the Medical College.
Coal, 2,240 lbs. to the ton, weighed by the public weigher, with
his certificate.
july 9-law8w J. S. HARVEY < CO.


NOTICE TO DELINQCLUENT STOCKHOLD-
ERS of the Chesapeake a' d Ohio Canal Com-
palty.-AII stockholders of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Company, who have not yet paid up their subscriptions, are lhere-
by notified to do so within sixty clays from thie date of this notice,
otherwise legal! i r.:-..:. '.-*r-,i will be instituted against them.
Scrip of the C I i, r. ,-11 be received in payment.
By order u.f 1, I..r.l : THO. TURNER,
CANAL OFFICE, FPRZDEICK, Cl. C. P- 0. Canal Co.
August 4, 1841. aug 4-6t
0 RNAMENTA.L AND LANDSCAPE GARDEN-
I NG (;.-JOHN OWEN HUGHESfrespectfully offers hisser-
vices to the Public as an Ornamental and Landscape Giardener. He
will undertake to lay out gardens and pleasure grounds in any style
to suit the taste of his employers. He will construct arbors, grottos,
rock work, water fountains, &e. and he will select naive and other
plants characteristic of the particular designs he may be called
upom. to execute. He maiutfactures and has constantly for sale,
wholesale and retail, the genuine Mushroom Spawn, equal if not
superior to any that can be imported. Seedsmen and nursery men
in any part of the Union, by sending thei.: orders in time, may be
promptly supplied on very reasonable terms. Orders for J. 0.
Hughes may hbe left with Mr. William Busat, Florist, 12th street,
or Mr. John F. Callan, seedsman and apothecary, corner of 7th
and E streets. J. 0. Hughes having been kindly permitted to
publish the following recommendations, commends them to the
public attention.
WASHINGTON, JIULV 11, 1841.
Mr. John Owen Hughes has been employed by us this season
as an Ornamental Gardener, and has given uits entire satisfaction.
He is fully competent, and we believe of the greatest fidelity in his
profession. T. P. ANDREWS,
N. TO'WSON.
Mr Hughes has likewise done some work in his line of business
for me this summer, which he executed to my entire satisfaction,
and I believe to be quite correct, attentive, and skilful.
GEO. E. BADGER.
WASHINGSTON, JUNe 7, 1841.
Mr. John Hughes, the bearer of this, was brought by mtire to the
United Sbtatea from England in the fall of 1839. His occupation at
the time I engaged him was that of assistant gardener in thie Man-
chester Zoological and Botanic Gardens. His certificates of
competency and ability in his business, from thie superintendent of
those gardens and others having means of judging, were of the
most satisfactory kind; and I received numerous testimonials to1
i.- .i:r.,r.'-A good character from gentlemen of unodoulbted rnspec-
aL..i.. HENRY GODFREY WHEELER,
autg 3 Reporter, National intelligence.
H UTLER'S PAPERS.-Letter paper, fine and super
fine, white and blue wove, ruled and plain, tembracing all
qualitie-. Bath Post, superfine v.hite wove; Foolscap, fine white
wove; flat do. extra fine do. ; blue wove do. ; superfine blue laid
do.; fine white wove, ruled folded ; Folio Post, blue ball; Stur-
,i, J.nossup & Brothers, Owen & Hulbert, Hudson's, Southworth's,
Pi"j,, u's, anid Snmith's, and every other paper that can be found
in the American market. Also on hand--
200 reams Post office double cap Writing Paper
200 do do cap do
100 do do Rival Printing
100 do do Envelope, super royal
100 do do FPolio Post.
r' The above papers will be sold is hlow itas at any establish-
ment in the city; most of them made expressly to order, and war-
ranted of tire lest materials. R. FARNHAM,
may 26 Penn. avenue, between 9th and ltlh streets.
NUMBER, LIME, BRICK, CEMENT, &c.-The
t subscriber has on hand a aer e supply of dry WVhite Pine.
4 4 ; together with almost every building material. Grateful for
past favors, he stml expects, by .i-:. n..i and correctness in busi-
nuesi, to share the public patronage, at bis yard on 12th street,
near the Canal. ULYSSES WARD.
N. B.-Two neat brick Houses on 8th street, for rent.
july 8- eo7t U. W.
Hjl HE PIANO FORTE PRIMER, containing thue ru
Sdiments of music; calculated either for private tuition or
teaching in classes, by J. F. Borrowes, from thie latest London
edition, with additions.
For sale at the Book and Stationery store of
R. F-ARNHAM,
july 5 Between 9th and 10th streets, Pernn. avenue.
R ODGERS'A CUTLERY.-Office penknives, Lady's
I penknives, desk-knives, and erasers ; a large supply thi-
day opened, antid for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Also-Perry's Filter Inkstand, diberent sijes London Parch-
ments t goose quiihs- yellow, white, ,.- r -- .1 ..I r. "i! ,..I
tOO ; swan quills, wild goose quills, i.. 1.. -i 11 I i .. ,, .e i
large supply (variou-) of all the latest and most esteemed metal
ici pens; French letter paper, manufactured with express refer-
ence to the use of the metallic pens, imported direct from Paris
by the advertiser; envelope paper from the F.' 'hka Midls, the
oest that is manufttactured in tlhe United States ; C..,. l. better auao
cap papers, and all the best varieties of American-made writing
papers ; London, Paris, and Boston inks and writing fluids.
On hand, every variety of Sationery, much of it imported by
F. T., of the best quality that can be bought for money in every
,ese. All for sale at the most reasonable prices, aun 4
gptIRASURY (OF KNOWLEDGE AND COM-
.t PLETE LIBRARY OF REFERENCE, in2
vols. of eleven hundred pages each, just received by F. TAY-
LOR, for sale, in full leather binding, at $3 75 cents for the net,
published at 6 dollars.) It contains a complete Gazetteer, a Chro-
nological and Historical Dictionary, Law Dictionary, Classical
l)icmionary, a Dictionary of the English Language, an English
Grammar, a Dictionary of Words, Sentences and Quotations in
general use from the Latin, Frceh, Italian and Spanish Lan-
guages, with their Translations in English, a Dictionary of Maxims
and Proverbs of all countries, translated an Ir.n T t -.-- I ofi
Science and Arts, a Biographical Dictionary, ams amass of other
moeful information, r. r-it.- I for immediate reference, too exten-
yive to be named %.' .... li,: limits of an advertisemntrt, A few
copies only received; aug 9
R)[,i113 I. PATENT PERRYIAN FILTER
S INIa-I'AND--A fresh supplyof thie above inkstand
lust received. The eulogy bestowed on this improvement by
thie publiejournals, and the preference obtained for Ihem over the
-,ommutmon inkstands, are almost unprecedented. The present novel
and scientific method of sup lying clear ink to the dlm ping cup,
and returning it into the resetvnir, is ,..-,-i..,i, shnnple-the
rectios being now performed biy uierely -u.... -i q ., lid to obtain
a supply, and shutting it down to withdraw it. In this state it
cannot overflow, whatever may be the change of temperature,
and it Is protected front dust or other ivjuiry in any place or cli-
mate. When time inkstand is filled, it is always ready for use, and
the writer will have a regular and daily supply of clear ink for
six moths. For sale at the bookstore o,
R. FARNHAM,
july 19 Bertween 9tb aul Olh streets, Penn. avenue.
4b LACK WkiTI NG I NK.-Just receive d from Boston
a large supply of Maynard & Noyes's black writing ink. This
ink is a thin, uniform fluid, flaws freely from the pen, aind, in a
short time, its color will change to a rich, beautiful ,lack. It
will not mould under any circursntancest aind is adapted to bouith steel
and quill pens. Its coirap)isitioi is such that, after t ,ins excluded
froul the air sonime time, its first appearance -...u i. pale ; but
those who are well acquainted with the ink never f t f-, I.. i
if it does not look black immediately, for it only t r o t ..
her second thought'" on the part of the consumer to satisfy him
of its being a rich, beautiful bieck. For sale by the aillon, and
and in quart, pinut, and half pint, and smaller bottles, by the do-
zen and at retail by I FARNHAM,
july 19 between 9th and 10th sts. Penn. av.
"t EW MUSIC.-All things love thee, so do I., Oh, do no
u il:;i, ii; I, .' -.i m ll I.i And is it lrayci? The dawn is break-
ting o' .i i. r,,.,. -..-..a quickstep. The sailor boy's grave,
(corre. i -In .. ) J .-I.. .tick step. The Chase. A dcecriptuive
ronduo. Alleghauny marchi. pur flig is there. I have loved thee
dearly ever. 'Tis sweet to ihUink. When stars -ire i n thie quiet
kies. The carrier tovo. Adieu to Provence. Guitar Music -
The dawn is breaking o'er us. Near the lake where drooped .he
willow. Slowly peals the vesper bell. Oft in the silly night.
I'he Admiral, a celebrated sea song. When stars are in the quiet
skies. New England, New England. My hbme o'er the sea.
The sailor boy's grave. Tho above new music is jis' received
and for sale at he Book and Music Store ofR. FARNHAM, Peon-
sylvania avenue, between 9th and 10th streets. Also, au addi-
tional supply of Burrowe's piano forte primer, containing the rudi-
ments of musai, calculated either for private tuition or tea-'hing
in classes, from the latest London ed tihn, with additions.
aug 6
N EW MARBL E YARIt, curlmer of 1st street attd
1L^Pennsylvania AvettUe.o-The subscriber, late frim
Philadelphia, begs leave to inform his friends and the Public that
lie has just established a Marble Yard in this city, where he in-
tends to keep constantly on hand Tmnbstones of every description,
Monomentus, aid other articles in his minfe ef Itmli-un and Ameri-
can Marble, which hue is willing to sell at very moderate prices to
any person who will favor him witl a call.
He will also undertake to ex-'cute orders in any kind of Mar-
ble work, either small or extensive, with which lie might be fa-
vored, and hopes, by strict attendied to his business, (with which
he is thorouglily acquainted,) to give general satisfaiction.
june 14-e,3o'u_ L. S FEGAGNINI.
ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS REEAYARD.--Ran
away from the subscriber, on the 10th of April, a negro
man calling bimsnli ROBERT BUCrLER, about 25 or 31 years of
age, about six feet high, weml proportioned, of rather light ciler,
amd of polite address. He erinces a nervousness or trembling of
the hands when spoken to. He had on when he leut hme dark
eassinot roundabmout, striped paotalooua1 anid fur hat; hue also cir-
ried with him a cloak. It is probable, however, that he has
changed his clothes. He has a wife at Stephen Beard, senior's,
Anne Arundel county, and left home to see her. He may bu in
the neighborhood. Ho can read, and I think can write, and it is


june 14 4 doors west of Brown's Hotel.
rgpO PARENTS AND TE'TCHERS.-SCIOOL
BOOKS.-The subscriber having lately received frnm
the North a very large supply of School Books, and all that are
used in the District, and havingselectedthiose thatare we Ill bound,
and the besteditions, those who wish to purchase will find ittotheir
interest to examine them. School Books will be sold at reduced
prices, and a liberal discount made to those who purchase by the
quantity.
Also, Blank Books and Stationery of every kind, of the best
quality in the market, and will be sold at the lowest prices.
R. FARNHAM,


G REEN TURTLES in all the different manners in
S which they mnyv be dressed, salt water terrapins accord-
ingly in the same manner. All other luxuries as usunal.
july 5-tf J. BOULANGER.
'-HE M0N PYYEI) MAN, a Novel, by Hvraae Smith
t one of th' authors ot the Rejected Addresses," iust pub-
lished; and The Life and Literary Remains of L. E. L., 2 vols. re-
ceived this day for sale by F. TAYLOR, and for circulation
among the subscribers to the Waverley Circulating Library.
EW B9tOOKS.-Just published, anti or sale at MORRI-
SON'S bookstore, four doors westolf Brown's Hotel-Lives
of Eminent Men of Italy, literary and scientific, by Mrs. Schellv
Sir 1). Brewater, James Montgomery, and others, in 2vols. 12mo.
The Siege of Florence, art historical romance, by Daniel McCair-
thy, Eeq. in 2 vola. Also, No. 11 Barnaby Rudge. aug 6
d AWS relate g to, the Public Lands-For sale by F.
S TAYLOR, in two volumes ; containing, also, the instruc-
tions issued from lime to tline front the Treasury Department and
General Land Office, with ijdicia! decisions, and official opinions
of the ,\ ..I., mG.. .A. .1 on qu!sti;ias arising under the Land
laws. i ..ii I ,.,. -. I tol, mapr, suisveys, Indian reservations,
&c. dc. Preparedl by the order of, and for the use of, Govern-
ment. A few copies only for sale by F. Taylor. aug 6
E0iW W OOKS.-Just published and for sale by WM. M.
e X O1=0RIISON, 4 doors west of Brown's Hotel, Tire Idler
in France, in 2 vola., by thie Countess of Blessina.uin. Charles
O'Malley, cheap edition. Also, Nos 8 and 9 of tii,,, r French
Revolution, and Nos. 8 and 9 of Waverley Novels, the cheapest
edition evee'4tulishcd in the United States, the whole of with chl
costs only-a five dollar note. aug 6
S1 ( 1 1 111 '..l J im,s i. i \ t lt B it- l s; .- 1)
I PETAI1L iVWINE STORES, No. 30 "1alnn1t st.
Plhiladclphla.-A business connexion for the pist sixteen years
with the well-known established house of JOHN VAUGHAN, Esq.
,_... i. ,ubscribcr great facilities for obtaining tiie best wines
l~u,~. i'
Having replenished his stock by various late importations of
Wines, &c. hie invites ott ntion to it, with the conviction oif his
ability to give satisfaction by the delivery of wines, liquors, &c.
that are of the best sorts, brands, and growth, all of his own im-
porting, sand on sale directly from the original casks, instead of
the drauglht wines and Hiquors being transferred to stand casks,
having in them the lees of many wines, as has been the usage of
the trade. Among his stock are the following :
SHERRIES-Pale and Brown, on draught at various prices.
In bottle-Amointilhtdo, East India, Savannah, Natchez, Extra Old
Brown, Tinta di Roti, Paxaretta, &c. &c.
MADEIRAS-Of Phlelps, Newton, Gordon, & Cossart, Scott
& Co. Howard, March, & Co. and others of variety, on draught.
In bottlis-Plain, Superior, East India of one and two voyages,
West India, Amelia, Sup. Dry Nutty, Pare Vintage 1822, New
Orleans, Count Calsathal, 1818, Extra Dry Natty Wine, Comet,
1811, Curious Oi 1 Rich and Dry Malmsley, with a great variety
of others, on draught, in bottles and demijohns.
PORT WINES, &c.-Extra Superior Old Red Port, vintage
1816, Extra Superior Old White Port, vintage 1620; both front
Burmoester's private stock at Oporto, direct. Old Red Carmarate
,nd Old White Bucellas. Ports on .1. -.--i
FRENCH AND GERMAN-( I ...r.... ,.. J. Vaughan, extra;
Red and White I. i. ; "I.,rets at nd Sauterne, of various
sorts; S ,i l.t ,..' \ '!,,t t .. ..l,' 'i k ...5 Pink B.,,..,,,l .
Extra It 1 and Frontigna ; i .....- "p irklig l-ii.
and Rhine Wines, as Must ach, Geisenheit, Marcobrun, Rudes-
ir, .1nn., .:- I it.-i I -..,I %....,.i.geu, Schartaberg, still
.kl o.I. I, FA ~,, iIl,'hl 1: I [1)...... I., :,. 'c
Al. 'Y I '. .,t. ., ',.., ti.,.. 1 Herring's beat, Mare-
,"*, , .. .. .. ,I ., i ., eight and in bottles, (f
Brandies, Gin, Whiskeys. Jamaica spirits, Peaich Brandly, &c.
With a general assortmentof Wines and Liquors, in bottles
and on 1. ... lI i good low-priced sorts, for culinary use.
Hava.., -. I, 0 .. Oil, &c.
Orders iroi aly part of the United States executed with fidel-
ity and despatch. JACOB SNIDER, Jutn.
mar 9-2,iw6m Ihiladelphlia.
R KA.kNSAS LAND AGENCY.-In compliance with
the urgent solicitations of several of my fortoer employers
in that line, I have determined to resume the LAND AGENCY
BUSINESS, aud now offer miiy services to all persons owning
lands in Arkansas, as an agent to pay taxes, redeem lands, record
heeds, procure information it relation to the quality, value, and
local advantages of lands in any part of the State, or any other
business connected with a GzNERAL LAND AgasNCY.
Prom a residence in Arkansas oif nearly Q2 years, during about
16 of which I have fortiherly had considerable experience as a
Land Agent, and some pretensions to business habits, I flatter my-
self that I shall be able to give satisfaction to all who mav intrust
'heir busiies.s to me. As it is my intention to make no advances
sf money, under any circumstances, it will be expeteld lhat all
who commit their business to me will ac,ompany their orders
with a sauffi'ient atnotiut to meet all disbursements that maty be
required Remittances may be mtuade (at the risk of the writers)
in notesof, or certificates of deposit in, any solvent banks in the
United States,
All communications (post paid) addressed to me at Little Rock,
Arkansas, will ineet with prompt attention, ifaccompamned by a $5
mote as an evidence that thie writer is wilting to pay for the ser-
vices lie may wish me to render.
Refer to Hon. A. H SvtiEta aniul Hon. W. S. FULTON, Senators,
and Hon. E. Cnoss, Representative, in Congress om nArkansas.
july 10-1twaim WM. E. WOODlUFPF.
E XCHANGE HOTIL, Banltimotre.-Thie subscriber
ever desirous to meet the wishes of the travelling commiu-
nity, has now the pleasure of informing his friends that he has
idded about fifty new and airy rooms to his hotel, which he trusts
will enable hint to accommodate all who may patronise his house.
W'rom the encoursgerenar lie has received, and from a determine
lion to meet the views (as far as post-ible) of his friends, hc flatters
himself thatold friends will continue, and new ones be induced to
give him a trial. Its near .... i,ii..i to the Railroaid Depots
-Ind the several steamnboats, if1, in'- idry, and well ventilated
qimartmeits, and healthy location, make it a desirable place for
Southern as well as Northern travellers. Repsectfuhly,
JOSEPH JEWETT,
july lf--2aw3tm Proprietor.
FU^ IIUH PAVILION HOTlrEL llerkeley Springs,
Virginia, will t ap r.-mr',rI time present seasioo to tihe
housee of the late Col U. ',,,, 1. h, the undersigned has rented
for a terotm ofyears.
This change, while it will considerably extend, will bo used as
an occasion for improving also the accommodations of this estab-
lis h m e nt.
june 26-lawe&2awd6w JOHN STROTHER.
L AND 1i-tll ,.--I,. --..1,-,:' ..r. Il-n- a'r h, Ie
salo a large tract of Land lyinu in Prince George's county,
Maryland, about ten miles front Washington attd eight miles
from Alexandria. The roads from \ .i,I., ., to Nottint'-
ham, from Alexandria to Upper Marlborough and Nottinghiam,
from Upper Marlboronmgh to Piscataway, and many others, pass
through this tract, which has been recently surveyed and divided
into small farms of two hundred and three hundred acres each.
A portion ofnihis tract Consists of very valuable timber and wood
land, not noe than five or six miles from Upper Marlborough,
adjoining the estates ofR. D. Sewall and Richard Trest, E squires.
This land will be sold very low, andl on a credit ef from one to ten
years, upon the purchaser giving satisfactory security.
Any atplicationm, made ii person or by letter, to thel subscriber,
near Bladensburg, or to Jothn Calvert, Esq., residing at Mount
Airy, w titia two miles of the land) will be promptly attended to;
and ih lhe ni will be shown to any one disposed to purchase, by
John Calvett, Etq.
jine 16-2awtf CHARLES B. CALVERT.
A DISCOURSE delhereid on tbe. Fast Day recoummendled
by the President nf the United States, by John Disean,
Pastor of thle Associate Refiormed C ngregation of Baltimore, jusl
published, and for sale at the Stationery store of
R. FARNHAM,
june Ii Between 9th and 10th streets, Penn. avenue.
T.'=ARRENTtON FEMALE IN3TITUTIE F'au-
qV uier county, Va.-The next session of hlii institu-
tioun, now under the charge of tlihe Misses SWIFT, will commence
un time 6dm orfS ptember next. The conree of instruction is that
usually pursued in the higher Female Seminaries of our country.
Further information may be obtained by referring to-
Hoi. J. W. Huntington, U. S. Senate.
H:n. Thomas Williamn, House of Reps.
Hon. Truman Smithi, S
leman Homer, Esq. )
Johln P. Phillips, Esq. >Warrenton, Va.
Cot. John Walden, july 17-cpt6thSept
INE iTUNIDRE)D DOLLARS RtEWARlD.-Ab-
.L sconded from the subs-riber, living near Washuingtto, on
the 15th instant, thie following described negro slaves, viz. JOHN,
-27 years old, about 5 feet 10 inches bigm, a brown black culor, the
sinew of one of his hams recently hurt so as to aut'e a ridge pri-
tuberanue. He has long been my vegetable market man, a plain
carpenter and joiner; has been hired at the Potomae Fisheries
fur several years past; strong natural sense ; believed can read
and write. DUMPTY, his brother, about 22 years old, not qnite
as lark, well mautde, lively manners, impediment in speech when
suddenly questioned; not quite as tall as John. LOUISA, their
sister, about 30 years ohl, not quite so dark as her brothers, of
common size and pleasant manners. Their clothing cannot he
described, as they had threat, variety and of thie best. ALFRED,
and his brother JERRY, black, as advertised im the National In-
-i ......r .., 1839, small stature, about 25 and 23 years of age,
r i, in.. .* 't rch of tlat year.
For thIe fumr meun I will give .$2t00 each, if taken ina free State,
and in like case, $100 for tlhe woman, orn$0tl each,no matter where
taken, if confined in any jail so that I get them again.
I have no loubt they have forged papers, and are now passing un-
der other aimes. The woman has a free husband, named Jim
Butler, a brown black color, about the height of John.
NOTLEY MADDOX,
may 19-wfwdwfiwc Near Washington.
gACON AND LA HD.-
BACO0,00 pounds Western Bacon, assorted
201 kegsand 20 barrels Lard
The above is received on commission direct from tle salters


at the Franklin Insurance Office.
july 7-2aw tf
ri-WO IUNI)RED AND) FIFt'Y REAMS FLAT
I CAP PAPER.-Just received, by the Schooners Vic-
tory an i Dodge, Two Hundred and Fifty Reams Flat Cap Paper,
comprising every quality, suitable for any purpose for which pa-
per of that size may be required.
Also, Royal and Can size Envelope Paper of the best quality,
constantly for sale at Stationers' Hall. july 8--2w3taw
F OR HIRE, a negro boy 16 or 17 years of ago. Apply at
S the law office of H. H. Dent, Four itd-a- alf street.


IMPROVEMENT OF RED RIVER, LOUISIANA

S EALED PROPOSALS will be received until the first day of
September next for executing the following works of improve-
ment on Red river, Louisiana. The proposals will be addressed
to J. J. Abert, Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers, vAash-
ington, District of Columbia, and endorsed on the envelope Pro-
posals for the improvement of the Red river."
Items of work to be done.
1st. To remove, by a day to be stated in the proposal, the present
raft situated in the main navigable channel of Red river, at and
near Phelp's landing, and embracing a distance of about three
miles, together with any and all additions that may be made to the
same by new accumulations of drifted materials prior to the com-
pletion of the removal of said raft.
2d. To eradicate, reduce, and remove from the main navigable
channel all rafts, planters, snags, sawyers, stumps, bogs, wrecks,
&c. that may now or hereafter be found to exist in the main navi-
gable channel, and to keep the same open between the outlet of
Red Bayou, near the northerly boundary of Louisiansa and the
confluence of said main navigable stream with Beyou Pierre river
six miles above Grand Ecore, embracing the entire district affect-
ed by the old raft.
It is expected that the work of the Ist item will be done by the
first day of February next; that of the second may be extended
l.... I. a series of years. Proposals will be made accordingly.
S ... parties offering for the work and obtaining the contract will
moreover be required to execute various other works of the follow-
ing character, viz.
3d. The formation of cuts off at thIe ;:..r;. of bends.
4dh. The reduction and removal of til points at abrupt turns
of the channel.
5ilt. The felling of trees, &c. standing on the banks of the chan-
nel; and
6ith. Such other works as may be deemed conducive to the im
provement of thIe navigation of the river.
All woks herein contemplated will be executed under tIle di-
rections ofra superintend ng engineer, and from items 3 to 6 inclu-
sive for such rates ofeompensation as he may deem equitable and
just. The said engineer being authorized to accept tlhe voluntary
assistance of a commission, on the part of the inhabitants of the
Red river country, in order to aid him in tire inspection of work
done, in verifying the same t--r.lr.r r- the terms of the contract
in estimating thie value of *1i,. -.' ,.--in items of work and the
amounts payable therefore, and in dec4atieg a contract void in case
of a failure on the part of the contractors to comply with thie con-
ditions and stipulations of time contracts.
Payments under contracts to be made semi annually and after
inspeclion of the work done. Bidders will name their sureties.
Bonds for the faithful performance of contracts will be exacted in
the penal stm of one-fourth of the estimated value of the whole
work covered by the contract. Ten per cent. of amounts periodi-
cally due under contracts will be retained and foirfeited as part of
the penally in cases of failure ofcontractors.
The Unitedt States steamboat Eradicator with tools and equip-
ment to be taken by the contractor at a fiir valuation, or on bids
in the proposals, and accounted for in work done under contact.
BuREAU Top. EsGitNEs, Jutov 8, 1841.
july lit-3taw4w
W101 RE ,.-i,. -- in.. m,-.:,- ,,.-. -t
S Market, lately occupied by BHron Mareschal, Austrian Mitt-
ister. Situation fashionable and healthy. Premises in excellent
order. Possession given immeduratehy. Inquire of
aug 9-dtf FRANCIS MARKOE, Jr.
r OTICEI TO TIMBER GETTERS.-The subscriber
i offers to the attention of Timber Getters some very valua-
ble Ship Timber, and also valuable rimber of other kinds. This
Timber consists of i, white Oak, Ash, and Yellow Pine, lying front r
half a mile to a mile of water uavigable for brigs and large
schooners. Letters directed, post paid, to the subscriber, at Mer-
ry Point, Lancaster county, Virginia, will be attended tlo promptly
saug 9-3t E. A. CURRIE.
'. OTICUo.-The subscriber lias on hand a number of splen-
d'id Carriages, which he will dispose of at reasonable I rices
for cash. He recommends persons who wish to purchase to give
him t call beficre they buy elsewhere
His assortment consists of one splendid Coach, one Barouchs,
one fancy Carryall, one Buggy %% ., with a top, and several
second-handed ; all of which will be sold low for cash.
N. B. All orders will be promptly attended to, at his old stand,
on Maine street, or at his stand in the rear of Gadsby's Hotel, Penn-
sylvania avenue.
jitly 22-1St JOHN M. YOUNG.
014RAVELLING BASKETS, FRENCH TWIST,
BUFFALO COMBS, ce.--S. P IRKER has just
received a large assortment of the above articles, which lie offers
for sale at very low prices, together with a handsome as-ortment of
fancy Pans, Comnbs and Brushes of every description, Wax
Dolls, &c.
Ornamental H air and Fancy store, between 9thi and l 0dh streets,
Penn. avenue. july 24--6itif
'1EACH EI.--A young lady wishes to obtain ,i situation as
teacher in a private fa-nily, or to form a school in an agree-
able neighborhood. Shite is competent to give instruction in all
the braucihes of a polite Erglish education, on the pianoo forte, in
wax and shell flowers, and other orutmiiental works.
The most satisfactory references can be g iven, if required.
Address S. post office Philadelphia. All letters must be post
paid. july 29--wl hnU
D OUIRLE PATENT PEUtRIAN FILTER
KINKSTAN D.-Perry & Son having affected consider-
able improvement in their Filter Inkstand, have now the pleasure
to announce that a second patent has been granted to them for
ouch improvement, which they have uiated with their first patent
under the title of Dub'e Patent Filter Inkstand." The eu-
log$ bcatowed on the Patent Filter Inkstand by the public .lour-
nals, and the preference obtained for them over the coimmnon ink-
stainids, were almost unprecedented. Tihe present novel and sci-
entifi cmt'thod of supplying c'ear ink to the dipping cup, and re-
turnming it into the reservoir, is exceedingly simple, the action being
now performed by merely lifting uip the lid to obtain a supply and
shtmting it down to withdraw it ; in this state it cannot overflow,
whatever may be the change of temperature, andt it is protected
from dust or otherinjury in any place or climate. When the ink-
stand is filhd, it is always ready lfor use, and the writer will have
a regular and daily supply of clear ink for four or six months.
Just received and for sale at the Stationery Store of
R. FARNHAM,
Where may be found French, English, and American Station-
cry, and w'irraintcd equal to any in tire markets wholesale and
retail. mar 31
N EW BOOKS--Life and Literary Remains of L. E. L
by Laman Blanchard, in 2 volumes. Ella V., or the July
PFour, by one of the Party. Also, Nos. 7 and 8 Chas. O'Malley;
and No. 8 Barnaby Rudge, are this day published and for sale by
W. W. MORRISON,
june 30 Four doors west of Brown's.
C 1l1t140 .Il9'1tiIkv, of all kinds that are now inu use in the
;.2" city, tie best editions and binding, for sale at the lowest
prices at the book and stationery store of
W. M. MORRISON,
may 12 Four doors west of Brown's Hotel.
Washlimgtont, I). C.
Orphans' Cuurt,July a0, 1841.
N TIlE APPLICATION of the, administrator of
Thomas Dittro, deceased, it is this clay Ordered, That
he give notice in some newspaper in the city ot Washington,o
once a week for three successive weeks, that he will, on be second
Tuesday in August next, proceed to pay and make distribution of
the assets in band, under the direction of the said court, to the
creditors of said deceased.
NATHANIEL P. CAUSIN.
True copy. Test: ED. N. ROACH,
july 21-w3w Register of Wills.
"iEWV NOVE1.--The Marrying Man, a novel, bv the ai-
Ai thor of Cousin Geoffrey, in 2 vols. Also, Number 9
Birnabty Fudge, are just received and fur sale by W. M. MOR-
RISON, four doors west of Brown's IHotel. july 9
EXCHANGE AND COT'ITON TRADE WITHI
ENGLAND.--Exchange and cotton trade between
England and the United States; containing pro forms accounts
on contton purchased in the turncipal markets of thie Union asd
sliipped to Liverpoul; with, Tables ih ... mg ths cost of cotton at
Liverpool, and thue mett proceeds oi I... c -in quotauionsa atnd cal-
culations of exchasgc operations between New York amd the
South, and between Londuo and the United Suates, by I. F. Entz.
Just published and for sale at thIe bookstore of
R. FARNHAM,
July 5 Between 9th and lOth sts. Penn. av.
IiSPTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, by W. G.
Simus, ammuhbir of The Partisan," "The Yemasneo," &c.
from its first discovery, in 1 vol. 1840.
Marthi's History of Non-tll Caroliua from the earliest
period, in 2 vtls. Just received fur sale by F. TAYLOR.
/ -'HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
l ias obtained from the Orphans' Court of Washington
.,.. I". the District of Columbia, letters t. '... i,.,-i .-
"l. | .: t,.... estate of Ehias Corcoran, late .* 'a si,.,,,i i .
county, D. C. deceased. AHa -in,...'i,,,. I *imms against the she-
ceased are hereby warned u ,. s. I. Ih ..1' w ith the vouchers
thereof, to the subscriber on or before thie 28th day of July
next; they may otherwise by law be excluded from all benefit of
said estate.
Given under my hand this 28th day of July, 1841.
JOHN B. BLAKE,
july 29-w3w Executor.
B AN C0tFT'S HISTORY OF THE UNITEi)
STATES, 3 vols. Democracy in America, 1st amd 2d
pasts. History of the .\.A-,' C . -, L. S. Turner, in 2 vols.
The Ecclesiastical and P .,in> th, i .-. of the Popes of RomB,
by Sarah Austin, in 2 vols. General History of the World, from
the earliest times until the year 1831, by Charles Von Rotteck,
LL. D. translated from the G'rmin ant e.ontiiued to 1840 by
Frederick Jones, A. M. in 4 wcls. History of the Navy of the
United States of America, by J. Penimore Cooper, in 2 vols.
The above works are for sale low by
W. M. MORRISON,


