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VoL. XXV.


WASHINGTON: MONDAY, FEBRUARY


27, 1837,


N. 7502.


NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE,

We find in the Fianklin Repository of Penn-
sylvania, the following beautiful stanzas, in which
the genius of Poetry celebrates, in strains worthy
of their subject, the achievements of Eloquence
and Patriotism. The verses claim too, a higher
measure of admiration from the circumstance of
their being, as we understand, from the pen of
a young Lady:
FROM THE FRANKLIN REPOSITORY.
We rescue our own names, character, and honor from all
Participation in this matter; and whatever the wayward char-
Sacter of the times, the headlong and plunging spirit of party
" devotion, or the fear or the love of power, may have been able
" to bring about elsewhere, we desire to thank God that they
" have not, as yet, overcome the love of Liberty, fidelity to true
" republican principles, and a sacred regard for the Constitu-
" tion, in that State whose soil was drenched, to a mire, by the
" first and best blood of the Revolution."
MR. WEBSTER'S PROTEST.
Old Massachusetts wr it
Within her lordljy'etn."
"- Ilas. SIGOURNEY.
----- 'k-''
Ay,-honestly, and feaur '"
Thy duty hath been 4in
Championof Truth andB Liberty,
New England's gifted son i
Well may the State that gave thee birth
Exulting hear thy name-
That to the farthest bounds of earth
Her glory shall proclaim !
Firm leader of that Roman band
Who in the lawless hour,
(When ev'n the Guardians of our land
Cringed to the nod of power;)
True to their country's grateful trust
Disdain'd to bend the knee,
And saw with indignation just
The shameful mockery-
What though in Freedom's holy cause
Thy voice was raised in vain-
For when did Party-spirit pause
At Truth's persuasive strain ?
That voice, in every patriot soul
Hath woke an answering tone;
And still the echoes onward roll,
Ev'n to the Idol's throne.
And blench thou not-though darkly now
The sway of Power hath spread,
A spirit it can never bow
Is rising from the dead;
And men are murmuring of the past,
And rousing them to see
The fearful doubts that overcast
Their future Liberty.
Then onward Thou whose warning cry
Hath broke that heedless rest,
Until thy own true energy
SGlows in each freeman's breast!
Until the faithfulness of yore,
Our Fathers' only guide,
Inspires Columbian hearts once more
With all thy patriot pride! -
Ay, point them to the Pilgrim Rock!
And to the hallowed mound
Where Warren met the battle shock,
In death with glory crown'd!
Let every burning word recall
The struggles of the brave,
Who nobly dared and suffered all
Their dearest rights to save.
The glorious dead !-It shall not be
That they have liv'd in vain,
While on the page of Memory
Their thrilling deeds remain!
Hath not each State some sacred spot,
Her Freedom's chosen shrine ?
Some record ne'er to be forgot,
Proud as the boast of thine ?
Yet all should only serve to keep
More true our Unity ;
Ev'n as our own bright rivers sweep
On to one blending sea;
So should the splendors of the past
With present hopes combine,
And round our Union ever cast
A halo all divine.
And when in future years thy name
Shall fill the poet's song,
And roll with all thy country's fame
On Hist'ry's page along;
Ev'n as thy own expanded mind
Now sheds its cheering rays;
Not to one narrow spot confined,
Shall be thy well-earned praise.
No-though the North may claim thy birth,
The Star's ascending gleam n
As just to all thy gifts and worth,
The South shall hail its beam!
Frol every lip-from every heart,
The glowing tribute won-
That thine has been a Patriot's part-
Cor.UMvIrA's noble Son!
FEB 1, 1837. B.

PANISH BOOK-DON QUIXOTE.-EI Inge-
njso Hidalgo Don Quijote De La Mancha, compuesto por
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. Nueva edicion clasica, ilus-
trada con notas historicas, gramaticales y critics, por la Acade-
mnia Espanola, sus individuos de numero Pellicer, arrietta, y cle-
mencin. Enmendada y corregida por Francisco Sales, A. M.
Instructor de Frances y Espanol en la Universidad de Harvard,


en Cambrigia, Estado de Massachusetts, Norte America. En
dos Tomas.
SPANISH HIVE; or Select Pieces from various authors,
moral, instructive, and amusing; will the various idiomatic
phrases at the bottom of each-piece, and also in the general in-
dex; the whole accented with the greatest care for the use of
beginners. By F. Sales, A. M.
LITERARY FABLES of Don Thomas de Yriarte; contain-
ing all the posthumous literary fables of the author; accompanied
with explanations in English of all the words and idioms which
are not found in the Dictionary of Neumann and Baretti, and a
table showing the difference between the ancient and modern
orthography. In continuation will be found the dramatic mas-
terpiece, entitled "The Consent of the Young Ladies," by De
Leandro Fernandez de Moratin. Prepared for the use of
-> schools and colleges in the United States of North America, by
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DEBATE IN THE SENATE.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1837.
The PRESIDENT having announced the special order
of the day, being the bill limiting the sales of the public
lands, and having stated the question to be-on the follow-
ing sections, moved by Mr. MOORE, as amendments to the
bill :
And be it further enacted, Thatall lands which have been
offered for sale twenty or more years and remain unsold, shall
hereafter be sold at fifty cents per acre; all lands which have
been offered fifteen or more years, and less than twenty years,
shall be hereafter sold at seventy-five cents per acre ; and all
lands which have been offered ten or more years, and less than
fifteen ears, shall hereafter be'sold at one dollar per acre :
Provided, That not more than one hundred and sixty acres
shall be sold to any onre purchaser, nor to any other than actual
settlers, at such reduced prices.
"And be it further enacted, That any person who shall
make the necessary proof, as required by the fourth section of
this bill, that he has occupied or cultivated any portion of the
public lands, subject to entry at private sale, such person shall
have the pre-emptive right in the purchase of one quarter sec-
tion, to include the land so occupied or cultivated at one dollar
per acre."
Mr. MOORE addressed-the Senate as follows:
Mr. PRESIDENT: When I had the honor to present to
the Senate last evening the amendments now under its
consideration, I said great injustice had been done that
class of our fellow-citizens who first emigrate and take pos-
session of the public domain, by that severe denunciation
that had been so liberally dealt out against them from se-
veral quarters upon this floor. Having been an early emi-
grant myself to the section of country in which I reside,
and having some knowledge of the character of the many
privations which those with whom I have been associated
had to encounter, and which are common with all early
emigrants to a new country, it was natural that my sym-
pathies and sensibilities should be excited. But, sir, I am
Well aware these missiles and censure were not thrown par-
ticularly at. Alabama, and as they have been met and re-
plied to by others, I shall endeavor only to give a brief ex-
planation of the operation of former pre-emption laws as
relates to the State of Alabama.
Sir, the only pre-emption law in that long catalogue
brought to view by the Senator from Missouri (Mr. BEN-
TON,) in which any portion of the citizens of this State
have had any interest, is the law of May, 1830, which was
limited in its operation to one year only; and the act of
June, 1834, which re-enacted the provisions of the law of
1830, and continued its operation for two years.
These laws have had an application in one or two coun-
ties only in the whole State of Alabama; and, in truth, it
may be said that the citizens in but one county have been
benefited to any considerable extent. These citizens, al-
though not in affluence, are as honest, as worthy and re-
spectable as the population in any other quarter.
And what, let me ask, is the character of the boon pre-
sented by the pre-emption laws, to which I have referred ?
The only advantage has been the protection it gave the
poor man from a competition with the more wealthy and
land speculator in the purchase of his little home, one quar-
ter-section, which had been made valuable only by means
of his own labor bestowed upon it.
Sir, it is due to my constituents that I should state one
fact, which is much to their credit anid honor, which is this:
I have never heard of any attempt to perfect titles under
these pre-emption laws by a resort to corruption, perjury,
subornation of perjury, or other improper means," about
which we have heard so much as having occurred in other
quarters.
There is another fact, which I take great pleasure in
bringing to the view of the Senate: This very county of
Jackson, which has enjoyed greater benefit from the pre-
emption laws than any other, has also furnished a greater
number of soldiers for the defence of the State than any
other county: she has now (unless they have recently re-
turned) about four hundred of her brave and patriotic citi-
zens, breasting the perils of the Indian war in Florida, and
what I fear is more appalhng to them than the dangers of
war, is the unhealthy climate which is the scene of their
operations.
These are volunteers, not draughted men. As soon as
the call for men was made known, more volunteered than
were required ; and, in this county, I have heard it said,
that, "if any draught should ever be resorted to, it would
be a draught to see who should stay at home."
But it has been intimated by the honorable Senator from
Georgia (Mr. KING) that this class of our fellow-citizens
have, by their disorderly and criminal deportment, provok-
ed the Indian wars in which the Government has been,
and yet is, involved.
Mr. President, as regards the Black Hawk war, I know
nothing, and therefore I say nothing; but, sir, as relates to
the Indian war in the South, I think I hazard nothing in
saying this can be traced to a different origin-this has ori-
ginated from the manner in which your Indian treaties
have been made, and the bad faith, yes, sir, the bad faith
in which their requirements have been executed. One
circumstance which has contributed greatly in exciting that
ill-blood which finally resulted in open depredations on the
part of the Indians, has been the countenance given to the
most gross and flagrant frauds practised upon them by un-
principled land speculators, in the pretended purchase of
their reservations. And, sir, I think I may assume the
responsibility of saying that some of the constituents of
the Senator from Georgia participated largely in these spe-
culations. Well, sir, the war having been brought about
by the means to which I have referred, who, except that
very class of our fellow-citizens, so much abused, to whom
the opprobrious epithet of "squatters" has been applied,
first shouldered their muskets to do the fighting ? The
silk-and-purple gentry, unless they can be so fortunate as
to obtain the command of a regiment or battalion, find it
more convenient to enjoy theirease upon their cotton farm.
If they contribute any thing, it is by way of substitute;
their person is too sacred to be exposed to the cruel hard-
ships of a campaign : they therefore do all their fighting
by substitute. Yes, sir, although this traduced class" do
not, as has been charged, originate the war, they are truly
active and principal agents in bringing it to a close.
But it has been alleged by the honorable Senator that
they pay no taxes to the Government," &c. Now, sir, I


demand to know if this be so ? I desire to know of the
Senator from Georgia (Mr. KING) whether the tax impos-
ed by the tariff does not operate upon this class of our fel-
low-citizens as well as any other 1 By what means are
they exempted from its influence ? Sir, does not the poor
man pay a tax for the hat upon-his head, the coat (although
it may be a coarse one) upon his back, and the shoes upon
his feet ? Is he not required to pay a tax for the plough
and weeding-hoe, the axe, and other farming utensils with
which he cultivates his little cornfield ? the sugar with
which he sweetens his coffee, and the salt that is put in his
bread ? Yes, sir, he pays a tax almost for every thing he
and his family either eat or wear; and this is not all, for
he is taxed for the very last nail that is driven in his coffin,
or the cofin made for any branch qf his family. And yet
we are to be told that they pay no tax !" I am willing
to'admit that they may not pay as much in amount as the
man who wears a beaver hat, a broadcloth cloak, a ruffle
shirt, and silk stockings, and who uses his wines and other
luxuries; yet- I will venture the assertion that the tax paid
by the poor man who may have a large family to support,
falls as heavy and is as oppressive upon him as the tax
paid by any other class of the community.
Well, now, a few words as regards the amendment sub-
mitted for the consideration of the Senate. Its operation
is confined to lands that havebeen in market for ten, fifteen,
and twenty years, and which theGovernment has not been
able to sell at the minimum price, and which, I hesitate
not to say, will never be sold unless the price be reduced.
This provision will enure mainly to the benefit of that class
for whom it is more imperiously our duty to legislate; those
in indigent circumstances, who have heretofore been driven


for. This policy is as inconsistent as it is adverse to the
interest of the-new States.
What, let me ask, would be the course of an intelligent
individual, under similar circumstances, who, having ob-
tained a large quantity of public lands, and, having sold
out the best at the highest price it would command, would
hold up the refuse with the view of obtaining the same price
for this? What has been the practice of every State in
the Union which has sold its public lands ? Have they
not reduced the price according to its quality ? And what
would be the course of any other individual who might
put in market any other commodity? Suppose he be a to-
bacco-planter, or a flour-merchant, would either of these,
having made sale of all the prime, think of holding up the
ground leaf tobacco, or the old and sour flour, with any
reasonable hope of ever obtaining the same price for this ?
Or would he not reduce the price of this article to its fair
market yalue ? T'is, it seems to me, would be the dictate
of pruldehce and common sense.
But, sir, we claim, and with great propriety, too, a re-
duction, upon the ground and principle upon which you
have reduced the tariff, in order to reduce the amount of
surplus revenue, and to bring down the rate of taxation to
the actual, economical wants of the Government. The
public domain is the article in which the people of the new
States deal mostly, and while you have extended a scale of
reduction to every otier article ef consumption, this has
been left alone untouched at its original high price. A
price fixed when the Government had a large public debt
unliquidated ; for the payment of which, the public domain
was pledged. This pledge is now redeemed, and the citi-
zens of the new States have the right to demand a reduc-
tion in the price of the public domain in a ratio correspond-
ing with that applied by the tariff to other articles.
But there are other and higher considerations which
should influence gentlemen in the support of this measure.
The citizens of the new States, although they pay their
equal proportion of the tax collected, have no interest in
the large appropriations of thousands and millions that are
made ainnally out of the public treasure for harbors, forti-
fications, breakwaters, forts, &c. on the seabord. This
amendment also proposes to place the means in the hands
of thousands of our fellow-citizens to become freeholders,
and thus increase their pride and independence, their at-
tachment to the soil, and to the Government, and, at the
same time, remove that odious relation that exists between
landlord and tenant.
But some gentlemen have argued in opposition to this
measure as if it were confined in its operation alone to the
citizens of the new States, and as if the citizens of no other
State had any interest in the matter whatever. But gen-
tlemen should recollect that the population of the new
States is composed of the good people from every other
State in this Union; and that emigrants from every quar-
ter are to participate in the wholesome provisions proposed to
be incorporated in this bill.
Sir, I was surprised to hear the honorable Senator from
Delaware (Mr. BAYARD) repudiate these enactments be-
cause they hold out extravagant inducement to emigration
from the old to the new States. And I would submit it to
the honorable Senator whether this is not a very contract-
ed view of the subject ? and whether it is not our duty to
legislate here upon the broad principle of promoting the in-
terest and prosperity of all ? And whether he does justice
to his constituents in withholding his support to the project
on account of the extravagant advantages it tenders them
for emigration ? And ought not the State he so ably re-
presented be willing to part with that portion of her popu-
lation who, seeing the avenue opened wide for the improve-
ment of their fortunes in the West and Southwest, feel de-
sirous of availing themselves of it ? And ought he not ra-
ther to be inclined to lend his aid in giving them encou-_
ragement than to impede their progress ? What, suppose
some rich landlord lose a tenant, and some of the manufac-
tories some of their hands, who labor for a mere pittance
for support, when, by emigration to the new States, they
become independent freeholders and landlords themselves.
Sir, I will repeat what I intimated on a former occasion,
that the People of the new Stamle havo a right to appeal to
the justice of the majority on this floor and in the other
branch of the National Legislature, who are now dominant,
and hold the power, for their aid in support of this mea-
sure. They have done much for the Administration, and
particularly has Alabama done every thing, and more than
could have been expected; she has sacrificed her feelings
and her principles; her citizens have sacrificed their at-
tachment for an individual pure and spotless-whose de-
portment either in the private walks of life or the public
councils of his country no honorable man will dare assail or
impeach. Yet they have sacrificed their attachment for
him, their neighbor, their friend, to gratify General Jack-
son. And I think I have the right now, in behalf of my
constituents, to make the appeal to the friends of the Ad-
ministration for aid in favor of a measure more intimately
connected with their interest than any other provision of
this bill.
Now, sir, one word more as to the other amendment pro-
posed as an additional section to the bill. Mr. President,
the provisions embraced by this are so obviously just and
proper, that I cannot anticipate opposition from any quar-
ter. In this there is no principle, the propriety of which
will be considered doubtful by gentlemen coming from ei-
ther the old or the new States.
It will be seen that this amendment proposes to secure to
an individual the pre-emptive right in the purchase of one
quarter section, t at he has improved and cultivated, at one
dollar per acre, of the land subject to be entered at private
sale, at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. This
will be of little or no service to other new States, which
will enjoy a more important advantage from that section in
the bill which secures to occupants the right of pre-emp-
tion in the purchase of the best lands in the country. But,
as regards Alabama, these golden days have passed ; the
good lands have long since been sold. I have known ma-
ny worthy and respectable citizens who had made improve-
ments upon the public lands, who were able to give from
five to ten, fifteen, and twenty dollars per acre; yet were
unable to secure their homes-were turned out and driven
off by the capitalist and land speculator, under the auction,
system, being unprotected at that time by any pre-emption
law.
This amendment would be viewed as a modest proposi
tion compared with other features in the bill, and I hope
it will receive the favorable consideration of the Senate.