july -27-7t
VipH subscriber has on hand, at his Marble Yard, south side
rnof Pennsylvania avenue, opposite No. 12, between 41 and
6th streets, a fine assortment of American and Foreihn Marble,
namely, Monuments, Tombs, Head Stones, &ec. which will be sold
low for cash, orin trade.
Also, Agent for the saleof Marble Mantels, from the celebrated
manufactory of John W. Maxwell, of Baltimore.
Grate setting done as usual. J. P. PEPPER.
N.B. Orders received for furnishing Anthraite Coal as here.
tofore, .sne I--dgtw2m


0 N FRIDAY NEXT, the 13th Instant, at ll
o'clock, at the warehouse, O'Donnell's Wharf, Baltimore-
250 half pipes Cognac brandy of various brands and vintages,
part very old and superior
19 quarter casks do do
500 cases of Claret, of various vintages
160 do White Wine
24 casks Vin de Grave
22 do Bordeaux and Marseilles Claret
18 quarter casks a Cette Madeira
15 Indian barrels eI
19 quarter casks Cette Port.
The above assortment, selected for this market, is direct im-
portation, subject to debenture.
WM. G. HARRISON,
aug 9-5t Baltimore.
IVERPOOtL FINE SAL'T'.-Daily expected, and for
sale by the subscriber, 500 sacks Liverpool fine salt, Wor-
thington's brand. JOHN DAVIDSON,
aug 7-3t Water street, Georgetown.
F URNISHED ROOMtS FOR RENT.-Three, or,
i required, four rooms, on the first fl or of the house situ-
ated on thie corner of Pennsylvania avenue and 12th street, op-
posite thie City Post Office.
Apply at th o House, or at the store af the subscriber.
JAS. CLEPHANE,
aug 7-3t Pennsylvania av. between Ilth and 12th sts.
N OTICE.--I am instructed by thie honorable the Circui
Court of the District of Columbia for the county of Washing-
ton to advertise a fine Lepine Gold Watch, four holed jewelled,
with gold chain and key. This watch was found in possession oh
a person who was arrested in tihe 4th Mar-h last, at the Presi-
dent's Hlouse, as i pickpocket, and i s supiposed to have been
stolen. l, ..,it r., one have lost such an article, they will please
apply a 'it, .j.I .ALEXANDER HUNrER, t
july 5--dif Marshal of the District of Columbia.
T EW PUIII .1ATIII.-- or1,,-I i,.I ,-gr'.-I 1
1 Don Joulnuin Velasquez de Lem and Don Pedro Fernan-
dez diel Castillo, members of tlIe Board of Commissioners, under
thIe Conveuntion of April I11, 1839, on the part oh the Republic of
Mexico, addressed to the President of the United States, by Ora-
zio de Attellia Santangelo, a citizen of the United States, with
tweety-three documents."
To be had at R. FARNHAM'S, Penn. av. between 9th and 10th
streets. july 21-5t
OR RENiT.-A large parlorand thrieeor four bed rooms,
S furnished, with kitchen and cellar. The rooms are plea-
sant, large, aind airy. These apartments would suit well for a
family, or three or four gentlemen.
Those ladies and gentlemen who would wish to suit themselves
before leaving the city would do well by making early applica-
tion at Miadame BIHLEt'S Fancy sttre, on Pennsylvania ave-
nue, between 9SI and Wlth streets, north side.
aug 9-3t
BOt)ARDING.-A small family and two or three gentlemen
can be accommodated with genteel boarI on reasonable
terms. Iiquirc third door west of the Globe office, Pennsylvania
avenue, aug 9-3t
N OTICE.-The copartnership between Horatio B Alden,
i f Randolph, Mass. and William Noyes, under the firm
of W. Noyes & Co." was dissolved t-y mutual consent on
the first of July last. W. Noyes is authorized to settle up tihe
business. H. B. ALIDEN,
%%..,.i .r-- ,.., r 6, 1841. W. NOYES.
I'h i u-'.it be continued at the old stand, Luuisiauna Ave-
nut, in Catlett's new bh Iding, by Wmin. N..,. -.. ,- Win. Noyes,
Jr., ami Albert Noyes, under the firm of' '% i. N yes & Sons;"
where will be found a large stock of coarse heavy ; boots and bro-
gins, with a good supply of ladies, gentlemen's, boys, misses,
and children's boots and shoes, manufactured expressly to out
order, all of whieh will be s.ld by the package or dozen, at fair
prices, for cash or for good paper.
aug 9-eo6t V. NOYES & SONS.
A SITUATION WANTED.-A young gentleman, who
is qualified to prepare students fir admission to college, and
who has had several years' experience both in the North and Soutbh,
is desirous of .'..i .:.,;, ,. -. i.ion either in some academy or as a
private teacher, r i...,.1,iIi from the most respectable sources
ais to moral character, literary attainments, and ability to impart
instruction will be furnished.
Address J. A. S., Wasbingtni.
Reference may be made to the Heon. John L. Kerr, Hon. Jas.
A. Pearce, anud John S. Skinner, Esq. july 12-tlS
O 'FERRALIS' COFFEE-IOUSE, Berkeley
Springs, Virginia.-This long-established '..-, lhi,
house is now opru for the entertainment of visitors. A %.h 'i,,
i principal l building g are connected several comfortable out-houses,
u.gether with W. Hunter's large boatding-house.
Grateful for past encouragement, nothing will be omitted to
merit a continuance by the Public's humble servants,
F O'FERRALL.
july 22-1m [Globe& Mad] JOHN O'FERRALL.
aI LL WR iGH'TI N G.-The subscribers inform the mil-
v.Ul. ers, &c. of this District ans the adjoining counties that
they are always prepared to undertake and complete satisfactori
ly all Mill work or Machinery commilted to (heir charge; having
i goad set of hands, constantly engaged, despatch can always be
given. They have every convenience for light work, repairs, &c
at their Saw-mill, corner of Water and Market sts. Georgetown.
R. E. DUVALL & CO.
REFaEENCES.
John Lyons, Esq. Georgetown.
George C. B nmford, E.q. Georgetown.
Gen. W. Smith, do.
Bernj. F. Miller, Superintendent Pot. Aq. Georgetown.
Thomas Lansdale, A&.- i -,. Man. Co.
Thorn im s Miller, Agent Montgomery Matt. Co. Md.
aug 2-eolts
"1 LEXANI)RIA ieOUNIDti, Steam-engline andt
t.- Machinme l ings ofevery description, high anwI low pressure steam engines,
lire engines, sheet-iron boats, mill and tobacco screws, turning
lathes, bells of all sixes, letter copying presses, &e. tr other nia-
-,hinery, executed promptly, and on thle most favorable terms by
T. W. & R. C. SMITH,
The above have a very large assortment of patterns for umill and
other gearing, &c. Also, a varietyot handsome patterns for cast-
iron rai-'ngs, &c.
They have forsale-
One locomotive engine
One 20 horse high pressure engine
Two 8 horse do do
One 3 horse do do
Allof which are completed, and will be sold very low if early
application is made. oct 3-ly
.J!IAN tFORTES.-My late invoice of Pianos by the Bre-
S men ship Jobannis, direct from E. Roscnkranz, Dresden,
are of superior workmanship, lone, and touch. These Piaunos are
made by my owun directions, with iron plates, extra iron braces,
and 7 extra keys from the 6 octave. They are fitted up in a hand-
some style, and I only want them examined to prove their good
qualities. I have been dealing in these Pianos for the lastseven or
eight years, and my knowledge of the durability of them enables
me to recommend Ern.st Rosenkraiz' best made Pianoi to the Pub-
lic generally as not surpassed by any. They will be sold retail
ur wholesale to suit the times. Apply at 22 Light street, Bait.
N. B. Oil Pianos taken in exchange.
july 9-1l9t JOSHUA M. MILLER.
ANTED TO 1IIRE IMMEDIATELY-A griod
Dinin-roomn Servant. A slave would be preferred. $10
per month will be paid. Inquire at Mrs. E. T. Arguellcs' Board-
ing house, nearly opposite Gadsbv's Hottl. auig 7-3t
rlO P'ARUNTS & TRUSTEES OF SCHOOLS.-
A gentlemm who is capable of leaching thie French, Ger-
man, LIatin, and Greek languages, and all the branches of Cluas-
sital E location, acnd has experience i, teaching, would wish to
obtain a situation in any scientifical institution. He would have
no obijectioun to go West, under favorable conditions. The best of
rof-reuces will be produced and required.
A letter ddlresned, post paid, to 1. H. K. C Washington, would
meet with au immediate attention, n aug 7-2w
District of Columblt It- .'." .-'--, county, to -tat:
jtils IS '1PO 4 l- i IlI' t lhat Joseph S. Sanford, oh
S- said county, brought before iiie .,.].l,- ;.n .. -1. a Justice of
the Pe tce in and for the said county, two .: I u.t,; i-k.i., up as ce -
trays trespassing on his enclosure. One of the said geldings is a
thick, s eckled gray, supposed to be 12 years old, or upwards,
and has been shuod all rounj ; has worked in gear and under ihe
saddle. The other is an iron gray, a little hipped on the right hip;
no shoes on ; hias worked in gear and under the saddle. Both
horses are in good working order.
Given under my hand and seal this sixth day of August, 1841.
R. It. CLEMEN r's, J. P.
The owner or ow ers of sidu property, as atiove described, are
requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take
titem away. JOSEPH S. SANFORD.
aug 7--3td ___________________
N^EGRO MAN FOR SALE.-My negro GEORGE
Li aged about 21 years, perfectly sound and healthy, raised
as a famnuiy servant; a first rate cook, waaher, and ironer; can
make any kind of pastry, and, if necessary, can spin, sew, and
knit. Any person in want of euch a servant will please call on
C. HOGMIRE,
Water Street, Georgetown.
Sold for no fault, willing to go South, but prefers the North.
july 29-reo3t
tTOREANI) ID SELLING-IziOUSHF(OR R1tiNT
5--The subscriber offers for rent an excellent two-story brick
house, with a large enclosure, situated on square No. 200, near
Mr. Matthew St. Clair Clarke's residence, lately occupied by Mr.
P. Patrick. The pr oines are undergoing some repairs, and will
be ready for a tenant ini a week's time.
Also for rent, the store and cellar on Pennsylvania Avenue,
oppB site Browum's "Hotel, where I used to keep store. It is a good
stand, and well calculated for any busimess- Ihmediate posses
sion can be' iven. For terms, &e., apply t G. C. GRAMMER,


BY ROBT. TAYLOR & CO. Baltimore.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF A STOCK OF DRY
GOODS.-On Thursday morning, 12th instant, at half
past 9 o'clock, we will sell at the store orR. MeEldowney & Co.,
No. 97 Baltimore street, by order of the Trustees, the entire stock
of Dry Goods of said store ; comprising a general assortment of
Fancy and Staple Goods suited to tIhe present and approaching
season, consisting of
Superfine cloths and cassimeres, cashmeretta
Cashmere, silk, and other vestings, satin do
Silk velvets, serge, silk buttons, summer cloths
Drilling, linen diaper, grass cloths, table covers
Hollands, lawns, white and brown linens
Fancy prints, furniture do, buckrams
Lain-.,' wool hints an.- irawers, rich mantillas
Fircy handkierrhiefsl anl s.:arf&, cashmere, silk, and eCtpe
at,. WI
E-nbi -.iared un I figured m.,.i.u.?Iines de lines
Beaver and pilot cloths, French and English merinoes
Bombasins, colored cambrics, painted lawns
Bishops' lawns, lasting, damask, blankets, flannels
Silks, various kinds, counterpanes, worsted comforts
Satinetts, jeans, red paddings, ticking
Plaids and stripes, thread, cotton, and silk gloves
Beaver and kid gloves, suspenders, gambrooms
6-4 cambrics, sewing silks, coat bindings
Silk braids, acesa, sewing cotton, black silk handkerchiefs
Pongee handkerchiefs, galleons, ribbons, crapes, bobbinets
Cerded velvets, needle-worked capes and collars
Checked muslins, barege, lace veils
Worked bands and insertings, silk and cotton hosiery
Merino and cashmere hoisery, lasting and gilt buttons
Threads, pantaloon stuff, green baize
Canton flannels, black and white crapes
Linseys, cambric dimity, laces, &c.
aug 8-dts R. A. TAYLOR A CO.
M f tO INT iT MART'S A *COI,.LGE.-4,he exercises
v..1. of study at this uInstitution will be resumed on the 16th of
August.
Mount St. Mary's College is situated in a romantic and beauti-
ful part of Frederick county, Maryland, emboasomed in woods
and retired from the distractions and moral danger of a city.
The site is peculiarly healthy, and is supplied with the purest wa-
ter by a spring gushing from tie rock. It is distant fifty miles
from Baltimore, eighteen from Frederick, Md. twelve from Get-
tysburg, Pa. and two from Emmetsburg, Md. The buildings are
sufficient for the accommodation of one hundred and fouty hbord-
ere. The various halls and rooms are spacious, airy, and com-
fortable.
This Institution was raised to the rank and invested with the
powers and privileges of a College, by the General Assembly of
Maryland, in the month of February, 1830.
The system of education embraces the various Arts and Sciences
usually taught in Colleges, conducted on the most comprehensive
plan. Acoumpetent knowledgeof the Greek and Latin languages
and literature,of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Chemistry,
Logic, Moral and Ih.tellectual Philosophy, Geography, Rhetoric,
aid History, is, by the statutes of the f'. I, it-.a-mFensable for
graduation; but the course of studies i.. t-. F'.. I.. ', Grammar,
Arithnmetic, Book-keeping, Practical Surveying, the German,
Italian, French, ahod Spanish languages. Nor is there any extra
charge, except for Music and Drawing.
Besides a well-selected library for the use of the students,
there is also a reading-room, in which the best literary ftnd sci-
entific periodicals may be consulted during the time of recess from
study.
There is a complete and excellent Philosophical Apparatus, a
Chemical Laboratory, and a Mineralogical collection.
ThIe Prolessoirsa and rutors, nearly thirty in number, residing,
with very few exceptions, in the Institution, devote themselves
entirely to the dutirs ,f their profession. Constituting but one
family with the students, they exercise, not only a constant super-
vision-friendly in the highest degree to discipline and decorum-
but also a moral imflauence of the most salutary kind. The students
are never permitted to go beyond the College limits, except in
omnpany with one of them. On the other hand, ample opporto-
nity is afforded by the retired md rural situation of the College
fur its pupils to enjoy, under the care of t:-eir teachers, every va-
riety of innocent and healthful exercise and recreation. Hence
ithe formation of a robust constitution is in general a result of some
years' residence in this Institution. The diet is wholesome and
abundant. The sick are well attended and nursed. Sistets of
Charity," from St. Joseph's, near Emmetsburg, have charge of
the Infirmary and of all those departments on which the health
ald comfort of the students chiefly depend.
While the government of the C, lege is mild and paternal, the
laws of good order, propriety, and morality are strictly enforced.
fle moral influence of instruction, persuasion, and encourage.
'nment is primarily and mainly relied on, and is seldom found in-
effectual.
The penalty of dismissal or expulsion is incurred by hbitual
neglect of study, wanton and repeated violation of the established
rules, profane swearing, irreligious language or writings, the in-
roduction ef infidel or immoral books, and other similar offences
against morality or the laws of the CoUllege.
Students who come Irons other Colleges must produce certifi-
cates of dismission in good standing.
When a student enters the College, he is admitted to those
.lasos which hel i hts found capable, on examination, of attending
with advantage. The most eligible time for entering ia fruom the
8thtu the 16th of August.
Frequent examinations of the different classes take place dur-
ing the academical year, aud rep res of Ihe students' progress in
ths several branches of study are reid publicly every Wednes-
hlay in the presence of all their Professors and tutors. Once a
year a report is sent to the parents or guardians, stating every
thing thit may interest them concerning their children or wards.
The Commencement is held on the last Wednesday of June,
previous to which the candidates for literary honors a-e examined
publicly; premiums are then distributed to the meritorious, and
degrees conferred.
Those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required
to write and deliver discourses approved of by the Faculty. To
be admitted to this degree it is necessary thai time candidate should
have gone through ati least the last year of the course in this In-
stitution, and have acquitted himself creditably, so as to give clear
evidence of his worthiness, both at the private and public exami-
nations.
Those who have received from the Faculty of this College the
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and have, during at least two years
thereafter, been engaged in scientific and literary pursuits, will
also receive ihe degree of Master of Arts, on application made to
tihe Presidenut aud Faculty, accompanied by satisfactory evidence
of their moral deportment and continued devotion to liberal stu-
dies.
The annu I vacation begins on the last Wednesday of June and
continues until the sixteenth of August. There being no Christ-
mas or Easter recess, students should notbe withdrawn from their
classes at either of those periods.
EXPENSES.
Board and tuition, per annum, including the entire classic and
scientific course, together with the modern languages, also doc-
tor's salary, washing and menuling, use of bed and bedding, paya-
ble half-yearly in advance, $182.
Music and drawing are extra charges, each forty dollars per
annum for those who wish te learn them.
Medicines are furnished at the apothecary's prices, and gener-
ally add but little to the expenses.
Parents or guardians, if 0isw, prefer it, can pay the sum of $350
which will be received in '.Ij I r all the branches of education
taught in the college, (except music and drawing,) fir boadiog,
clothing, and other necessary expenses. Postage and pocket-
money are excepted.
Every student must be supplied on entering with four summer
suits if hbe enter in the spring, and three winter sails if he enter
in the fail. He must also have at least six shirts, six pair of
stockings, six pocket handkerchiefs, six towels, and three pairs of
shoes'or boots. The students will be provided with clothing by
the Institution, if such should be the wish of their parents. It is,
however, preferred that they should be furnished from home,
when this is practicable.
No uniform is required or worn.; b hut simplicity and economy
are recommended to parents and observed at the college.
Bills of expenditure are seat at the close of every half-year to
the parents, and at the same time is issued a draft at 6 days'
sigut. Parents or guardians not residing in the United States
mnuist appoint a representative in these States responsible for the
regular payment of the expenses, and bonnd to receive the stu-
dent should it become necessary to dismiss him.
Should a student heave the College before thl expiration of a
quarter, no deduction can by made for tlie remainder of that quar-
ter, except in cases of ci :kness or dismissal ; nor is any made for
the vacation, during which parents have the option of leaving
their children at the College or taking them home. When pa-
rents wish their children to spend the vacation at home, they
uaust give previous notice, and forward their travelling expenses.
ra Letters ef inquiry should be addressed to the President
of Mount S Mary's C llege. Emmntaburg, Md.
St. Mary's College, July 29, 1841. satng 3-3t
A CARD.--Captain PARTRIDGE begs leave respeetlully
to inform the Public that the annual examir.,tin of the ca-
dets of the Norwich Uuiversity, (at Norwich, Vermont,) will om-
sensce on Mondav, the 9th of August, and continue one week.
The annual commencement will be on Thursday, the 19mh of Aug-
ust. There will be literary exercises on the day before the com-
mencement. TIme friends of liberal and useful education are re-
spectfully invited to attend both the examination snd the com-
amencement. The fall term will commence on the 15th of Sep-
tember, when candidates for admission are requested to join the
institution. lilt 10-law3w
B 4A R N UM'S CITY HOTEL .-The subscriber respect-
fj fully informs his friends and patrons that, after a lapse of
five years, he has resumed the proprietorship of the CITY HO-
TEL, and has spared neither pains nor expense in putting the
house in complete order; the exterior as well as the interior has
been thoroughly cleaned and painted, the halls flagged with mar-
ble, the parlorsand chambers refurnished, anod the entire estab-
lishment thoroughly reorganized. The subscriber therefore hopes,
by Imis long experience in the business and untiring exertions to
please, to merit and receive that liberal share of patronage here-
tofore extended to hit-it being the aim of himself and those in
his employ to make the City Hotel not onlythetrveyle's hams,
but also a place of real enjoyment. DAVID BANM- -,


llafImw









%



r*i_____ scheme of ,rt J e.tf,: c and the Scientific Committee v(
IGi_ Tt the institutee relate new wonders of the fertility of the soil in
NATIONAL I LL GL. NCEI. 5 Vriety of its valuable products. ad
-- --- j _^ -_ ---A--tl ,.he chief towns on the Loire have subscribed liberally "
FROM OUR EUROPEAN CORlIESPON DENT. l'r a railroad between Orleans and Nantes. It is an excel- m
lent enterprise, the river being scarcely navigable two-thirds tc
PARIS, JULY 15, 1841. of the year. From the reports of the recent meeting of the S
INFORMATION rFn TROSE IT MAY CONCERN.-Al letters to Paris and Rouen railroad company, it would appear that the ri
Americans at Paris should be directed to the care of the main works will be executed about the middle or end of 1843, th
Consulate or Legation, or some known banker or merchant, thanks to the capital and labor imported from the other side sf
If nuot, they are-after a slight inquiry, usually fruitless- of the channel. At the opening of the railroads between tL
thrown into a dead box of the General Post Office, where Bordeaux and Teste, and Strasburg and Basle, the solemni- m,
they are dissected. Our Consuls every where receive for ties and rejoicings had all dignity and emphasis. Not long a-
Americans, of whose address they are ignorant, numbers of since, the inauguration of the steamboat Stanislas, to 1ly be- ci
letters which are not called for; and, no provision being made tween Nancy on the Meuthe, and the Rhine, was celebrated fl
for the postage, the Consuls are thus heavily taxed. The by the authorities, civil and military : the Bishop, in his pan- ta
postage between England and France is enormous, and dis. tifical robes, gave benediction to the vessel, and delivered a th
graceful to the Governments. When persons in America beautiful discourse on the tendency of steam navigation to <
write by the steamer, to Paris, on their own business, they convert the human species into one Christian family. In des- i
should contrive to pay that charge. The resident in Paris trying rural seclusion and simplicity, in bringing into daily a
may be glad to defray the expense of what relates to his own and hourly contact city and country, however separated be- n
-oncerns, but not so, in all cases of mere service to others, fore, do the modern discoveries afford a gain for rural and in- d
On bo sides of the Atlantic, the classes most terior morals and religion' The railroad between Aix-la- e
On both sides of the Atlantic, the classes most s..,
in e in te Chapelle and Cologne will be ready for use by next autumn; c
interested in the continuance of peace-merchants it connects the seaboard of Belgium, by less than half a day, e
and traders of every description-anticipate and with Rhenish Prussia and the waters of the Rhine ; it must p
predict war more readily than others. The sinis- divert much i ,,i.oil.; from France, and not a little transit s
ter rumors and expectations which they so readi- trade. The backwardness of this country in internal im-
ly raise, or catch and transmit, have the worst provements is a relative as well as a positive disadvantage b
Trieste, Otend, and Rotterdam are becoming formidable n
effect on prices, stock, and enterprise, and occa- rivals of the chief French commercial ports. In a review of i
pion frequent fluctuations highly injurious to re- Mr. M. CHEVAswER's history of our public works, in the g
gular and honest business. Journal des libats of the 9th inmt. the inferiority of France a
The newspapers give melancholy stories of to some of our States is exhibited arithmetically: taking g
Sn t the rate of a million of inhabitants, her improvement is as f
children sold in the secluded streets of the French ne to sixteen to that of Pennsylvania, and one to nine with ,
cities, and even in the highways; of school boys New York. The reviewer adds: What have we done i
missing, and apprentices undergoing treatment with so many nittl,uids (millions of millions of francs)
quite as savagely cruel as any case of negrn miar- that havo been voted to the Government in the tweLty-fve c
tyrdom. Paris, and indeed nearly all the large yearspasti What canquests have we naade tocompensate us
for Iho internal sterility of this expenditure 1 What great i
towns of France, abound with vagrant boys (ga- i national advancement or productive project have our i um
mins) with excellent natural endowments, who ing orators brought about I" These orators, and the tower-
seem to be abandoned to the worst destinies, ing writers, have in sooth been decrying material interests, ,
moral and physical. In respect to humanity and exalting moral grandeur, and calling for extension of empire
public good, they require and deserve more ofthe abroad, North, East, South, and West. With the treasure
and gman-power wasted in Africa, cr the amount now apir o- c
zeal of philanthropists and missionaries than any printed to the embasti!llement of Paris, all the woihld might i
distant heathen. I like the Paris custom of con- have been rendeicd tributary to the catilal and kingdom, by
dusting children to and from the schools in large transit, entrepot, every form of communication and exchange;
covered cars, handsomely painted. They are to say nothing of domestic intercourse and fructfication, .
thus preserved from the street dangers, (scarcely T he Monileur of the llth instant tells us that, during the
thus preserved from the street dangers, (scarce last month, upwards of one hundred thousand days' work
known in the United States,) and the school-go- were performed by the troops oni the ramparts, and that ten
ing is rendered a lively recreation. In the French thousand is the contingent held ready for eachti day. The
official reports on military concerns, there is an Dibals of the 12th expatiates oin the immensity of the toil and
occasional flourish about he atiotic ardor with performance ; boasts that one of the forts, already much ad-
Svanced, is equal in size and scope to the Citadel of Antwerp,
which the conscripts enter the ranks. The very arid adds that the works--both continuous wall and forts-
reverse might be inferred from the registers of sub- ;ire executed according to all the rules of science and art, and
stitutes, who have not been fewer than sixteen or with a solidity which mnay be termed mnonumenual." The
twenty thousand annually; from the numerous Comnimerce of the 13.h r-epies: "Thus we shall have four-
i e of e p teen fortresses, some of them equal to the Citadel ofAntwerp;
instances of self-mutilation to escape service, nd encouraging memento and the fourteen will command all
those of atrophy and death by nostralgie, home- communications with the capital by water and land, and
sickness, and from the frequency of desertion. turn five or six hundred pieces of cannon on the faubourgs,
Orphans being exempted, fathers commit suicide indeed, into the very heart of the city, so that Paris may be
to rescue their sons. 1 have set aside a remarka- famished or demolished as the masters thereof shall please !"
Here is no ( u -. -I r t., in this statement. General iPox-
ble and dismal article on this head, of Le Corn- ilsAs, the renowned artillerist, in different conversations with
merce, (23d of April last.) In a debate, last wit- 1re last winter repeated his notion that the Americans, to
ter, in the Chamber of Deputies, M. DE LAROCHE- cave been able to accomplish so much physically, must have
FAUCAULD, whose testimony is indisputable, 'holly neglected intellectual and social improvement. "1
affirmed that the fact was often ascertained, (,on la admire your achievements il the material w ay, but you have
no science, no literature, no great names, no high cultiva-
constate souvent,) and would, if an authentic record tion-you can have none." Although 1 pointed to England,
ofthe causes ofsuicides was kept, be acknowledged e adhered to his alternative, arguing that she had made hier
to have occurred much oftener than was suppose ariucipincy through ages, in knowledge, taste, anid refinement,
ed. We lodge, at Versailles, a few doors from a before site turned to such account her physical energies aind
r a h resources of wealth. Let the American people hasten to rec-
very spacious military penitentiary, at the gates of at t a n p to th ad t u
t ity their financial affairs, and prove to the world that they
-which we daily witness distressing scenes illustra- are not without metal culture anid esthetic taste, although
tive of the evil incident to military systems. The hey have in their infancy, as a nation, surpassed the rest ol
conscripts and the substitutes are generally youths, mankind in every thing else. I reconnoitred, yesterday, a con-
(in appearance from eighteen to twenty-five ;) un- vocatiion ot the lauuudrcsscs of the numerous garrison of Ver-
de thearande from welle et, btwnot m a;) u ailles-scourers of the bed-linen, as they are fimuiliarly call-
der the middle size ; well.set, but not muscular ; d They were mi their professional dishabille, and numabeed
.in good bodily condition en the whole ; with il- some eighty or a hundred. The whole American Union
genuous, intelligent countenances. Though al- wouldd not have furnished such a bouquet of civilization, (if 1
lowed to go at large, singly and in parties, they may be allowed a violetit metaphor;) and imposing as they
rarely ommit the least disorder ; every where, on were, I found them less remarkable as specimens than the
rtrty m i the manifeeas irnesnes r ad d o i arger horde uf female scavengers whom n have seen collected
duty, they manifest earnestness and docility, fear the Hotel de Vlle in Paris. You will find among the
I ta h Hotel do Ville iin Paris. You will findl amamong thu,
Commodore NAPIER, in one of his election har- extracts from the principal election-harangues in Great Bri-
aingues, remarked that, in point of personal char- tain, which I send you, a signal case of rhetmical substitution
acter and habits, the British soldiery were fir in- ond inversion in the following sentences of Mr. ATTWOOD, at
r ..1. i i r ,Birminghiam: "The moral grander of llle Bri'iih name
ferior to the French ; the former being recruited Birmingham: "The moral grandeur Of fue ,riieh munom
o h f n r it shattered and shivered the power of the Egyptians; swept
from the very dregs of society, the latter obtained their armies out of Syria; and, in an instant, rescued Con-
by a sweeping code from the families of respecta- stantinople from conquest by them, and from the more terri-
ble tradesmen, small farmers, and uncorrupted ile protection of the Russians." Tlhi isis akinto thed& ctrine
peasantry. Such youths, however, do we see whichl is ascribed to the Koran, that superior force, in what
brought, chained two and two, to the peitentia- hands soever, comes from God, and .houid be obeyed and worn
brotight, chained two and two, to the permitenlia- iu, i Ol Adia Si R. Srmasun iii huisuimi
t"...,.l ...-- r.'i..i.% Old Admiral Sir R. STO'FOR D, in his din-
ry, under escort of mounted gens d'armi6, for ner speech at Malta, attributed the shattering aund shivering to
desertion, truant habits-the disorders of itourderie and reck- the new and admirable system of gunnery, and specified its
less vivacity rather than absolute guilt of any description. tremendous offct at Acre from even a small ship, the Carys-
Neither on their arrival for severe confinement, nor on their fort. In the accounts from the British squadron in China, of
exit in the same way, when transferred to depots, do they hbe- .he reduction of the Bogue forts, it is said ; Our rapid suc-
tray depression of spirits; their good-humor, contrasted with cess is mainly owing to the admiireble firing of the gunnery-
their fatigue and detention, inspires the more interest, as it mmate on board tihe steamer Nemesi.. It was perfect rifle
Ever conveys the idea of callousness, the extreme of moral practice." Moral grandeur has thus become the convertible
perversion. Towards the end of last month, returning from phraseof invention and skill in ballistics ; and owhen Varner's
the market between six and seven o'clock in the morning new infernal machine of war, which last month was avouch-
with one of my daughters, we saw twelve of the delinquents, ed in thu House of Commons, and to which the Ministry
cout.led by chains, coming forth to march to other quarters, promised all attention and favor, shall have been brought into
vsith mounted guards before and behind the file. I was in service Great Britain will be on the pinnacle of moral sub-
thueir sight, and they rattled their chains in play; but as soon limity. In is pronounced to be the mont destructive ever
as they described my daughter, they all closed and diew their known, or even imagined ; more so than the old Greek ire
grey cloaks about them for the purpose of concealing their of which the Belgian journals describe it as a revival, with
situation. rhis trait touched me; and when I happened to the appliances of niodern explosive machinery. Be you on
mention it in the diligence, before an officer of the Versailles your guard, atd amuend to the sound recommendations in the
garrison, he assured me, with tears in his eyes, that, in the hate reports from your Departments of War and the Navy.
great majority of instances, though the rigors exercised were Every American must be ., ,i i.-I by the publication of
necessary for main indispensable ends, the culprits incurred Miss SEDoWiCK'S Letters from Abroad to Kindred at Home
them from mere levity and seduction, and without any essen- That eminent lady could not fail to do credit in every respect
tial wickedness whatever. We often see at the gates of the to American literature and to her sex. No copy of the work
penitentiary, females of decent exterior, exhibiting marks of has reached this capital; but I have read the notices of it
severe grief, who may be presumed near relatives, and who in the London Literary Gazette and London Athenarum.
bring clothing for the inmates or seek interviews. I am sad- and I see its merits by the quotations and the acknowledg-
dened by every detachment that I see directed to the South, amnts of the reviewers. Benewolent spirit, good humor,
after reading of the sufferings and havoc to which these raw gtapkie power, close sind perspicacious observation ioh char-
troops and simple youths are exposed in Atgeria. The utter actors and unemi-rs-, and the salutary, sure judgments of a umo-
hopelessness of the exhausting war on the Arabs is shadowed ral sense constantly active, recommend the tio volumes; apart
out in this single phrase of a telegraphic despatch of the Go- from the intrinsic interest of the persons and scenes thai she
vernor-General, dated Mostaganem, 3d instant : Our affairs describes. The London journals think that the favored guest
are in good train, but there is no submission ef any tribes." has encroached somewhat on private individuality and do-
Non ofuires rent en bonne volereats il n'ya aucune sou mestic living; and they revert to the bad example of others.
mission de fribt s.'" The two grand expeditions of this season I suppose the stricture and the assimilation to be undeserved,
yield no real dominion. When central positions ase garni- because she treats of public characters, and neculiar, not ,1o.


soned the conquerors dare not venture abroad; the Arabs re- rogatory customs and appearances. It is probable, I think,
turn to lie in ambush ; the harvests are seized, but the posts that the parties are rather pleased than offended by pages
require to be victualled chiefly from the coasts; some of the written with a kind and grateful temper, and meant in a
Paris writers guess that the troops could be fed at home at measure to be admonitory as well as entertaining for her
less cost and risk. AS D-EL-KADE1 abandoned his towns, country. I am not acquainted with the productions of any
showing that he cared little for them, and skilfully avoided female writers here, which I would prefer, on any score, to
general, direct engagements, in order to keep in tact his regu- those of a Miss SEDawucK or a Mrs. StoRaNEY but if
lar forces, upon which he relies for preventing any defection higher, real, litray esert could be asserted for the French,
of thb tribes and remaining master of the territory traversed there ia one difference more than compensatory. Lmbertin-
by the French, or exposed to mere incursions. We have a ism is unknown--it is iimpossible-iin the publications of
new printed scheme of colonization from the worthy curate American females. The wiman-I may add, no doubt, the
of Constantine. He proposes large fortified farms under a man-who should issue a licentious book, or obscene
sort of law-martial: what a lure for the Swiss and German writing in any form, would be, in the United States, barish-
husbandmen I ed from all respectable society, whatever the author's super
A heavy fire is kept up by the Paris editors on Lord PAL- priority in style and contrivanre, and read, if at all, by stealth.
RNasToN, for his denunciation of the French warfare in Al- Long may this be the case, as it is a main security for public
geria, which I quoted for you in my last epistle. They retort morals! The reverse, nearly, prevails in this capital, The
by extracts from British authorities concerning the excesses doors of the Acadeinie Frangaise and of the Court, after
of the British armies in India. The Courier Frangais de- those of the highest circles, have been thrown open to Vic-
dares that his Lordship wittingly lies-il meant sciemnment ; Inr Hugo. There being a vacancy in that Academy, Bar.-
and urges the French Government to ask explanation of this ZAc, ALEXANDER Dum As, and BRANGoER are urged as candi-
it new insolence" of a British Cabinet Minister. The Sicle dates for the fauteuil which was occupied by the two COaR-
exclaims against his audacious hypocrisy, with" an indignant NEi.LLS. Madame GEOnOE SAND, whose personal career has
reference to the butchery of the Chinese and the devastations been as reprbate as her pen is profligate and noxious, is the
committed ou threatened in the Celestial Empire. Admirable star, the cynosure, of public resorts, select parties, and bril-
logic of England, Bsays another, both as to China and Spain ; liant assemblies. I should relate, however, that last winter
she first obtains by bribery their aid and connivance for a vast a French author of c.onsiderable repute confessed to a friend
contraband trade, and she vindicates or excuses the smug- of mine that, having been admitted the same morning, to the
glingby the fact oftheirvenality and co-operation Messieurs bed chamber of Madame SAND, on a mere visit, before she
D TOQUEVImLLE and E B AUtMONT have brought from Algeria had risen, he felt a little twinge of conscience when she
!he persuasion that the country is worth pereveraqce in thae tang the beh for her daughter, a fine girl of sixteen or se-


enteen, to serve her chocolate at her bed side, notwithstand-
ng his presence. I am sorry to see, in the London papers,
Ivertisements of close translations of her worst novels,
without any curtailment." The police of Paris employs
rany agents and incurs great expense in the vain endeavor
o suppress dissolute publications for the populace, and the
Society des Bonnes Maeurs, established here, pursues inqui-
es and tries correctives in every quarter of France; but
hey cannot touch the upper fountains-the consecrated
prings-of corruption. The contemporary drama consists,
hree-fourths, of fairce and ribaldry, and abominations of de-
moniac crime and vice in the shape of sentimental medley
lapted to debauch, in every sense, the working classes that
rowd the theatres of the Boulevards, and especially to in-
ame them with jealousy and hatred of all the higher or for-
unate classes, so deemed, in what respect soever. Two or
three of the largest play-houses are mere schools of univer-
al Radicalism. It has struck me, in many of the pieces
which I have witnessed or read, that immoral sub-intrigues
cnd incidental sallies were introduced as necessary season-
ing-a sacrifice to the common depraved taste and loose
domestic life; because they were evidently superfluous or
embarrassing for the main plot and dialogue. The offi-
ial inquisition sometimes expunges such matter, and,
specially, obnoxious political texts ; but the expurgated
production is soon printed as it was composed, with marks,
bowing the venomous bites of the censorship." A still
eorse effect cones from the unqualified eulogy of plays and
uooks as corrective of vice, which are founded upon enoi-
mities anid doctrines to be rather held impossible or exceed-
ngly anomalous and rare, and which include necessarily
gross situations and effusions thus rendered more familiar
and venial. A comedy entitled The Sciool of Young Sin-
gle Women," by Md. Mi LAME WA.DOR, has obtained great
avor and vogue as a maost impressive lesson of virtue ; and
ret its whole tenor is a perversion of true moral spirit and
dea; and circumstances which could never occur in any
respectable American sphere, form the plot and details. If I
could make it compatible with your limits and mine, I would
iabridge or analyze a French duodecimo of 243 ;ages, pub-
ished this year, with the title Appeal of a Christian to the
Literary World, by G. DE FELIcE, Professor of Ethics and
sacred Eloquence. This author is a clergyman of the Re-
formed Church, who sees andt follows out his subject in true
philosophical and Christian points of view. Hiia second chap.
ter treats of the progressive'decline of French literature; the
causes of which he proves and deplores without being able to
excite a hope of its regeneration. It is not that, among the
thousands of volumes styled new which the Paris press an-
wually yields. there are not many of moral as well as literary
sterling value: I have kept a record of those, chiefly, into
which I have dipped, in order to notice them in a distinct
communication ; but they remain unknown to the great plu-
rality of French readers; the circulating literature is the
trashy, the crude, the licentious under all aspects-the spawn
of mercenary purveyors and dashing adventurers. Periodi-
cal writing is a trade here, over-stocked and over-done, as
every where else. The first price at which the publishers
sell, or attempt to sell, the volumes which are scribbled for
them by the popular authors, defies all proportion to quan-
tity or quality of matter, and refers solely to the improvi-
dence of curiosity and wealth, and the need of the countless
circulating Ihbraries. Recently I took from one of these A
Year at F'lorence, the latest abortion of ALEXANDER DUMAS ;
hoping to catch some satisfactory or amusing glympses of the
fame us Tuscan capital. The two octavos are advertised at
fifteen francs ; the contents could be reduced, without disad-
vantage to text or reader, int-. a fifth of their present compass:
the author does not reach Florence earlier than the 70th page
of the second volume; and hecommunicates nothing, in eiher,
worth the trouble of cutting the leaves. Nevertheless, this
chaff is recommended in the journals as the very pith of lux-
uriant genius, A few months hence it may hue bought at
thirty or twenty sous. DUMtAS, wh,-, in the common estima-
tlion, stands on the level of VicTrmO HtUm, if not higher, is a
" colored man," with all the African traits. His father,
general of artillery, was a negro from Biurbon, The Ga-
zette de France relates that JULES J4PIIN, the great theatrical
critic, invited to breakfast an American gentlemnan recom.-
mended to his notice by CHARLES KEMBLE, the actor; that
when they were seated at the table, a mulatto entered, whon
Janin welcomed affectionately, and placed with all homage
next to himself. The American knew nothing of the guest
but quickly retired, and complained bitterly to Mr. Charles
Kemble of the affront which Janin hadl put upon him by suet
company. Ere long, the same intruder, with dark skin ant
woolly pate, will be seen aaongui the Forty in the palace o
the Institute. A French translation of Washington Irving's
Astoria, in two volumes, has just come forth. The -.-...
dienne rof the llth instant contains a good article upun thu
work, in which warmia praise is bestowed on all the writing
of Mr. Irving, and parsicetarly on his Life of Columbus.
But the French feuillemonust places him next to Cooper ii
American literature, ignorant, probably, ot L.-' ;ii. judge
trent of America and Great Britain. In the article of th
Quotlidienne, the memoirs of T. Hunter and T. Tanner ar
treated as authentic in the s'cne degree with Irving's Astoria

MEDICALt CO)ILL G-:, Richiinond, Va.
T HE next winter tenr of lectures in thi Intstitution will coin
menree on theI first Monday in November, and continue un
til thie last week in February.
Dr. John C-ille oni Theory and Practice of Medicine.
Dr. A. L. Warner oo Surgecry.
1)r. L. W. CNamberi-ayne on Materia Medtuca nnd Therapeutics
Dr. R. L. Bohin mnon on Obstetrics and lDiseases of Women anu
Children.
D)r. Thomas Jolmnsononn \- i.d I l. .
Dr. Socrates Manpint on 1 .... ..
Clinical Iectures will be delivered regularly (at the Collegi
Infirmary) by the Professois of Medicine aidl Surgery, ant at tih
Penitentiary and Armory by ithe Professor of Materia Medica
The Profeseor of Aiatorny, having charge of thie City Almns-house
will deliver GClinical Lectures in t hat Inftistion. The student
wil have the 1 .. .. .,-nding oal the Clinical Lectures with
oumt cliiharge. I I.. i -a-1 ., -. fior clinic-l instruction and practice
anatomy are not surpassed by aty medical school in our country.
AUG. L. WARNER, M. I).
aug 10-tNovlcp Dean of Faculty.
lp0) TEACH ERS.-The Ftlemningsburg Semimnary will bi
cSau vaiat oi the IstMonday in Septemusber next. The trustee-
arc desirous of rocuring a competent teacher by that t lime (or am
soon aIereafter a priacticable) to take charge ofit. A gentlemoar
and his wife quidified to teach would be preferred. The numbic
of pupils now in thue Seminary are about 80 iu the two departuimce=
It is believed l tat number can he retained anl perhaps increased
if desired. None need apply but those who, iarm produce satisfae
tory tleti~mionial. D). K. SrOCKTON,
President Board of Trimttees, Flemingsburg, Ken.
Reference- to L. \W. Andrews, Iloum e of Representatives.
aug tO-eprtrSuil
MAGNIFICENT SCHEMES.

4 prizes of $25,000 amoun ting to $100,000,
FOR a:Ttt .EPTEMBER; AND
$50,000-- ;.i I it.Im-- (,.**3,inlii,
FOR 23D OCTOBER.
J. G. GREGORY & CO., Managers.
SPLENDID UNION LOTTERY, CLass S, FOR 1841.
To tie drawn at Alexandria, D. C. en Saturday, Sept. 25.
55I L1ANT SCHitE
1 prize of 24,0t)0 duis1. 4 prizes nf25,OOO di,1.
1 tu 2,;,Ot)0 ;l.. ulari., imaktg I OO,OO
1 do 2S,000 lollsl. j dolars
1 prize of S10,000 4 prizes if 2 000
1 do of 8,(l000 50 do of 1,{(!0
1 do of 6,101 50 do of 500
1 do of 5,1533 50 do of o25uI
2 prizes of 4,0)00i 11)0 do if 21)O, &c.
14 drawn numbers cut of 78.
Tickets $15-Halve.s .7 50-- .uQrters--$3 7 ,--:.,.ii.. 3.1 87
Certificates of packages of 26 whole tit -.. .i.i
D)o do 26 half do 100
Do do 26 quarter do S0
Do do 26 eighth do 25


THll


:11,Iliiil-- ,f,:Jr Ii1f.1--$25,000,
ON SATURDAY, OCT. 23,
E GRAND UNION LOTTERY, CLASS 9, for 1841,
Will be drawn at Alexandria, 1). C.
16 drawn ballots.
MAGNIFICENT SCHEME,.


I Grand Capital prize of 50,000 dollars.
1 Splendid prize of 30,000 d,..-I,1,.
I do ,it> ) a,Oo0 ,l.,ilar-.
1 do do 10,000 dollars.
1 prize of $8,000 10 prizes of $1,500
1 do of 7,000 10 do of 1,250
l do of 6,000 50 do of 1,000
1 do of 5,)000 50 do of f0o
1 do of 4,000 1 50 do of 400
I do of 2,5010 10(0 do of 300
1 do of 2,311 100 do of 250
4 prizes of 2.t)00 170t do of 200
5 do of 1,750 1 &o. &A. &c.
16 drawn numbers out of 78.
Tickets 820--Hialves $10-Quarters $5-Eighths 82 50.
Certificates of packages of 26 whole tickets $260
Do do of 26 half do 130
Do do of26 quarter do 65
Do do of 26 eighth do 32 50
lr Orders for tickets and shares and certificates of packages in
the above splendid schemes will receive the most prompt atten-
tion; and the drawing tof each Ilttery will be sent immediately
after it is over, to all who order from its. Address
J. G. GREGORY & CO. Managers,
july 29-2aw6wd&cp Washington, D. C.


BY AUTHORITY.

LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES
PASSED AT THE FIRST SESSION OF TWENTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS.

[PRIVATE-No. 3.]
AN ACT to revive and continue in force for ten years an
act entitled "An act to incorporate the Mechanic Relief So-
ciety of Alexandria."
Be it enacted by the Senate and Hlouse of Representatives of
the United States of America in Congress assembled, That
the act entitled An act to incorporate the Mechanic Rlief
Society of Alexandria," approved April thirteenth, eighteen
hundred and eighteen, be, and the same is hereby, revived,
and shall continue in force for the term of ten years from
and after the passage ot this act; and all the rights, privi-
leges, and powers granted by the said act to the Mechanic
Relief Society of Alexandria," and the corporate existence
of the said society, are hereby revived and continued in full
force for the term of ten years from and after the passage of
this act: Provived, however, It shall and may be lawful for
the trustees of said corporation, at any time before the expi-
ration of the said ten years, to dissolve the same; to sell and
convey the estate, real and personal, which has been, or may
hereafter be, vested in said corporation; and to make such
disposition of the proceeds, after paying all just debts of said
corporation, as they may deem proper.
JOHN WHITE,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
SAM'L L. SOUTHARD,
President of the Senate pro tempore.
Approved, August 9, 1841.
N 7 JOHN TYLER.

IN SENATE-AUGuST 7, 1841.


The Senate having proceeded to the discussion of the point
of order, and the question pending being an appeal taken byy
Mr. CALHOUN- from a decision of the Chair that a motion to
lay an appeal on the table was in order-
Mr. PRENTISS said the question was simply a questionI
whether an appeal on a point of order could be laid on the
table; or, in other words, whether, when an appeal was ta-
ken from the decision of the Chair On a question of orer, it
was in order to move to lay the appeal on the table. He al-
ways felt predisposed to support the Chair, and should certainly
do it in all cases of & doubtful nature, as well as in those
where the Ctair was clearly right. Hlie well knew how diffi
cult it often was to decide with correctness questions whichI
suddenly arose, and upon which there was no time or oppor.
tunity ficr reflection.
Questions of order were frequently, in their nature, very
embarrassing. They were often new, depending upon no
fixed rule, but up in general and not very well defined princi-
ples of parliamentary law. If rules could be found applica-
ble to them, they were often complex, and it ..i-,, ll' i 'i.- as
to be readily and at once understood. T.u ,'- r.., ,lien,
that the presiding officer would never fail to decide with per-
fect accuracy upon the spur of the occasion, was to ascribe to
him a degree of infallibility which no human being possessed,
however exalted he might be. It was said by Lord Thurlow
of Lord Mansfield that he was a surpri-iig man, a wonder-
ful man; ninety-nine times in a hundred he was right in his
decisions and opinions; and, when once in a hundred times he
was wrong, ninety-nine persons out of a hundred could not dis-
cover it. This, which was sup posed to be sonithinrg of a
compliment, was no compliment at all, if absolute freedom
from error was essentiall to the character of a great and able
judge.
The Chair, in the present case, had been gvrerned by a
precedent from the other House, and it was not at all sur-
priAng that he should, on the emergency of the occasion,
have yielded to the force of that precedent, and taken it as his
guide. The precedent, no one could deny, was exactly in
point, and in the absence of any fixed explicit rule was eunti-
tied to respect and weight. But it was of no bididing autho-
rity upon the Senate, andl, in the opinion of Mr. P., was
wrong, both upon principle and authority.
It was a clear principle and settled rule of parliamentary
law that there could not be a motion upon a minotion, as a
motion to lay on thle table a motion to postpone, or a motion
to postpone a motion tQ lay on the table; otherwise, as hail
been said, you might go on with motion upon motion ad in-
initmum, and ever come to the end of a question. Nor couhl
aany incidental question arising in the progress of proceedings
be subject to a motion to lay on the table. You could not
lay on the table a motion to amend, or any other incidental
motion. This could be done only by moving to lay the main
subject oni the table, which would carry with it, necessarily
andl of course, all incidental motions and questions. The
question of order in (his case was one which had incidentally
arisen in the course of the proceedings, andi was to be dis-
posed of in the manner prescribed by the rules of the S nate.
It was to be decided first, before any further proceedings could
be had upon trke main rautter, It necessarily interrupted and
f put a stop to any further procceding, aed pnust first be put out
of the way hby a direct thecision upon it,
It had been said that you could tonve to lay any motion on
the table. This was quite too broad an assumption; for it
Shad been i-Penr that no incidental motion or question whatever
Swas liable to be disposed of in that way. But an appeal on r
, question of order va not a maton, or in the nature of a me-
tiow. It neither intvolvej nor wvs fiundod upon a motion.
SAn appeal, in its --..r.;r-. ,. I, h proper se-nsp, was a transferol
Sa question from -r.,- tit-,aI to another, or from one. I.-- u I
a to another. In this case, it transferred the question r.. iJ
Sfromi the Chair to the Senate. Tho appeal vacated the deci-
sion of tile Ch.ir, and the question stood before thoi Senate
in its original formn, the stn a i i no decision of the Chir
had intervened. It was the same identical question of or-
der which the Chair, for the sake of convenience and de-
spatch of busin c', -i uhlio'.J to decide in the first instance,
not finally or i ..,... .... 1), i, -: subject to the opinion of the
Senate. As the o iiginal question of order was the only ques-
tion properly blietre time Senate, andi as it was admitud oi all
hai ds that the question of oider itself could, in no stage of it,
Sbelaid on the table, it was Ilain that thore was t- ., i- ._ it,
the proceedings oi the question to whlich a motion to lay on
the tm'ble cOiU;h attach,.
When a question of ord-r was raised by e -[,In a member
to order, cor was raised in any other form or way, the Chair
decided the question in the lf-rst instance, subject to an appeal
to the Senate. Any member, i i i I' .1 with the decision of
the Chair upon the question, was entitled to take the opinion
of the Senate upon it. The member did not ?move for an ap-
peal, or ask leave to appeal; the appeal was his right, his pri
vilege, and neither the Chair nor the Senate could disallow it.
If thie appeal was a matter ofriglht or ;.mu l,.' would seemi
to be very clear that it was not subject to be disposed of by a
motion to lay on the table. The dftcision of such a motion,
either way, would leave the question undecided; for, if 'I..
motion prevailed, and the appeal was laid on the table, vit
would hbe at the most but a mere argunentaliyve affirmance nof
the decision of the Chair. It would not ba a direct affirm-
ance, and might be a mere evasion of the question. The ap
peal gave a rightli to a positive affirmance or disaffirmanrice of
the decision, aind the question could not be evaded in that in-
dihrect way. With every disposition to give a just and liberal
support to the decisions of the Chairn oi all occasions, Mr
P. was compelled to say that he could nrt sustain the decision
in the present instance.