[Mr. KING, of Georgia, in a subsequent stage in the de-
bate, having submitted two amendments to the bill, viz. one
requiring that the applicant for a pre-emption shall make
'oath before the register and receiver that he has not re-
'ceived the benefit of any pre-emption law heretofore
'passed by the Congress of the United States ;" and the
other, providing that no pre-emption shall be granted to
'lands from which the Indians had not been removed at
Sthe commencement of such occupancy."]
Mr. MOORE said he had already declared that the
interest which the State of Alabama would have in this
law compared with that which other new States and Ter-
ritories would enjoy was very inconsiderable. Yet he had
given the bill his hearty support from principle. He was
willing to do justice to other citizens, the early emigrants,
in whatever quarter they may be located. But now the
honorable Senator from Georgia (Mr. KING) proposes so
to modify the bill as to destroy even that small interest
which the State from which he came might claim to have,
and to exclude his constituents from any participation in
its wholesome provisions whatever.
Mr. M. solemnly protested against the adoption of any
such amendment; he hoped the Senate would not gratify
the Senator from Georgia in effecting such manifest injus-
tice to the citizens of his State.
That Senator had again renewed his unwarranted de-
nunciations against that meritorious class of our fellow-
citizens, whom he again reproaches by calling them "pro-
fessional squatters." And by this amendment proposes to
break up and destroy what he is pleased to call their
profession and livelihood." And, sir, he is desirous also
to put an end to the improper treatment and cruelty with


and become honest and respectable citizens, and were
worthy the protection this bill proposes to give them.
But if the Senator succeeds in his proposed amend-
ment, his (Mr. M.'s) constituents, few as they were, who
have obtained any pre-emption under any former law, are
now to be excluded from any benefit or protection.given
by the pre-emption clause in this bill, and left entirely at
the tender mercies of the land speculator.
Now, sir, where is the propriety of this, where the pro-
priety of excluding a poor man from a pre-emption under
this law, merely because he has been compelled to make
sale of his land heretofore paid for, in order to improve his
condition and provide more effectually for the permanent
prosperity of his family ? Sir, the gentleman can with
much more propriety change the character of his amend-
ment, by modifying it in such manner as to exclude and
render the land speculator incompetent, instead of the pre-
emptioner, to purchase in any future sale, and with such a
modification Mr. M. would vote for it. 1
Again, another portion of his constituents were to be
made step-children of, and excluded from the provisions of
this law, because they have made their settlements before
the Indians are removed from the territory theej have sold.
And the gentleman had stated correctly when he said his,
amendments would only apply to that portion of aoantry
recently acquired from the Cherokees, situated in the State
of Alabama. And he would inform that Benator that,
small as this slip" of country was, the General Assem-
bly had organized three new counties out of it, which
were settled by honest and respectable citizens in every
manner worthy the favorable consideration of Congress.
The treaty had been ratified long since, many had gone
there since the purchase and since the ratification, tand
yet the Indians are not removed, and no one can tell pre-
cisely when they will be entirely removed. The people
nevertheless are subject to all the restraints, responsibili-
ties, payment of taxes, &c. in the same manner that others
are in any other part of the State, and were entitled to
equal participation in the important provisions of this
bill.
But Mr. M. said he had felt the peculiar force of that
argument of the Senator from Ge&gia resulting from his
tender sympathies and compassion for the poor Indians
which inspired iis bosom with such a strong and laudable
desire to put a stop to those cruelties heretofore practised
upon them.
Mr. M. thought, looking to the history of the times,
and reviewing the legislative action of the State of
Georgia, (prompted doubtless by none other than the most
tender and humane considerations for the poor Indians,
for whom the Senator would make us believe he also feels
much sympathy,) that such arguments came with very
bad grace from that quarter. That Georgia should feel
more than other States for the welfare of the Indians, and
that her delegation should be disposed to withhold from
honest occupants pre-emption rights in the purchase of the
public lands, iest encouragement should be given to im-
proper treatment to the poor Indians, was among the very
last arguments he had supposed the Senator from Georgia
would have resorted to in support of his proposition.

LAST DAY.
HE SIAMESE TWIN BROTHERS-CHANG-
ENG very respectfully acquaint the Ladies and Gentle-
men of Washington that they have fixed on Wednesday, March
1, as positively the last day of their stay in this city.
Hours of admission, from 10 to 12 in the mining, and from
7 to 9 in the evening, and at no other time.
At the Globe Hotel, (Maher's,) directly opposite the New
Theatre.
Admittance 25 cents. No re-admission to the Room.
feb 25-4t
XHIBITION.-RUSSELL'S stupendous and magnifi-
cent Planetarium, or Cclumbian Orrery, the most exten-
sive, beautiful, and perfect work of the kind in the world, will
be exhibited at the Masonic Hall, in this city, commencing on
Wednesday, the 15th instant, and continuing daily, until fur-
ther notice.
This Planetarium was invented and constructed by JAMES
RUBEseL, Esq., of Worthingtori, Franklin cuunrty, 1rioo,--nd wag
completed only about two months since, after more than ferjty
years' mental and manual labor. The most enthusiastic
praise and admiration have been elicited from all who have
seen it.
As a piece of mechanism alone, this Planetarium presents
great attractions. The style and beauty of workmanship woAll
also compensate any beholder. The extent may be understood
from the table or zodiac having a circumference of thirty-six
feet, the outer planet describing a circle of more thanforty-five
feet, its containing above five hundred cog-wheels, and weigh-
ing r early one ton.
In the complication of its movements, illustrating the highly
interesting science of astronomy, it far surpasses any other
Orr,:ry now known. The primary planets move in their rela-
tive times around the sun, in orbits inclined to the ecliptic, sah.
ing clearly the places of the nodes. They also revolve ..ineir
axes, with their correct inclinations and directions. The prima-
ries are attended by their satellites, performing their periodic
and diurnal revolutions. The eccentric and inclined orbit of
the moon, the retrograde motion of its nodes, the revolution upon
its axis in its proper time, and its librations, are all represented.
Eclipses, transit, phases of the moon and planets, changes of
the seasons, &c. &c., are all perfectly illustrated.
It is without doubt the most beautiful and perfect representa-
tion of the solar system which has hitherto been produced, and
the expressed opinion of those who have seen it has uniformly
been that more can be learnt of the peculiar movements of the
earth and heavenly bodies during one exhibition, than could lbe
acquired in many weeks from reading.
A Lecture upon the most interesting subjects of Astronomy
will be given by Dr. R. HILLs, at the time of exhibition.
The Public are assured ths is no trifling toy. Testimonials
of its superior excellence have been received from the Presi-
dent and Professors of Kenyon College, Ohio, Washington and
Jefferson Colleges, Pennsylvania, lie present members of the
Legislature of Ohio, the Judges of the Supreme Court of Ohio,
and from many other professional and scientific gentlemen.
The doors will be open at 3 and 7 o'clock P. M., and the Lec-
ture will commence thirty minutes afterwards precisely.
Tickets 50 cents, to be had at the door.
Arrangements can be made for entire Families and Schools.
Admittance for children under 12 years of age, half price.
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storative," with great benefit. I believe it may be safely used,
and to great advantage, by every one. It has greatly diminish-
ed the dandruff, an. very much improved the texture of my
air, from the occasional use of it for eight or ten days.
Yours, &c. E. J. SHIELDS,
Of House of Representatives.
Mr. J. W. SMIrH.
DEC. 1836.
We concur in the above recominendation-of the efficacy of the
"Persian Hair Restorative," in removing dand ufffrom the head,
and the other beneficial effects resulting from its application to
the hair. N. SICKLES,
W. TAYLOR, M. D.
Dec. 16, 1836. Qf House of Representatives.
For sale at Callan's Drug and Perfumery Store, opposite the
old Patent Office. Price $1 per bottle, feb 7-5tif
F THOROUGH BRED FILLY 7FUR SALE.-
I will offer at public sale, before my store door, on Tues-
(lay, the 28th of this month, at 11 o'clock A. M. a thorough
bred RACE FILLY, four years old next grass, by Sussex,
aind out of a mare by Thornton's Rattler. The filly was raised
by Dr. D. Craufurd, of Prince George's county, Maryland, and
i ; indonrl condition for the training stable; or, persons disposed


DEBATE IN THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
SPEECH OF MR. THOMPSON, (or S. CAROLINA,)
On the right of Slaves to petition.

TUESDAY, FEB. 7, 1837.'
Mr. Speaker : I am reluctant, sir, to throw myself again
upon the indulgence of the House. The original resolu-
tion which I submitted upon this subject, and which seems
so much to have shocked the delicate sensibilities of some
gentlemen, was dictated by the irrepressible feelings which
the conduct of the honorable member from Massachusetts
was so well calculated to excite. More calm reflection has
only served to confirm me in the opinion that the course
which I adopted was that which duty demanded; and al-
though I should not be sustained by a single vote, it wolld
not in the slighest degree shake my purpose. No, sir, in
this as in every other contest of duty, honor, and right,
there is consolation, if in nothing else, in the glorious sen-
timent of Henry at Agii*ourt: The fewer men the
greater share of honor." It is not the first time that, in
the moment of conflict, I have tound myself abandoned
by some of those who had urged me into it. I am some-
what in the condition of Richard before the fatal day of
Bosworth: my allies dropping off one by one. Likehim,
I hope, in nothing else. Gentlemen who yesterday reprov-
ed my flagging zeal, and urged a resolution for the expul-
sion of the member from Massachusetts, to-day find my
resolution too strong by half. AlkI desire is, the formal
and unequivocal expression of the House, that to present
a petition from slaves is unauthorized by fhe Constitution,
a disrespect to the House, and a violation of the rights and
feelings ot a'portion of its members., I have no personal
feelings of vengeance against the honorable member (Mr.
ADAMS) to gratify, although his habitually harassing the
House, and irritating conduct on this subject of abolition,
have been well calculated to rouse such feelings. How
great have been his trespasses during this session upgd
your patience, and that of the House, is in the knowledge
of every member.
My honorablle friend from Virginia (Mr. ROBERTSON)
admits that the conduct of the member from Massachusetts
was a wanton trifling with the House, and unjustifiable
torturing of the feelings of its members, and that the sub-
sequent explanations of the gentleman nothing extenuate
the offence." Now, sir, I beg to be informed, if a wanton
trifling with the Houses and torturing the feelings of its
members is not a disrespect deserving censure, what is ?
The honorable member from Massachusetts (Mr. LIN-
COLN) has urged with much zeal and force that there was
no offence in the question which was asked; that there
can be no violation of the decorum of thd House in asking
a question, a question which may or may not be answer-
ed. Is this true, sir ? No offence in a question Can
greater offence be offered than by asking some questions ?
There are some questions not to be asked, and this is one
of them. Is it no disrespect to ask a member if he is not
destitute of honor or truth ? None whatever, according
to the argument, because the question may be answered or
not.
Slaves have no right to petition. They are property,
not persons ; they have no political rights; and even their
civil rights must be claimed through their masters. Hav-
ing no political rights, Congress has no power in regard to
them, and therefore no right to receive their petitions.
They are property, not persons, under the Constitution.
The Constitution is the paramount rule of the House, and
any attempt, however made, to present petitions from them
is a violation of that Constitution, and a flagrant disres-
pect and insult to a portion of its member. Does any man
dare to claim that the House, of which I am a member, is
a tribunal to which appeals from my slaves are to be ad-
dressed, and in which their denunciations of me are to be
received This is a question that I willnot argue. From
the position that slaves have a right to petition, to that
which should assert their right to vote, "the step is short
and natural." They can have no such light, unless they
have political right. If they have, to refuse them am agen-
cy in making the laws by which those rights are guarded,
is to violate the great fundamental principle of our Revolu-
tion. If they-have the right to petition, the principle must
be carried out to that extent. I repeat, sir, I will not ar-
gue such a question for any other purpose than to show the
enormity of the act of offering such a petition.
The gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. LINCOLN) ob-
jects that the charge is indefinite, intangible. How, says
he, did the member trifle with the House ? I will tell you,
sir. After presenting various abolition petitions, the mem-
ber (Mr. A.) stated that he had a petition from twenty-
two slaves, and asked if it came within the resolutions of
the gentleman from Kentucky, (Mr. HAWES,) thus giving
to the House an additional reason to believe that the-pray-
er of the petition was for the abolition of slavery. I in-
quired if it was an abolition petition, and requested that it
might be read. The honorable member from Massachu-
setts declined to answer. My friend from Alabama (Mr.
LEwis) inquired of the Chair whether the petition did
pray for the abolition of slavery. He was informed by the
Chair that it did. The honorable member was silent, and
permitted the misapprehension of the Chair into which he
had led both you, sir, and the whole House, to remain un-
corrected, when he alone had it in his power to set the
House right. One word from him would have sufficed.
He refused to give that one word. He allowed more than
one resolution to be submitted and speeches to be made on
th.t supposition ; and not until he supposed the House suf-
ficiently embarrassed and entrapped, did he condescend to
state what was the nature of the petition. Is not this tri-
fling with the House t Let every member honestly an-
swer the question. But, sir, I take broader ground. To
present any petition, for any object, (and it is perfectly in-
different what that object is,) from slaves, is without au-
thority or right, and an unjustifiable and insolent trifling
with the House.
T he hon. member from Kentucky(Mr.GRAVEs) has replied
to an argument which no one has used. I certainly have
not. He seems to suppose that the act of the honorable
member from Massachusetts disregarded as offensive, be-
cause it is calculated to bring into contempt the resolutions
of his honorable colleague, (Mr. HAWES.) I have not
heard any such ground afsutmed. I shall certainly be one of
the last to break a lance in defence of those resolutions.
The same honorable member has also argued that it could


be no disrespect, as the member from Massachusetts dis-
claims any such intention. Does not every one see this
would excuse any, the greatest violation of decorum ? A
member may ask another if he is not guilty of falsehood,
and is not a knave, and in his defence say he meant no of-
fence, is he to pass without censure ?
The honorable member is a slaveholder, and represents
slaveholders, and on that account I must say that I have
heard no speech on this floor which has grated so harshly
on my ear. I regretted it, deeply regretted it, as coming
from a slaveholder. It concedes, in my judgment, the
most vital principles for which the abolitionists contend. Look
at their petitions. They say that slavery is an evil, a na-
tional sin, and a disgrace. Will these be cured by aboli-
tion in this miserable ten miles square ? Does any man
believethat their purposes arc confined to that 1 You might
as well tell me thtt you would set fire to ten feet square in
a dry prairie, and that you designed and expected that it
would extend no further. No, sir, these men, fanatics as
they are, understand their game. They know that this is
our weakest point-that upon which their strongest show
of plausible argument can be made; and, like a skilful
commander, they first assail the weakest point of the ene-
my, as diseases settle upon the weakest part of the system,
and a more pestilent disease than this does not exist. It is
a foul aud blasting malaria, which is prostrating the jus-
tice, virtue, and independence of a portion of the country.
Is there not at least one member on this floor, who last ses-
sion was opposed tothese wretches,but who,at the last elec-
tion, was obliged to give in his adhesion or give up his seat
here-a painful alternative to any but a patriot-to a pat-
i *.-P -^ --*C;A;nc fbc,/ Tnnnr ho /nor of^ a


'~Y~rY07a~hl _~TT~----*CYmf~*CI(I~giP~~~ilPP~s~i~l II--rg~I--OF~TIElf*IIPIJ4


not disturbing the bones of their fathers? Are they not
guilty of that worst of parricide, the murder of a father's
fame ? I should think that, if they believed in spirits, as
they once did, they would expect the ghosts of their fathers

Freedom of opinion and of speech, and sympathies with the
Indian and African are the three great topics of New England
cant of the present day. How long has it been thus, vide the
following extracts from Neal's History of New England; to say
nothing of that glorious act for securing, the freedom of opinion
and the press, the sedition law, wiiich had the united support of
New England.
The New Englanderspetition their magistrates to take speedy
measures against the Anabaptists.--Neale's History of New
England, 1 vol. 279.
Three were punished shortly aflei for religious opinions, viz.
John Clarks, fined 20 or to be whipped.
John Crandall, 5 or whipped.
Obadiah Holmes, 30.-1 vol. 280-1.
Holmes received 30 lashes at the whipping post.-1 vol. 283.
And John Stone and John Hazwell, were each fined 40-shil-
lings, or to be whipped for shaking hands with him and praising
God for his courage and constancy.-l vol. 283.
The Government of New England proceeded against the
Quakers as it had done against the Anabaptists, by fines, im- -
prisonment, and whipping, and these proving ineffectual, they
put three or four to death.-l vol. 291.
They imprison and banish Mary Fisher and Ann Austin, for
being Quakers.-1 vol. 292-3.
SLaws against Quakers.-1 vol. 293-4.
Nicholas Upshall, aged 60 years, was fined 30 and banished
for speaking against that law.
Mary Clarke, whipped 20 stripes for being a Quaker and
coming into New England, 1657.-vol. 1, 295.
Ch. Holder and John Copeland each received 30 lashes and
9 weeks imprisonment forthe same.-295.


I"


4


~3api~Japkl~kRi~e~6;r)a--- ~~~~-._~_~~~- r----~aWnP~~W~Plb~L~~li-*~ ~i~;hr-- I~LP~A1.BIIBD~PICILI~ ~se~kq~l Lp~ill~l~


body give to each other ? "Call ye this backing your
friends ? A plague of such backing, say I."
Think, Mr. Speaker, I may say that I am not tespnn- .
sible for the erratic and discursive course of this debate. I
have endeavored to confine myself to the subject before -the
House, and I now reluctantly advert to -some topics hot-
strictly pertinent, but which have notbeen first involved by
me. The gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. LINCO1N)
has complained of severe denunciations of his state. Not
by me, sir. I am guiltless on this, as on all formero-casions.
I would not wantorily assail the character of any State,
and especially of that ancient, enlightened, and renowned
Commonwealth. But when these vile assassins are excit-
ing our slaves to revolt-to murder-infanticide; when
their poisoned shafts are daily aimed atour lives, and, what
is of infinitely more value,-at our characters, when I strike
back, and gentlemen choose to interpose their State to
receive the blows aimed at them, they must take the'con-
sequences. I shall bate no jot of the force of m~y blows on
that account.
The gentleman has given us another eulogy upon these./
amiable fiends-these most respectable assassins. No,
sir, Bllow me to say that I have read a wek.on the subject
of slavery, written by a man than whom mone is poHtehou1
ored at the North, and-one whom ftie S.eth, too, once de.
lighted to honor, and whie,- dAd not, is the be t of the
-infamous brotherhood; and I v eat to sa tha no book
of the same number of pages, in ant language, contains
libels more foul and false. As a class, they are fools or
knaves, and there is no escape from -the alterifive. If
they do not know how worse than vain are their efforts,
and that they only tend to make worse the condition of
those whose friends they profess to be, they are entitled to
the former-if, knowing it, they persist in their vile purio-
ses, with no hope of good, but at the risk of tearing down
the proudest temple which human tvisdom has reared to
human liberty, none will deny their right to the latter ap-
pellation.
The gentleman from Massachudetts, as if entirely un-
conscious of the offensiveness of such topics, speaks of the
right of the People of the North- to sympathize with hu-
man suffering-with the oppressed-with those improperly.
held in bondage. Now, sir, what does all this mean when
translated 1 It means this : that we of the South are op-
pressors; holding men in bondage so cruel and unlawful
as to enlist the sympathies of the generous, the warm-heart-
ed People of the North-sympathies of which we must be
destitute, or we would cease from such wickedness. Now,
sir, gentlemen must expect these charges to be repelled.
Rosseau, I believe it was, regretted that he had not been
born a Roman. I am thankful and proud that Ilwas born
an American, a slaveholder, and a South Carolinian. I
regard African slavery, in all its bearings, as a blessing-as
a blessing to th-e slave himself; and I challenge a denial of
the proposition, that nowhere on the earth, in his native
land or any other, is the African, so elevated in the scale
of being, or in the enjoyment of as much comfort--so vir-
tuous, enlightened, or happy-as those who are slaves in
this country. I am satisfied that in no country where do-
mestic slavery does not exist, has the character of man
ever been, or ever will be, found in its highest development.
I believe it essential to the maintenance of liberty. Where,
let me ask, when the liberties and honor of this country
have been assailed by enemies, foreign or domestic, have
they flown for refuge? I feel that I am treading on deli-
cate ground. It may be invidious in these times, when the
whole North is so clamorous about the freedom of speech
and the press, to remind gentlemen of the sedition law;*
and when they seem to have taken Americaanhonor exclu-
sively under their keeping; to remind them of the part
which their States bore in the late war-that second strug-
gle for independence-for we should have ceased to have
had the most essential attributes of a nation if we had'not
waged that war. Northern commerce was assailed, and
Northern seamen impressed. The North counted the cost,
and was opposed to war. The national honor wa mTaifp
and the rest of the nation courted not the cost, but rushed
into the conflict, and came out of it triumphantly, with the
North all the while hanging upon their skirts. I know,
sir, that there Were hnlutrious etcepitkiI. _I eep not of
individuals, but of the conduct. df Stat. 7.
When the gentleman (Mr. Li toiLN) speaks ofthe sym-
pathies of the North, for h unan u offering, for the oppressed
and those held in unlawful bondage, 1 cannot forbear to
congratulate him upon the return of those feelings-for, if
aught that's true in history be," it Was not always so.
There would seem to have been a time when these honor-
able feelings had fled from their land. And e\en now, it
seems to be a most modified benevolence, a most restricted
philanthropy, which demands as indispensable that their
objects should have a red or a black skin ; for their own
color and race, their hearts are as cold as they ever were.
How, Mr. Speaker, if it should turn out that slavery has
been brought upon the country by this most tender-hearted
people ? How, if 1 shall show that the blackest and the
bloodiest pages in the history of this country, or of man,
are to be found in the treatment of the aborigines by New
England ? That, as long as the slave trade was profitable
and tolerated, it had no horrors in their sight? That they
had no sympathies with the poor Indians until they had lit-
erally exterminated all the tribes, by whom their fathers,
flying from another land, were kindly and hospitably re-
ceived-ere yet the untutored savage had learned the arts,
the frauds, the rapacity of the white man, which they first
taught him? Now, when they are no longerincommoded
by the vicinity of the savage, their sympathies are not with
their brethren, circumstanced as their fathers were. Their
philanthropy and their selfish interests are never opposed,
however there may be such opposition to the interests of
others. I like not your courtezan turned prude, after
ability to be vicious has ceased, and trust her nothing the
more that she claims to be of the" unco quid, the rigidly
righteous," and is seen at church meetings and christen-
Ings, sanctified and demure to a proverb.
Are gentlemen ignorant that mainly on New England
rests the responsibility of the great importation of slaves to
this country? that the colonial Legislature of Virginia
passed twenty-two acts against it? and that it was through
the power and influence of the New England colonies that
the trade was not stopped ? It was a business in which
they could turn a penny, and their humanity slept. When
gentlemen are daily regaling the House with their pathetic
ieremiads on the horror and atrocity of slavery, are they









lqP w tifetmWe wa1W W'sk
to rise up and accuse them. In r own tines, let me ask,
how long has it been since the pple of a State, now the
head-quarters of the abolitionists, b1way of showing their
abhorrence of slavery and the slave de, placed the sov-
ereignty of that State in another brn h of Congress in
the hands of a convicted, a notorious notorious in all the
meanings of the word) slave-dealer and kidnapper ?
Well, ir, as to the other point on which these philan-
thropists are most sensitive-the treatment of the poor In-
dians; for their hearts seem to have two subdivisions-one
for negroes, the other for Indians. Speak of the poor Afri-
can, they are in paroxysms of charity ; of the poor Indian,
and thenr philanthropy is almost spasmodic; a most rare
benevolence, which uses as its means murder and rapine;
a charity which does its alms with money rifled from the
pockets of others. What think you, sir, of Indian chiefs,
ay, and women, too, taken prisoners in war, and shot or
sold as slaves in the West Indies ? What think you of
wars of which the historian thus speaks with truly Spartan
brevity-" the whole tribe was exterminated The Narra-
gansetts, Mohegans. Pequods, Wamlpanoags-where are
they Exterminated i It is fitting-there is a beautiful
propriety in the sons of those who exterminated them, set-
ting up for philanthropists as the exclusive friends of the
Indians! What think you, sir, of a civilized and most re-
ligious soldiery, made up of men who had left their native
land to indulge here, without restraint, a religion of peace,
love, and charity, firing into the wigwams of squaws and
children-enrichin their sterile soil with the blood of wo-
nmen and children What, sir, of rewards being offered
by law for Indian scalps, indifferent (of course, for it could
not be known) whether torn from the heads-of warriors or
women, of decrepit age or sleeping infancy ? We of tlhe
South, who boast not of our humanity, have never gone
farther than to offer rewards for the scalps of wolves-ne-
ver forhuman scalps. The heart sickens, and human na-
ture shudders at the picture. And from what history, I am
asked, are these elegant-extracts ? From the history of the
immediate descendtuirs of the Pilgrims; and what may be
deemed even a higher honor t-n th-at, they were thus de-
scended, the ancestors of outitreseit philanthropists-as
Cornelia boasted more of being the mother of the Gracchi
than the daughter of Scipio. It is no excuse to say that
these colonieswere then subject to Great Britain. The
form of their government -may have been.in some particu-
lars different, but these were the acts of the colonists them-
selves.*
I repeat, sir, that I congratulate the gentleman on the re-
turn of these humane feelings. I would, in all deference,
recommend his people to beware lest the reaction may lead,
as re-actions areapt to do, to extremes. This spirit of phi-
lanthropy these good people may be unaccustomed to. Let
them not drink of it too deeply at first. I take no special
pleasure in these topics, but I am tired, sir, of defending,
and I know of no better way of defending than to attack.
I commend the.chalice to the lips of gentlemen them-
selves, and desire that they should realize, by actual expe-
rience, how pleasant it is. If there is any thing which is
calculated to wound gentlemen, it is the truth of history
which offends, and not I who have referred to it.
Mr. ADAMS inquired whether Mr. THOMPSON still ad-
hered to the opinions heretofore expressed by him, which
follow :
Does the gentleman, even in the latitude which he gives to
the right of petition, think that it includes slaves ? If he does
not, he has wilfully violated the rules of the House and the feel-
ings of its members. Does that gentleman know that there are
.laws in all the slave States, and here, for the punishment of
those who excite, insurrection? I can tell him that there are
such things as grand juries; and if, sir, the juries of this Dis-
trict have, as I doubt not they have, proper intelligence and
spirit, he may yet be made amenable to another tibhunal, and
we may yet see an incendiary brought to condign punishment."
Mr. T. replied, as to the first: When those remarks
were made, Idid not believe that there could be any man
who entertained the opinion that slaves have the right of
petitioning. The gentleman has since avowed that most
extraordinary opinion. He had not, however, done so be-
fore my remarks were made. An opinion so extraordinary,
that I could ,not have supposed he entertained it on any
other authority than his own declaration. As to the sec-
ond, I have only to say, that when I spoke of the liability
ofthe gentleman to a criminal prosecution, I understood
(and it was the fault of the gentleman himself that I so un-
derstood it) that it was an abolition petition. As it was
not, the remarks hAve no application to him. If it had
been, the expressions used by me were just, and well de-
served; and I repeat the opinion, as broadly as it is there
expressed, that the presentation of a petition for abolition,
may furnish sufficient evidence of correspondence and con-
&plrauy witfistaves to incur tho penalties ofthe laws against
those who excite insurrection. Not for the act done in the
House, but for the evidence which the act in the House
furnishes of a crime committed out of the Hou-e-4 -a orimo
- --;-' rg tuT'~ntrmembei takes his seat. I find a man
n my kitchen urging my slavesto sign a petition denounc-
ing me as an oppressor and tyrant, and asserting that sla-
very is a violation of the rights of man and the laws of his
Creator. What stronger incentive to insurrection? Would
the fact of his being a member of Congress give him impu-
nity? Suppose he acknowledges on the floor that he had
done this with the purpose of exciting insurrection ; or sup-
pose he does some equivalent act, or uses words which
equally establish it-may it not be used as evidence? Sup-
pose a member voluntarily to acknowledge on the floor that
he had killed a man--may this hot. be given in evidence ?
Suppose a member to denounce another in debate as a
traitor, and to say that he will give five hundred dollars to
any one who will assassinate him-the member thus de-
nounced is assassinated by a bravo in the rotundo, who de-
mands the reward-is this act to pass with impunity be-
cause the guilt of accessary consisted in words spoken in
debate, though not the less clearly the guilt of an accessa-
ry ? What is the object of the provision of the Constitu-
tion3 The great privilege of the freedom of debate ? Sure-
ly not impunity for crimes. Surely nothing could be more
revolting than to contend that the criminal laws of the land
may be-iolated, if done, by a member of Congress in his
seat. And the denial of my position leads to that. The
gentleman puts the case of a member being brought before
a grand jury for denouncing the President. Would the
gentleman say that would be a violation of any criminal
law ofthe land I Unless he can, the case is not parallel,
and the gentleman knows it. If, however, it can answer


him any purpose, he is pertcctly at liberty to pervert my
argument.
I shall continue, as I have done, to denounce the many
flagrant and atrocious usurpations of this Government
without fear of criminal prosecution ; and I venture to say
that ifthe honorable member from Massachusetts regards
the cases as parallel, no other human being does. But, sir,
what scorn would he not deserve and receive who should
attempt to screen himself behind his privileges from the'
penalties of the criminal laws of the land ?-to interpose
the privilege of a member of Congress between a felon and
the gibbet-a privilege intended to secure perfect freedom
sof thought and of speech, claimed as an, immunity for
crimes? The moral guilt would be the same, and the same,
I trust, would also be the infancy of the act and the penal-
ties of the law.