L AW N Ir C.-tl, y, .-.. ,.............. .....
velv ,- i .- -' '- i "- ., .1
attend all the Courts held ii Ha milton county, Ohio, and lhe Cir-
cuit and Dxsurirt Courts of the United States at Columbus.
B SfORFER,
WM. KEY BOND.
CINCINNATI, (Othio.) ept. I. 1. 40. set l 12-ely
I I'-. !ktE:N'TUCKY.-Tie suubscmiier will sell tt, aue-
tion at thie Louisvi'le ,tel, in Louisville, on t % 1 '. i,1 i. rsl
-f' Sepitember next, at 10 o'clock A. M. the i .im .... l .- i: of
Land in the State of Kentucky, to wit,
Onue Tract ofiabout 2,300 acres on the Ohio river, in the county
of Truimbl. I t '. tho upper half of a tract of land commonly
called "C i. 4,000 acre tract," and the part allotted to the
subscriber by deed of partition between Daniel Carroll and him-
self, dated March 3, t1830. This tiat is well known to be one
of the finest tracts of landl in the Stare, fronting on thie Ohio river,
being about 30 miles above Loaisville and at ithe mouth of Corn
creek ; about one-fourlh ef the tract is bottom land, inferior to
none on the Ohio river, containing a large part of what is called
"The Big Bottom;" the residue is uplrand, of lhe first quality.
There are a few snimdl improvements, and the residue is heavy
timnbered land, equal in qutantimy and quality to any in the Sta'e.
The tract will be sold in Imos of from 200 to 500 acres each, ac-
cordio;, to a survey thereof.
Also, a Tract of about 800 acres, lying on Russell's creek, in
Greene county and a few miles from Greenesburg, i. _,11 the
soldd part of a thousand acre survey, formerly owned by Elie
Williams, and one of the best tracts of land ini that vicinity.
Also, one other Tractof 600 acres, lying on Rough creek and
ncarthe mouth of lHall's creek, about 10 miles flomr Harford, in
the county of Ohio.
Time terms of sale will be one-third in cash, and the residue in
one and two equal annual instalments, with interest, secured by
satisfacltory notes and a lien on the property. An indisputable and
onincumbered title will be conveyed to thie parchaser by general
warranty deited.
For a more particular description, reference is made to Capt.
Jack Pr-..o" iion, fur tthe 4,000 acre tract, mear Bedfmird ; to Thini.
bV, i. 1........i i.',i tract on Russell creek; to Wm. H. Field,
Esq. I 1 ,inl., ,u-.,I to Wmt. Tiros. Carroll, Esq. of Washing-
ton. CHARLES H. CARROLL,
Groveland Centre, Livingston County, N. Y.
june 30-tawd&cta
fl The Louisville Journal, Cincinnati Guizette, the Common-
wealth at Frankfort, und the newspaper at Greensburg will putt-
lish twice a week till day of sale, snd forward their accounts to
meat Louisville by lhe day of sale. C. H. C.
^* i: CAULEY e; SON'S Patent E'iloor O11 C lths for
t oomis, Halls, Vestibules, Stairs, &G.--ThO subscri-
bers will receive orders for and furnish at the shortest notice
Ciolha of any sias, without seam, 0n very accommodating terms,
.15i.-' .. ,,.i.r l, r..t,.i .] Comments are inneeessary, as the
"-. "" i'r in ni r ".'n...i. hes been long established not only
in this city, but all over the Union.
A book of patterns is at our store, where members of Con-
gross and citizens generally are respeetfunly invited to call and
examine for themselves.
july 3l-eTulTbhSatltu WM. & GEO. STETTINIUS,


'WENTY-SEVENT-ii CONGRE S.
FIRST SESSION.

MONDAY, AUGUST 9, 1841.

IN SENATE.
Mr. CHOATE presented a memorial asking that chloride
of lime might not t-'- ..j ,; 'i.1l to duty.
The resoluliin .. ,.mit.d i.N, Mr. LmNN some days since,
requiring the President to give notice to the British Govern-
ment, agreeably to the convention of 1827, putting an end to
he treaty for the joint occupation of Oregon, was taken up,
when
Mr. LINN announced his intention to offer some few re-
marks on the sulject either to morrow or next day; mean-
ime, hie would riquest that it be passed over informally,
which was acquim-uctd in.
The resolution submitted hy Mr. CI.AY, of Alabama, re-
ling to tihe appointment of additional clerks in the lind of-
ice, and the grounds on which they were appointed, &c. was
taken up, when
Mr. SMITrI, of Indiana, said he wouli call the attention
if the Senate to the subject-matter of the resolution. So
far as he was individually concerned, he had no objection to
the resolution; but he submitted whether it was worthwhile
to burden the Departments with a call of this kind, where no
legislative action could grow out of it. In his opinion, Con-
gress had nothing to do with the appointment of clerks; that
belonged exclusively to the Executive branch of Government.
If any legitimate object could be effected by it, tie would be
just as willing as any Setnator in the body that it should pass.
But must not all perceive, if we had i ,. r;..li to call on one
Department, we had Ihe same right t ..-.,il .- another, until
there might lie no end to calls, out of which, as he had said
before, no legislative action could grow During his legisla-
tive lif-, hlie had never seen a resolution of similar import;
but, if it was proper in itself, he was not disposed to make
this an exception.
Mr. CLAY, of Alabama, thought the resolution touched
a tender place. The present Administration had come in
under thie cry of retrenchment and reform," and under that
cry lie had understood several new clerks had been appointed
to the Land Office; anud hbe sought to institute an examina-
tion into the facts anid the grouihds on which these appoint-
mients had been made; andi should he not lie permitted to do
so! He would sugge-t that legislation might grow out of the
fadcts. Suppose they heard that the head of an office had been
abusing hbs privileges, should they not institute an inquiry
into the facts of the easel When it was known that thl
business of an office was so materially diminished as to re-
quire the dismissal of some twenty clerks under one Admi-
nistration, and all at once it was found that another Adlminis
traction, coming into power under the badges of reform an.h
economy, had appointed additional clerks, was it not impor-
tant to ascertain whether the facts as stated were so or not ,
lie thought the ienriator from Indiana must at once admit the
propriety of the call.
Mr. LINN said this was to be a reform Administration,
and it could not begin at a better time to carry out its
pledges. He was not a little surprise!] to see objection made
to a resolution calling for a simple statement of facts. But it
only served to show that there was no disposition to carry
out their pledges. That about economy and reform was just
ab,)ut as much respected as that about proscription, and he
should endeavor to nail such counterfeits to the counter, that
those who ran might read. What, said Mr. L, after tin
public buildings are n early finished and the Florida war clos-
ed, is it not our right a well a n our duty to see that the im-
amense sums asked fur hy you should he used properly 7 You
made the charges against us of piofligacy, dishonesty, andi
m.. aind now we meau to make you honest, whe-
h,.r ..,ivjii uor not; we shall watch closely your move-
nmients; we sliall look into your abolition appointments, and
every 'i ;.. .Ise, I promise you.
Mr. i >'TI, of Indiana, would say nothing more.
He made num objection to the resolution if it was a proper one.
lie had nothing to apprehend from the most rigid scrutiny ;
therefore the remarks ofthe Senators from Alatbama and Mis
sour could not apply, as no such matters had presented t hemin-
selves to his mind. He was as willing, ay, and as ready, as
any Senator on that it )or to expose abuses, let them exist
where they, might. His remarks had no reference to thu
screening of any bady fronl just responsihiility, hbut simply to
determine the question whether the rcsJiuin was proper oa
expedient where legislative action was riot likely to grow oul
of it. And he desired, once for all, to disclaim any other
object.
Mr. PRESTON saw no obj-ction to the resolution ; he
(lid riot think that any additional clerks were required, nor
did he believe that arny had been appointed beyond time exigen-
cies of the office. Reform was not absolute; it must be rela-
tive; arid what the present Administration stood pledged to
do, was to act better than their predecessors. They came in
under a pledge to s.o much better, ay, conspicuously better,
thau those who preceded them, anmd thibis pledge they should am
least redeem. With regard to twenty cl,-rks having been
dismissed, all might see how, by a sudden fit of retrenchment
and reform, a partly going out of power could be induced to
dismiss twenty clerks of those opposed to them in order to
show a clean sheet. When they had exceeded their income
hby millions, they couhl very easily come forward and say
debt was a very bad i-; .it' ideavor to thmow the respon-
sibility on our nide o: ,' l : i -. e (Mr. P.) was nrot dis-
poseti to change because a different example had been set b,
the other code : it was not the first lime that an Admini-tra-
tion had come in under I. ..', and he meant, humble as hi
was, to endeavor to see m. i l.. Whigs carried oufu. theirs tc
a consummation. They had snatched the watchwords from
the other party, anid came in under their banners ; and if w(
forfeit our pledges, as they did, he for one would hie willing to
put his hand to hi- mouth, and his mouth in the dust, and say
we huive sinuned.' For twelve years the destiny of the coun-
try had been in the hand oi a party who were daily set
ing for the benefit of their party, to thb exhluson of all hut
their own immediate friends. t ie did not mean to say,ce teris
paribus, that frietmds were niot to tie taken, but that men
should not have been put out for opinion's sake, which had
otoriousl, hbeenr the case. They had never said that the
President had not the poesir cf removal without the sanction
of the Senate; that had long since been seuied qy Mr. Madi
son ; but they had said, over and over again, that the power
had been abused. Had there inot hben the strange anomaly
presented of a large majority of the Pro,)le often defeaied I y
a minority; they had a trained, discipline baild underr it,
which had been rewarded by the spoils of offurie, and was i1
proper, right, or con.ci.ivnt to retain such men '? That then
muay be persons in cafice of that party who didi not use teit
officees for selfish or party views ho did not doubt ; but there
were others who had, and the Executive would be faithhlss
'o his trust if he continued such persons in place. This hie
would consent to, that if ever his party should be found so
lost to hour as to send a. rcmber of Congress with a roving
commission to visit'costoni-houslss : o. other p!a'es to see bho
could and who could not vote or ta x public officers pro raia
for the publication of political essays, or use Hickory or Tip
pecamte clubs to promote the election of any particular chief
hlie would l "i ,lhi,4, to see it withered and Ib -stedl under the
indignant .';.. - the American People. WVhrel he couhl
defend he would-wheie igno .ant ha wootld he silent; but
where any thing was wrong in principle, he desired to see iu
exposed ; that was the reform hie desired to sec--sa miething
that would rear mattm-rs out ef the atmosphere of party, anut
elevatee them t tohe region of patriotism; and hue entreated
gentleteuro not to think he had changed princilt, or would
owink at any abuse, whether 'in friend or foe.
Mr. CLAY, of Alabama, rose to reply, when the Chair
announced that the morning hour had expired.
Mr. CLAY, of Aalaama, would ask of the courtesy of the
Senate to be allowed to proceed.
The question was pug, ati ci a division, there appeared
20 for and l against it.
Mr. CLAY, of Alabama, did not expect when the resolu-
tion was submitted that it would have created any debate.
It was a simple call, asking nothing extraordinary and ma-
king no ol'ctr-' Why, then, all this exuitement'I He desiredI
to test t, u,.!. I uy ,f those usho came into power, and see
whether their ptudges had mben rideemeil. It was but the
other day they had frum the Committee on Finance a report,
a great Ifurnish abumt retrenchment-six millions Sive
hundred trIm usand dIslars was the credit side of the
sheet--p,-r eintra, twelve millions, to meet a deficit which
they could not show ; besides all which, there was a new
tariff bll to raise some millions inore. [Mr. PaEsT-ON. Well,
it is to pay your debts ] The gentl-man says something
about debts; wei know their policy is to charge every thing
upon us, and define nothing, hut we rui i<_ .. scrutiny
into all our acts. According to the pledges of gentlemen,
proscription was to be proscribed, retrenchment and refusrm
were to ensne, and yet what had been the evidences t A
loan of twelve millions, added to the puswvr of issuing Trea-
sury notes to lhe amount of six millions more; theta to
issue bonds for ten milhiuris, and seven millions more on a
contingency, which was almost sure to happen ; and these
were the evidences which they had in the first four months
of the new Administration. they would see how far the


People would tolerate their acts. He hoped the resolution
would ie permitted to pass The Senator from South Ca-
rolina had -aid something about a sudden fit ofretrenchment
after the November electionn ; but the clerks heo alluded to
were dismissed a year before, and the business of the office
was brought up so that their s-rvic s cou!d be dispensed with.
Mr. PRESTON and Mr. LINN made some remarks not
heard.
Mr. BUCHANAN and Mr. BENTON rose at thesame
time; when Mr. BENTON took his seat, and was followed by
Mr. BUCmiNAN.
Mr. BENTON. Well, as the gentleman from Pennsyl-
vania sits down, I shall rise up. ie diJ not indulge in tancy
cases, or draw on his imagination for his facts, but he held
in his hand a little document frccm which ihe would read.
Daniel Webster was the drawer and John Tyler the endor-
ser. Here Mr. B. read from the communication sent to the
House of Representatives in relation to the diplomatic arrear-
ages. There was the proscription of the whole diplomatic
corps at once ; and to pay for it a tax was to be raised on tea,
to add to the burdens of the poor factory girls; ind this was
fior the purpose of t l,--u homno the whole diplomatic corps
and sending others in their places. Yes, said Mr. B. demo-
cratic Ministers are to be sent home from all the world, and
federalists and abolitionists put in their places. The aboli-
tionists had forced themselves into respect, and this they had
done with a Virginia President. This extra session had
been called to relieve the distresses ofthe People ; and what
had been done, but a bountiful supply of bills for the purpose
of dividing out spoils


Mr. PRESTON was glad the Senator from Missouri had
nade an issue between fancy anti fact. Was Mr. Stevenson
removed I'1 le had always understood that gentleman hadl
earnestly desired to Ie recalled before. Mr. P. then went
through the whole diplomatic college, and insisted that, after
all the cry about change, there were only two removed, which
was unprecedented in the history of any Administration, and
contrasted most strongly with that of General Jackson, when
the day of the ceremony of succession had scarcely been
closed before he had struck from the diplomatic list that great
man over whose tomo they were still mourning.
Mr. BENTON read from a letter received from a gentle-
man in Missouri, who had resigned his office, as Mr. B. said,
to escape the ignominy of dismissal; and hence it was no
lees proscription.
Mr. B. insisted that all the flourish about magnanimity
was gratuitous; that the document's spoke of appoinimpents
made and contemplated. There was an outfit of $9,000 to
the Minister of Spain, where they at present had a Charge.
There was so much for this, on the score of economy of the
present Administration. Thus, with anti-proscription on
their lips, and songs of patriotism in their mouths, they hadl
exhibited the most rabid canine appetite for office from Tip-
pecanoe and Tyler too," from the footstool of the President
down to the mest humble places.
Mr. SMITH, of Indiana, said they ought to have proceed-
ed to the orders of the day when the hour was out, and here-
after he should insist on the observanceo of the rule. The
session was now drawing to a close, and he desired to get
through tile bill which he hadl under charge; at a proper time,
and when the weather was cool, he might be disposed to dis-
cu!s the ptrrs-ct subject.
Mr. PRESTON replied at considerable length; he said
the Senator from Missouri had left the diplomatic corps and
taken refuge in the great West. Well, with regard to the
removal of Colonel Melvane, he was disposed to think that
the President might have been deceived. With regard to
diplomatic appointments, there had been, he thought, about
five, in the course of ten years, for the court of Russia ; and
one( Senator on this lltor could tell how delightful it was to
spend some time in Italy on the way to St. Petersiurg. If
i.f-, i t,,. Iltil proper to resign, why, there were vacancies
.1 in .,,.i I- thought it highly improper that men in high
places should remain after a signal def-it of their party. In
the first eighteen months of the Jackson Administration,
more diplomatic agents had been removed than would bIe like-
ly to ble during the whole of the present; and they had the
gratifying spectacle that the Government had not put forth its
strength in an insulting and vituperaive manner, such as
had, in too m ny instances, marked the coniluct of its pirede-
sessors. With regard to Spain, would any man say that
econotiy was the cause which I d to the change from Minis-
ter to Charge at that court, by the preceitiig administration 1
Was it not rather for the purpose of reforming ithe trission 1
Another ease where a change was contemplated by tihe pre-
Rent Administration, was at thi court of Braz I, a court
which, he would undertake to say, had great bearing on
Amerucan interests. Amid all the unfortuimntI-. cl.,rn. and
violent revolutions which hadl taken place, B ,z I h.d pre,
served her station. A young European,just budding into hope,
and full of American feeling, was anxious to have a minister
at his court-there were already fourteen envoys extraordi.
nary at that court, and it was desirable that we also should
send one there. Ha thought it of more advantage than even
Spain, Prussia, or Russia.
Mr. PREsTON offered the "., .t .,.' amendment; which
was accepted, as a modification, by Mr. CLAY; :
Andi the same information, with regard to snph increase or di-
minution during the four years from 1829, the four years front
1833, and the four years florio 1837.
MIr. BUCHANAN rose and replied at some I. ilih to
Mr. PRESTON, in which, after contending that the ) re-
trenchment and reform was ever on one side, while the praq.
tice was oni, the other, he glanced at the diplomatic measures
of this country, which, looked at from a distance, might do
very well, but when taken in hand, would not be fiumnd what
they were cracked up to be." Hle defended, with much
zeal, the superior Importance of the court of Russia over
that of Brazil, or any other, eren those of London or Paris.
Mr. SMITH, of Indiana, desired to proceed to the orders
of the day, and gave notice that to-morrow, and every day
thereafter, tie should insist, on a full observance of the rule.
Mr. KING desired to reply to direct imputations made by
the Senator frrm South Carolina on. the missionn to Russia.
Mr. PRESTON disclaimed the slightest idea of saying
any thing invidi'-ius or contumelious either of the mission or
the Senator. He hadl merely spoken of Iho pleasure which
resulted from a short stay in Italy on a passage to the frozen
regions of the North, without intending i,. .li:tis ..J-s- i.
UIdeed, if he must say what he though; i: 0. ,j t,,.: ih,. tl._
stay was entirely too short.
Mr. SMITHI moved to proceed to the orders of the day,
Mr. CLAY, of Ala. hoped he would withdraw it, in order
to give his colleague (Mr. KIN.a) an opportunity to reply.
Mr. SMITH could niot withdraw his motion.
Mr. WRIGHT rose to inquire into a point of order. The
Senate hadl given permission to proceed, and the rule said ex-
pressly they should proceed to the orders of the day Iunless
otherwise ordered," which he believed had been the fact in
the present case. ' . I ';
The CHAIR said the motion was in order under the rule,
Mr. RIVES thought it better to proceed with the discus-
sion until it was finished. These incidental matter, when
postponed, were generally found to occupy the morning hour
frequently fior a whole week, and often running over into the
ilay. Mr. R. then made brief statement of the course of Mr.
KiNGe.
Mr. KING explained that the business before the Senate
was strictly in order. That the Senator from Indiana could
only reach his object by moving t lay the subject onf lhi
table.
Mr. SMITH, of Indiana, moved to lay it on the table.
Mr. RIVES desired to say a few words, observing that he
would confine himself strictly to the subject of lproscription
of the diplomatic corps.
Mr. iMITH, of Indiana, said one explanation might be-
get antither. He had every wish and every desire to oblige,
bula he -i-st leave it to the Senate.
Mr. L \IY, of Alabama, asked if the Senator moved to
lay on the table with a view to give it the go-hyl
Mr. SMITH answered, by rio means, but with the sole
view of proceeding to the order of the day.
The question was then tak.-n on laying the subject on the
table, and decided in the affirmative as follows:
Y EAS-Messrs. Bares, Bayard, Benton, Berrien, CIhoate, Pi
of Kentucly, Cliylon, Dixon, Evans, Grahim, tiii.t .-,- ... . r.
(,inn, Merriti, Miller, Moreihead, P'orter, Premtiss, Preston, Sitn-
lions, Saith, of ldliani, Southard, 1 i i .1 \ .. _24.
NAYS-Mcssis. Allen, Archer, I,.'. -., -i. r..-, Catliori,
Clay, of Alabama, Catithli-rt, Pulton, Henderson, King, McRo
herts, Motite, Nicholson, Rives, Smith, of Conneeuticut, "Sturgeos
Tappan, Waller, Williams, Woodtbtidge, Wooedbury, Young-22.
The Senate then proceeded to the consideration of the or-
der of the day, being the bill to appropriate for a limited pe-
riod the proceeds of the public lands.
On motion of Mr. SMITH, of Ind. several amendments
of the cnmmiiiitee were adopted.
Mr. WALKER moved the followii-g amendment, to be
addd to theftil h section ;
"And be it further enacted, That the two per cent. ofihe ne't
tr ceeds of iie lalts sold by the United States in the State of Mi.-
Sissippi since the lst lDccemher, 1817, or that may hereafter be
sold under ite act entitled An set to enable the people of the
western part of Mississippi T rrm. r I forn a constitution and
State Governmeni, and tar 11. .1 .... of such State into lha
Union oii an equal footing with the original States,' ant alt act stip-
plementary ihereto, reserved for tire milking of a road or roads
leading to said State, be, and the seame i hereby, relinquished to
the State of Mississippi, payable on the 1st day of May after the
passage of this oc, so tar as the same may then have accrued,
and qitrt,-rlv payib e, as the same may accrue, afier siid period :
Provided, That the Legislature of said State shall first pass an
act d -daring their acceptance of said relinquishmieiut in tull of
said fied, accrued and accruing ; and, also, embracing a provision
to le aialterible without the consent of Corigress, that the whole
oa said two per cent. fund e.hall be failififully applied to the con-
structi ii of a railroad leading firom Bramdon, in the State of Mis.
aisipti, to the eastern boundary of said State, in the dtieetian; as
near as tay be, of the towns if Satina, Cahawba, and Montgonme-
ry, in the St ete of Alabama."
This was debated at some length by Messrs. WALKER,
CLAY, of Altaibma, nnd KING, in suipirn, ansi opposed
by Meosrs. EVANS, WHtlTE, and SMITH, oflndiana.
It was then adopt, i: Yeas 22, nays 2].
Mr. CLAY, of Ala., then moved an amendment to tha
same effect iin relation to Alabama. "
Which was rrjeced ; Yeas "20, nays 22.
Mr. CALHOUN off- red the following amendment, to be
added to the end of the second section
"Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be so ecrn-
straei as to convert the distributive shares assigned to the several
States irot a debt due thetr, or to prevent Congress from repeal-
ing this act whenever it shall deem the public interest to require
it, except so far as it may relate to the said grants."
This was advocated by Messrs. CALHOUN, ALLEN,
and others, anoi opposed hy Messrs. SMITH, of Indiana,
WOODBRIDGE, ant PHELPS.


It was then rejected : Yeas 21, nays 25.
Mr. McROBERTS moved an amendment, to add in the
second section, at the fourth line, after the word Colum-
lia," the words "and'the Territory of Wisconsin, Iowa, and
Fblorida."
This was advocated by Mesrs. SEVIERWRI1QHT, and
ALLEN, and opposed by Messrs. H UNTINGTONGLAY,
and SMITH, of Indiana, on the ground that the G.vern-
ment paid the civil expenses of the Territories, and also made
appropriations for their schools, public buildings, roads, &e.
and also that, hy the deeds of session, the lands were granted
to the States.
Mr. WOODBRIDGE also opposed it, and Mr. BU-
CHIIANAN said he should be induced to vote against it, in
compliance with his instructions.
The question was then taken on the amendment, and re-
jecterd : Yeas 20, nays26.
And, after a session of near seven hours, the Senate ad-
journed.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

The journal of Saturday having been read-
On motion of Mr. ADAMS, it wasso amended as to eon-
form to the fact in relation to the Navy Pension Bill, which
was referred to the Committee on Naval Affairs, and not to
the Committee of Ways and Means, as therein specified.
Mr. JONES, of Virginia, rose and said he had been re-
quested by a public meeting of the Democratic party of the
county of Fauquier, in the State of Virginia, to present
the resolutions adopted by that meeting on the 2Ath ultimo:
a reiuebt with which it afforded aim plesure to comply, A










the resolutions expressed the opinions entertained by a high-
ly respectable portion of the people of that county on the
deeply interesting questions which had hitherto and still con-
tinued to occupy the attention of Congress. The preamble
expressed, as the sense of the meeting, that the present extra
session of Congress was not called for or justified by any
of the reasons which had been urged in its support. The
resolutions remonstrated in strong and forcible terms against
the passage of any law far the establishment of a Nation-
al Bank, whether under the title of United States Bank,
Government Bank, or Fiscal Agent, and whether said
bank shall be located in the District of Columbia or else-
where ; against the passage of any law for the distribution of
the proceeds of the sales of the public lands ; against an in-
crease of the tariff, and against the creation of a national
debt.
These resolutions expressed the strong and decided opposi-
tion of the meeting to all those measures-an opposition
which he believed was not less strong or decided with the
Democratic party throughout the Union.
Mr. J. said as there was no subject now pending before
any committee of the House to which these resoliu lions re-
ferred, he in .ved that they be laid on the table, and printed.
Mr. POWELL remarked that, inasmuch as the resolutions
presented catte from thle district which he had the honor to
represent, lie felt himself in duty bound to offer some explan-
ations thereon, that the House milht be fairly possessed of
the extent of the claim of those resolutions to be received as
an expression of public opinion in the quarter from whence
they came.
Mr. P. re,-narked that as to the respectability of the meet-
ing he had no doubt on that point; he perceived the names
of highly respectable gentlemen connected with it; but, if he
was correctly informed, the meeting from which these resolu-
tions emanated was the result of a call of the democracy fur
the purpose upon which they acted; that the meeting was held
accordingly at the court-house of that large county, and at
court time; and that the number who felt so far interested
in the matter as to give their attendance amounted to thirty-
three; and of that number there assembled, three distinguinh-
el gentlemen of the democratic party openly and ably opposed
the doctrine of repeal as applied to charters. Mr. P. remark-
ed that it was as to this doctrine of the resolutions that he had
thought it necessary to speak ; as to the other topics of which
they treat, I e had nothing to say; they embraced the common
principles of the party, and, as stech, they might pass for what
they were worth. But, as to this modern cry cf repeal, he
could not p'r.nit an impression to be troade that it could find
toleration in his district, even with the great body of the de-
mocratic party ; but f-.r this hlie was not authorized to speak.
Certain lihe was, that in the district at large, of which Fatquier
constituted a part, a doctrine .l-i.,. ,iz;, _- would find little
favot-a doctrine going to t i. ti..l.,.tn ..1 public faith, and
all the principles upon which property rests its security, and
uprooting the fundamental principles of society. Mr. P. there-
fore, in the name ofthe Commonwealth of V'r,,- at large,
and of his own district in particular, repudiated such doctrines.
However they might flourish elsewhere, te was well assured
that in the ancient Commonwealth of Virginia, the land of
steady principles, they would take no root, and find no favor.
Mr. GOGGIN then inquired of his colleague, (Zir. Pow-
ELL,) whether one of the gentlemen alluded to by him as
opposing the resolutions was riot a State Senator of the party
opposed also the present Administration. Mr. G. said he
askel for information, as he was unacquainted in the
county.
Mr, POWELL replied,thal such hlie understo-i, t.o le the
fart, antdi tat the ic. .,l. ii'.,n alluded to justly ei.j..y di the
high r9tinrialion of his party and of society at large.
The resolutions were then laid on the table.
And the question recurring on the motion to print-
Mr. CUSHING moved to lay that motion on the table.
lMr. INGERSOLL asked the yeas and nays, which were
ordered, antd, being taken, were yeas 107, nays 76.
S,) the motion to print was laid on the table.
On leave given, Mr. WARREN presented a petition from
many citizens of Albany, Georgia, praying for the passage cf
a bankrupt law at the present pespion of Congress applying
to all classes of persons.
Mr. DAWSON (also on leave given) presented petitions
in favor of the bankrupt law from several hundred citizens of
the city of Augusta antd county of Richmond, in the State of
G-.,r a. Also, from the citizens of Darien, and county of
Ilil ,,..hl, in the same State. Also, from a large number of
citizens of tke city 4if New "orkai which were referred to the
Comminittee of the Whpls on 'the state of the Union.
Mr OWSLEY, of Kentucky, proposed to offer a joint
resolution, providing (if the Senate concur) fir the final
adj aurnment of thii House on Wednesday, the 18lh day of
August.
Mr. M [. DI[l [1 ',, It D hoped that, by general consent, all
resolutiqns which members might desire to offer would be
received.
Mr. FILLMORE inquired of the Speaker whether the
resolution of the gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Ows-
LEY) was in order at this time '1
The SPEAKER said it could only be received by gener-
al consent.
Mr. FILLMORE then said he objected. He would ob-
jet to any resolution of the kind until some disposition had
been made tf the general bankru pt law. '
S the resolution, being objected to, was not received.
Mr. PICKENS inquired of the Speaker what was the
order of business 1
The SPEAKER said that the regular business was the
call ot the States ifor resolutions.
Mr. BROWN, of Philadelphia, on leave, presented a me-
morial (the purport of which was not heard by the Reporter)
Other members asked a similar privilege, which was re-
fused.
Mr. THOMPSON, of J.idliana, asked leave to make a
report from the Committee on the District of Columbia,'
SOhbjection was made.
The States were then called in their order for resolutions.
A resoluti in was offered by Mr. ADAMS, of which (by
some accidental circumstance) no copy could be obtained, but
which will be noticed to-morrow.
Mr. TILLINGjAST offered to present certain joint re-
solutions from the Legislature of Rhode Island, 'the purport
of which was not slated, or not heard.)
Mr. TURNWY objected.
The SPEAKER said that resolutions of State Lpgisla-
tures were not properly in order at this time, but on peti-
tion day.
Mr. TILLINGHAST withdrew the resolutions.
Mr. FERRIS offered the fulloiing resolution; which, giv-
,tir rise to debate, was ordered to lie over :
SResolved, That the Secretary of tle Navy tie directed to inform
this House; at the comIenonement of the next session of C ,.: ...
what measures have been taken to carry int) effect the 'i ,'-
;t of March, 1835, authorizing the construction of a dry dock in
hiie harbor of New York or its adjacent waters.
Mr. CHARLES BROWN, of Pennsylvatia, offered the
following resolution ; which, giving rise to debate, was or-
dered to lie over :
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be requested to
furnish to this House, at the commnenement of its next session, a
statenment showing the juanti'y of foreign coaIls imported into the
United States during the years 1833, 1839, and 1840; where from,
-t 0-htf port received, amid what duty per bushel was charged

Also, to inquire, into the manner foreign coals ire measured at
ite different ports of ihe Uviied Slttes, with reference to the im-
psiiian ifthe uist i,.,. t i eoi, and reportto this House
whether the same is .. I ... ,-. I according to law; tand if net,
wvhat farther legislation, if ony, in his opinion, is necessary to a
ttnore uniform measurement, and en oreemett of the laws provid-
tifg for tile payment of duties ono foregin coats.
jn pursuance ef notice heretofore given-
Mr. W. W. IRWIN asked and obtained leave to introduce
a bill to provide the means of payment for seven sites for Ma-
rine Hospitals in the Western States, purchased in pursu-
ance of the act of 3d March, 1837.
Ot motion of Mr. I. the bill, having been read twice by
its title, was rerrel to the Committee ot Ways and Means.
Mr. SNYDER offered the following resolution ; which,
giving rise to debate, was ordered to lie over:
Resolved, Tbat hereafter no appropriation shall be made for
noy otiw wo- k, or for the riepa;irof soy fort, h-urtress, armory, build-
haag, tr imt rovement of any kittI for tite use of the U. State?, until
tle Mngincer or proper u licir under whose supervision saod im-
pruveteuit shill coitne shall first maite out pans itid specifications
of said work, with untm csiltnate of the whole expenie, one copy to
be il -d in the Clerk',, office, and the otiuer in the Department o(
feate, to which said work uppr.rpriately belongs. And said sn.
goiner or officer shall advertise the work to be done in three
newspapers in each State, for tEe space of four weelte one paper
ti be printed at the capital of each State in which the laws oh
the United States are tublhisled; the other two in the counties
puearest the sork to be done. All the proposals shall be filed, std
the work let to thie lowest responsible bidder; all which said
acconnts shall be settled in lie usual way.
And the Hnuse shall appoint, by i'allot, a standing committee oh
nine members, but one to be takan from a $uate, whose duty it
shall be, when rt qui ed by Congress, to audst all accounts of ex-
penditure of public moneys in accordance with the plan, specifi-
cation, and allotment of said work.