Extracts from Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts-ac-
count ofthe Pequod war.
"The Indians soon climbed: to the top of the palisades to avoid
the fire, nd 'so exposed .themselves to the English bullets;
others forced their way out o- the b.fort, and if any of them broke
through the English, the aHied Indians were in a ring at some
distance, so that few, if any, escaped. There were 60 or 70
wigwams, and it was imagineddbfoar 'o"five hundred Pequods,
men, iomrnn, and children. Few, if any, escaped."-1 vol.
page 78.;- -
"The ladians in alliance witththe English (i. c. Colonists)
had taken ten males anm eight-!'enales; four of the males were
disposed of, nie to each of our Sachems, the rest put to the
sword. Four of the females wereleftat the fort-the other four,
carried to Connecticut, where the Indians challenged them as
their prize; they were sacrificed to end the dispute. 79. Many
ofthe captives were sent to Bermudas and sold for slaves. The
Pequod tribewas wholly extinguished." 80.
All these atrocities were perpetrated in the name of God, and
to do-him service. Hear E. G. That it was evident that God
had chose New-England to plant his people in, and that it
would be displeasing unto him thathis work should be hindered."
In the account of the war with the Narragansets this is found :
They began to fire the wigwams-in many of them the Indian
women and children perished." 298.
The termination of Philip's war.-" A great many of the
chiefs were executed at Boston and Plymouth, and most of the
rest were pold and shipped off for slaves to Bermudas, and other
parts." 307.
The hand of the great Philip, a hero and patriot, was cutoff;
and"4Iays the historian, "produced a handsome penny, many
having a tariosity to see it." "The ruling passion strong in
war as in death."
L( m i- .- -" _


PROCE DINGS N CONGRESS.
IN CONTI B TION. .

FRIg FEBRUARY 24, 1837.

IN SENATE.
TARIFF.
The Senate having resumed the considerationof the bill
to reduce the duties on certain imports-
Mir. DAVIS spoke at length in reply to Mr. CALHOUN
and others, in relation to the history of the tariff of 1828,
and the course of New England in reference to that bill.
He denied the authority of any Senator to pledge his State
to an observance of the compromise law of 1833. T-hat
was tor the Legislatures of the States to do.
Mr. BENTON went into a lengthy reply, in which he
quoted the journal to show that the present bill was more
advanced in proportion to the date of the session than the
compromise bill had been in 1833; from which he took oc--
casion to vindicate the committee who reported it from the
charge of delay. He denied the binding force of the com-
promise act, against which he spoke with some severity.
He warmly commended the policy of regulating commerce
by equivalents, and expressed a detcrmiiiiation to commence
a regular system of operations with a view to--have that
policy extensively pursued by this Government.
After a few remarks from Mr. NILES, the question was
taken on striking out the duty on salt, and decided in the
negative, by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Buchanan, Calhoun, Clay, Clayton,
Crittenden, Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Kent, Knight, .Mc-
Kean, Nicholas,Jtobbins, Robinson, Southard, Webster
-15. ,
NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Benton, Brown, Cuthbert,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Mouton, Niles,
Norvell, Page, Parker, Prentiss, Rives, Ruggles, Scvier,
Strange, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Walker, White,
Wright-28.
Mr. BENTON moved to amend the bill by inserting a
particular kind of blankets, (specified in his amendment,)
used principally by the Indians; which amendment was
agreed to-Ayes 23, noes 14.
Mr. NILES moved to insert an amendment to reduce
the duty on coal, coke, &c. to $1 within the present year,
and to 75 cents a ton the succeeding year, &c.
Mr. NILES spoke at length in support of his amend.
meant, inveighing with great severity against the duty on
coal, as leading to monopoly, and oppressive to the poor.
In the course of his speech he adverted to the influence of
capitalists over the legislation of Congress. He went not
for wealth, but for numbers.
Mr. BUCHANAN replied, and dwelt upon the neces-
sity of a protecting duty to the coal miners of Pennsylva-
nia. On the faith of that protection, a great amount of
capital had been invested,in cutting railroads and canals to
the coal region. The business gave employment to a large
number of poor and industrious people, while the small
vessels engaged in transporting the coal coastwise formed
an invaluable nursery for our seamen. It was no mono-
poly. The coal region was of vast extent, and open to all
who choose to purchase.
Mr. NILES briefly replied, and insisted that it was a
monopoly, because the canals and railroads were in the
hands of wealthy companies; and as to a nursery for sea-
men, that would be only increased by a reduction in the
price of coal.
Mr. WEBSTER opposed the amendment, and argued
that the only true way to bring down the price of Ameri-
can coal was to free it from the competition from England
and Nova Scotia, where the late Duke of York owned a
coal mine, which his creditors expected would soon have
command of the American market, as soon as the protect-
ing duty-should be removed. He inveighed against the
perpetual vacillations in our policy, and argued to show
that those who had invested extensive capital on the faith
of our laws were entitled to something like stability in the
course of the Government. He protested against the cry
of taxes being for the rich against the poor. In a country
like this, if the Government did not protect capital when
employed to supply the great wants of the country, we
must sit down contented to be forever a poor nation.
Mr. NILES briefly replied, insisting that protection was
needed only where there was an exertion of skill and inge-
nuity, and not for the supply of a coarse material which the
Sand of the Almighty had scattered profusely over mountains
and valleys. He was not the representative of capitalists ;
he went for the mass, for numbers, not for money, &c.
Mr. PRESTONsupported the amendment of Mr. NILEs,
and declared that, if his hands were free from the restraint
or the compromise act, he should move not merely to re-
duce, but to take (ff the tax entirely. He then went into
a political view of the subject, and contended that the va-
riant courses of the four chairmen of the Committees on
Finance, on Manufactures, on Foreign Relations, and on
Naval Affairs, in reference to the tariff, showed that, with
the party having the ascendency, the tariff was an open
question, on which the members of tlat party were per-
mitted to differ; whence he argued that the South could
have no pledge that the policy of the coming Administra-
tion would be decidedly an anti-tariff policy. Pennsylva-
nia was irreclaimably tariff; Virginia unalterably anti-ta-
riff: and these two great States had combined to put in a
President who was to stand, like a great Colossus, with one
foot on tariff Pennsylvania, and the other on anti-tariff
Virginia, while the little States of the South might creep
about between his legs, and seek them out dishonorable
graves.
Mr. WEBSTER spoke with great earnestness, and
with unusual warmth and some severity, in reply to Mr.
NILES, whom he accused as having misrepresented him on
this and other occasions, as advocating the cause of capi-
tal against that of labor; the poor against the rich. If he
thought that it was the true interest of the poor to reduce
the protection on American coal, he would cheerfully vote
for the amendment; but believing exactly the reverse, he
should oppose it. He reminded Mr. N. that the whole
system of protecting policy, nay, the Constitution itself,
had had its origin in the desire to protect American indus-
try against overwhelming British competition. The adop-
tion of the Constitution had not been owing to the rich


men, but to the mechanics, the laboring men of this coun-
try. The true way to benefit the poor was to protect their
industry, to secure to them a reward for their toil. He re-
minded Mr. N. of the large protection enjoyed by the work-
ing men of Connecticut-the heavy duties on hats, on
tin ware, imported woollens-and reprobated the idea of
attacking a general policy to accomplish a mere temporary
purpose. The way to make American coal cheap was to
protect it from foreign competition until the capital em-
ployed had completed the means of supply, and domestic
competition reduced the article to its minimum price. It
was very true that coal was scattered through the moun-
tains, and there it would lie forever, until the hand of la-
bor, guided and employed by the combination of capital,
brought it out. The object of the protecting policy was to
secure those brawny arms and industrious hands steady
employment and a fit reward; and it was a false and inju-
rious representation of the policy, and of those who ad-
vocated it, to hold them up to odium as favoring the rich
against the poor.
Mr. BUCHANAN replied, with some warnth, to a re-
mark of Mr. PRESTON which he considered as personal,
but Mr. P. promptly explained.
Mr. B. proceeded to vindicate his course, as having been
prescribed to him by no party arrangements or party tram-
mels, but dictated solely by a sense of duty, and a regard
to the interests of his constituents.
Mr. PRESTON followed, in fuller explanation of'what
he had before said as to the tariff being an open question,
and in regard to the obligation imposed by the compromise
act.
Mr. NILES replied to Mr. WEBSTER, denying any in-
tention to misrepresent him, or to have made a personal
reference to him in his former remarks, yet insisting on the
influence of capitalists over the legislation of Congress.
He commented in rather a humorous manner on the course
of Mr. PRESTON, whom he represented as endeavoring to
awaken the ghost of nullification, and as wandering all
around the points of the compass until he got to a point
that was not in the compass. [A laugh.]
Mr. EWING, of Ohio, here moved to adjourn. The
motion was lost-Yeas 10, nays 33.
The question was then taken on the amendment pro-
posed by Mr. NILES, for a gradual reduction of the duty on
foreign coal, coal screenings, and coke, and decided in the
negative, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton, Hubbard,


and, if gentlemen wanted to benefit the poor, here was an
opportunity.
Mr. PRESTON inquired what duty that article paid.
Mr. WRIGHT replied 15 per cent.
The amendment was rejected.
Mr. KNIGHT moved to strike out the article of button
moulds. The motion was negatived-Ayes 16, noes 19.
Mr. CRITTENDEN moved to strike out all spirits
made of vinous materials imported into the United States."
Mr. WRIGHT explained that the object of the com-
mittee had been to reduce the revenue as far as they could
with safety, and, as this article bore a protecting duty of
from 53 to 85 cents, they supposed it might be reduced one
half, and still sufficiently protect the domestic article made
from grain; in which case, without injuring any one, the
revenue might be reduced half a million of dollars. He
demanded the yeas and nays; which being taken, stood as
follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Buchanan, Calhoun, Crittenden, Hen-
dricks, Kent, Knight, Morris, Prentiss; Preston, Robbins,
Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tipton, Tomlinson, Webster,
White-17.
NAYS--Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Geo., Linn, Nicho-
las, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier,
Strange, Tallmadge, Walker, Wall, Wright-21.
Mr. KENT moved to strike out the article of wines.
After some remarks by Messrs. NORVELL and
SOUTHARD, the question was taken by yeas and nays,
as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Buchanan, Crittenden, Hendricks,
Kent, Knight, Morris, Robbins, Robinson, Southard, Swift,
Tipton, Tomlinson-12.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Davis,
Fulton, Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia,
Linn, Lyon, Nicholas, Niles, Norvcll, Page, Parker, Pres-
ton, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Walker,
Wall, Webster, White, Wright-26. *
The bill was theh reported to the Senate, and all the
amendments agreed to, with the exception of the following:
1. Duty or china and porcelain, earthen and stone ware.
Mr. WRIGHT suggested that, as the Senate was now
very thin, although it might happen that a different vote
would be obtained from what had been given in committee
when the Senate was full, yet it would be better to adhere
to the former vote, to avoid a reconsideration or other diffi-
culty when the seats should be full again to-morrow.
To this it was replied that one Senator (Mr. KNIGHT)
had avowedly changed his vote, and another was present
now who had not been in committee.
The question on concurring with the Committee of the
Whole in the amendment which struck out this article
from the bill, (thereby retaining the protecting duty upon
it,) was decided by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Bayard, Buchanan, Crittenlen, Davis,
Hendricks, Kent, Linn, Nicholas, Robbins, Robinson,
Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlison, Wall,
Webster, White-18S.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert. Fulton,
Hubbard, King. of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Knight,
Lyon, Morris, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Rug-
gles, Sevier, Strange, Walker-19.
So china and earthenware were retained in the )ill, as
free of duty.
2. Blankets chiefly used among the Indians.
On this Mr. DAVIS demanded the yeas and nays. He
objected to the amendment as injurious to the interests of
several manufactories of blankets established within the
United States.
Mr. BENTON, Mr. LINN, and Mr. NORVELL ex-
plained the great difference between Indian blankets and
those of a domestic manufacture, and the very decided pre-
ference which the Indians expressed for the one over the
other, and which precluded all competition from 3ur fac-
tories, with what were usually known among themes Mac-
inaw blankets. They were thick, finely woven, an] of the
finest wool, and impervious to.the rain.
After some desultory conversation, the amendment was
concurred in by the Senate-Yeas 23, nays 14.
So the Indian blankets were inserted in the bill as frees
of duty.
3. On striking outcigars. Amendment agreed tc: Yeas
18, noes 16. ,
Mr. DAVIS renewe"Tn the Senate the motion he had
made in Committee of the Wh1ole, to.strike from the bill
olive oil, and demanded the yeas and nays.
Mr. WEBSTER advocated the amendment to take off
the duty on this article, while it would afford but a very
trifling relief in point of revenue, went to interfere with the
great whaling interest, which it was so important to
cherish.
Mr. NORVELL also supported the motion, and the
question being taken, it was carried by yeas and nays, as
fellows : .
YEAS-Messrs. Bayard, Buchanan, Crittenden, Davis,
Hendricks, Kent, Knight, Linn, Nicholas, Norvell, Rob-
bins, Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton,
Tomlinson, Webster, White-19.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Lyon,
Niles, Page, Parker, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange,
Walker, Wall-17.
Mr. KENT moved to strike out sulphate of quinine and
calomel, but the amendment was rejected; when at about
8 o'clock the question was at length obtained, and the bill
was ordered to be engrossed for its third reading by the fol-
lowing vote;
YEAS--Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Linn,
Lyon, Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Rug-
gles, Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Walker, Webster,
White, Wright-23.
NAYS-Messrs. Buchanan, Crittenden, Davis, Hen-
dricks, Kent, Robbins, Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tipton,
Wall-11.
And then the Senate adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

FORTIFICATION BILL-IN CONTINUATION.
Mr. BELL moved to add an additional section to the
bill, providing that the money which should be in the Trea-
sury of the United States on the 1st of January, 1838, re-


serving five millions of dollars, should be deposited with
the several States, according to the 13th, 14th, and 15th
sections of the bill to regulate the public deposits, approv-
ed June 23, 1836.
The amendment was debated by Messrs. BELL, CAM-
BRELENG, WILLIAMS, of North Carolina, GAR-
LAND, of Virginia, and UNDERWOOD.
Mr. A. MANN moved to amend the amendment of Mr.
BELL, by adding after the word States" in proportion to
the ratio of representation of such States in the House of
Representatives of the Congress of the United States."
The subject was further debated by Messrs. McKEON,
A. MANN, G. LEE, .W. THOMPSON, CRARY,-
ROBERTSON, BOULDIN, and LANE.
When, the question being taken, the amendment to the
amendment was rejected.
And the question was taken on the original amendment,
and decided in the negative-Ayes 71, noes 75.
So the amendment was rejected.
On motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, the committee
then rose, and reported the two bills to the House; (i. e.
the Army and Fortification Appropriation bills.)
And, omn motion of Mr. WILLIAMS, of North Carolji
na, at nine o'clock,
The House adjourned.

SALE OF CARRIAGES, BAROUCHES, &c.-
On Thursday, 2d March, at 4 o'clock P. M. I shall sell, at
the stables of Mr. Hard, (formerly Mr. Fuller's,) on Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, the following handsome carriages, barouches,
&c. viz.
1 close quartered coach for two or four horses ; an excel-
lent article for gentlemen travelling
3 handsome coaches, (only in use a few months,) Northern
built, in thorough order and repair
3 do do single and double Barouchesbrass
and silver mounted
2 do Buggy Wagons, just finished.
Terms at sale. The above articles are all in first-rate order,
are built of the very best materials, and will be sold without re-
serve. They will be ready for inspection the day before the
sale, at the above place.
feb 27-dts EDWARD DYER. Auct.
N OVERSEER AND GARDENER WANT-
ED.-A sober, steady man, of middle age, with or with-
out a small family, is wanted at Arlington, opposite to Washing-
ton, city. To one of this description, acquainted with the cul-
ture of the market garden, good accommodations and.liberal
wages will be given f.h o7_3t


TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1837.