Mr. WILLIAMS, of Maryland, offered the following re-
solution; which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to
lie over:
Resolved, That the Committee of Ways and Means be instruct-
ed to inquire into the expediency of appropriating ait sum of money,
to.be expended (if in Ithei juduinent of the President ,f the .United
States it shall be or may become necessary) in making provision
to place thi porter Havre d& Grace, in the State of Maryland, in
a state of security from ftieign assault.
Mr. WISE said he had just been requested by an officer ol
the United States with one leg to offer the following reso-
lution :
Resolved. That all commissioned officers and privates of the
Army and Navy of the United States, who have lost a Ihr-b in the
service of their country, be, and are hereby, allowed the privilege
of admission to the lobby of this House.
rCries of Ay, ay"-" No, no."]
Mr. BRIGGS. The resolution changes a rule of the
0ouse.
The SPEAKER. It can only be entertained by unani-
mous consent.
Mr. KEIM said he supposed the resolution, if it gave rise
to debate, must lie over.
Mr. WISE. It can be entertained by unanimous consent
I hope no objection will be raised.
Mr. KEIM. I object to the resolution, unless it is so mo-
difiedl as to admit rank and file together.
The resolution was again read.
Mr. BRIGGS. If they have received the thanks of Con
gress, they are entitled now to come on the floor.
Mr. ARNOLD suggested that the resolution should be st
modified as to admit private soldiers.
Mr. WISE was willing so to modify the resolution, he
as to embrace" all soldiers who had lost their limbs."


Mr. ADAMS inquired of the Speaker whether the resolu-
tion did not, as a matter ofcourse, lie over I
The SPEAKER said it must lie over if there was not una-
nimous consent.
Mr. ADAMS. Then 1 desire it to go over. I think the
resolution, if adopted at all, should be modified.
A voice. It has been modified.
Mr. ADAMS. Yes; but there are other modifications
that I should desire to make.
So the resolution was ordered to lie over.
Mr. HOPKINS offered the following resolution ; which
was adopted:
Resolved, That the Postmaster General be required to inforT I
this House, with as little delay as practicable, how much of the
appropriation of $125 000 for the construction of the new Post
(i-. i....-.,, made for the year 1841, remains unexpended.
Mr. GILMER, from the Select Committee on Retrench-
mnient, offered the following resolution, which, giving rise to
debate, was ordered to lie over :
Resolved, That the chairman of the Commnittee on Retrench-
ment ask leave of the House to sit during thie access of Congress,
and the committee have power to send for persona sand Fapiers,
and to report at ithe next session by bill or otherwise.
Mr. UNDERWVOOD offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Secretary of War be required to report to
tis House, at the next session of Congreso, the number of fortifi
nations within thie U ited States, showing, in tabular form, the
amounts expended during each yearof the three last Congresses
in the construction or repairs of each ; the amount expended from
and after the 4th of March last up to the latest period priorto the
report which may be practicable ; thteip amount estimated as neces-
sary to complete the construction or repair of those yet unfiuish-
edl, and the whole expenditure on those finished; the number of
gumns which are to be employed at each fortifications when comn-
pleted, the number of workmen .i .....I .,i '..,. ,, -,, each for-
tification., anid the nmuount of wa_.. I '- ,, 1., 1,. ,. mon'h o01
year; and the number of mnen wiuich will be required to mao such
fortifications in time of peace, and also in time of war; and that he
further report the manner in whi, 1ithe contracts for supplies of
materials to construct such fbrtificationts are or have been made,
and whether they are let to tihe lowest bidder, upon advertise
mnent, or in what other mode are the supplies furnished, and the
cost of the principal timber, per cubic foot, used in conatructing
the fortification ; and likewise thie cost or price of stone, brick, or
other principal materials used.
Mr. FILLMORE suggested to Mr. U. so to modify the
resolution as to include '" the expenses of those fortifications
that have been completedd,"
Mr. UNDERWOOD accepted the modification.
And the resolution, as modified, was adopted.
Mr. POPE offered the following resolution, which, giving
rise to debate, was ordered to lie over:
Resolved That the Committee on the Post Office and Post
Roasu be insa'rne d to inquire into tie expediency of. .1 I;,
a miall roite, the mail to be carried *",.- -, .. r .., it,, I -
town, in Nelsonn county, in Kentudl k. .i ,. .. . .-, I. ..-
ty, in same State, and thence to Nashville.
Mr. MASON, of Ohio, offered the following resolution,
which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to lie over;
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be directed to
lay before thIis Hoouse, as early as practicable at the next session
of C a statement showing-
F' ",t It, estimated cost and quantity of the lands actually
ceded by Indians to the Uited States, exclusive of the lands re-
served for or subsequently granted to Indians.
The amount paid out of thle Treasury on account of salaries and
contingent expenses of the General Land OIL :., and the local
land offices, separately
The estimonitdcu amount paid out of the Treasury on account of
salaries ant cotiniigenut expenses at the surveyors' offices, on ac-
count of the sauld ortion of the public lands.
The amount paid out of the proceeds of the public lands, while
in the hands of the receivers, on account of thle sald-i;es and con-
tingent expenses of the land o(vcea.
The esginateu amount pail for surveying such po tionsof the
public lands as have been sold or otherwise disposed of.
The amount paid to the State of Georgia, and fr the liquidation
of clahius arising out of the laws of the United Sttces..
Thie amount paid out of ihe Treuasury in consequence of the pur-
chase of Louisiana and Florida, for principal and inteiesat, sepa-
rately. '
The amount paid to the several States, or set apart as being the
2, 3, and 5 per cent. fotdus.
The estimated cost a:.d quantity of the lands reserved for Indi-
ans, or those graoned to them in lieu of, or as part compensation
far, the lands ceded by them to the United States, separately.
Second The amount paid by the purchasers of the public
lands, showing how much Was paid in money, and howy touch in
military wvarrants, stoci;s, evidnuces of public delibt, a..l land scrip,
respectively.
The amount of interest on the sums annua ly paid into the Trea-
sury for the public lands, and the interest on the sumts annually
paid in lind warrants or military scrip, separately.
The quantity and estimated value, at the minimum price per
acre, of the lan-ls gratedid tn the several Slates f6,r the purposes of
education, roads, ctealhs, &c.
The quantity and saitiiated value, at the minimum price per
acre, of the lands granted or eact apart for bounties to the officers
and soldiers of the revolutionary and late wars.
The quantity and estimated value, at the minimum price per
acre, of the lands granted to individuals or companies, other than
the .,r, .,. -. .. the ordinary private claims.
The quantity and estimated value of the lands reserved for,and
granted to, Indian individuals, or it tribes, in lieu of the lands ce-
ded by them to the United States, separately.
Third. The estimated amount paid for salaries and contingent
expenses of the offices of Surveyors Getneral, and for surveying
suchi portions of the public lands as httve not been sold by the Uni
ted States, separately,
The estimated quantity stoveyed and unsold, and the quantity
ceded and not surveyed.
Fourth. The amounts annually paid into the Treasury out of
the duties accruing at the ports of New Orleans and Mobile, and
in Michigan,and the interest on the payments so made.
Also, statements showing in detail, and under each 'treaty, tihe
cost and quantity of the lands "oeded to site Uluited States, ex-
clusive cf the lands reserved and subsequently granted to In-
dians," and those"'' reserved for Indians, or granted iu lieu of the
lands ceded by ihem,'!
Mr. CALVARY MORRIS offered the following resolu-
tion, which, .' ;1,i rise to debate, was ordered to lie over:
Resolved '. Senate and House of Representatives of
the United Ltates of America in Congress assembled, That
all letters and packets, weighing two ounces and under, carried
by post, to and from Mrs. Harrison, relict of the late William
Henry Harrison, be conveyed free of postage during her natu-
ral I.
Mr. t.rDLII NGS offered the following resolution, which
was adopted :
Resolved That the President be requested to transmit to this
House, as early in lthe next session as may be convenient, all evi-
dences in his possession (not heretofore communicated) respecting
the origin of thie Seminole war, together with a list of ail slaves
captuurrd during said war by the t I I in the service of
tie United S ates in'; Forida the u... i f for the capture of
;-uch slaves, (it any,) and the manner in which said slaves have
been disposed of siuee their capture.
Mr. MOORE, of Louisiana, .1, ..1 the j-..r.j resolu-
tion, which, l ;,;, rise to debate, was ordered to lie over:
Resolved, ii ,'.. Commit'iree ou Commerce be instructed to
inquire into tihe expediency of establishing a port of entry on Red
River, either at Nat-hitochies or Shrevesport, a d of allowing the
benefit of drauhback on cotton imported inland from Texas, when
exported, and on foreign goods exported inland to Texas and
Mexico.
By general consent, the SPEAKER laid before the House
c rain depositions in the case of the contested election from
Virginia; which were referred to the Committee on Elec-
tions.
The committees were then called in their order for reports.
Mr. DAWSON, from the Commiltee on Military Affairs,
reported till ,,.I i _. f'urmhir provision for the suppression of
Im dian u ilih ...- i'm '1 -t.t, -.
The hill having been read twice ly its title-
Mr. DAWSQN, remarking that it contained no appro-
priation, anti that its object was merely to continue in f,,rce
certain provi-iuunts of the act of 1836, which had expired, (be-
ing a bill -,ath, .,;t... the President to call out additional vol-
unteers,) ,uIr-h ie did not require committernut, moved
thut lhe bill be put on its third reading.
Aoter a moment's conversation between M. ;f-. McKAY
and DAWSON, the bil! wat re trred to mc- t. .mmittee of
the Whole rn the state rof the Union, and was ordered to
be printed.
Mr. UNDERWOOD, from Ihe Committee for the Dis-
trict of Columbia, reported, wi'l an h rim rin,-., ui'. the Senate
bill in relation to the District Banks. 1;. 'i t.-l to the Com-
miutt-u of he Whoil on the state of the U,,ion.
Mr. UNDERWOOD, from the same committee, reported
a bull to authorize the recovery of fines and forfeitures incur-
red under the charter laws and ordinances of Georgetown,
before jusi ices of the peace.
r The bill having been read twice, Mr. U., after briefly ex-
plaining the provisions thereof, moved that it be put on its
third readiug at this time.
And, no onijection beisg made, the bill was read a tl~ird
time and passed.
Mr. THOMPSON, of Indiana, from the Committee for
the Di-trict of Columbia, made a report on the subject of
Pennsylvania avenue, (mu relation to which subject a bill had
been heretofore reported.)
The report (without being read) was laid on the table,
. and ordered to be printed,


Mr. THOMPSON, from the same committee, made a re-
port on the subject of the repairs of the Potomac bridge, (in
relation to which subject also a bill had been heretofore re-
ported.)
The report (without being read) was laid on the tabla, and
Ordered to I-e printed.
a Mr. CUSHING, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs,
reported, with an amendment, the Senate bill (heretofore re-
ferred to that comrnitee) entitled An act to amend an act
entitled an act to carry into effect the convention between the
United States and the Mexican Republic."
S Mr. C. stated that the amendment proposed by the conm-
mittee was to strike out the enacting clause of the bill.
a Mr. WELLER. That is considerable of an amendment,
I should say.
On the as,.. o .-ii .f Mr. WISE (as the Reporter under-
0 stood) thetu., I.,- >i...- thie table.
Petitions and memorials (on leave) were presented by the
- following members, and were appropriately referred:
Mr. UNDERWOOD, of Kentucky.
0 Mr. ROOSEVELT, of New Ydk.
Mr. RANDOLPH, of New Jersey.
Mr. WOOD, of New York.
Mr. SMITH, of Connecticut.
REPEAL OF THE SUB-TREASURY LAW.
The unfinished business of Saturday was the bill from the
- Senate repealing the act commonly known as the sub-Trea-
sury law, as the said bill had been proposed to be amended by
* the Select Committee appointed by this House on the subject
of the Currency.
* Mr. PICKENS rose in opposition to the bill, which, as
well as its antagonist measure, a Bank of the United States,


he considered as involving principles deeply affecting the dis- war had been commenced upon the currency. He next en-
tribution of wealth and the wages of labor. After a word of tered into some statements to show the great expense in-
commendation on the sub-Treasury bill, he laid down the ge- curred under this system in the collection and disbursement
neral principle, that nothing so much disturbed the currency of the revenue. He condemned the sub-Treasury as not
and exchanges of a country as the use of Government credits answering the ends and purposes which its advocates had
of any kind, directly or indirectly. HIe had advocated the claimed for it, when it became the law of the land; and he
su.-Treasury system chiefly because it abstracted Government pronounced it as a humbug of the veriest kind, which had -
credit from the business concerns of the country, been forced upon the country by palming upon this House
Mr. P. then traced the effect of the system he opposed a representation from a whole State that had not been elected
from the year 1833 to 1837; insisting that the exportation by the People.
of Government credits to Europ' had brought back not mo- He declared that he wseald as soon think of sanctioning
ney, but an inundation of European manufactures, which thile .ct of a robber who should break open the vaults of the
came in competition with our own domestic labor. The Treasury and take out the treasure, as he would of voting to
catastrophe in 1837 1ad put a slop to this; insomuch that, retain the sub-Treasury. He would ask his democratic
while the imports iof 1839-40 had been 105 millions, the ex- friends to point out in what respect the sub-Treasury had v
ports had been 131 millions: the balance going to pay the benefltteil the country. Would it, he inquired, relieve the
interest anti part of the principal of our foreign debt; while embarrassments under which the country was laboring I
but a year before the imports had been 150 iuh il n ., and ex- Would it regulate the exchanges, and enable men to do their t
needed the exports by 56 millions. This, alone, was enough business with facility, dispatch, and at a reasonable expense? i
to derange the currency and exchanges of the country. No, gentlemen would not say that it had that effect; and
Mr. P., adverting to the I-an of twelve millions, and the the only reply that could be obtained from them in answer [
creation of bank stork, together with the distribution bill, to your questions was, that the bill created a separation of h
prophesied that the result would be a repetition of the same the, Government from the banks. His honorable friend from
measures as had flooded the country with foreign goods, and, Virginia, (Mr. HUNTER,) the late Speaker, said theotherdav,
instead of regulating, would disturb and derange currency with great candor, openness, and fairness, that his opposition c
and exchange, was inot to the credit system, but that he was opposed to the
He appealed to gentlemen from Connecticut and Penn- whole banking system of the country. He knew that during e
sylvania, whether they would stand such a mass of foreign the late political canvass it was again and again charged o
competition. Capitalists would get control of the Government that the locofocos were opposed to the banking system, that
credit, as they had lately had of State credit,and Corporation they desired its destruction, and that charge had not been t
credit. But it would be that class of capitalists whose capi- denied, C
tal, being chiefly invested in stocks, was moveable, and could He maintained that they did desire the destruction of the
easily be transferred into a new channel. These would conie credit system. And had they not, he asked, now got up the
in competition with those, whose capital being in lands and cry, from ome end of the Union to the other, of "Repeal," p
in factories, was fixed, and could not be withdrawn from its Repeal," in reference to the bill passed a few days ago for b
ex;lin: i-vestmient. The effect would be, at first, to produce the establishment of a National Bank I When such senti-
,. w i,..,,,- and deceptive appearance of prosperity; but this ments as these were put forth, what was to be inferred I The s
would be quickly sumcceeded by reaction, and a proportionate conclusion was irresistible. HIe argued that one of the lead- m
condition of mercantile distress and embarrassment., ing characteristics of thie minority was their hostility to the
Mr. P. then proceeded to contrast the circumstances under credit system, and also a desire to resort to direct taxation, ri
which the previous national banks had been created with those What had they heard the other day from the gentleman fromW
of the country at this time, arguing to show that, if a bank South Carolina ? Did he not avow that he was in favor of
should be established now, form ign exchange would be against direct taxation 7 And what did the gentleman from New C
the country ; and if Government did not interpose to aid the York say, but that it was a part of the Democratic system It
bank, by creating some sort of exchequer bills, it would not Did rio, hle would ask, time gentleman from New Hampshire,
stand six months. This, he said, the People never would in a speech, sustain the doctrine itself t The issue was now C
countenance or tolerate. Ile went into some statistical state- raised of the destruction of the credit system through the
menus, showing what had been the course of the last bank, Sub-Treasury, as opposed to a National Bank. He was
andi what had led to its ruin. He did not spare the Penosyl- ready to accept that issue on the part i f his constituents, a
vania bank, which he designated as a charnel-house of cor whether for weal or for wo. Mr. M. went on to trace the
eruption, disgusting and revolting to behold. blighting and ,itl,, ri, hl,'cts of the Sub-Treasury on the
Hle next went into the all,-ged power of a national bank best interests ,i it ... '-'ir, and showed that it had reduced
to regulate exchanges, which h he utterly denied. The true the specie circulation ; and he quoted from a speech of Mr.
meaning of exchange was the difference between cash and Calhoun to prove that, in the same ratio asthe circulation was
thie value of a bill drawn upon a particular point; but, in the reduced, the value of property was reduced also. He then
modern use of the term, it had come to be considered as mere- added that the loss to his constituents alone, in slave property,
ly the difference between bank notes of different banks. Thus if they were comieliled to sell at the prices which now prevail,
in Savannah there were banks which paid, and other banks would I. e thirty-two millions of dollars. With regard to a S
which did not pay specie, and the diff-rence in the value of National Bank, it had been said that the question was settled.
their notes was called exchange. It was a mere asurdiltyso He did not know exactly how that might be, but this he a
to call it, and thIe argument founded on it was a mere catch- could say, that in his own State, that in every pamphlet and t
penny argument. newspaper thatcame from the city of Washington,the People d
In confirmr.atiun of his position that the United States Bank were told that the issuo was between the sub-Treasury and a a
never did, in this modern sense, equalize the exchanges of National Ban'. And no sooner was the election over, and S
the country, Mr. P. quoted a long table in detail showing the Van Buren party found themselves defeated, than they
thle rates of exchange in different years during ihe lifetime of disseminated throughout the wh-le country that that was not5
the bank. Hlie insisted that neither a paiiornal bank, nor the the issue. He would say, that so far as his own State was tl'
Government itself, nor any other power on earth could or concerned, the question was settled, and settled that the sub- tl
ever ha oi.it,,d exchange, hut the course of trade, which Treasury should be repealed. But, whether settled or not ti
was as tr-. O'Ll.. and uncontrollable as the laws of Nature; one thing li he would say, and that was, that the friends of a
but being itself controlled by the relation of deziand to sup- National Bank had passed the bill.
ply. He traced the contrary id~ea Go the English financiers, Mr. STEENROP, then obtained the floor, and spoke in C
and their inferortcosa from the operations of the Bank of Eng- opposition to the repeal. hI
land; but gave it as his opinion that there never hall been a Hte was followed by Mr. HASTINGS, of Ohio, whoread h
greater fallacy. Hle relied much on thet fact that while the a speech on the same side.
Bank oft England had increased her bullion nine millions in Mr. GIDDINGS said that during the last eight months o
1813, yet the course of foreign exchange had been steadily whir' 'his House had been engaged in legislation, more than
against the bank. The theory assumed in, ili,; .:. tiich twooiu those months had been spsnt in discussing this ques- tl
were not true. but were on the contrary ino..-.. i. :.- ,,as, tion o '.sab-i-Treaiury and its antagonist measure. In that hi
that the course of trade, the state of the tariff, and the amount timne, ,,,thing more than a hundred and two speeches, lihe
of products in foreign countries remained always the same. believed, had been made and published, and by hundreds of
Even when England was importing graiu from abroad, ex- thousands senit fourth to the People. He believed he would now n
change remained ngainat iier. better eslberne the interests of those who sent him here by en- a
But if' a national bank could reguhlte domestic exchange, deavoting to bring the debate to a close than by making a tI
how could it do it i As it had in 1819,'20, and '21, by break- speech. 1Ir therefore called for the previous question. I
ing all the Southern banks, that it might concentrate all the Mr. WELLER moved a call of the House.
specie of the country in its own vaults I Such must again be Mr. JOHN T. MASON moved an adjournment; but with.
the inevitable effect of a central bank with blanches in the drew it. ,
States. He quoted a letter of Mr. Biddle's to a committee of Mr. HALSTED renewed the motion, and asked the v
Congress in 1832. He insisted that the apparent equalization yeas and nays; which were ordered, and, being taken, were- f
of exchanges was deceptive, and the mere effect of transfer- Yeas 62, nays 95.
ring brokerage from private counters to the counters of the So bthe House refu-..1 i.. .: 'rt,.
branch banks, while labor felt no benefit from the operation. Mr. LEWIS WILt LI A l-Ib 5I.ked the yeas and nays on c
Mr. P. now went into a history ofthecauses of thie )evul- the motion that there bo a call of the House; which were or- r
sion in business which occurred in 183'; which he traced, dered, and, being taken, were-Yeas l01, nays 77.
not to any war of the Government against the Bank of the So the call was ordered. '
United States, but to the course pursued by the Bank of Eng- And the roll being called, 178 members answered to their
land in first extending her credits over this country and then names.
suddenly increasing her bullion four millions and i',i>t-,. And the names of the absentees having been called, 206
her discounts eight miltliTns ; thus withdrawing sixth) ',..,.. members appeared to hbe present, f
of dollars in a si, gle year from the amount of circulation. In All further proceedings were then suspended. t
addition to this 'had come the effect of the deposit distribu- Anti the question recurring on seconding the demand for t
lion bill, which aggravated the evil and precipitated the ca- the previous question-
tastrophe. That it was not owing to the sub Treasury, lhe Mr. WILLIAMS, of Maryland, twade the following point
insisted, was proved by the fact that the sante and greater dis- of order:" a
tress was experienced simultaneously in England and also in ,That a tuis observance of Parlisnentary law and practice, not t
some parts of the continent, i incensusent with iuh" -n-lsrti ruls of this House, requires Ih ti
Mr. P. ,iiv .--. .- with soe vehemence against the plan every bill shall be ..J i,.... : 1 by paragraphs, FOB AMEND-
of the I'iscal B .i.l, as a political measure and a Treasury m-ENT, at least once, before the question shall be put whether it
bank, as a monster-go., engendered in fraud anid brought shall be read a third time; and that tho bill entitled An a-t to i
forth in corruption; andti avowed his determination never to reteal" t' &_. not havein been so read, the previous question
bow in worship before such a horrid idol. Neither would the e-n :,,t noicproperly appiy." t
country; they would give all vested rights to the winds, tear he SPEAKER overruled the point.
up all parchment edicts to threads, and trample them under Mr. WILLIAMS asked itf it was in order to mat.e some
their feet ; but never, never could or would they submit to so Tre Seaks on this tuoint o
vile a compound of fraud and iniquity as was now proposed T1he SPEAKER decided that t was not in order, the pre-
to be forced upon their necks, vious quest;. been called.
Mr. HUNT next obtained the floor, and went into a ir. WILLlA appealed from the decision.
speech in support of the biil, it' which lie took a retrospective Which decision, by yeas 149, nays 20, was sustained by
view of the riso anti progress of the Sub-Treasury bill, from the lituse.
183'7 down to the present time. The motion for the previous question was then seconded.
He had constantly, and from the first, protested against and And the maini question was ordered to be taken.
opposed it; and he now thanked a merciful Providence that And the main question, being on agreeing to the amend-
he had been spared, as he hoped, to see the r final repeal of so meitoflhe select committee of this House, was decided it
odious a measure of ignorance and tyranny, within one year the affirmative.
after its birth had been celebrated by the firing of cannon, So the amendment (of which the Reporter has not a copy)
and hailed as a third Declaratit, f l.. I. .o .!., u was agreed to.
Mr. H. insisted that its ...i..-.,'I., I bsen pro- The bill, as amended, was then ordered to be engrossed for
nounuced by the whole American People-the Gub Treasury a third reading, i
having tnetm made a distinct issue z.hrt. ,; ..-t the country at And having been ordered to a third reading nowU, the bill,
the late Presidential election. by the following vote, was passed:
Mr. 11. would vote for its repeal because hlie wished to see YEAS-Messrsi. Adams, Allen, L. W. Andrews, S. J. Andrews,
the country return to the good old path in which our fathers Arnold, Ayerigg, Babcock, Baker, Barnard, Barton, Birdseye,
had trodden, and which had conducted the country to a Black, iBlaii, Bo-rdman, Borden, Botts, Briggs Brockway, Hron-
height of prosperity unequalled in the history of the world, son, M. Brown, J. Brown, Blunune, W Butler, Calhoun, J. Camp-
hei referred to the financial quackery whinh luad marked the ll, ,William B. Campbell, Thoms J. Campbell, Caruther.,
past Admiistrati une i al averted, with a eeof regret, to the Childs, Chiutenden, John C. Clark, Staley N. Clark, Cowen,
past Administrations averted, with a eye of regre, to th Crastou, Cravens, Cushing, Garrett Dttvia, %Villiam C. Dawson
incomnparable currency the country had enjoyed before the Deberry, John Edwards, Everett, Vessenden, Filhniore, A.
era of experiment commen,-ed: then passed to Gen. Jackson's I awrence Foster, Thos. F. Foster, Gamble, Gentry, Giddlings,
war on the United States Bank, in the rfae of all tlt libene- Gilmer, Goggiii, Patrick G. Goode, Graham, Green, Greig,
fits it had conferred upon tise country ; to Jeremiah Mason's Hahershaui, Hall, Halsted, William S H-]sHn., Henry, How-
yanhee contumacy, and the attacks ot the Hero on Iieck Ju- ard, Hudson, Hunt, James Irvin, ,ll. .1.. \. Irwin, Jainm",
nior and his monster, till he brought th9 nsrative down to W. C. Johnson, Isaaec 1). Jones, John P. Kennedy, King, Lane,
the adoption of the State B il. 5s5e5tn, and Mr. Woodbury's Lawu once, linn, Mallory, Thomas F. Marshall, Samson Mason,
boast as to its sufficiency ;" 1 tI the purposes of a national in- Matunin, Mattocko, Maxwell, Mayna~d, Meriwether, Moore,
situation, gnd of its having actually accomplished those purpo- Morgan, Morris, Morrow, Nislet, Osborne, Owvley, Prarce,
see with increased economy tm the Giovernment ; and so ar- Pensitdeton, Puiee Pi w all, Prosfit, Ramney. Bonipnuin Rind ull,
rived at the grand crash in M ay, 1837, which prostrated Randh ,I.. P -. ts- . ., i.. n d ot duy .. it,,Sahvltan
the all, a hdha o w thi cr s'ta, mu l i ~.. .,, -u t. Smith, Stanly, Stoke-
them all, and led to the called session und-r Mr. Van Boron. hy, Straoitn, Stuart, Summorsa, Tal aferro, John Bt. Tiumpson,
The result had surprised nobody but the ve.-y men who of .
Ruiebard \. Tthongp-o~u, I ,,. i. soual, Temlshnson, Tmipheut,
all others ought not to have be., ur1riscd. Mr. Woodbury, Truimbull, Uoderwood, \ ... 1;... ..., Wallace, \Varren, Wmshi-
whose head wan a9 lumimous as mud, was, indeed, greatly i:,gtoo, Edward ID. White, Jo seph I. White, Thomas W. Wil-
amansed at it, as was Gen Jackson also; but ,u.5. were the lusts, Lewis Williatus, Christopher H. Williams, Joseph 1,.
only two m,-ni in the Union wirn had forercee~i nothing of the WihiUaia, Wintlhrop, Yorke, Aiugustus Young, John Young-134.
danger. NAYS-Messrs. Arrington, Alherton, Banks, Beeson, Bid-
Mr. H. adverted to the vast multipiiealion of State banks lick, Bowne, Btoyd, Aaron V. Brown, Charles Brown. Burke,
as the direct '(* .:i of the system pursued by these Solomons ; Sampson H. Butler, William 0. Bumler, Green W. Calhuwell,
yet when these institutions, by pursuing the very poliu y to Patrick C. CaldwelI, Cory, Chapman, Cliord, Clinton, Coles,
which they had been invited and simulated, wire utterly tross, Cne. Ethis, atd D. .'as, Jan Daw uyun, Charlesan,
ruined, they were made the suhjec's of unmeasured vitu- l t p ne,h i. dwaois, Fit..-t <. Gouds, GJ rdon, Gustin, Char-
peratiu,n, and accused of treachery. Even Stales, whose Le- ris, A :... lHasting>, Hays, Hotmes, Hopkins, Houe-k, Houston,
gislatures had been temptetl to multiply banks and enter into Hubard, Hunter, hvgersnll, Jauk, Cave Johnmnn, John WV. Jones,
enterprises upon the fends thus spreati abroad, were public- Keimi, Andr.-- K., I I .. uis, I.ttlshield, Lowell, Abraham
ly, and it a solemn Presidential message, denounced as spend- McClellan, i, i. mu 'l l. i ., MeKay, Marceand, Alfred Mar-
thrifts, ant their public enterprises as profligate and reckless shall, John Thompson Masun, Mathiews, Medill, Miller, Oliver,
speculations. Parmenter, Patridge, Payne, Pickens, Plomer, Reding, Rigga,
Mr. H. spoke with ridicule and contempt of the mission to Rogers, Roaevelht, Saunders, Shaw, Shielt's, Snyder, 9, ,:>,
Europe to discover how the Governments of Spain, and Al- Steonrrd, Turney, Van Buren, Ward, Watterson, Weller, mm. -,1.
giers, and Cuba collected and disbursed their revenues ; and brook, Jatines W. Wilhiams, Wood-87.
was proceeding to speak on the providing of one currency Mr. HALSTED moved a reconsideration of the vote just
for the People and another for the Government when his taken.
hour ex-ired, and he was followed by After some remarks from Mr. H. the motion was with-
[A message was received from the President of the United drawn.
States, by the hands of JOHN TYLEs, Jr. his private secre- Mr. J. C. CLARK renewed it, and demanded the previous
tary, informing the House that the President had approved question; which was seconded.
and signed the bill uu to revive and continue in force fur ten The main question (which was on the reconsideration) was
years the act entitled An act to incorporate the Mechanic ordered to be taken; and, being taken, was decided in the


Relief Society of the city of Alexandria.' negative.
A deep silence pervaded the Hall when the message was So the vote was not reconsidered.
announced, which wassucteeded with roars of laughter when And then, at half past six, the House adjourned.
the character .of the bill which had received the Presidential A-AT AR -o-N-of.O
signature became known.] 'TIONAlI #IEATRE.-SECOND NiGHr of Mr. JO-
T "^6.^ ^~~. l P"*lH FOSTER, producer, director, aod inventor of the
Mr. MERIWETHER adverted to some of the remarksN PH FOSTER, proatucec, mhirecnr, atd inventor of the
oh the gentleman from New Yuurk, (Mr. H'N,) atid the suite- ful drarna f thie Naiad Qumeeo, St. Gecrme and the Dra-
o the gentleman from New York, (Mr. H heNT,) and ther gorgeous dramas. This EVENING, AU-
gentleman front South Carolina (Mr. PICKRNS,) atid also GUS' i th, 1841, will be presented the historical drama, ia
lo those ofthe ir ciil,a.a, from Pennsylvania, (Mr. INGERt.- three p, 1!, entitled
SOLL,) made a i, dr,). ince. THE LIFE OF NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,
He then went on to say that he would now, without taking ITn which a splendid stud of horses will appear.
up the time of the House in ;efe-tIng to the cross road r per
speeches and the harducirder argursiets which the gentle- Napoleon Bonaparte Mr. J. FOSTER,
man from South Carolina was so fond of ttting on all occa- whose extraordinary likeness to the great original has been the
sons, proceed to give some of his views on the subject then theme and admiration of thousands of his brave veterans, who have
before them-the repeal of the sub-Treasury. exclaimed, at the close of each performance, their heartfelt burst
He would say, at once, thatbe uwan in favor ofihe ropo- of approbation, Vive la Napoleon."
He would say, at once, that he dwash ina favor of he propoi- In the course of the evening a variety of singing and dancing.
tion, and he expressed his utter inability to discover how the To concise, first time here, wi t c
friends of the sub-Treasury came to the conclusion that it Toco eI, first tiote hers, with the com c, pantonmime, within
friends of the sub-Treasury came to the conclusion that it he original music, new dresses, &c. as produced by Mr, J.
was a measure separation' the bank from the State. For his Foster, ofn
own part, he had never been able to perceive it; but, on the MOTHER GOOSE,
contrary, regarded it in a light exactly the reverse. Or, ttarlequin and the Golden Egg.
He next proceeded to cite fiom the report of Secretary With a varictv of tricks, changes, and transformations never be-
Woodbury, made at the last session of Congress, for the pur- fore attempted here, in which several performers of distinction
pose of showing that there was scarcely a bank in the coun- will appear.
try with which the Government was not most closely and in-
timately connected, and that they had greatly increased in SAMUEL M. CHARLES,
number of late years. Portrait and Miniature Painter,
He contended that the sub-Treasury rendered it almost Third Street, Four Doors from Pennsylvania Avenue,
impossible for the Government to shake off these mushroom WASHINGTON CITY.
institutions, which hadt sprung into existence ever since the aug 7- eo3t ...


WASHINGTON.
"Liberty and Uniotn, now and forever, one and
inseparable."

TUESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1841.


CONGRESS.

The business of the Extra Session


is going on


with earnestness and good faith.
The BANK BILL, as our readers know, passed
he House ofRepresentatives on Friday. On Sa-
urday, it was presented to the PRESIDENT OF THE
JNITED STATES for his approbation or disappro-
bation, and is now in his hands.
The SENATE was yesterday engaged in the dis-
cussion of the Land Distribution and General Pre-
mption bill, (which has already passed the House
of Representatives,) and made some progress
herein. The fate of that bill will probably be de-
ided within a day or two.
The bill to repeal the Sub-Treasury Act (which
passed the Senate some weeks ago) was de-
ated all day yesterday in the House of Repre-
entalives; and being, by the aid of the Previous
Question, ordered to a third reading, was finally
ead a third time and passed. So that that bill
wants only the signature of the President to be-
ome a law. Thus does the House of Represen-
itives press steadily onward in the path of duty,
carrying into effect the will of the People, and,
o far from repining at the labor they go through,
apparently enjoying it as a pleasure.

LATEST FROM ST. AUGUSTINE.

CORRESPONDENCE OPn rH SAVANNAH GEORGIAN.
OFFICE OF THE NEWS,
St. Augustine, August 3,1841.
Thie steamer William Gaston arrived this afternoon from
southern posts. The large scout started from Key Biscayne
nd Fort Dallas far the Everglades on the evening of Friday,
he 30th ultimo, consisting of six companies of artillery, un-
er the command of Captain BURaKE, and a number of sailors
nd marines, under the command of Capt. ROGERS and Lieut
SLOAN, of the Navy-amounting in all to about 400 men and
0 canoes, with which they anticipate accomplishing much
awards the close of this protracted war. We heartily wish
hem success, and look forward with no ordinary anxiety for
he accomplishment of much good.
We are sorry to learn that the gallant officer, Major
CHI.DS, who was to have commanded the expedition, was
eft sick at Fort Dallas. The posts South are generally very
healthy, with the exception of a few cases of slight lever,
wing to the exposure of the men to the sun.
Maior CHILDS has issue,] an order for the removal of all
he stores and store-houses from Key Biscayne to Fort Dal-
as, and will break up that post (the Key) entirely.
The accounts from Key West are of the most deplorabh
nature. The yellow lever is said to be raging at that place,
nd very fatal-a large number have already fallen victims
o it. One of the unfortunate victims is Mr. LANDON C.
KENBY,
The fever has been still worse at Havana, and we learn
hat there are nine Americans ships now lying in that port
without a soul on board, all having died of the prevailing
ever.
We have no further news from Tampa Bay to communi
ate, since the last intelligence of the Indians coming in very
apidly.

SOMETIMES BY FnIR."-More Accidents to the
Southern Mails.
1. The mail from Weldon,North Carolina, coming North
ailed to connect at Petersburg on the 6th instant," owins
o an accident to the cars caused by the blowing down of a
ree across the track !"
2. The New Orleans mail letter-bag of the 30th ult. on
arriving at the Pontchartrain railroad wharf, before leaving
he car, was discovered to be an fire."
The said mail being sent back to New Orleans, it was
found that only three letters were so mutilated as not to ad
nit of being forwarded by the next mail; of these three, twu
appear to have been written at Pass Christian, and addressed
o Ciarval, and one to J. A. Frazer, containing a check
late 29th July, oi Messrs. Corning & Co. New York. No
ice was promptly given of the accident and its effects b3
the postmaster at New Orleans.

At the recent commencement of Dartmouth College, New
Hampshire, the degree of LL. D. was conferred on JARED
SPARKS, Professor of History in Harvard University, and on
FREDERICK HALL, M. D. Professor of Chemistry in the Medi
cal Department of the Columbian College, Washington, D. C.

FtIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT REYNOLDteBUROn.-We have
rague accounts of a dreadful affijir at Reynoldsburgh, (Ohio,)
on Wednesday. A large number of citizens were raising
the frame of a church, when tt unfortunately fell to thi
ground, injuring some thirty persons, some very severely.
The village has been converted into a general hospitt'l.
[State Journal.

MARRIAGE.
On the 5th instant, by the Rev. GEORGEto LEtMON, ROBT.
DOUTHAT, Esq. of Charles City county,(Va) to Miss
MARY A. MAISHALL, oldest daughter of Dr. JaOuELINE
A. MARSHALL, of Prospect Hill, Fauquier, Va.

DEATHS.
At Baltimore, on Saturday morning, after a painful and pri.
tracted ill.iess, SAMUEL SHERWOOD, printer, aged 46
years.
At Annapolis, on the 5th instant, Mrs. SARAH WIND-
HAM, ,r.t 95 %ears.
On ,lhr- .i...y night, 4(h instant, at Ihe residence of his
father, near New Market, JOHN H. McELFRESH, Esq
Mr. McELFREst was one of the wealthiest men itn WV esterin
Maryland, having succeeded to the large fortune of Mr. C,
MANTZ.
At Tallahassee, (Florida,) on the 20ih ultimo, of conges-
tive fever, Gen. JOHN GRAHAM, son of Capt. Q. GiA-
HAM, (formerly of New York, but now of Rock river, Illinois,
wiil known as commander ofoneof the New York and Liv-
erpool packet ships )
Gen GuAHAM entered theU. S. Military Academy at WesI
Point July 1, 1829, at the age of 15. Hle graduated in 1834
and was attached to the 4nil Regnmmnt U. S. Infantry as Bre.
vet idul Lieutenant. In June, 1836, he was appointed Ist
Lieutenant 2d Dragoons, and in 1837 promoted to a Captain.
cy in thie same Regiment. in this littercapacity he was sena
to Florida, and subsequently distinguished himself by his sal
lant conduct at the battle of the l'V,,tut ,. 'h,. In 1838
Uapt. Graham resigned his commis-ion in the U. S. Army,
and was afterwards appointed Atdjutant General of the Terrt
torial forces by Gov. R. R. Reid.
Most heartily do we commiserate the distressed condiioi
of the family of the late Guy. R. R. REIn, of whom the de-
ceased was son-in-law. In less than two years seven of it,
members have died; among them, Lieut. REin, the gallan
commander of the unfortunate" Sea Gull," one of the vesselm
of the South Sea Exploring Expedmtion, supposed to har,
foundered off Cape Horn. A desolate widow and two youn
children only are left out of this distinguished and once happ
and numerous family.-Sentinel.
[CO.MMrNIATED ]
In this city, yesterday, after a short illness, Mr. JOH13
WILLIAMS, in the horty-fourth year of his age.
Few men have lived and died in this community more uni
verbally and deservedly respected. In boyhood, and youth
and manhood, living and dying, he has enjoyed the confidenc
anid affectionate regard of all who have ever become acquaint
ed with him. Couhl sympathy and tears and prayers hay,
kept hi n in our midst, ne had not fallen. We desire to boy
submissively to the blow which crushes and overwhelms ou
spin's. God's will be done. D.
On Sunday, 8th instant, RnOmRT McCoy, infant son n
MICnAEL and SARAH ANN REARDEN, aged 11 months and 1'


days. ______________

V The Board of lHealth will meet at the City Hal
on this day (Tuesday) the lOthi instant, at 6 P. M. aug It
iRepeal AssoClation.-The regunl-r monthly meeting c
this Association will be held on Tuesday evening next, at th
usual time and place. Members arc particularly requested to b
punctual in their attendance.
aug 7-3t By order: JAS. HOBAN, President.
C ATARACT HIUSEi, Niagara talls, N. Y., P
WHIrNEY & SONS, recommends itself by the ssuperi
style in which it is kept, by its baths, its vicinity to tlie Falls, anm
by a view of the Rapids. There is also to be found PIora KOWA
LEWSKi, a safe and po'yglottic guide to the Falls, who know
perfectly well all the places worthy of the notice of the natural
or the curious, and who first discovered a new passage with
most astonishing and beautiful light beyond the Termination Reck
behind the great Horse Shoe Falls, described in the Mornin
Herald of New York, June 16-w6W


OFFICIAL. -

APPOINTMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT,
By and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

ALEXANDER P. FIULD, Secretary for the Terri-
tory of Wisconsin.
ISAAC OTIS, Marshal for the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.

EDITORS' CORRESPONDENCE.

NEW YORK, AUGUST 8.
The passage of the BANK BILL in the House of
Representatives gives great satisfaction here. All
are now discussing the probabilities of a veto. The opinion
has gained strength within a few days that the President
would sign the bill.
The Locofocos are to hold an anti-bank meeting at Albany'
to-morrow. One of the objects of the meeting is to oppose
the revenue bill. The organs of the Opposition are raising.
a great cry about the enormous tax that is to be imposed on
tea, coffee, &e.; and state, which is not true, that the prices
of the articles proposed to lie taxed have risen in proportion to
the duty proposed to be laid. The fact is, neither of the four
principal articles, tea, coffee, sugar, and salt, have risen at
all in that proportion. Coffee, which has been most affected,
has advanced here and at Boston about one-half a cent per
pousd-and at this there are very few buyers.
There is no local news. As far as business and news Are
concerned, Sunday here is a dies non. The weather is plea-
sant, though warm, and the city is as healthy as it usually is
at this season.

Sales This Day.
1 GENTEEL FURNITURE AT AUCTION.-Or
%X Tuesday afternoon, the 1Oilth inst. at 4 o'clock, we shall sell,
without reserve, at the residence of Capt. N. C. Maerae, on I
street, between 17th and l8th streets, and opposite the residence
ot Ih l.t Gn- iaccuinbh, all the household and kitchen furniture,
consisting of-
Handsome mahogany Sideboard, mahogany Chairs
Do do Dining and Card Tables
Hair Sofa, Rocking and Easy Chairs, Andirona and Fire Irons
Handsane white granite Dinner Set, Franklin Stove
Mahogany Bureaus, high-post and French-post Bedsteads
Feather Beds, Shuck Mattresses, &e.
With a general assortment of kitchen furniture
Terms cash. DY ER & WRIGHT,
aug 9-2t Auctioneers.
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AT AUCTION.-
On Tuesday next, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock A. M.
we shall sell at No. 3 Mechanics' Row, east of the City Hall, a va-
riety of new and handsome household furniture of a gentleman
declining housekeeping, such as-
Handsome marble-top pier table
Lounges, mahogany chairs, ottomans
Centre table, rocking chairs, window cuttainas
Cut glass decanters, tumblers, wines, &c.
Dinner and tea set, astral and other lamps,
Plated candlesticks, silver plated basket and castors
Bronze fender and andirons, shovel and tongs
Hest beds, bedsteads, wardrobe, bureaus
T.,. I .h-, E, washstands. &c.
%% i, tt m,' .:r furniture generally, and a good assortment of
kitchen articles. DYER & WRIGHT,
aug 9-2t Auctioneers.
CIVIL& MILITARY AQUATIC EXtCURSION.
4b A; The MECHANICAL RIFLEMEN, having en-
gaged the safe and commodious steamer COLUMBIA,
respectfully inform the Public that they intend giving a pleasure
excursion on Tuesday evening next, the Oth inst. The boat will
leave the wharf precisely at 4 o'clock, and, after proceeding down
the river as far as Indiao Head, return by 12 o'clock the same
evening. Military and Cotillion Bands are engaged, and an abun-
dance of excellent refreshments will be on board. Those who
contemplate taking this excursion may be assured that thing
will be left undone to make it an agreeable one; and to such as feel
inclined to join in the dance, it is only necessary to add that ar-
rangements have been made which will ensure the most perfect
order. Tickets (to admit two ladies and a gentleman) St : to be
bad of the committee, Capt. T. J. Williams, Lieuts. J. Drummond,
J. MeClelland, and S. Lawrence, Mr. J. T. C. Clatk, Secretary,
and at the Store ofj. P. McKean, Penn. Av.
Thie cotillions will be conducted by an experienced professor.
The members of the volunteer companies are particularly in-
vited to appear in uniform.
The tickets are positively limited to two hundred and fifty.
aug 5-ThSM&T
A MARRIED GARDENER, who has been laboring for
L many years at a very extensive farm, and who is acquaint-
ed in all the various branches of horticulture, wishes to obtain
another situation as gardener. The best references can be given.
Post-paid letters directed to A. B., City Post-office, will be attend-
d to. sit e --3t
.joltJ SALE, A N I a II f.Ak Jd, ofl modern construc-
tion, and substantially built. The owner having no use for
it, will dispose of it cheap, for cash. The hearse may be seen at
Mr. Joseph Abbott's coaclb-house, on the corner of G and 13th
streets, west. aug 10-3t
*tO) RENT--A convenient two-story brick House, with a
rr back kitchen and stable, on Missouri street, between 4J
and fith streets. Possession can be had on the 16th inst.
aug 10-es4t G. \VATTERSTON.
frIlIRKEY RUN FARM.-It is proposed to sell the
U- whole or a part of Turkey Run Farm, containing abott
onine hundred acres. It lies adjoining the town of Warrentoe,
toauquier county, Virginia, on the southeast side of Lee's Ri.l...
and is a part of the estate of the late Charles Lee, Esq. 1I .1,.
into consideration its locality, southern exposure, sondi suscep iili-
ty of improvement, together with the moderate terms which would
be acceded to, no opportunity, probably, was ever offered in this
section for a more profitable investment. Ifit is not sold in a short
time it will be sfor rent.
Application for information may he made, in person orby letter,
to the subscriber, agent for Me. and Mrs. Pollock. Aidress at
Warrenton Springs." WM. McCOY.
N.B. The undersigned is desirous, also, to sell his own farm.
on which lie resides, adjoiningthe Fatiquier Sulphur Spring tract,
containing three hundred and thirty-five acres. 'The farm is in sa
good state of improvement. The dwelling-house is plain, but new
and comfortable. containing seven rooms besides basement and
closets. There is also a good kitchen, school house, ice house,
spring-house in the yard, and servaints' and other nece siry out-
houses. [mug 10-w4wcp] WM. McCOY.
lOR RItUNT-A two-story double house, situated on thu
Scorner of 1 and 19th streets, west end of the city. This is
an excellent house and in ample order.
Also, a house on E street, between 8th and 9th streets, direct-
ly opposite Rev. 0. B. Brown's residence. To a good and per-
maient tenant rent will be moderate.
For 'it i ,i to the subscriber either at his residence in the
First .-a, ..t it the Centre Market on Tuesdays, Thursdays,
and Saturcavsa.
aug 10-co3t HENRY WALKER.
VALiJABLE HOUSE AND LIOT for SALE.
The two-story brick-house on 9th street, fronting east,
S next to the cornet of E street north. It is finished in
the best manner, and of the best workmanship and materials.
For terms apply at the house. snaug 10-teolw
s Zc"t FtOi NEW Y ORK.--Regular Iaine.-Pack-
/^,.f ei Sehooner fDooE, R. Knapp, master, with imme-
i ^f/ diate despatch. For freight or passage apply on
bF. & A. H. DODGE,
aug 10-4t Georgetown.
*- L REfiI AND SEASONABLE DRY GOODS.-
, ].' We will open to-day Fresh and Seasonatle Dry Goods cf
-every description. PERRY & ASHBY.
aug 10--3t
t --' ILL BE RECEIVED TO-1AY--
, V 50 pieces mourning calico, 121 cents per yard
50 do lead and black, new style
I Chene chintz, 121 eents per yard
15 pieces black and blue black bombasin, extra cheap
t and fine
* 30 dtzeen hematitched and corded border linen cambric
handkerchiefs.
Wthichm we will sell low if early applied for.
S autg o-3t PERRY & ASHBY.
WI71tili BE t^a-ENED THIS DAY-
I w 5 whales cotton batts, for comlorts
3 bales unbleached cottons, 61 cents per yard
6 bales 5-4 brown cottons, at 12j cents per yard
1 bale btrlaps
t 12 bales cotton burlaps and brown drilling
$ 1 bale pcni'entiarv plaid cottons
e I hare plaid cottons, at 6* cents per yard
5 3 cases calicos, for comlorts, at 6- cents per yard
Y With a great many other desirable dry goods, which we respect-
fully solicit purchasers to call and examine.
NERRY & ASHBY,
S New Store, 2 doors west of 7th street, opposite Centre Market.


S aug 10-2t
ITY HOTEL, New York.-The Public are informed
that the above named spacious establishment is now in
complete order for the reception of company, having recently un-
e dergone many alterations and improvements. The parlors and
t many of the rooms are newly furnished.
e The proprietor wotld respectfully solicit a continuance of the
very liberal patronage this establishment has heretofore received,
t and he pledges himself that the house shall be so conducted as to
insure to his patrons every Fosible comfort snd convenience.
)f aug 5-iflm A. GARDNER.
4 ()ST, a few days ago, a large gold ring, having the figure
Sof a hound on the bulb. The finder will please leave it
Sat this office, and oblige the owner. aug 9-3t
11 ON TUESDAY
THE ALEXANDRIA LOTTERY draws.
Df 14 drawn numbers in each package of 26 tickets.
e $9,000--$2,000-$ 1,500- 91,295-5 prizes of
e $1,100-5 of $500, &c.
Tickets 83-Halves $1 50-0Quarters 75 ets.
Par sale by 3 0 GREGORY & CO., Managers,
S aug 9-2t Next dor east of atrsh.s Washinglon.

r
i-strict of Columb ita, asshington county, 0o wit:
NAURIAUCIAEDOWLING has applied to the Hon Win.
.1ECranch, Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the District of
it Columbia, to be discharged from imprisonment under the sot for
a the relief'of insolvent debtors within the District of Columbia.
Son the 26th instant, at 9 o'clock A. M., at the court room, when
g and where his creditors are requested to attend.
aug 10-31 WM. BRENT, Clerk%












WASHINGTON.
"Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and
Inseparable."

TUESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1841.

CONGRESS.
The business of the Extra Session is going on
with earnestness and good faith.
The BANK BILL, as our readers know, passed
the House ofRepresentatives on Friday. On Sa-
turday, it was presented to the PRESIDENT OF THE
UNITED STATES for his approbation or disappro-
bation, and is now in his hands.
The SENATE was yesterday engaged in the dis-
cussion of the Land Distribution and General Pre-
emption bill, (which has already passed the House
of Representatives,) and made some progress
therein. The fate of that bill will probably be de-
cided within a day or two.
The bill to repeal the Sub-Treasury Act (which
passed the Senate some weeks ago) was de-
bated all day yesterday in the House of Repre-
sentatives ; and being, by the aid of the Previous
Question, ordered to a third reading, was finally
read a third time and passed. So that that bill
wants only the signature of the President to be-
come a law. Thus does the House of Represen-
tatives press steadily onward in the path of duty,
carrying into effect the will of the People, and,
so far from repining at the labor they go through,
apparently enjoying it as a pleasure.