IN SENATE.
Mr. TALLMADGE presented the credentials of the
honorable Silas Wright, re-elected a Senator of the United
States from the State of New York, for six years from and
after the 3d of March next.
The following petitions, praying the abolition of slavery
and the slave trade in the District of Columbia, were pre-
sented :
3y Mr. McKEAN, from ladies of Pittsburg and of Phi-
ladelphia, and from citizens of Pennsylvania, amounting
in all, to 6,000 or more petitioners.
By Mr. SWIFT, from inhabitants of Vermont.
By Mr. EWING, of Ohio, from inhabitants of Lucas'
county, Ohio.
Which petitions were not received; the question of re-
ception being successively laid on the table on motion of
Mr. BAYARD.
Mr. McKEAN having called for the yeas and nays on
laying the motion to receive his petition on the table, they
were ordered, and it was laid on the table by the following
vote:
YEAS-Messrs. Bayard, Black, Calhoun, Clayton,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Norvell, Parker,
Robinson, Ruggles, Sevier, Tallmadge, Walker, White,
Wright---1.
NAYS-Messrs. Clay, Ewing, of Ohio, Hendricks,
McKean, Morris, Prentiss, Robbins, Southard, Swift,
Tipton, Wall, Webster-12.
On motion of Mr. HUBBARD, the Committee on Pen-
sions was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of Benjamin McCall.
Mr. PRENTISS, from the Committee on Pensions, to
who:n was referred the petition of Jonathan Crow, reported

a bill granting him a pension ; which was read a first time,
and ordered to a second reading.
Mr. SOUTHARD, from the Committee on Naval Af-
fairs, reported the bill referred to them for organizing the
navy, with amendments, which were read.
Mr. TALLMADGE, from the Committee on Naval
Affairs, reported a bill to adjust and settle the accounts of
Horatio N. Crafts, which was read twice by consent, and
ordered to be engrossed for a third reading.
On motion of Mr. DAVIS, the Committee on Com-
merce was discharged from the further consideration of the
memorial of the weighers of the port of New York, pray-
ing an increase of compensation; from the further conside-
ration of the memorial of the General Hospital Society of
the State of Connecticut, praying a grant from Congress of
$20,000; from two memorials of the Mayor and City
Council of Baltimore, one having reference to Chesapeake
bay, and the other to a depot for the use of revenuecutters;
from the memorial of John H. Clarke, of Boston, in rela-
tion to telegraphs, this subject being already in progress;
and from the petition of Daniel P. Drown, for an increase
of compensation, which Mr. HUBBARD stated was not suf-
ficient to pay his expenses.
Mr. DAVIS observed that many cases similar to this
had been brought before the committee, who were fully
persuaded that there ought to be a general law on the sub-
ject, in regard to which the committee had not yet all the
requisite information ; and he observed, further, that abill
for this particular case would at once be embarrassed by a
multitude of amendments.
On motion of Mr. SEVIER, the Committee on Pensions
was discharged from the further consideration of the peti-
tions of Alexander Eskell, and of S. Newrisha.
On motion of Mr. TOMLINSON, the Committee on
Pensions was discharged from the further consideration of
the petition of John Edmonds, for arrears of pension.
Mr. DAVIS presented the proceedings and resolutions
of the Legislature of Massachusetts, urging on Congress
the importance of observing the faith of the compromise
tariff act, and of a steady and uniform policy in relation to
commerce. Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
LAND LAWS AND DECISIONS.
The following resolutions were offered by Mr. WEB-
STER:
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury cause to
be prepared a collection of the instructions which have been
issued from time to time, either by the Secretary of the
Treasury or the Commissioner of the Land office, except-
ing only such as refer exclusively, both in principle and
application, to particular or individual cases, together with
the official opinions of the Attorney General on questions
arising under the land laws.
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate cause the
general public acts of Congress respecting the sale and dis-
position of the public lands, together with the instructions
and opinions mentioned in the foregoing resolution, to be
printed for the use of the Senate.
In offering these resolutions, Mr. WEBSTER said it
was his object that the general acts, the instructions given
under them, and the official opinions of the Attorney Gen-
eral on questions arising in the administration of these laws,
should be collected and published, and made available to
all. These instructions and opinions are in manuscript.
They are only known at the Land Office, and may govern
questions arising there without any means on the part of
those interested, to possess themselves filly of their character
and contents. The laws, although contained in the two vol-
umes commonly called the volumes of the land laws, were
yet mixed up with such a mass of treaties, ordinances, and
private acts, that it is not always easy to bring them ta-
gether, or to get a connected view of their provisions.
The. subject was getting to be very important. Interfer-
ing claims were constantly arising, especially under pre-
emption acts; and it was understood that an appeal, in these
cases, lay to the Commissioner, or to the Secretary of the
Treasury. The land office was thus becoming an import-
ant judicature; and it was essential that its course and its
rules of proceeding should be known. Interesting rights
were decided by it, and it became Congiess to look into its
proceedings, and to see that the laws were openly, fairly,
and ably executed. The first step to reach this end, was


to make public, in some accessible form, the instructions
and opinions under which the land officers acted. Any
further provisions to insure a proper administration, could
then be adopted, which Congress should judge necessary,
if, indeed, any should be thought necessary.
The resolutions were agreed to.
The following bills were read a third time, passed, and
sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence :
The bill to authorize the President of the United States
to ascertain and designate the boundary between Michigan
and Wisconsin,
The bill to establish a port of entry at Jersey city, New
Jersey, and for other purposes.
The-bill adjusting the land claims of Baron Bastrop, the
Marquis de Maison Rouge, and others in Louisiana and
Arkansas.
The bill to continue the office of Commissioner of Pen-
sions ; and
The bill to ratify and confirm certain official acts of John
Pope, former Governor of Arkansas.
REDUCTION OF THE REVENUE.
The bill to alter and amend the several acts imposing
duties on imports, (for reducing the duties,) came up on its
third reading and final passage.
Mr. SOUTHARD having called for the yeas and nays
on the question, proceeded at some length in opposition to
the bill, and especially those portions of it whiah affected
the arrangement of the compromise act of 1833, urging that
the duty on sugar ought as much to be repealed as the duty
on salt; that the bill would favor the rich far more than
the poor; and that the faith of the country, as well as high
individual interests, requiredthat the provisions of the com-
promise tariff act, so called, of 1833, should not be violated.
Mr. CLAY went int6 a history of the inception and
adoption of the compromise bill, and the general under-'
.standing with which it had been received throughout the
Union, and argued to show that if the present bill should
pass, the friends of the protecting policy would be free,
hereafter, to augment protecting duties, as they might deem
the interests of the country to require. He concluded a
very animated appeal by moving that the bill be recommit-
ted to the Committee on Finance, with instructions to strike
out all articles on which the duty is now 20 per cent. or
above, in accordance with the provisions of the compromise
act of 1833.
Mr. CLAY'S motion to recommit the bill was negatived
Sby the following vote:


palm leaf brooms, button moulds, tinned and japanned
saddlery, and spirits made from vinous materials, which mo-
tion was negative by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS -Messrs. Bayard, Black, Calhoun, Clay, Clay-
,ton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Hendricks,
Knight, McKean, Prentiss, Preston, Robbins, Southard,
Spence, Swift, Tipton, Tomlinson, Webster-20.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Ewing, of
Illinois, Fulton, Grundy, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Mouton, Nicholas,
Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Robinson, Ruggles,
Sevier, Strange, Tallnadge, Walker, White, Wright-27.
The bill was then passed by the following vote:
YEAS-Messrs. Benton, Black, Brown, Cuthbert,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, Grundy, Hubbard, King, of
Alabama, King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Mouton,
Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Ruggles,
Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Walker, White, Wright-27.
NAYS-Messrs. Calhoun, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden,
Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Hendricks, Knight, McKean, Mor-
ris, Prentiss, Preston, Robbins, Robinson, Southard,
Spence, Tipton, Tomlinson-18.
On motion of Mr. LINN, the 1~enate proceeded to the
consideration of the bill to establish a Surveyor General's
office for the Territory of Wisconsin.
On motions of Messrs. ROBINSON, TIPTON, a.nd
NORVELL, the bill was successively so amended as to
provide for the establishment of Surveyor General's offices
in the States of Illinois, Indiana, and-Michigan respective-
ly, and having been still further amended, it was ordered
to be engrossed for a third reading.
On motion of Mr. WHITE, the bill to authorize and
sanction the sales of reserves provided for Creek Indians in
the treaty of March 24, 1832, in certain cases, and for
other purposes, was considered as in Committee of the
Whole, and ordered to a third reading.
On motion of Mr. WALKER, the bill to amend the
act for laying out Fort Madison and other towns in Wis-
consin, and for other purposes, was considered as in Com-
mittee of the Whole, and ordered to be engrossed for a
third reading.
Also, the bill to establish two additional land offices in
Wisconsin, west of the Mississippi.
On motion of Mr. WEBSTER, the bill to approve and
confirm three several acts of the Legislative Council of
Wisconsin, establishing three banks in that Territory, was
considered, as in Committee of the Whole, and ordered to
be engrossed for a third reading.
Also, on the motion of Mr. HENDRICKS, the bill es-
tablishing certain roads in Wisconsin. (Amended with
additions.)
On motion of Mr. TALLMADGE, the joint resolution
for the relief of Lieut. Horatio N. Crabbe, was, by consent,
read a third time and passed.
On motion of Mr. MORRIS, the bill for the appoint-
ment of an additional attorney for the Territory of Wis-
consin, was considered, as in Committee of the Whole, and
lost.
On motion of Mr. HUBBARD, the bill explanatory of
the act granting half-pay to the widows and orphans of
those who (lied in the military service of the United States,
was considered as in Committee of the Whole, explained
by Mr. TOMLINSON, and opposed by Mr. CALHOUN, who
moved to strike out the'second section of the bill, but the
amendment did not prevail, and the bill was ordered to its
engrossment.
The Senate then proceeded (about 5 o'clock) to Execu-
tive business.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
MEXICO.
The unfinished business of the morning hour was the
report, with the accompanying resolutions, reported yester-
day by Mr. HOWARD, from the Committee on Foreign Af-
fairs, on the subject of the relations between the United
States and Mexico. -
Mr. CAMBRELENG said he did not sec the chairman
of the Committee on Foreign Affairs in his place, and he
would therefore move that the further consideration of the
subject be postponed until to-morrow.
Mr. McKIM said he would state for the information of
the House-that his colleague (Mr. HOWARD) was very un-
well, and not able to attend to his duties here.
Mr. ADAMS hoped that the chairman of the Commit-
tee of Ways and Means (Mr. CAMBRELENG) would name
some other day than Monday; Tuesday, if he pleased. He
hoped that, as so many weeks had passed over without an
opportunity having been given to present petitions, and as
Monday was the last day on which they could be present-
ed during the present session, another day would be fix-
ed on.
Mr. CAMBRELENG then moved Tuesday; which
motion was agreed to.
And so the further consideration of the subject was post-
poned until Tuesday next.
On motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, the Committee of
the Whole on the state of the Union was discharged from
the further consideration of the bill making appropriations
for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the Government
for the year 1837, with a view to its recommitment to the
Committee of Ways and Means, for the purpose of adding
thereto certain amendments.
The motion was agreed to; and Mr. CAMBRELENG
thereupon reported the bill back again to the House, with
certain amendnhents. And the bill and amendments were
committed.
Mr. THOMAS, from the Committee on the Judiciary,
reported a bill for the relief of James P. Carlton. Read
twice, and committed.
Mr. HOWELL, from the Committee on Invalid Pen-
sions, moved that the committee be discharged from the
further -consideration of the petition of Charles Larabre,
and that the same do lie on the table. Agreed to.
Mr. CASEY, from the Committee on Public Lands,
to which was recommitted the bill to authorize the Illinois
Central Railroad Company to construct a railroad through
the public lands, reported the same with amendments.
Committed, and ordered to be printed.
Mr. LINCOLN, from the Committee on Public
Lands, moved that the committee be discharged from the
consideration of the petition of inhabitants of Chenango
county, New York, for a law limiting the sales of public
lands to actual settlers; of the trustees of the Franklin


Manual Labor College, in Illinois;.and also of the petition'
of Bishop Chase, of Illinois. Agreed to.
Mr. JARVIS, from the Committee on Public Buildings,
reported upon the petition of John McArann, concluding
with the following resolution, the consideration of which
was postponed until Tuesday next:
Resolved, That- it is expedient that the public ground
between the Pennsylvania and Maryland Avenues, the
west Capitol square, and Third street, should be enclosed,
for the purpose of being improved as a botanic garden, and
for the establishment of a national museum; and the Pre-
sident of the United States is hereby requested to cause a
survey of the grounds, and a plan of the grounds and suit-
able buildings to be made, with estimates of the expense;
and that he also be requested to cause the collection of
plants and natural curiosities belonging to John McArann,
of Philadelphia, to be examined by competent judges, for
the purpose of ascertaining their value; the whole to be
submitted to this House at its next session.
CULTIVATION OF SILK.
Mr. ADAMS, from the Committee on Manufactures, to
whom had been referred a resolution of the House, in-
structing them to inquire into the expediency of promoting
the culture and manufacture of silk in the United States,
reported thereon at length.
Mr. A. said that this report had been made at the pre-
sent session, though probably it was not perfectly in order.
The resolution referring this subject to the Committee on
Manufactures had been adopted at the last session of Con-
gress; and the committee, at that time, charged one of its
members, (Mr. JUDSON, a Representative from the State of
Connecticut,) who had offered the resolution, with the du-
ty of collecting the information alluded to. That gentle-
man had been subsequently transferred to another depart-
ment of the Government, and had resigned his seat in this
House. He had not ceased, however, to prosecute his in-
quiries; and, at a late period of the present session of Con-
ress, the chairman of the Co:nmittee on Manufactures
Mr. ADAMS) had received a letter from him (Mr. Judson)
containing the substance of the information which had
been collected, and which was very valuable. Mr. A.
therefore, as the chairman of the committee, reported that
letter as a part of his report, and asked that it might be re-
ceived as such. The letter was short, and- he asked that
it might be read.
The same having been read, Mr. A. moved that the re-
port, together with the letter, be laid on the table, and


Objection having been made, the resolution was ordered
to lie over.
Mr. CONNOR, from the Committee on the Post Office
and Post Roads, reported the following resolution :
Resolved, That the House will go into Committee of the
Whole on the state of the Union on Monday, immediately
after the reading of the journal, for the space of one hour
and a half, for the purpose of considering two bills reported
,by the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, for
the erection of a building for the Post Office Department,
and a bill to provide for additional clerks in the Post Office
Department and Auditor's office, and for ether purposes.
The SPEAKER said the resolution would require a
vote of two-thirds for its adoption.
Mr. STORER moved to amend the resolution by add-
ing and all the bills reported from the Committee on Re-
volutionary Pfensiowu; '-which amendment was rejected.
Mr. JARVIS suggested to the gentleman from North
Carolina (Mr. CONNon) to modify his resolution so as to
name Monday, immediately after the reading of the jour-
nal," and then to say 'I and all other bills which the com-
mittee may see fit to take up."
The SPEAKER said that this resolution having been
reported from a committee, it would not be competent for
the gentleman from North Carolina to modify it.
Mr. CONNOR said he would adopt the first suggestion
of the gentleman from Maine, (Mr. JARvis,) and moved to
amend the resolution by striking out the hour of eleven,
and inserting immediately after the} reading of the jour-
nal."
Mr. ADAMS hoped that no other business would be
allowed to interfere with the presentation of petitions on
Monday.
And the question on the amendment of Mr. C. was ta-
ken, and decided in the affirmative. So the amendment
was agreed to.
Mr. JARVIS moved to amend the resolution by adding
at the end thereof "and all such other bills as the commit-
tee may see fit to take up for consideration ;" which amend-
ment was rejected.
Mr. JOHNSON, of V, inia, moved to amend the reso-
lution, by including the in-relation to the extension of
the pension system; "whir amendment was rejected.
Mr. CAVE JOIl NSO ,moved to lay the whole sub-
ject on the table; whipF.kJ(-, was rejected.
Mr. LANE moved td amendthe resoution, by including
the bill granting a right of way. through the public lands
to the Maumee Branch Railroad Company; which amend-
ment was agreed to.
Mr. BOON asked if it was in order to restrict the com-
mittee, by specifying in the resolution the time which should
be allotted to them for the consideration of these bills.
The CHAIR said the matter was within the power of
the House.
Mr. ADAMS called for the yeas and nays on the adop-
tion of the resolution; which were refused.
And the question on the adoption of the resolution was
then taken, and decided in the negative--Yeas 88, nays
57; [two-thirds not voting in the affirmative.] So the re-
solution was rejected.
UNITED STATES BANK.
Mr. GALBRAITH, from the select committee upon
the subject of the United States Bank, reported the follow-
ing joint resolution:
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of
the United States of America in Congress assembled, That
until the notes of the late Bank of the United States, which
may have been returned since the 3d day of March last,
redeemed from the funds of the said bank, shall cease to be
re-issued by its officers, directors, trustee or trustees, and
until the amount due to the Government from said bank
shall be settled to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the
Treasury, the notes of said bank, and the notes of any
bank to which its funds and estate may be transferred in
trust for the payment of its debts and discharge of its obli-
gations, shall not -be received in payment of any debts due
to the Government of the United States, or taken in ex-
change or deposit in any of the banks selected as deposi-
tories of the public money; and the Secretary of the Trea-
sury is hereby directed to adopt such measures as he may
deem necessary to carry this provision into effect. A
The resolution having been read the first time, and the
question being on the second reading,
Mr. LINCOLN said he was somewhat surprised that a
report should have been made from a committee of which
he was a member, without his having had either the honor
or the opportunity of being present when it was agreed to.
It was one of the most extraordinary proposiftons he had
ever heard. It proposed that no bank, which should re-
ceive the outstanding bills of the late United States Bank,
should have its own money receivable in payment of debts
of any kind due to the Government; it was, in short, to
discredit the notes of any bank in the Union which should
receive such bills. But, before he entered into a consider-
ation of the character of the resolution, he begged leave to
put one or two interrogatories to the chairman of the select
committee. And, in order that that gentleman might see
the pertinency of the interrogatories, he (Mr. L.) would
state what had been his own observation of the course of
proceeding in relation to this resolution.
Immediately after the constitution of this committee, a
notification yvas made to its members-to meet, for the pur-
pose of considering the various propositions committed to
it for examination, discussion, and action. At that meet-
ing, he believed, all the members but one were present. No
distinct action was had, but there had been a general sen-,
timent, so f.r as lhe had understood the remarks of the dif-
ferent members of the committee, unfavorable to any defi-
nite action at that time ; but there had also been a distinct
understanding that, whenever the chairman of the com-
mittee should think it advisable that the committee should
again be assembled, a meeting should take place on notice
given by him. The committee voted no adjournment, but
left it to the discretion of thechairman, (Mr. GALBRAITH,)
enlightened as he (Mr. L.) had hoped that gentleman would
show himself to be, to re-assemble the committee at such
time as he might elect. Accordingly, some time afterwards,
Mr. L. received a notice to meet the committee in one of
the rooms of the House. Within fifteen minutes of the
time appointed for the meeting of the committee, coming up,
he met the chairman of the committee going down from the
Capitol, who informed him that the committee had not as-
sembled; that he had been at the room, but that no one


was there. Soon afterwards, he (Mr. L.) was again noti-
fied to meet the committee. He came up, looked into the
room in which the committee was to assemble, and in eve-
ry other committee room on the first and second floor. He
then came into the House. He beat up messenger-boys
and door-keeper:;, to inquire for the chairman; but he could
neither see nor hear of him; and, after wandering about
the purlieus of the palace for some time, he gave up the
search as fruitless. He found neither the chairman nor
any member of the committee; and, when he did at last
chance to meet him, he (Mr. L.) told him he must return a
non est inventus against him. He (Mr. L.) was then no-
tified to meet on. another occasion. He came the third
time. In the committee-room he met the chairman and two
other members of the committee'; and, after discussing the
subject, (not a word of a report was said,) and after inquir-
ing what it was proposed to do, he was informed that this
resolution was -one thing which he wished to bring for-
ward. But there were only four members present; three
at first, one coinng; 0e~' "ids and he was notified
that a meeting would held-at the private chambers of
the committee on that evening. But he heard nothing
about a report, nothing about a bill.
[It is necessary here to explain, that Mr. L. alludes to
the report and bill which were presented by Mr. GALBRA1TIt
a'few days since, from the same select committee ; the lat-
ter of which provides for the infliction of pecuniary penal-
ties for re-issues of the notes of the late Bank of the Unit-
ed States.]'
On the evening referred to, Mr. L. said it was impact)
cable for him to attend, in consequence of other duto
The next evening he understood that a report had tb
.made, not one word of which had been submitted to him
and that a short bill ofa single section had also accompan-
ied the report. Of this, no notice had been given to him;
nor had he been notified of any other meeting on the sub-
ject, save that in the private chambl alluded to.
He now wished to inquire from tWchairman of the com-
mittee whether a majority of the committee were present
when the report and bill were agreed to ? Whether the
report was read before la majority ? And whether a ma-
jority agreed that the' report and resolutions both should
be reported to the House ? And, if so, why the resolutions
were not reported at the same time as the report accompa-
nied by the bill ?
Mr. GALBRAITH made some explanations in reply,
which were very imperfectly heard; but he was understood
to express his astonishment at the nature ofthe observa-









Some time elapsed before he notified them. He 4htd noti-
fied them two or three times. and at last, there were four
members present, namely, the gentleman from Maine,(Mr.
MASON,) the gentlemart from,New York, (Mr. A. MANN,)
the gentleman from Massachusetts, (Mr. LINCOLN,) and
himself. It was mentioned at that time that the gentleman
from Massachusetts and the gentleman from New York
were batf members of another select committee, and that
they could not attend in a morning. It was then proposed
to meet in the evening.
Mr. G. here explained as to the places previously pro-
posed for the meeting of the committee, before the meeting
in a private chamber on the evening alluded to. At this
last mentioned meeting. (Mr. G. said) a majority of the
committee were present; that was to say, five members out
of the nine who composed the committee. The report was
read; the bill and resolution were both read, and agreed to
by all the members present, and an amendment, suggested
by one of the members, had also been agreed to. He (Mr.
G.) had been instructed by all the members, constituting
the majority of the committee, to report the bill, the report,
and the resolution.
In answer to the question of the gentleman from Massa-
chusetts, why the resolutions were not reported at the same
time as the report and bill, he would say, that they would
have been reported on the same morning, but that the hour
apportioned for reports from committees expired before an
opportunity was given to him to present the resolution to
the House.
Mr. LINCOLN was proceeding to make some further
remarks, when,
The hour having elapsed, Mr. CAMBRELENG call-
ed fur the orders of the day.
BANK OF THE UNITED STATES.
Mr. INGERSOLL rose and stated that he learned from
the Speaker that he had in his possession a memorial from
the President, Directors, and Company of the Bank of the
United States, which might obviate the necessity in the
mind of every gentleman, of further proceedings upon the
resolution offered from the select committee. He, therefore,
asked leave of the House for the Speaker to present the
memorial, and requested the Speak to do so.
Leave being granted, the SPEAK presented the follow-
ing memorial, which was read: .
To the Senate and House of ~ ~ Wiles in Congress
Sassembt'ed:
The memorial of the Proedent, Directors, and Company of
the Bank of the United States, respectfully represents: That,
having recent seen among the documents printed by Con-
gress, a reportof the Secretary of the Treasury, in which he
la-mnents that he has not been able to settle with the bank, and
invokes the Aid of Congress, they deem it proper to state that
they are now, as they always have been, ready and anxious to
settle ; and that not the slightest delay, nor the least obstacle of
any kind, can justly be ascribed to them. This they propose to
render obvious in a few words.
In a settlement between the Government and the bank, one
of two courses was necessary. "The first was to wind up the
whole business of the institution and divide the proceeds; a
mode inevitable, had the bank ceased its operations on the 4th
of March. But, as the institution continued, with no change
except the retirement of a single partner, it was deemed a pro-
cess equally harsh and useless to force the country to pay sixty
millions of debts at a moment of general embarrassment, mere-
ly to balance the books of the bank : and the second mode was
therefore preferred-that of estimating the value of the stock
on the 4th of March, and paying the Government its proportion.
This was the easiest, and simplest, and fairest mode of adjust-
ment. It was obviously the mode contemplated by Congress,
who, on the 23d of June, 1836. authorized the Secretary of the
Treasury to receive payment "in such instalments, and payable
at such times, arid with such rates of interest as he shall see fit
to agree to." To estimate the value of the stock was, therefore,
the firststep towards the settlement. Accordingly, soon after the
Secretary received his authority from Congress, a report was
made by a joint comLmittee of three members of the late bank,
three of the new, and three impartial umpires connected with
neither, stating the value of the stock. This valuation on the
part of tht bank was transmitted to the Secretary, with an offer
that all the materials upon which it is founded will, of course,
be submitted to any examination which you may desire to
make ;" and that the bank would be equally ready to adopt any
mode which may be deemed expedient for making such a divi-
sion of the assets of the bank as may assure to the Government
its just and ample proportion." To this communication the Sec-
retary answered on the 19th and 20th Sept. as follows : I have
cheerfullly accepted your offer to permit an examination to be
made of the materials upon which that report is founded;" and
will appoint three gentlemen to investigate those materials
and report to me their views upon them, and also the proper
basis of a settlement." These commissioners accordingly vis-
ited the bank, and, after nearly four months, reported. It was
naturally presumed that when they made their report, the Sece
retary would inform the Board of Directors whether their valu-
ation accorded with that of the bank, or in what respect it dif-
fered, so as to enable the Board to accept the terms or to offer
others, or in some mode advance the settlement. It is much
to be regretted that such a course was not pursued. 'But, since
the month of September,- when the Secretary apprized the
Board of the coming of the Commissioners, who were to re-
port their estimate to him, no communication of any kind what-
soever was made to them by the Secretary; but while they
were waiting to know whether their valuation was acceptable to
him, or in what it was deemed deficient, they were surprised
by a communication, not to them, but to Congress, stating the
failure of hismnegotiation. They regret this, because, if the
Board had been made acquainted with the wishes of the Go-
verntnent, as exFlained in the report now made to Congress,
they would have instantly and cheerfully accede to them.
That regret is deepened by another measure of the Secretary,
which seems alike unauthorized and unfortunate.
The act of Congress of the 23d June, 1836, directed the Se-
cretary to receive the capital stock belonging to the United
States in the late Bank of the United States, in such instalments,
and payable at such times, and with such rates of interest, as
-he shall see fit to agree to, and also to settle and adjust the
claim for surplus profits, accruing on said capital stock, on
such terms as he may think proper."
When this act passed it was perfectly well known to ev-
ery member of Congress that, for nearly four years preceding,
there had been a disputed question of taw between the Govern-
ment and the bank, in regard to damages on a bill of exchange,
which the bank had in vain urged the Executive to pursue be
fore the judicial tribunals. *The subject had been often before
Congress--before the Committee of Ways and Means in 1833,
who proposed no measure in regard to it-before the Committee
on Finance of the Senate, who, in their report of the 18th of


December, 1834, declared that the rightofthe bank was "found-
ed in strict law ;" that the retainer was avowedly made to
procure a submission to the courts and juries of the country ;"
and that "if the Government thinks itself wronged by such
proceedings, the law prescribes the manner in which it shall
seek redress." With the full knowledge of these facts, when
Congress authorized the Secretary to settle with the bank for
the capital stock, and the surplus profits, they certainly could
not have intended to refuse the receipt of this capital stock and
surplus profits, unless the bank should surrender, uncondition-
ally, its right toa judicial trial of the question which one of their.
own standing committees had decided in favor of the bank.
Yet, without any, the slightest authority from Congress, the Se-
retary, as appears by the public documents, has determined that
he will never settle with the bank without a previous surrender
of its rights-declaring that, "preliminary to a final adjust-
ment of this interest, the Treasury Department would require
that the bank should pay that portion of the dividend on the
stock of the United States wvlich had been withheld for dama-
ges on the draft upon the French Government." Now, it is
manifest that this is a proceeding which Congress did not au-
thorize, and can scarcely sanction. It .cannot be that the Con-
gress of the United States, after pazsing- law declaring the
mode in which questions between the d~ov aient and the citi-
zens are to be adjudicated, and 'after seeing the bank pursue
exactly that mode, will now endeavor to force the institution
out of the path of law, by refusing to adjust other interests,
which have no connexion whatever with that controversy.
The original claim of damages was a necessary act of duty by
the bank in favor of the Government, who, if there was any
right to draw the bill, had an equal right to the damages. The
pecuniary interest involved was and is a matter of indifference.
It was only the tone assumed in regard to it, and the evident de-
sign of forcing the bank to abandon its rights, which gave im-
portance to the claim and forbade the surrender of it. The
Board of Directors would deemn themselves faithless, not merely
to the institution, but to the cause of constitutional freedom, if
they could be thus driven from the courts ofjustice by any me-
nace from an executive officer. They have accordingly decided
the question deliberately and irrevocably. If the proffer of a
judicial decision is accepted by the-Government, the bankl will
cheerfullyabide the result. But until then there should not be,
and there cannot be, any surr r, or concession, or compro-
mise.
The Board of Directors will now make one final offer to set-
tle, and they make it directly to your honorable bodies, so as to
avert the hazard of any further mediation. They learn from
the printed report of the Secretary, that the commissioners
would have recommended the following terms of settlement:
To value each share of the stock at $115 58, and receive pay-
ment for it by equal instalments, payable in September 1837,
1838, 1839, and 1840, with six per cent. interest until paid.
The Board of Directors agree, at once, to those terms, and
are ready to carry them into execution.