LATEST FROM ST. AUGUSTINE.
CORRESPOND DENCE OP riE SAVANNAH GEORGIAN.
OFFICE OF THE NEWS,
St. Augustine, August 3,1841.
The steamer William Gaston arrived this afternoon from
Southern posts. The large scout started from Key Biscayne
and Fort Dallas for the Everglades on the evening of Friday,
the 30th ultimo, consisting of six companies of artillery, un
der the command of Captain BuRKE, and a number of sailors
and marines, under the command of Capt. ROGERS and Lieut
SLOAN, of the Navy-amounting in all to about 400 men and
50 canoes, with which they anticipate accomplishing much
towards the close of this protracted war. We heartily wish
them success, and look forward with no ordinary anxiety for
the accomplishment of much good.
We are sorry to learn that the gallant officer, Major
CHILDS, who was to have commanded the expedition, was
left sick at Fort Dallas. The posts South are generally very
healthy, with the exception of a few cases of slight ever,
owing to the exposure of the men to the sun.
Major CHIL,;s has issued an order fur the removal of all
the stores nd store-houses from Key Biscayne to Fort Dal-
las, and will break up that post (the Key) entirely.
The accounts from Key West are of the most deplorable
nature. The yellow ever is said to be raging at that place,
and very fatal-a large number have already fallen victims
to it. One of the unfortunate victims is Mr. LANDON C.
KENRY,
The fever has been still worse at Havana, and we learn
that there are nine Americans ships now lying in that port
without a soul on board, all having died of t(ie prevailing
fever.
We have no further news from Tampa Bay to communi
cate, since the last intelligence of the Indians coming in very
rapidly.
A, SOMETIMES HY FIRE."-YMore Accidents to the
Southern Mails.
1. The mail from Weldon,North Carolina, coming Nortbh
failed to connect at Petersburg on the 6th instant, "owinv
to an accident to the cars caused by the blowing down of a
tree across the track !"
2. The New Orleans mail letter-bag of the 30lh ult. on
arriving at the Pontchartrain railroad wharf, before leaving
the car, was discovered to be on fire."
The said mail being sent back to New Orleans, it was
found that only three letters were so mutilated as not to ad
mit of being forwarded by the next mail; of these three, twt.
appear to have been written at Pass Christian, and addressed
to Clarva), and one to J. A, Frazer, containing a check
dated 29th July, on Messrs. Corning & Co. New York. No
tice was promptly given of the accident and its effects b)
the postmaster at New Orleans.
At the recent commencement of Dartmouth College, Neu
Hampshire, the degree of LL. D. wa conferred on JARED
SPARxs, Professor of History in Harvard University, and on
FREDERICK HALL, M. D. Professor of Chemistry in the Medi
cal Department of the Columbian College, Washington, D. C.
FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT REYNOLDFBURGn.-We havf
vague accounts of a dreadful al'jir at Reynoldsburgh, (Ohio,)
on Wednesday. A large number of citizens were raising
the frame of a church, when it unfortunately fell to lh
ground, injuring some thirty persons, some very severely.
The village has been converted into a general hospital.
[State Journal.

MARRIAGE.
On the 5th instant, by the Rev. GEoRGE LEAMMON, ROBT.
DOUTLHAT, Esq. of Charles City county, (Va ) to Miss
MARY A. MAtSHALL, eldest daughter of Dr. JAQUELINE
A. MARSHALL, of Prospect Hill, Fauquier, Va.
DEATHS.
At Baltimore, on Saturday morning, after a painful and pro-
tracted illness, SAMUEL SHERWOOD, printer, aged 46
years.
At Annapolis, on the 5th instant, Mrs. SARAH WIND-
HAM, aged 95 years.
On Wednesday ni{'ht 4ih instant, at the residence of his
father, near New Market, JOHN H. MeELFRESH, Esq
Mr. MeELF'aESH was one of the wealthiest men in W esters
Maryland, having succeeded to the large fortune of Mr. C.
MANTZ.
At Taliahassee, (Florida,) on the 20lh ultimo, of conges.
tire fever, Gen. JO)HN GRAHAM, son of Capt. O.. GUA-
HAM, (formerly ot New York, but now at Rock river, Illinois,
Wi.Illknown as commander ofoneof the New York and Liv-
erpool packet ships )
Gen. GRAHttM entered the U. S. Military Academy at West
Point July 1, 1829, at the age of 15. He graduated in 1834,
and was attached to the 4 ih Regimi',,t U. S. Infantry as Bre-
vet 2d Lientenant. In June, 1836, he was appoented 1st
Lieutenant 2d D, : '. ]*!, and in 1837 promoted to a Captain-
cy in tile same 1...,,-,, r.'. In this lattereapaeity he was sent
to Florida, and suL'sequently distinguished himself by his t, al.
last conduct at the battle of the Wilhlacoichrae In 1838,
Cant. Graham resigned his commission in the U. S. Army,
andlwas afterwards appointed Adjutant General of the Terrn-
torial forces by Goy. R. R. Reid.
Most heartily do we eomtniseraite the distressed condition
of the family of the late Gay. R. R. REID, of whom the de-
ceased was son-in-law. In less than two years seven of its
members have died, among them, Lieut. REID, the gallant
commander of i he unfortunate "Sea Gull," one of the vessels
of the South Sea Exploring Expedition, supposed to have
floundered off Cape Horn. A desolate widow arid two young
children only an?, left out of this distinguished atnd once happy
and numerous family.--Sentinel.


[COMMUNICATED.]
In this city, yesterday, after a short illness, Mr. JOHN
WILLIAMS, in the forty-fourth year of his age.
Few men have lived and (lied in this community more uni-
versally and deservedly respected. In boyhood, and youth,
and manhood, living and dying, he has enjoyed the confidence
and affectionate regard of all who have ever become acquaint.
ed with him. Could sympathy and tears and prayers have
kept hi,n in our midst, he had not fallen. We desire to bow
submissively to the blow which crushes and overwhelms our
spirits. God's will be done. D.
On Sunday, 8th instant, RoBERT McCoy, infant son of
MICHAEL and SARAH ANN REARDFN, aged 11 months and 14
days.

nr The Board of llealtlh will meet at the City Hall
on this day (Tuesday) the loth instant, at 5 P. M. aug 10
16- Repeal Association.-Tlie regular monthly meeting of
this Association will be held on Tuesday evening next, at the
umal time and place. Members are particularly requested to be
punctual in their attendance.
aug 7-3t By order: JAS. HOBAN, President.
C ATARACT Hi)USE, Niagara talls, N. Y., P.
WHII'NEY & SONS, recommends itself by the superior
style in which it is kept, by its baths, its vicinity to the Falls, and
by a view of the Rapids. There is also to be found PlaTt KOWA-
LEWSxi, a safe and polyglotlc guide to the Falls, who knows
perfectly well all the places worthy of the notice of the naturalis
or the curious, and who first discovered a new passage with a
mostastonishing and beautiful light beyond the Termination Rock,
behind the great Horse Shoe Falls, described in the Mornin
Herald of New York. june 16--6w


OFFICIAL. f -.

APPOINTMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT,
By and with the advice and consent of the Senate,

ALEXANDERP. FIELD, Secretary for the Terri-
tory of Wisconsin.
ISAAC OTIS, Marshal for the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.

EDITORS' CORRESPONDENCE.

NEW YORK, AUGUST 8.
The passage of the BANK BILL in the House of
Representatives gives great satisfaction here. All
are now discussing the probabilities of a veto. The opinion
has gained strength within a few days that the President
would sign the bill.
The Locofocos are to hold an anti-bank meeting at Albany'
to-morrow. One of the objects of the meeting is to oppose,
the revenue bill. The organs of the Opposition are raising:
a great cry about the enormous tax that is to be imposed on,
tea, coffee, &a.; and state, which is not true, that the prices
of the articles proposed to he taxed have risen in proportion to
the duty proposed to be laid. The fact is, neither of the four
principal articles, tea, coffee, sugar, and salt, have risen at
all in that proportion. Coffee, which has been most affected,
has advanced here and at Boston about one-half a cent per
pound-and at this there are very few buyers.
There is no local news. As far as business and news are
concerned, Sunday here is a dies non. The weather is plea-
sant, though warm, and the city is as healthy as it usually is
at this season.

Sales This Mfay.
"ENTEEL FURNITURE AT AUCTION.--Oa
%A Tuesday afternoon, the IO0th inst. at 4 o'clock, we shallbat l
without reserve, tt the residence of Capt. N. 0. Macrae, on I
street, between 17th and 18th streets, and opposite the residence
of it, lair n.G- Maeinb, all the household and kitchen furniture,
consistIng of-
Handsome mahogany Sideboard, mahogany Chairs
Do do Dining and Card Tables
Hair Sofa, Rocking and Easy Chairs, Andirons and Fire irons
Handsafae white granite Dinner Set, Franklin Stove
Mahogany Bureaus, high-post and French-post Bedsteads
Feather Beds, Shuck Mattresses, &e.
With a general assortment of kitchen furniture
Terms cash. DYER & WRIGHT,
Oaug 9-2t Auctioneers.
HOUSEHOLD F-URNITURE AT AUCTION.-
On Tuesday next, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock A. M.
we shall sell at No. 3 Mechanics' Row, east of the City Hall, a va-
riety of new and handsome household furniture of a gentleman
declining housekeeping, such as-
Handsome marble-top pier table
Lounges, mahogany chairs, ottomans
Centre table, rocking chairs, window curtains
Cut glass decanters, tumblers, wines, &c.
Dinner and tea set, astral and other lamps,
Plated candlesticks, silver plated basket and castors
Bronze tender and andirons, shovel and tongs
Best beds, bedstead-, wardrobe, bureaus
Toilet glasses, washstands, &c.
With chamber furniture generally, and a good assortment of
kitchen articles. DYER & WRIGHT,
aug 9-2t -- Auctioneers.
CIVIL; MILITARY AQUATIC EXCURSION.
,ulS i h._-L MECHANICAL RIFLEMEN, having en-
4= M ti k^l"pred the sale and commodious steamer COLUMIOIA,
-, .. 'i'll.-, ......, the Public that they intend giving a pleasure
excursion on Tuesday evening next, the I0th inst. The boat wilt
leave the wharf precisely at 4 o'clock, and, after proceeding down,
the river as far as Indian Head, return by 12 o'cl,ek the same
evening. Military and Cotillion Bands are engaged, and an abun-
dance of excellent refreshments will be on board. Those who
contemplate taking this excursion may be assured that nothing
will be left undone to make it an agreeable one ; and to such ea feel
inc-lined to join in the dance, it is only necessary to add that ar-
rangements have been made which will ensure tlie most perfect
order. Tickets (to admit two ladies and a gentleman) $I : to be.
had of the commtnittee, Cqpt. T. J. Williams, Lieuts. J. Drummond,,
J. McClelland, and S. Lawrence, Mr. J. T. C. Clark, Secretary*
and at the Store of J. P. McKean, Penn. Av.
The ottillions wi!l be conducted by an experienced professor.
The members of the volunteer companies are particularly in-
vited to appear in uniform.
The tickets are positively limited to two hundred and fifty.
aug 5-ThSNI&T
A MARRIED GARDENER, who has been laboring for
many years at a very extensive farm, and who is acquaint-
ed in all the various branches of horticulture, wishes to obtain
another situation as gardener. The best references can be given.
Post-paid letters directed to A. B., City Post-office, will be attend.
-i to. ao"ng --3t
.oLirR SA Lxt A N S f1&" IS.AHISII of timdcion construC-
tion, and substantially built. The owner having no use for
it, will dispose of it cheap, for cash. The hearse may be seen at
Mr. Joseph Abbott's coach-house, on the corner of G and 13th
itreeta, west. aug 10-3t
rB^O RENT-A convenient two-story brick House, with map
Mr back kitchen and stable, on Missouri street, between 4J-
and 6th streets. Possession can be had,on the 16th in.t.
aug 10-eng4t. G. WATTERSTON.
[I RHIKKEY IN FARM.-It is proposed to sell the
Si. whole or a part of Turkey Run Farm, containing about
nine hundred acres. It lies a 'I i.-,- It,. t.wn of Warreaton,
.auqsiier county, Virginia, on It. .: .,,h .-11- I- of Lee's Ridge,
and is a part of the estate of the late Charles Lee, Esq. Taking
into consideration its locality, southern exposure, and suscep ihih-
ty of improvement, together with the moderate terms which would
he acceded to, no opportunity, probably, was ever offered in this
section for a more profitable investment. If it is not sold in a short
lime it will be for rent.
Application for infoiinauion may be made, in person orby letter,,
to the subscriber, agent for Mi. and Mrs. Pollock. Aldress at
Warrenton Springs." WM. McCOY.
N.B. The undersigned is desirous, also, to sell his own farm.
on which lie resides, adjoining'the Fauquier Sulphur Spring tract,
containing three hundred and thirty-five acres. The farm is in a
good state of improvement. The dwelling-house is plain, but new
and comfortable, containing seven rooms besides basement and
closets. There is also a good kitchen, school house, ice house,
spring-house in the yard, and servants' and other nece-sry out-
houses. [-mig 10-w4wcp] WM. McCoY.
"ttOR RUNT-A two-story double house, situated on the
]b corner of I and l1th streets, west end of the city. This ia
an excellent house and in ample order.
Also, a house on E street, between 8th and 9th streets, direct-
ly opposite Rev. 0. B. Brown's residence. To a good and per-
manent tenant rent will be moderate.
For terms apply to the subscriber either at his residence in the
First Ward, or at the Centre Market on Tuesdays, Thursdays,
and Saturcays.
augl10-eo3t HENRY WALKER.
A-& VALUABLE HOUSE AN D LfOTlfor SALE.
jr The two-story brick-house on 9dh street, fronting east,
I next to the cornet of E street north. It is finished in
tie best manner, and of the best workmanship and materials.
For terms apply at tile house., _____ aug 10--eolw
lvcOH V~K EW Y t)K.--Regular Lineo--Pack-
c^r~ t Selhooner DoneE, R Knapp, master, with imme-
dilm liate despatch. For freight or passage apply on
board or t F. & A. H. DODGE,
saig 10--4t_________Georgetown.
*RESHt A-NDSEASONAB IE DRY GOOIDS.--
*'We will open to-day Fresh and Seasonable Dry Goods cf
e v e ry d esc rip tio n P B A A H Y
augl10--3t _______PERRY & ASHBY.
Wll.Lri, BEK RECEIVED TO-1)AV--
6fr 0 pieces mourning callao, 12ti cents per yard
50 do lead and black, new style
Chene chintz, 12 f aents per yard
15 pieces black and blue black bombasin, extra cheap
and fine
30 dozen hemstitched and corded border linen cambric
handkerchiefs.
Which we will sell low if early applied for.
,ag10--3t PERRY & ASHBY.
WB~it,,B o it-N ED THIS DAY--
TV 5 bales cotton batts, for comlorta
3 ba~les unbleached cottons, 6} cents per yard
B bales 5-4 brown cottons, at 121I cents per yard
1 bale burlaps
t 12 bales cotton burlaps and brown drillings
s 1 bale penitentiary plaid cottons
1 ha'e plaid cottons, at 6 cents per yard
3 cases calicoes, for comforts, at 6 cents per yard
With a great many oiher desirable dry goods, which we respeet-
fully solicit purchasers to call and eamine. ^
New Store, 2 doors west of 7th street, opposite Centre Market.


aug10-2t
iTY HOTEL, New York.-The Poblic are informed
that the above named specious establishment is now in
' complete order f)r the reception of company, having recently un-
e dergone many alterations and improvements. The parlors and
* many of the rooms are newly furnished.
e The proprietor would respectfully solicit a continuance of the
v very lib. ,a, i -.,r ... Ihis establishment has heretofore received,
r and he o-l.'.i s t...r.Lif that the house shall be to c inducted as to
insure to his patrons every Fossible comfort and convenience.
f aug 5-iflm A. GARDNER.
i )OST, a few days ago, a large gold ring, having the figure
of a hound on the bulb. The finder will please leave it
at this office, and oblige the owner. aug 9-3t
I ON TUESDAY
THE ALEXANDRIA LOTTERY draws.
f 14 drawn numbers in each package of 25 tickets.
c $9,000--$2,000_-$1,500--$1,295-5 prizes of
e $1,100-5 of $500, &C.
Tickets 83-Halves $1 50-Quarters 75 cta.
7 For sale by j.G. GREGORY & CO., Managers,
aug 19-2t Next4-ear t. Ga v .
Dsrd sictof Columbia, W ashington euty, to uit;
TVAtfRICE D)OWILING beaa plied to the Hon War.
1Craneh, Chief'Judge of the Ciret Court of the District of
it Columbia, to be discharged from imprisonment under the act for
a the reliefoif insolvent debtors within the Distric't of Columb is.
:,on the 25th instant, at 9 o'clock A. M., at the court room, whe a
g end where his creditors are requested to attend.
au.. to-at WM. BiiRNT, Clerk,