1838, 1839, and 1840, with six per cent. interest till paid.
To this the bank distinctly accedes. What more can be
desired ? He, therefore, moved that the memorial be referred
to the Committee of Ways and Means, and that it be
printed. Which was agreed to.
On motion of Mr. CAMBR ELZNG, the House then
proceeded to the orders of the day.
ARMY APPROPRIATION BILL.
The House took up for consideration the bill making
appropriations for the support of the Army for the year
1837, which had been returned from the Senate with cer-
tain amendments, which amendments had gain been
amended by the House in Committee of the Whole on tihe
state of the Union.
The pending question was on concurring with the Com-
mittee of the Whole in the amendments to the amendments
of the Senate.
And the first, as amended, having been concurred in-
Mr. TOUCEY moved to amend the second amendment
(which provides for the payment of certain volunteers of
Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi, called
out during the past year for service in the Creek and Semi-
nole wars) by adding an appropriation of $100,000 for the
payment of the Connecticut militia, called into the service
during the last war, in the following cases: First, those
called out to repel actual invasion; secondly, those called
out under State authority, and afterwards received into the
service of the United States, and, thirdly, where they were
called out under the requisition of the President of the
United States, or any other officer of the United States.
'After some remarks from Messrs. TOUCEY, LIN-
COLN, HARDIN, INGHAM, A. MANN, WHIT-
TLESEY, of Connecticut, UNDERWOOD, and Mc-
KAY-the question was taken, ahd the amendment was
agreed to.
Mr. McKAY moved to amend the amendment by add-
ing an appropriation of $30,000 for the payment of the
claims of the militia of North Carolina, who served during
the late war with Great Britain, in the cases enumerated
in the act of the 31st of May, 1830, which authorizes pay-
ment of the claims of the State of Massachusetts for the
payment of her militia, &c.
Mr. BOON demanded the previous question.
The SPEAKER said the effect of that motion, if agreed
to, would be to cut off the whole amendment of the Sen-
ate, as amended by the Committee of the Whole in this
House.
Mr. BOON thereupon withdrew his motion; and, after
a few remarks from Messrs. McKAY, OWENS, and
PARKER-
The question was taken, and decided in the affirmative-
Ayes 86, noes not counted.
So the amfiendment was agreed to.
Mr. DUNLAP moved to amend the amendment by add-
ing that the Tennessee volunteers who equipped and arm-
ed themselves, marched to the place of rendezvous, and
tendered their services in the year 1836, but who were not
received into the service of the United States, should be
paid the same sum allowed in this act to those volunteers
who had been mustered into the service of the Uinited States
and immediately discharged.
After some remarks from Messrs. DUNLAP and E.
WHITTLESEY, the question was taken, and the amend-
ment was rejected.
Mr. BELL renewed the proposition made in Commit-
tee of the Whole by Mr. PEYTON, to amend the amend-
ment by adding an appropriation-of $150,000 for arrears of
pay of the Tennessee volunteers, raised December 10th,
1812, and discharged December 10th, 1813.
The question was then taken, without debate, and the
amendment was rejected.
Mr- LAWLER moved to amend the amendment by
adding an appropriation of $15,000 as one month's pay to
the volunteers of the State"of Alabama, who marched to
the place of rendezvous at Vernon, but who were notmus-
tered into the service of the United States, in consequence
of the neglect of the officer of the Government to whom
that duty had been assigned.
Mr. DENNY wished to inquire from the gentleman
from Alabama (Mr. LAWLER) to what officer allusion was
made in this charge of neglect ? He (Mr. D.) would like
to know whether there was any foundation for the charge.
He was not disposed to pass censure, even by implication,
without knowing why, and of what nature the charge
might be.
Mr. LAWLER said that the evidence in this case had
been referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and it
was not in his power at this moment to'turn to it. He
would, however, state the facts as they were known to ex-
ist. He was not prepared to give the name of the officer
alluded to. The troops had been called on to rendezvous
at Vernon, in Alabama; they had marched a hundred
miles for that purpose, and the Government officer failed to
attend to muster them. They remained some days, and
then were compelled to disband.
Mr. DENNY said he had no objection to pay these vo-
lunteers if they had performed any service which entitled
them to be paid. But he objected to any member's getting
up in his place here and charging an officer of the United
States Government with neglect of his duty. This was
not doing justice to an officer of the Army ; let him be ar-
raigned before the proper tribunal. The gentleman from
Alabama got up here, and, for the purpose probably of
making his claim in this case stronger than it really was of
itself, made an indirect charge against an officer of the
United States. He (Mr. D.) thought this proceeding was
gratuitous.
It might be as the gentleman had stated, that they as-
sembled at the place alluded to, and were not mustered in-
to service; and, if so, he (Mr. D.) would say, let them be
paid, if the case came within the provisions adopted for the
regulation of the claims of volunteers. But it was impro-
per thus indirectly to make a charge of neglect, when no
evidence of the kind appeared. There were not facts be-
fore the House to justify it in sanctioning such a charge;
and why should the words of the amendment be at war
with the facts ? If the gentleman was in possession of any
facts, let him make them known in the proper place.
Mr. LAWLER said that, in proposing this amendment
in its present shape, he had no intention of wounding the
sensibilities of the gentleman from Pennsylvania. (Mr.


DENNY,) or of making a charge against the conduct ofany
officer of the Government. He had simply intended, in
justification of the rightful claim ofthese volunteers on the
justice of Congress, to state what the fact was, without
any purpose of arraigning this officer before the country
for the neglect-of his duty.
But if this was the true and only objection of the gentle-
man to this amendment, he (Mr. L.) would obviate all
cause for objection, by modifying the language in that par-
ticular, and he would then see whether any other objec-
tion would be raised against one of- the plainest and most
just propositions that had ever been presented to the House.
Mr. L. then modified his amendment so as to leave out
the words because of the neglect of the United States
officer to whom the service was assigned."
After some remarks from Messrs. MERCER, CRA'IG,
LAWLER, CAMBRELENG, MARTIN, CHAP-
MAN, and C. JOHNSON-
The question was taken, and the amendment was re-
jected.
Mr. OWENS renewed his motion, made in Committee
of the Whole, to amend the amendment by adding the fol-
lowing :
That the sum of twenty thousand dollars be appropriat-
ed to re-imburse the State of Georgia for money expended,
or to be expended, by said State, in payment for the servi-
ces of volunteers in the Creek and Seminole wars, for los-
ses pustaincd by them, and medical attendance furnished
them, during said service, or in going to or returning from
the place of rendezvous; the said volunteers not having
been regularly mustered into the army or the United States,
and, under the existing laws, not entitled to pay; but au-
thorized to be paid by an act of the Legislature of the
State of Georgia, passed 26th December, 1856; provided
that good and sufficient evidence be furnished the War
Department that the said volunteers, in said act designat-
ed, have been paid by said State in conformity with its pro-
visions.
And, without debate, the amendment was rejected.
Mr. FORESTER moved to amend the amendment by
inserting after the words which relate to the payment of
the volunteers of Kentucky, Tennessee," &c. the words
" including the companies in the State of Mississippi mus-
tered into the service." Agreed to.
The question then recurring, on concurring with the
Senate in its amendment as amended by the House,
Mr. HARDIN asked the yeas and nays; which were
ordered.
And, after some remarks from Messrs. MASON, of
Ohio. LINCOLN, CRAIG, TOUCEY, and GRAVES,


concurring with the Coummittee of the Whole in their said
amendments.
The first amendment was as, follows: Strike out the
ib[l, inig item :
or incidental expenses attending repairs of fortifica-
li;)as, and for ;he pui ;:ase oi'add: lionad laud in their neigh-
brhn od, one hundred thsitsand dollars."
WVlici- am'indlilent wasconcurred iin.
The next amendment made in committee, was that ap-
propriating fifty thousand dollars for fortifications at New
London harbor, Connecticut."
And the question being on concurrence,
Mr. McKAY moved to amend the amendment by adding
at the end thereof, a proviso "that the above sum should
be expended in the repair of Fort Griswold, or in the erec-
tion of a new work which, as a system of public defence,
may take its place;" which was agreed to.
And the amendment, as amended, was concurred in.
Mr. PARKS moved to amend the amendment by add-
ing an appropriation of $50,000 for fortifications at the
mouth of the Penobscot river, in the State of Maine.
And the question being taken, it was decided in the af-
firmative: Ayes 71, noes 59.
So.the amendment was agreed to.
SURPLUS REVENUE.
, Mr. BELL renewed his motion, made in Committee of
the Whole, and there rejected, to amend the amendment
by adding thereto an additional section, providing that the
money which may be in the Treasury of the United States
on the 1st of January, 1837, reserving five millions, shall
be deposited with the States in conformity with the provi-
sions of the act approved 23d June, 1836. [See Friday's
deferred proceedings.]
Mr. BELL did not desire to enter into further debate, but
hoped the House would take the vote at once.
Some remarks were submitted by Messrs. GRAVES
and RE YNOLDS, when, the hour of three having arrived,
the House took a recess until half past four o'clock.
EVENING SESSION.
The House met at half past four o'clock. The pending
question was on the amendment to the amendment propos-
ed by Mr. BELL, and which was under discussion when
the House took a recess.
Mr. HARDIN moved a call of the House.
Mr. E. WHITTLESEY suggested that the House
should take up, with a view to reference, the bills on the
Speaker's table; passing over such as would create debate.
Mr. YELL objected. The bill first on the list' was the
land bill, and he would not consent, under any circum-
stances, that that should be passed over.
Mr. E. WHITTLESEY said he would then withdraw
his motion. If the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. YELL)
was willing to sacrifice the whole business of the country
to that one bill, so be it.
Mr. McCARTY said there was a Senate bill on the ta-
ble, to the reference of which his friend from Arkansas
would, he was sure, not object; and that was the bill mak-
ing appropriation for the Cumberland road. Mr. McC.
moved that it be taken up, and referred.
Mr. YELL objected. He had himself two or three bills
on the table, which he was very anxious to have referred;
but he would rather that they should all go down together,
than that the land bill should be put aside.
And, the question on the motion of Mr. HARDIN having
been taken, a call of' the House was ordered.
And the roll having been called, one hundred and one
members answered to their names.
Mr. ANTHONY moved a suspension of the proceed-
ings on the call; which motion was rejected.
The Clerk proceeded to call the names of the absentees;
When Mr. GRENNELL again moved a suspension;
which motion was rejected.
The roll of absentees were gone over, and there appear-
ed one hundred and sixty-two members present.
On motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, all further pro-
ceedings on the call were suspended.
The amendment to the amendment having, on motion
of Mr. MERCER, been read,
Mr. HARDIN called for the yeas and nays; which
were ordered.
Mr. BOON inquired if it was in order now to offer an-
other amendment.
The SPEAKER said it was not in order to offer an
amendment to an amendment.
Mr. C. ALLAN said-that, as the question before the
House was extremely important, and as there was not a
large number of members present, he would move a call of
the House; and on that motion he asked for the yeas and
nays; which were ordered, and being taken, were: Yeas
71, nays 115.
So the bill was referred.
The question then recurred on the.adoption of the
amendment to the amendment, and, being taken, it was de-
cided in the affirmative: Yeas 113, nays 90.
YEAS-Messrs. Adams, Alford,Chilton Allan, H. Alien, An-
thony, Bailey, Bell, Bond, Boon, Bouldin, Briggs, Buchanan,
Bunch, John Calhoon, William B. Calhoun, Campbell, Carter,
Casey, George Chambers, John Chambers, Chetwood, Childs,
Nathaniel H, Claiborne, Connor, Corwin, Crane, Cushing,
Darlington, Dawson, Deberry, Denny, Dunlap, Everett, For-
ester, Fowler, French, Graham, Granger, Graves, Grayson,
Grennell, Griffin, Hiland Hall, Hard, Hardin, Harlan, Harper,
S. S. Harrison, Hawkins, Hazeltine, Henderson, Hiester, Her-
rod, Hoar, Hunt, Huntsman, Ingersoll, W. Jackson, Janes, Je-
nifer, Henry Johnson, Kennon, Kilgore,Laporte,Lawrence,Lay,
Luke Lea, Lewis, Lincoln, Love, Lyon, Job Mann, Sampson
Mason, Maury, May, McCarty, McComas, McKennan, Mercer,
Montgomery, Morris, Parker, James A. Pearce, Pearson, Pet-
tigrew, Phillips, Pickens, Potts, Reed, Rencher, John Reynolds,
Robcrtson, William B. Shepard, Augustine H. Shepperd,Shields,
Slade, Spangler, Sprague, Standefer, Steele, Storer, Sutherland,
Taliaferro, WVaddy Thompson, Underwood, Vinton, Washing-
ton, White, Elisha Wlhittlesey, Lewis Williams, Sherrod Wil-
liams, Young-I113.
NAYS-Messrs. Ash, Barton, Beale, Bean, Beaumont,Black,
Bockee, Borden, Bovee, Boyd, Brown, Burns, Cambreleng,
Chaney, Chapman, Chapin, John F. H. Claiborne, Cleve-
land, Coles, Craig, Cramer, Crary, Cushman, Doubleday,
Fairfield, Farlin, Fry, Fuller, Galbraith, James Garland, Ghol-
son, Gillett, Grantland, Haley, Joseph Hall, A. G. Harrison,
Haynes, Hok, Hubley, Huntington, Jarvis, Joseph Johnson,
Cave Johnson, John W. Jones, B. Jones, Klingensmith, Lan-
sing, Lawler., G. Lee, J. Lee, Leonard, Logan, Loyall, Lucas,
Abijah Mann, Martin, William Mason, Moses Mason, McKay,
McKeon, McKim, McLene, Miller, Muhlenberg, Owens, Parks,


Patterson, Patton, Franklin Pierce, Dutee J. Pearce, Phelps,
Pinckney, Joseph Reynolds, Rogers, Shenck, Seymour, Shinn,
Sickles, Smith, Thomas, John Thomson, Toucey, Turrill, Van-
dcrpoel, Wagener, Ward, Wardwell, Webster, Thomas T.
Whittlesey, Yell-90.
So the amendment to the amendment was adopted.
Mr. A. MANN moved further to amend the amendment
by adding after the words States," in the sixth line, the
words in proportion to the ratio of representation in the
House of Representatives of the Congress of the United
States."
Some remarks were submitted by Mr. M. in favor of his
proposition, and by Mr. YELL in opposition to it (of which
a report will appear hereafter ;)
When Mr. WILLIAMS, of Ky., raised the question
that the amendment was not in order.
After some conversation thereon, Mr. A. MANN, with
a view to remove all obstacles on the question of order, mo-
dified his amendment so as to read, Provided that the said
deposits shall be made," &c.
The subject was debated by Messrs. DENNY, MER-
CER, HARDIN, BOON, A. MANN, BOULDIN, Mc-
KEON, WARDWELL, and VANDERPOEL.
Whereupon, Mr. TURRILL demanded the previous
question.
The Chair (Mr. BRIGGS) stated that the effect of the
previous question, if ordered, would be to cut off theamend-
ments of the Committee of the Whole as amended by the
House.
And, the question being taken on the demand for the
previous question, there appeared-Yeas 75, nay 110. So
there was no second.
And, the question recurring on the amendment to the
amendment,
The House was further addressed by Messrs. VAN-
DERPOEL, McCOMAS, PICKENS, D. J. PEARCE,
DENNY, CAMBRELENG, and HOAR, (of whose re-
marks, also, a report will appear hereafter.)
Mr. A. MANN demanded the yeas and nays, which
were ordered; and, being taken, were as follows :
YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Ash, Barton, Beale, Beaumont,
Black, Bockee, Bovee, Brown, Buchanan, Cambreleng,Chaney,
Chapin, Cleveland, Coles, Connor, Cramer, Doubleday, Drom-
goole, Dunlap, Evans, Fairfield, Fry, Fuller, J. Garland, Gra-
ham, Graves, Hamer, Hawkins, Haynes, Hazeltine, Hubley,
Huntington, Jarvis, Joseph Johnson, C. Johnson, JohnW. Jones,
Kilgore, Klingensmith, Lansing, Gideon Lee, Joshua Lee,
Leonard, Logan, Loyall, A. Mann, J. Mann, W. Mason, McKay,