the resolutions expressed the opinions entertained by a high- Mr. ADAMS inquired of the Speaker whether the resolu- he considered as involving principles deeply affecting the dis- war had been commenced upon the currency. He next en-
ly respectable portion of the people of that county on the tion did not, as a matter ofcourse, lie over I tribution of wealth and the wages of labor. After a word of tered into some statements to show the great expense in-
deeply interesting questions which bad hitherto and still con- The SPEAKER said it must lie overif there was notuna- commendation on the sub-Treasury bill, he laid down the ge- curred under this system in the collection and disbursement
tinued to occupy the attention of Congress. The preamble nimous consent. neral principle, that nothing so much disturbed the currency of the revenue. He condemned the sub-Treasury as not
expressed, as the sense of the meeting, that the present extra Mr. ADAMS. Then I desire it tog over. I think the and exchanges of a country as the use of Government credits answering the ends and purposes which its advocates had
session of Congress was not called for or justified by any resolution, if adopted at all, should be modified, of any kind, directly or indirectly. He had advocated the claimed for it, when it became the law of the land; and he
of the reasons which had been urged in its support. The A voice. It has been modified, sub-Treasury system chiefly because it abstracted Goveirnment pronounced it as a humbug of the veriest kind, which had
resolutions remonstrated in strong and forcible terms against Mr. ADAMS. Yes; but there are other modifications credit from the business concerns of the country, been forced upon the country by palming upon this I-louse
the passage of any law fjr the establishment of a Nation- that I should desire to make. Mr. P. then traced the effect of the system he opposed a representation from a whole State that had not been elected
al Bank, whether under the title of United States Bank, So the resolution was ordered to lie over. from the year 1833 to 1837; insisting that the exportation by the People.
Government Bank, or Fiscal Agent, and whether said Mr. HOPKINS offered the following resolution; which of Government credits to Europe had brought back not mo- He declared that ht wseld as soon think of sanctioning
bank shall be located in the District of Columbia or else- was adopted : ney, but an inundation of European manufactures, which tile :.(t of a robber who should break open the vaults of the
where ; against the passage of any law for the distribution of Resolved, That the Postmaster General be required to inform came in competition with our own domestic labor. The Treasury ant take out the treasure, as he would of voting to
the proceeds of the sales of the public lands ; against an in- this House, with as little delay as practicable, how much of the catastrophe in 1837 bad put a stop to this; insomuch that, retain the sub-Treasury. He would ask his democratic
crease of the tariff, and against the creation of a national appropriation of $125,00O for the construction of the new Post while the imports of 1839-40 had been 105 millions, the ex- friends to point out in what respect the sub-Tr,-et,,tw had
debt. Office building, made for lhe year 1841, remains unexpended. ports had been 131 millions: the balance going to pay the bienefilted the country. Would it, he inquired, tolio, the
These resolutions expressed the strong and decided opposi- Mr. GILMER, from the Select Committee on Retrench- interest and part of the principal of our foreign debt; while embarrassments under which the country was laboring'I
ties of the meeting to all those measures-an opposition ment, offered the following resolution, which, giving rise to but a year before the imports had been 150 millions, and cx- Would it regulate the exchanges, and enable men to do their
which he believed was not less strong or decided with the debate, was ordered to lie over : needed the exports by 56 millions. This, alone, was enough business with facility, dispatch, and at a reasonable expenseI
Democratic party throughout the Union. Resolved, That the chairman of the Committee on Retrench- to ,terim-e the currency and exchanges of the country. No, gentlemen would not say that it had that effect ; and
Mr. J. said as there was no subject now pending before ment ask leave of the House to sit during the access of Congress, N or 1', adverting to the lVan of twelve millions, and the the only reply that could be obtained from them in answer
any committee of the Ho-loue to which these resolut lions re- I nd the committee have power to send for persons and papers, creation of bank stock, together with the distribution bill, to your questions was, that the bill created a separation of
furred, he inved that they be laid on the table, and printed. and to report at the next session by bill or otherwise, prophesied that the result would be a repetition of the same th Government from the banks. His honorable friend from
Mr. POWELL remarked that, inasmuch as the resolutions Mlr. UNDERFWOOD offered the following resolution: measures as had flooded the country with foreign goods, and, Virginia, (Mr. HUNTER,) the late Speaker said theotherdav,
presented came from the district which he had the honor to Resolved, That the Secretary of War be required to report to instead of regulating, would disturb and derange currency with great candor, openness, and fairness, that his opposition
represent, lie felt himself in duty bound to offer some explan- this Houset itthe next session of Congres%, the number of fortifi and exchange. was not to the credit system, but that he was opposed to the
ations thereon, that the House might be fairly possessed of cato,"s within the U itd States, showing, in tabular form, the He appealed to gentlemen from Connecticut and Penn- whole banking system of the country. He knew that during
the extent of the claim of those resolutions to be received as amounts expended during each yearof the three last Congresses Sylvania, whether they would stand such a mass of foreign the late political canvass it was again and again charged
in the construction or repairs of eath ; the amount expended from competition. Capitalists would get control of the Government that the locofocos were opposed to the banking system, that
they came. report which may be practicable; flte amount estimated as neces- credit, as they had lately had of Stale creit~and Corporation they desired its destruction and that charge had not been
Mr. P. remake lthat as to the respectability of the meet- sary to complete the construction or repair of those yet unfinish- credit. But it would be that class of capitalists whose capi- denied.
ing he had no doubt on that point;i he perceived the nDmes ed, and the whole expenditure on those finished; ethe number of isl, being chiefly invested in stocks, was mnveable, and could He maintained that they did desire the destruction of the
of highly respectable gentlemen connected with it; but, if he guns which are to be employed at each fortification when corn- easily be transferred into a new channel. These would comne credit system. And had they not, he asked, now got up the
was correctly informed, the meeting from which these resole- pleted, the number of workmen annually employed upon each for- in competition with those, whose capital being in lands and cry, from title end of the Union to the other of Repeal,"
tions emanated was the result of a call ot the democracy for tifieation, and the amount of wages paid them by the mon'h 01 in factories, was fixed, and could not he withdrawn from its Repeal," in reference to the bill passed a few days ago for
the purpose upon which they acted; that the meelingwas held year; and the number of men which will be required to mai such existing investment. The effect would be, at first, to produce the establishment of a National Bank 7 When such senti.
accordingly at the court-house of that large county, and at fortifications in time of peace, and also in time of war; and that he a fictitious and deceptive appearance of prosperity ; but this ments as these were put forth, what was to be inferred t The
court time; and that the number who felt so fitr interested fiurther report thatmanner in wibidlthtire contracts for supplies of would be quickly succeeded by reaction, and a proportionate conclusion was irresistible. He argued that one of the lead-
in the matter as to give their attendance amounted to thirty- erials to consruct such lbrtiications are or have been madie, condition of mercantile distress and embarrassment. ing characteristics of tile minority was their hostility to tlhe
three; and of that number there assembled, three distinguih- a^n, owhathe otheyade a re the .wsutp bliddes furnierndetie Mr' P' then pro)ceeded to contrast the circumstances under credit system, and also a desire to resort to direct taxation.
Gentlemen of the democratic party openly and ably opposed in a er er ui u d t which the previous national banks had been created with those What had they heard the other day from the gentleman from
the doctrine of repeal as applied to charter. Mr. P. remark- the portincatiop and likewise the cost or price of stone brick or of the country at this tie, arguing to show that, if a bank South Carolina 1 Did he net avow that he was in favor of
ed that it was as to this doctrine ofthe resolutions that he had other principal materials used. should be established now, for. ign exchange would be against direct taxation t And what did the gentleman from New
ih o.u, t ii necessary to speak ; as to the other topics of which Mr. FILLMORE suggested to Mr. U. so to modify the the country ; and if Government did not interpose to aid the York say, but that it was a part of the Democratic system I)
i.,eyn, .,,, le had nothing to say ; they embraced the c bank, b creating some sort of exchequer bills, it would not Did no, lie would ask, the gentleman from New Hampshire,
principles of tpe harty, an d s say they might pass feor wht that have been ctirnpleteil e of ths ifaons stand six months. This, le said, the People never would in a speech, sustain the doctrine itself 7 The issue was now
they were worth. But, as to this modern cry cf repeal, he Mr. UNDERWOOD aeerted the modifiation countenance or tolerate. He went into some statistical state- raised of the destruction of the credit system through the
could not wr.nit an impression to be made that it could find And the resolution, as modified, wasadoed ments, showing what had been the course of the last bank, Sub-Treasury, as opposed to a National Bank. He was
tcoleratim in his district, even winh the great body of the de- Mr. POPE r ffetrednthe fallowin resolution which, giving and what had led to its ruin. He did not spare the Pennsyl- ready to accept that issue on the part tf his constituents,
mocratic party ; but t..r this he was not authorized to speak, rise to debate, was ordered to lie over J vania bank, which he designated as a charnel-house of cor whether for weal or for we. Mr. M. went on to tiace the
Crtain he was, that in the district at large, of which FaIquier Resolved That the Committee on the Post Office and Poet ruptiuon, disgusting and revolting to behold, blighting and withering effects of the Sub-Treasury on the
constituted a part, a doctrine so disorganizing would find little Roadas )e rsaru c ed to inquire into tie expediency of establishingI He next went into the all-ged power of a national batik best interests of the country, and showed that it had reduced
favoi-a doctrine going to the violation of public faith, and a ratl rconic, the mail to ie -.. ;,, .,, i- r 1.,r I 1 to regulate exchanges, which he utterly denied. The true the specie circulation and he quoted from a speech of Mr.
all the principles upon which property resws its security, and town, in Nelson conunly, in E ..1. I .1 ,_,] ....... lI,t r...,.:..,,..- meaning of exchlnge was the difference between cash and Calhouun to prove that, iu the same ratio asthe circulation was
up'a *tio the fundamental principles ofsociety. Mr. P. there- ty, in same State, and thence to Nashville,. the value of a bill drawn upon a particular point ; but, in tie reduced, the value of property wis reduced also. He then
fore, in the name of the Commonwealth of Virginia at large, Mr. MASON, of Ohio, offered the f" I .,m resolution modern nsc ofthe termit had come to be considered as mere- added that the loss to his constituents alone, inslr,1,1. 1-"pi
and of his own district in particular, repudiated such doctrines, which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to lie oert; y the difference between bathk notes of different banks. Thus ie they were eomtielled to sell at the prices which ....i i~r. i.,
However they might flourish elsewhere, le was well assured Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be directed to in Savannah there were banks which paid, and ether banks would ce thirty-two millions of dollars. With regard io
that in the a.ncient Commonwealth of Virginia, the land of lay hefime this House, as early as practicable at the next session which did not pay specie, and the difference in the value of National Bank, it had been said that the question was settled
steady principles, they would take no root, and find no favor, of Congress, a statement showing- their notes was called exchange. It was a mere absurdity so He did not know exactly how that might be, but this he
Mr. GOGGIN then inquired of his colleague, (Zir. Pow- rst. The estimated cost and quantity of the lands actually to call it, and the argument founded on it was a inere catch- could say, that in his own State, that in every pamphlet and
ELL,) whether one of the gentlemen alluded to by him as ceded by Indians to the Uaited States, exclusive of the lands re- penny argument, newspaper that came from the city of Washington, the People
opposing the resolutions was not a State Senator of the party served for or subsequently granted to Indiana. In ..,,r,.,..i..,, of his position that the United States Bank were told that the issup was between the sub-Treasury and a
opposed also the present Administration. Mr. G. said he Theamount paid outof the Treasury on account of salaries and never 1.l.,l, Ih, r order sense, rqualize the exchanges of National Bank. And no sooner was the election over, and
aaked for information, as he was unacquainted in the contingent expenses of the General Land QIoe, and the local tlhe country, Mr. P. quoted a long table in detail showing the Van Buren party found themselves defeated, than they
county. Thnd fticspare "in iset paite tt oft te w l o y hc tile rates f exchange in different years durin the ifelime of disseminated throughout the hle country that that was not
Mr, POWELL replied, that such lie understo', 1 t.,-I.I the salaries anti;ninigeat expenses at 'he surveyors' oflrcees on as- thernack. ite insrsted that neither a porional bank o hor ohe he issue. He woudl sa ,t hat so fared as s own State watsu i
fact, and that the gentleman alluded to justly ei.j..ytd tie count of the sold portion of the public lands. Government itself, nor any other power on earth could or concerned. Io: *i. -11 was settled, and settled that the sub-
high cqtirnation of his party and'of society at large. The amount paid out of th proceeds of the public lands, wile ever hal *"., ,il,',d exchange, but the course of trade, which Treasury -t..,. mi., r pealed. But, whethe- setlled or not
The resolutions were then laid on the table, in the hands of the receivers, on account of the saji-;c8 and con- was as irr .,s-t I.- Lnd uncontrollable as the laws of Nature ; one thing fie would say, and that was, that the friends of a
And the question recinring on the motion to print- tingent expenses of the '.., rI but being itself controlled by the relation of dieaand to sup- National Bank had passed the hill,
Mr. GUSH ING moved to lay that motion on the table. The el;tiratcii amount I .. 1 .r ..irveying such po tionsof the ply. He traced the contrary it4ea ,o the -:,,,i,.i hiqanciers, Mr. STEENROD, then obtained the floor, and spoke in
Mr, INGERSOLL asked the yeas and nays, which were public lands as have been sold or otherwise disposed of. and their infere!rce; from the operations t.f il I,, to k ofEng- opposition to lhe repeal.
ordered, and, being taken, were yeas 107, nays 76. The amount paid to the State of Georgia, and fir the liquidation land ; but gave it as his opinion that there never had been a He was followed by Mr. HASTINGS, of Ohio, who read
S., the moiion tt print was laid on the table, of claims arising out of the laws of the Unitld Stiic3. *rater fallacy, He relied much on the fact; that while the a speech on the same side.
On leave given, Mr. WARREN presented a petition from Tle amount paid out oftihe Trensury in consequence of the pur- Bank of England had increased her bullion ninie millions in Mr. GIDDINGS said that during the last eight months
many citizens of Albany, Georgia, praying for the passage cf chase of Louisiana and Piorida, for principal and tinmterest, Sa. 183, yet the course of foreign exchange had been steadily whi" .his House had been engaged in legislation, more than
a bankrupt law at the present cesrion of Congtess applying Ar,.'amouny t paid to 'lie several States or set apartas being tie 8ainst the bank. The theory assumed many -!.;1 7. which two ol' those months had been spnta in discussing this ques-
to all classes of persons. 2, 3, anda6 per pcent. mdl al Sp were not true, but were on trhe contrary impossible-: such as, tion of '.e sual-Trealury and its antagonist measure. In that
M r. DAW SON (also on leave given) presented petitions The estimated cost a .dAquantity of the lands reserved for Indi. that phe course of trade, the state of the tariff, and the sam e.nt eli ee d, h de en m adetandaphbndredandtby eh es, he
in favor of the bankrupt law from several hundred citizens of ans, or those granted to them in lieu of, or as part compensation of products in foreign countries remained always th, same. believed, had been made and published, and by hundreds of
the city of Augusta and county of Richmond, in the State of inr, the lands ceded by them to tlhe United States, separately. Even when England was importing grain froa abroad, ex- thousands sent forth to the People. He believed he would now
Georgia. Also, from the citizens of Darien, and county of Second. The amount paid by the purchasers of the public change remained against her, better suiMero the interests of those who sent himhere by en
.eltntosh, in the same State. Also, from a large number of lands, showing how much was paid in money, and '-'wr ,n.-h in But ift a national bank could regulite domestic exchange, deavoting to bring the debate to a close than by making a
4..- ,, tle city If New Vorki which were deferred to the military warrants, stocks, evidences of public deht, 1..l ,,,j ..,.,1 how could it do itf! As it had in 1819,'20, and '21, by break- speech. He therefore called forte previous question.
Committee of the Whr.le on'the state of the Union. respectively, ing all the Southern banks, that it might concentrate all the Mr. W'ELLER moved a call of the House.
Mr. OWSLEY, of Kentucky, proposed to offer a joint Trie amount of interest on the sums annua ly paid into the Tree- specie of the country in its own vaults I Such must again be Mr. JOHN T. MASON moved an adjournment; but with-
resolution, providing (if the Senate concur) for the final sury for tire public lands, and the interest on the sums annually the inevitable effect of a central batik with blanches in the drew it.
adj.ournment of thigh House on Wednesday, the 18th day of paidinohad wVarrants or military scrip, separately. States. HIe quoted a letter of Mr. Biddle's to a commiltee of Mr. HALSTED renewed the motion, and asked the
A.ugust. Tht ,I,., .,d estimated vale, at the minimum price per Congress in 183,2. He insisted that the apparent equalization yeas ad nays; which were ordered, and, being taken, were--
M Mr. UZ4DERWOOD hoped that, by general consent, all eduation,1 oe .. ...an c !, o i s te of exchanges was deceptive, and the mere effect of transfer. Yeas 62, nays 95.
solutions which members might' desire to offer would be Tile quantity and iated value at the minimum price per ing brokerage from private counters to the counters of the So the House refused to adjourn.
received, acre, of tire lands granted or set apart for bounties to the officers branch banks, while labor felt no benefit from the operation. Mr. LEWIS WILLIAMS asked the yeas and nays on
Mr. FILLMORE inquired of the Speaker whether the and soldiers of the revolutionary and late wars. Mr. P. now went into a history of the causes of the levul- the motion that there be a call of the House; which were or-
resolution of the gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Ows- Tire quantity and estimated value, at the minimum price per "ion in business which occurred it, T1'1"'4, which he traced, dered, and, being taken, were-Yeas 101, nays 77.
LEY) was in order at this time 7 acre, "f ,hh lina. ir- n.-rt to individuals or companies, other than not to any war of the Government ,i,.i the Bank of the So the call was ordered.
The SPEAKER said it could only be received by gener- the .,.'. ........ i i ...dinary private claims. United States, but to the course pursued by the Bank of Eng- And the rol( heing called, 178 members answered to their
al consent. The qtantity and estimated value of the Lands reserved iorand land in first extending her credits over this country ard then names.
Mr. FILLMORE then said he objected. He would ob- granted to, Indian individuals, or to tribes, in lieu of the lands ce- suddenly increasing her bullion four millions and :it .llioh-, And the names of the absentees having been called, 206
jest to any resolution of the kind until some disposition had ded,, ,,,. ... -the United States, separately, her discounts eight milihltis ; thus withdrawing sixt) ,i ,.,., members appeared to be present.
been mais of the general bankrupt law. of I. e f th ed amount paid for salaries and contingent of dollars in a -.I year from the amount of circulation. In All further proceedings vaere then suspended.
theI resolution, being objected io,'"was not receivedI "xpens s ftie offic sofSur vrCt hahnsurveyig ai'on to this had come the effect (f the deposit distribu- And the question recurring on seconding the demand for
Mr. PICKENS inquired of the Speaker what was the ted Sluats(separately l a tion bill, which aggravated the evil and precipitated the ca- the previous question-
order of busi nes4 l The estimated quantity surveyed and unsold, and the quantity tastrophe. That it was not owing to the sub Treasury, he Mr. WILLIAMS, of Maryland, i ade the following point
The SPEAKER said that the regular business was the ceded and not surveyed, insisted, was proved by the fact that the same and greater dis- of order:
call ot the States for resolutions. Fourth. The amounts annually paid into the Treasury out of tress was experienced simultaneously in England and also ;In "'That a due observance of Parliamentary law anl practice, not
Mr. BROWN, of Philadelphia, on leave, presented a me- the duties accruing at the ports of New Orleans and Mobile, and some parts of the continent. inconsis,ent with ih" "'"n~ll-- rrieS of this House, requires thl t
morial (the purport of which was not heard by the Reporter ) in Michigan, and thir interest ou the p'tyments so made. Mr. P. ,, :'-' .: with stuoe vehemence against the plan every bill shall be .",I i ;' ... ',, by paragraphs, FOR AMEND-
Other members asked a simihr privilege, which was re- Also, statements I,- i..- in detail, and nader each 'reaty, the of the Fiscal Batik, as a, political measure and a Treasury NE-T, at least once, before the question shall be put whether it
fused, cost and l ..... .. .. nds "ceded to the United States, ex- bank, as a monster-go., engendered in fraud and brought sball bit read a third titmne; and that lho bill entitled An alt to
Mr. THOMPSON, of I.dliana, asked leave to make a elusive. Io.. I ilds reserved and subsequently granted to In- *tnth in corruption i and avowed his determination never to repeal," &c-- not having- been so read, the previous question
report rom the Comittee n the Distrt of Columbia, dians," and these,*" reserved for Indians, or granted iu lieu ofthe bow in worship before such a horrid idol. Neither would the th.n olt now propery p
Objection was made, land i ceded by them t. country ; thy would give all vested rights to the winds, tear The SPEAKER overruled the point.
T*fe States were then called in their order for resolutions. Mr. CALVARY MORRIS offered the fallowing resolu- up all parchment edicts to threads, and trample them under Mr. WILLIAMS asked if it was in order to make some
A resolution wasoffered by Mr. ADAMS, of which (by tion, which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to Ile over : their feet-, but never, never could or would they submit to so rernarks on this i,,int 1
some accidental circumstance) no copy could be oRetained, but Resolved i?, the Senate and House of Representatives qf vile a compound of fraud and iniquity as was now proposed The SPEAKER decided that it was not in order, the pre-
which will be nolicediu ta-morrow. the United States of America in Congress assembled, That t h forced upon their necks, vios que';..,. ;o.,. been called.
a11 letters and packets, weighing two ounces anti under, carried t bMfrceduNTon teitrb neks. foo, n wItitoa rl. ILIA...apeldfothdci-on
Mr. TILLINGNAST offered to present certain joint re- a ^, ^ '' Ir U TI" h!ml h ltr ~ <^'' r.r I.LLi A M^appealed from the decision.
Mr. ILLNGPASToffredto peset crtan jintre-by post, to and from Mrs. Harrison, relict of the late William MpeeHUNTnesupot ofbtaiedlii, twihhe f toorandrentitrospcie Wihdcsob es19 as'0 a tsand
solutions from the Legislature of Rhode -land, the purport He..y yHarrison, be conveyed free of postage during her Ratio speech i nsuppot ofthe sill ,it which l ibook aT retrospective I Vch decision. b ya 19, Days 20, was stayed by
* of which was ntslaated, or not heard.) ral lifre. view ofte riso anil progress of the Sub-Treasury bill, from the [luse.
Mr. TURNgY objected. 183'7 down to the present time. The motion for the previous question was then seconded.
The SPEAKER said that resolutions of State Lgisia Mr. GIDDINGS offered the following resolution, which had constantly, and from the first, protested against and And the main question was ordered to be taken.
tures were not properly in order at this time, but on peti- Resolv ted Tt h P i b r t opposed it; and he now thanked a merciful Providence that And the main question, being on agreeing to the amend.
oe a i Ps t to trasmt to he had been spared, as he hed, to ee the na repeal of so ent the l committee of this Houe, was decided in
Mion day. wouse, as early in the next session as ,y be convenient, all evi- odi ensparedasur e of ignorance and tyranny, within one year s arthe affirmative.
M r. T IL L IN G H1A ST w ;thdrew the resolutions, d ances in his possession (not heretofore com m unicated) respecting o i u t m ac r fi n r n e a d t r n y ih n o ey a So the amuendm ent (of w which tile R reporter has not a copy)
Mr. FERRIS offered the fllo.Nin resolution ; which, giv. the origin of the Seminole wart-qetier with a list of all slaves after its birth had been celebrated ly the firing of cannon,
plig rise to debate, was ordered to lie over : captdnrd([ during said war lby ihe troops engaged in the service of and hailedl as a third Declaration of lIde-pendeFner waagreed to.
I- ...,i, t.1, That the Secretary of the Navy be directed to inform the United S aits in t)Forida ; the aincunt paid for the capture of Mr. 11. insisted that its condemnallon had been pro- The hill, as amonlded, was then ordered to be engrossed for
Io. 11 ... at the coninicencment of the next session of Congress, i urh slaves, (if any,) and the manner in which said slaves have nOUeCed by the whole Aeserican People-the Sub Treasury third reading.
what measures have been taken to carry into effect the act of the been disposed of since their capture, having been made a dIstinct issue iht....'... the country at And having been ordered to a third reading now, the bill,
41 of March, 1836, ,,,..-0 '.. the construction of a dry dock in Mr. MOORE, of Louisiana, .il. ,.,1 the following resolu- the late Presidential election. by the following vote, was passed:
l habor of Ne '' .aIant waters, .tion. which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to lie over: Mr. H. would vote for its repeal because he wished to see YlAS-Mes.rs. Adams, Allen, L, W. Andrews, S. J. Andrews,
Mr. CHARLES BROWN, of Pennsylvania, offered the Resolved, That the Commit'us ou Commerce be instructed to the country return to the good old path in which our fathers Arnold, Aycrigg, Babcock, Baker, Barnard, Barton, Birdscya,
following resolution which, giving rise to debate, was or- inquire into the expediency of establishing a port of entry on Red had trodden, and which had conducted the country to a Black, Blair, Bo-irdman, Borden, Botts, Briggs' Brockay, Bron-
dered to lie over : River, either at Natchitoches or Shrevesport, a d of allowing the height of prosperity unequalled in the history of the world. son, M. Brown, J. Brown, Burncll, W Butler, Calhoun, J. Camp-
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be requested to benefit of drawback on cotton imported inland front Texas, when Ile referred to the finarn.;zl o. I.. n- which had marked the bell, William B. Campbell, Thotims J. Campbell, Caruthers
furnish to this House, at the commencement of its next session, a exported, and on foreign goods exported inland to Texas and past Administrations i a l,-tit.l, %.,it a't eye of regret, to the C"isli (3nttenden, ,ls 0. d g ark, SttDaey N, lark, Cowen
statement showing the quantity of foreign coals imported into the Mexico. incoB parable currency the country had enjoyed beot re the Rranston, CrateDs, CushieR, Garrett Davis, William C. Dawsnn,
Doherty, John Edwards, Everett, 'essenrdcu, Filhntore, A.
United States during the years 1839, 1839, and 1840; where from, By general consent, the SPEAKER laid before the House era of experiment commen-,l : then passed to Gen Jackson's Itaawrenee Foster, Tho E s, Poster, -GamblesGentry, Giddings,
twhaort re c, retain depositions in lhe case of the contested election from war on the United States Bank, in the faae of all the bene- Gilner, Qoggin, Patrick G. Goode, Graham, Green, Greig
tocteorul.
Also, to inquire into the manner foreign coals are measured at Virginia; which were referred to the Committee on Elee- fits it had conferred upon the country ; to Jeremiah Mason's Hailersham, Hall, Halsted, William S. Hastings, Henry, How-
the, different ports of lhe Uriied Staltes with reference to dhe ir- tion), .ankee contumacy, and the attacks ot the Hero on Nick Ju- ard, Hudson, Hunt, James Irvin, William W. Irwin, Jamci,
position of the duties '|',- I I Sirto] and report to this House The committees were then called in their ordeT for reports, nior and his monster, till he brought t4 I native down to w.C. Johnsen, Isaac D. Jones, John P. Kennedy, King, Lane,
whether t~he same is .... i ......,.. I according to law; and if n'ot, Mr. DAWSON, from the Cumimittee on Military Affairs, the adoption oflthe State Bank svr~tem, and Mr. Woodbury's Lawrence, 1I~nn, Mallory, Thomas P. Marshall, Samwon Mason
wihat f, rther legislation, Sf ivny, in hisa pinion, is necessary to a reported a bill .*,..1 i r'uriti..r provision for the suppression of boast as to i.. .,,]li..i ,-, l trail the purposes of a national in- Mathiiot, Mattock.% Maxwell, Mayna'd, Meriweiher, Moore,
tnpre tniform meaasulrenent, and cn orcninent of the laws provid- Indian hnstiliti. ; ,r, F-i .t,.I .. stitution, an i .., ,, I,. ,, 11- actually accomplish ed those purpo- Morgan Morris, Morrow, NisbetI Osborne, Owslev Pvarce,
ing for tlie payment of" dotie-ii on foregin coalB4. The hiill I, .,. ...' I~een read twice hy ils title see with increased economy to the Gnverinment ; and so ar- Pe'"1lc1tn"" Pope, Puwait, Proffnt, Ram,..B ,n .i...-.. Ralnd.dll
(~n pursuance af notice heretofore given-- Mr. DA\V-i. N, remarking thai it contained no appro- rived at the grand crash in May, 1837, which prostrated Raml"' 1.. P ... P.. "i ,. R* '" '- h 1>'.' '" I ... nSalton
Mr. W. W. IRWIN asked and oh~tained leave to intrmduce priation, anil that its object was merely to continue in force them all, and lad to the called session under Mr. V,,n Bores. f"1 y, Strtm Star,'' Sum'r'er" "Tat s*ierra Jehn B". T o pson
u bill to provide the means of payment for seven sites for Me- certain provii.ins of the act of 1836, which had expired, (be- The result had surprised nobody but the men who' of Richard W"Thilon'po, 'Tlighst Tolanld Tomlinson, Trip ett
rise Hospitals in the Western States, purchased in pursu- ing a bill authorizing the Preside.nt to call out additional vol- all others ought not to |have beeF,< suriprised. M1, Woodbury, Trumbull, raderwoodi'Van PRnse'laer, Wa'llace, Warren *Wash-
anee of the act of 3d March, 1837. unteers,) and therefore did not require commitment, moved whose head wa<; ag ]uminnoui as mud, was, indeed,.... ,]1, i:,gton, lEdward I). White, Jcaepii L. White, Thomas WV. Wil-
en m.)tion of Mr. 1. the bill, having been read twice by that tihe bill be pluton ils third reading, amazed at It, as'was Gen. Jackson also ; but they v. ,,.* i,,. llnis, Lewis W illiams, Christopher H. Williams, Joseph 1,.
its title, was referred to the Committee ot Ways and Means. Aflar a moment's conversation between Mefisrs. ,..t,\ .\") only'two men in the Union wbo had fo .eycseei nothing of the WIillaiatn, Wtnthirop Yorke, Aogustus Young, John Young-1l.34.
Mr. SNYDER offered the following resolution ; which, and DAWSON, the bill war: rfierrod to the'Committee of danger. "NAYS--Messrs. .\.-;,-i ..:1 Alhertonn Banks, Beeson, Bid-
g~iving rise to debate, was ordered to lie over ; the Wrhole ou tihe state 'of the Unto'n, and was ordered to Mr. H. adverted to the vast muhtiptieation of State banks lack, Bowne, Boyd, > .. r. \ Brown, Charles Brown, Burke,
Keesolved, That thereafter no nppropriatioo shall be made for be prit~ed; ,r^ r L s's the direct 'ii*' .. o tlhe system1 pUrsud by these Solomons ; Sampson H. ,}1"1t'er, William' O. Butler,Green \V. Cadel,:''''
n n lw ,.o~k, or for tbenrep~air of any fort, t ,trces, armory, build- .Mr. U'NDERWOOD, from the Committee for the Dis- yet when lhese institutions, by pursuing the very policy to Patrick G. Cald well, C~ry, Chapman, Clifford, Clinton, Coles,
frog, o~r movement of any kind fo~r the use of the U. State., until trier of Columbia, reported, wi. h an amendment, tbe Senate winch th,'y had been invited and stimulated, were utterly Gross, IDanicl, Richard D. Davis, 5ohn H. Dawson. Dean. Ioan,
the Eogineer or proper lti,.-r u~ndcr whose supervision said iur- bill in Telalion to the District Banks. Refeirred to the Coan- ruined, they were made the subjee's of unmeasured vitu- A."^ F ,'"d *'or"an', \' .-' ',, it. Goods' Godn ,., *,. Ha-*"ns
proveeuiit shi~il coline, shall first make out plans and specificaliorrs mittce of thi Whnhr on the sta-te of the Uoion. peratii.n, an) accused of treachery. Even States, whose Le- r'iT, ldh Hastings, "uya Homs H'".(,-""k1ir% lt,' ', taunon
of said work, wlihl ao, estate of the whole expense, one, copy to Mr. UNDERWOOD, from the same committee, reported gislature's hlad been "tempted to multiply banks and enter into Huhard, tHntr l~r sn^ lJack ave Johnon, J'ohin WV. ne
Le ; in the Clerks arites, and the oih~er in the Department of a bill to authorize, the recovery of fines and forfeitures incur- enterprises upon the fends thus spread abroad, were public- Keim, Andrew Kennedy, Lewis, 1ittlefield, Lowell, Abraham
;.aiae, to which said work appr~q~ipaiely bclnnga. And said en- red under the charter laws and ordinances of Georgetown, ly, and in a.solemn P~resideataia message, dlenounceet as spend- McClellan, Robcrt Mc( lcllaa, MeKay, Marchand, Alfred Mar-
"i-"."'-, or nfincer shall advertiia lhe work to be done in three before justices of tbepeace. thrifts, and their public enterprises as ,,r. rl,. ,t and reckless shall, John Thomnpson Mason, Mathews, Medill, Miller, Oliver,
newspapers in each State, for the space of fiulr weeks ene paper The bill having been read twice, Mr. U., after briefly ex- speculations. Parrmenter, Patridge. Payne, Piekens, Plainer, Reding, Riggs,
ube prnted i r ^h e U olt d S a e r e u' b l se d ; t'' h e ^ p o th e r lt w oai th e d c o nt e th ird r ea d i e st-a t th is tim e E u ro p e to d i so v e r h o w th e G o v e rn m e n ts o f S p a in a n dI A I- S t e o n rcd T u rn ey V a n B u re n W a rd W a tte rso n W e ll cr W e st-
the work let to the lowest responsible bidder; all whichi said .And, no obj~ction belie made, the bill was read a ttird biers, and Cuba collected and disbursed their revenues ] and brookt J)ames Williams, Wood--87.
ccounts shall b~e settled in lhe nsual way. time and passed, was proceeding te speak on the providing of one currency Mr. HALSTED moved a reconsideration of the vote just
And the House shall appoint, by t'allot, a standing committee of Mr. THOMPSON, of Indiana, from the Commiitee for for the People and another fo~r the Government when his taken.
nine members, but one to be taken from a State, whose duty it the Di<-triet of Columbia, made a report on the subject of hour expired, and he was followed by After some remarks from Mr. H. the motion was with-
shall be, when r quit eil by Congress, te aadit all accounts of ex- Pennsylvania avenue, (in rehltion to which subject a bill had [A message was received from the President of the Uniteil drawn. ,
pendimre of public moneys in accordance with the plan, specifi- beern heretofore r,'ported.) States, by the hands of JOHN TYLER, Jr. his private eecre- Mr. J. C. CLARK renewed it, and demanded the prevmios
cation, and allotment of said work. The report (without being read) was laid on the table, tare, informing the House that the President had spproved question; .which was seconded. .....


Mr. WILLIAMS, of Maryland, offered the following re- and ordered to be printed., and/signed the bill to revive and continue in force for ten The main question (which wai on the reconsideration) was
solution; which, giving rise to debate, was ordered to Mr. THOMPSON, from the same committee, made a nre- years the act enhiied An act to incorporate the Mechanic ordered to h e taken; and, being taken, was decided in the
lie over: port on the subject of the repairs of the Potomac bridge, (in Relief Society of the city of Alexandria.' negative.
Resolved, That the Committee of Ways and Means be instruct- relation to which subject also a bill had been heretofore re- A deep silence pervaded the Hall when the message was So the vote was not reconsidered.
ed to inquire into tirhe expediency of ,I , ;,, ..... frI, ,.... ported.) announced, which wassueded with roars ofAnl then, at half past six, the Hous adjourned.
to.be expended (if in the jud-ment dc it, -r,.. t ,. I',,.1 t.... The report (without being read) was laid on the table, and te character ,f the bill which had receive d the Presidential
States it shall be or may become necessary) in making provision ordered to be printed, ture charamer Tithe knw EATtE.-`-SECOND whIGih of Mr. P d-
to place the port of Havre d Grace, in the State of Maryland, in Mr. GUSHING, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, signature became known.] r -A.PH FOSTER, producer, director, ard inventor of the
a kate of security from foreign assault, reported, with an amendment, the Senate bill (heretofore re- Mr. MERIWETHER adverted to some of the remarks fl^ drPH fOtheR raa Oumer Stretor, and inthtrfh
Mr. WISE said he had just been requested by an officerof furred to that committee) entitled Alu act to amend an act of the --i fro, New Yrk, (Mr. HUNT,)and tn e w 0 too other gorgeous dramas. This EVENING, AU-
the United States with one leg to off.r the following rses- entitled an act to carry into effect the convention between the gentleman fro tSouth Carolina (Mr. PICKENS,) and also GIJS'" ith, 1841, will be presented the historical drama, in
lution: United States and the Mexican Republic." to those of the errol...... ,I, from Pennsylvania, (Mr. INOGE- three p, entitled
Resolved. That all commissioned officers and privates of the Mr. C. stated that the amendment proposed by the com- H i" went a to a that onw ut THE LIFE OF NAPOLEON BONAPARTE,
Army and Navy of the United States, who lave lost a lhmb in tire mittee was to strike out the enacting clause of the bill. lHwilih went on to say that he would Bpw, without taking I whic a splendid stud of horses will appear.
serviceeof theirecoutry, be, and are hereby, allowed the privilege Mlr. WELLER. That is considerable of an amendment up the time of the House in ilefe-t .igg to the erase road
fa sn hlh ft uIh'^d ay. speeches and the hard eirder argued hkh the gentle Napoleon Bonaparte Mr. J. POSTER,
ofn fromssionhtoathenalwabysoffthis ofursingIon auldasay- w oseetardinary likeness to the great original has been tile
roris o y ^ S ay- o 11-lOn te sugaostion of Mr. WISE (asthe Reporter under- ma fo South Carolina was sofond of ottng on allocca- whose extr,
M rf B IGri S 'of T heA y eay -- o, n c hO nta u singes a. W [ SEles o f R p ort r u n er -s io n s, p ro c eed to g iv e so m e o f h is v ie w s o n th e su bjec t th e n th em e a n d ad m iration of tho usan d s o f h is b rav e ve terans, w h o h ave
Mr. BRIGGS. The resolution changes a rle of the stood) the billlies upon the table. b b t ep o h s re exclaimed, at the close of each performance, their heartfelt burst
House. Petitions aon memorials (on leave) were presented by the before them-the repeal of the sub-Treasury.
The SPEAKER. It can only be entertained by unani- following menibprs, and were appropriately referred : He would eany at once, that he was in favor ofthe propsi of approbat, "Viv Napoleon." s ng d dancing.
moss consent. Mr. UNDERWOOD, of Kentucky. tion, and he expressed his utter inability to discover how the In the course of the evening a vprieandodan,
molls c nsent.To eonelur e, first time here, with 'he earn r pantomime, with
Mr. KEIM said he supposed the resolution, if it gave rise Mr. ROOSEVELT, no New Yctk, friends of the sub-Treasury came to the conclusion that it all the original music, new dresses, &c. as produced by Mr. J.
to debate, must lie over. Mr. RANDOLPH, of New Jersey. was a measure separating the bank from the State. For his Poster, of
Mr. WISE. It can be entertained by unanimous consent. Mr. WOOD, of New York. own part, he had never been able to perceive it ; but, on the MOTHER GOOSE,
I hope no objection will be raised. Mr. SMITH, of Connecticut. contrary, regarded it in a light exactly the reverse. Or, Harlequin and the Golden Egg.
Mr. KEIM. I object to the resolution, unless it is so mo- H He next proceeded to cite from the report of Secretary a variety of tricks, changes, and transformations never be-
difd as to admit rank and file together. REPEAL OF THE SUB-TREASURY LAW. Woodbury, made at the last session of Congress, for the pur- fore attempted here, in which several performers of distinction
The resolution was again read. The unfinished business of Saturday was the bill from the pose of showing that there was scarcely a bank in the coun- wilt appear.
Mr. BRIGGS. If they have received the thanks of Con- 'Senate repealing the act commonly known as the sub-Trea- try with which the Government was not most closely and in-
gress, .ir(v trentitled now to come on the floor. sury law, as the said bill had been proposed to be amended by timately connected, and that they had greatly increased in SAMUEL M. CHARLEMS.
Mr. A RNOLD suggested that the resolution should be so the Select Committee appointed by this House on the subject number of late years. Portrait and Mtntatur Patiter,
modified as to admit private soldiers, of the Currency. He contended that the sub-Treasury rendered it almost Third Street, Four Doors from Pennsylvania Avenue,
Mr. WISE was willing so to modify the resolution, he Mr. PICKENS rose in opposition to the bill, which, as impossible for the Government to shake off these mushroom WASHINGTON CITY.
laid, a to embrace all soldiers who had lost their limbs.l" well as its antagonist measure, a Bank of the United States, institutions, which had sprung into existence ever since the aug 7- eo3t