'Huntsman, Ingersoll, Ingham, W. Jackson, Janes, Jenifer,
H. Johnson, Kennon, Lane, Laporte, Lawlcr, Lawrence, Lay,
Lewis, Lincoln, Love, Lyon, Martin, S. Mason, Maury,
McCarty, McCmis, McKenrni,, Merc er, Msrrs, Owcen,
Ptrker, PFtakiia Pier::e, 1). J. I'earcp, J:.,nes A. Peace, Pear-
son, Pettigrew, Phelps, Phillips, Pick,.n Pincknry, t'ots,
Reed, nRencher, John leynoids, R kbe.-tdun, Williaim B. Shear l,
Shinn, Slade, Sloane Spangler, Sprageo, Staniefer, Steele,
Storer, Thomas, Waddy lThompnou, Vinten, V.'a:dLingo.Iu,
White, E. Whittlesey, Thomas T. Whittlesey, Lew is Williamls,
Yell, Young-119.
So the amendment to the amendment was rejected.
Mr. CAMBRELENG then offered, as an amendment
to the amendment, the provisions (in substance) of the bill
commonly called the Tariff bill."
Mr. IAARDIN thought it was very late in the evening
to commnene regulating the whole tariff of the country.
Mr. BELL rose to a point of order. He contended that
the bill proposed as an amendment was entirely irrelevant,
having reference to a wholly different subject.
The CHAIR (Mr. BRIGGS) decided that, as the bill was
not the same as had been committed to the Committee of
the Whole on the state of the Union, but had been essen-
tially modified, it was in order to offer it as an amendment
to the amendment.
Mr. 1ERCER appealed from the decision.
Mr. TANDERPOEL demanded the yeas and nays on
the appeal ; which were ordered.
The appeal was debated by Messrs. BELL, CAMBRE-
LENG, MERCER, REED, PATTON, JOHNSON, of
La., HAYNES, and WARD;
When, the question being taken, Shall the decision of
the Chair stand as the judgment of the House 1" it waN
decided in the negative-Yeas 94, nays 97.
So the House reversed the decision of the Chair ; and
the proposed amendment to the amendment was declared
to be out of order.
Mr. MARTIN offered as an amendment to the amend-
ment the provisions (in substance) of the bill commonly
called the "Land bill."
The CHAIR (Mr. BRIGGS) decided that the-sime would
not be in order, under the decision just made by the House.
The subject-matter was totally different and independent.
Mr. MARTIN appealed from the division, and, after a
few remarks thereon, asked for the yeas and nays on the
appeal; which were ordered.
And the question being taken, Shall the decision of
the Chair stand as the judgment of the House?" it was
decided in the affirmative-Yeas 112, nays 70.
So the decision of the Chair was affirmed by the House;
and the proposed, amendment to the amendment was de-
clared to be out of order.
The question then recurred on the concurring with the
Committee of the Whole in the amendment as amended,
and, being taken, was decided in the affirmative-Yeas
112, Nays 841.
So the amendment, as amended, was concurred in.
The next and last amendment made in Committee of
the Whole, and coming up on the question of concurrence
was, the appropriation of $40,000 for fortifications at the
mouth of Connecticut river.
After a few remarks from Mr. McKAY, expressing his
opposition to the appropriation at this time, on the ground
that a survey had not yet been made,
The question was taken, and the amendment was non-
concurred in.
Th'question then recurring on ordering the bill to be
engrossed for a third reading,
Mir. VANDERPOEL demanded the yeas and nays;
which were ordered.
And, after some remarks from Mr. PATTON in justi-
fication of his intended vote, the question was taken, and
decided in the affirmative--Yeas 111, Nays 70.
YEAS-Messrs. Adams, Alford, Chiton Allan, Heman Allen,
Anthony, Bailey, Bell, Bond, Boon, Borden, Bouldin, Briggs,
Bunch, John Calhoon, Campbell, Carter, Casey, George Cham-
bers, John Chambners, Childs, Nalh. H. Claiborne, Clark, Con-
nor, Corwin, Crane, Cushing, Darlington, Dawson, Deberry,
Denny, Elmore, Evans, Everett, Forester, French, James Gar-
land, Graham, Granger, Graves, Grayson, Grennell, Halcy,
Hiland Hall, Hard, Hardin, Harlan, Harper, Samuel S. Harri-
-son, Hazeltine, Henderson, Heister, Hoar, Hunt, Huntsman,
Ingersoll, William Jackson, Henry Johnson, Kilgore, Lane, La-
porte, Lawrence, Lay, Luke Lea, Lewis, Lincoln, Love, Lyon,
Job Mann, Sampson Mason, Maury, McCarty, McComas, Mc-
Kennan, Mercer, Montgomery, Morris, Parker, Patton, D. J.
Pearce, J. A. Pearce, Pearson, Pettigrew, Phelps, Phillips, Pick-
ens, Potts, Reed, Rencher, John Reynolds, Robertson, W. B.
Shepard, A. HI. Shepperd, Shields, Slade, Sloane, Sprague,
Standefer, Steele, Storer, Sutherland, Taliaferro, Waddy Thomp-
son,_ Underwood, Vinton, Washington, White, E. Whittlesey,
Thomas T. Whittlesey, Lewis Williams, Sherrod Williams,
Young- 11I.
NAYS-Messrs. Ash, Beale, Bean, Beaumont, Black, Boc-
kee Boy, Brown, Burne, Oemrbreleng, Chntey, Chapman.
John F. H. Claiborne, Cleveland, Coles, Cramer, Cushman,
Doubleday, Dromgoole, Dunlap, Fairfield, Fry, Fuller, Gholson,
Gillett, Grantland, Jos. Hall, Hamer, Hannegan, Albert G.
Harrison, Hawkins, Haynes, Holt, Huntington, Jarvis, 4os.
Johnson, Cave Johnson, Klingensmith, Lansing, Lawler, Gide-
on Lee, Leonard, Logan, Loyall, Lucas, Abijah Mann, Martin,
William Mason, McKay, McKim, Moore, Owens, Parks, Frank-
lin Pierce, Pinckney, Joseph Reynolds, Rogers, Schenck, Sey-
mour, Shian, Sickles, Smith, Thomas, John Thomson, Toucey,
Turrill, Vanderpoel, Wagener, Wardwell, Yell-70.
So the bill was ordered to a third reading.
And, on motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, the bill
(having been previously engrossed) was read a third time
and passed.
On motion of Mr. BELL, the title of the bill was so
amended as to add to the end the words "and for other
purposes."
A motion was made to adjourn, but was withdrawn to
enable the Speaker to present to the House the following
communications :
A Message from the President of the United States,
transmitting a letter from the Secretary of War ad interim,
in relation to the survey of the mouth of the Mississippi
river.
On motion of Mr. JOHNSON, of Louisiana, referred
to the Committee of Ways and Means, and ordered to be
printed, exclusive of maps.
A communication from the Secretary of State, trans-
mitting a list of persons who had invented new, or useful
arts or machines, &c. Laid on the table, and ordered to
be printed.
A communication from the Secretary of State, transmit.


ting a list of all patents for useful discoveries, &c. Laid
on the table, and ordered to be printed.
On motion of Mr. CAVE JOHNSON, at 10 o'clock,
The House adjourned.
ERRATUM.-By an unaccountable accident, one page of
the manuscript report of Deferred Proceedings in the
House of Representatives, on Thursday evening, and
which appear in our columns of Saturday, was lost. We
were thus led into an error which was discovered too late
to be remedied.
The correct statement of the proceedings, as given in the
mislaid manuscript, was substantially this :
The amendment of Mr. PEYTON to the Army Appropria-
tion bill, for provision for arrears of pay to the old Tennes-
see volunteers, being under discussion, the committee, on
the suggestion of Mr. MRRCEa, laid that bill aside, to give
time for the better consideration of the amendment referred
to, and took up the bill providing for the establishment of
Hospitals on the Western waters. One amendment was
made, and others were offered, and rejected. The commit-
tee then rose, and reported that bill to the House, and also
reported progress on the Army Appropriation bill. The
former bill was taken up by the House on the question of
engrossment, and it was then that Mr. PATTON moved to
strike out the enacting clause; and not on the Army Ap-
propriation bill, as erroneously stated, and which at that
time was still under the dominion of the Committee of the
Whole.

THE DELAWARE BREAKWATER AND MR.
SUTHERLAND.

It having been incidentally stated in the House, in the
course of debate on the ship Pennsylvania, that the Dela-
ware Breakwater had had the effect of diminishing the
depth of the channel of the Delaware, this was by mistake
attributed by our reporter to Mr. Sutherland. Mr. SUTH-
ERLAND only spoke ofa deposit made in the neighborhood
of the navy yard, at Philadelphia, by the erection of
wharves, &c.; but never stated, nor intended ever to state,
that the breakwater had injured the navigation of the river
Delaware. On the contrary, that work has been of im-
mense advantage to Philadelphia; and, so far from the
navigation of the river being deteriorated by it, the engi-
neer hasreported "that the water on the bar is at this time
deeper than the pilots ever before knew it."


WVASHINCG TON*
Sl t;erty. alnd Union, nowv and forever, one and
itse ,arablc.-

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1837.

Our readers will perceive by the report of
Saturday's proceedings of the Senate, that the
bill to modify and reduce the existing tariff of
duties on imports has passed that body, and
been sent to the other branch of the Legislature
for concurrence.. Almost alf of the articles
comprised in the bill are those coming within
the class of non-protected articles. On these
it is proposed to abolish the duty entirely, and
about this there was no division of sentiment
and no debate. A few of the articles in the
bill, however, suc4 as salt, spirits, and some
others, bearing a duty of twenty per cent. or
upward.:, fall within the protected class, and on
these it is proposed to reduce the duty at once
one-half. This reduction being deemed an in-


fraction of the compromise act of 1833, gave
rise to all the able and animated debate which
has occurred on the bill during the last week.
Mr. CLAY, the father of that beneficent measure,
(the compromise bill,) closed the debate on Sat-,
urday by one of his most powerful and eloquent
efforts, in a very impressive appeal to the Senate
to preserve inviolate that favorite measure. But his
efforts were not successful, his motion to exclude
the disputed articles from the bill being lost by a
majority of one vote. The publication of the
debate (which will be given as early as practi-
cable) will disclose the various grounds on
which gentlemen voted on both sides of this'
question.
In the House of Representatives, an effort
was made in Saturday evening's sitting to have
the body of the Senate's bill, with some slight
modification, annexed as an amendment to the
fortification bill; but it failed by a vote of the
House, (against the decision of the Chair,) de-
claring it not to be in order to propose it as an
amendment to that bill.

The adroitness with which Mr. LETCHER suc-
ceeded, in the House of Representatives, four
years ago, in engrafting upon the stock of a
House bill the Senate bill, which by this means
became a law, now-known by the title of the
Compromise Act, has been much celebrated,
and not more than the cleverness of the achieve-
ment deserved. But we doubt whether it equal-
led in dexterity a movement of the member
from Tennessee, (Mr. BELL,) whose familiarity
with Congressional tactics enabled him, on Sa-
turday last, having the majority on his side, (as
the event proved,) to incorporate in the bill
making the annual appropriations for fortifica-
tions, a provision for distributing the surplus re-
venue which shall be in the Treasury on the Ist
of January, 1838, on the same principles as by
the act of last session the surplus in the Trea-
sury on the 1st of last January was directed to
be distributed (or deposited) with the several
States.
To understand the importance of that experi-
mental knowledge of the rules which enables a
member to get such a proposition before the
House at this period of the session, it should
be noted that, had he moved it as an independ-
ent amendment, the Previous Question might
have been called upon him, which, being agreed
to, would have precluded his or any other
amendment. He took advantage, therefore, of
a depending amendment, to move his proposi-
tion as an amendment to the amendment, which
contained within itself many important provi-
_sions for particular objects of appropriation,
(not, technically, to the bill.) The Previous
Question would have cut off the depending
amendment (moved to be amended,) and other
depending amendments, in which some mem-
bers of the House felt a deep interest. The
consequence of this was, that, when the Pre-
vious Question was ultimately called, it was not
sustained by a majority. The House was there-
fore brought to a direct vote on Mr. BELL'S pro-
position, and it was carried. It became part of
the bill, and is a part, and a very material part
of the Fortification bill, as it has passed the
House of Representatives, and is now before
the Senate.

On Friday last the Legislature of Maryland
elected JOHN S. SPENCE a Senator in Congress
for six years from the 4th of March next. Dr.
S. is now in the Senate, having heretofore -been
elected to serve out the remainder of the term
of the late Mr. GOLDSBOROUGH.

Niagara Ship Canal.-Among the bills before
the House of Representatives is one, which we
are only lately apprized of, for the construc-
tion of a SHIP CANAL ROUND NIAGARA FALLS.
This bill was reported by Mr. HARD, of New
York, from the Committee on Roads and Ca-
nals. The bill proposes to appropriate half a
million of dollars, and directs the work to be


constructed under the direction of the Secretary
of War, upon such one of the proposed routes
as will best promote the internal defence and
commercial interests of the country. We know
of few objects more worthy of national expen-
diture, and fewer still, the value of which would
so far transcend the amount of any probable ex-
penditure upon it.

( The report of the Committee on Foreign
Relations of the House of Representatives, on
-. oa t w 0 ..,:;,. I,: AX A% d W lIV .., nP n r


EDITORS' CORRESPONDENCE.

NEW YORK, FEB. 23, 107.
We have had snow, hail, wind, and rain,
since I last wrote you, and the rain is now fall-
ing in torrents, and gives usa prospect of"open-
ing the Northern and Eastern rivers. The wea-
ther, indeed, for the pastweek, promises an early
Spring, which will do much towards diminish-
ing thd distresses of those who have not the
ready means to pay high prices for the necessa-
ries of life. Wheat is selling in Rochester for
$2 a bushel, and sells for $2 25 at retail in
New York.
The city to-day is exceedingly dull. Half
of our world were up till early morning, 'at-
tending the Balls, Theatres, Museums, Private
Soirees, &c. in honor of the Birth-day of'the .
great Washington. This has done one-half to ,
wards making to-day dull, and the bad weather"
has done the other half. Stocks to-day llow-r-
sold at slightly reduced prices. But every thing
in our money market looks blighter than upowi:
Monday and Tuesday. : '
Upon a close examination of the last Englisth
papers, comparing dates, &c.,-I am induced to
believe that the report of the loss of the Havre:.,
and New York packet-ship ERIE, Capt. FunDck,,
of which I wrote you yesterday, is, at least, pre-
mature. There are good reasons fof hoping
that the Captain and crew are not lost, and sonipe
reasons for believing :that eyen the ship-may
be safe.
The Northern Mail is in, bringing us Albany-"
papers of yesterday. They bring us no ne*vs.
The Eastern Mail is also in, bringing us Bos-
ton papers of Wednesday. They also contain
no important news.
Yours.-Half past Three P. M,
[The Express Mail from New Yorkfailed
again last evening. So the above is our latest
news from that city.]

ANOTHER AFFAIR IN FLORIDA.


FROM THE JACKSONVILLE COURIER, FEBRXIARY 16.
BLACK CREEK, FEB. 14, 1837. 1
The steamboat JOHN STONEY arrived at this place this
morning, in which Lieut. Col. FANNIN and Capt. PIERCY,
of the United States Navy, came passengers. They report
that a battle took place on the morning of the 8th at En-
campment Monroe, at the head of Lake Monroe. This
post was attacked at five o'clock in the morning, and a
brisk firing kept up by both parties until eight o'clock,
when the Indians retired. Colonel FANNIr was in com-
mand of about two hundred and fifty regulars, and Capt.
PIERCY in command of thirty-nine friendly Indians. Cant.
MELLON, United States Army, was killed. Lieutenant J.
T. McLAUGHLIN [of the Navy, a volunteer, acting as
quartermaster] and fourteen privates were wounded.
The hostile were estimated at three or four hundred strong.
When the Indians retired, the friendly Indians yelled at
and taunted them all they could, to make them reney the
attack; but not a syllable or gun was heard from them.
This account, as far as it goes, you may depend upon. I
had it from Captain Piercy.
In haste, yours, &c.
The above intelligence is confirmed by the arrival at this
place, on Tuesday night'last, of the steamer Cincinnati,
Captain Curry. The attack on Fort Mellon-(Encamp-
ment Monroe, at Lake Monroe) was made, it is supposed,
by PHILIP and his gang. The battle was furiously contest-
ed. The loss on the side of the hostiles is not known.
The Santee was lying off ornthe lake not far from the
fort, in wait for the embarkatioi of the troops to transport
them to Volusia, in obedience to an order of General Jesilp.
Lieutenant THOMAS left the post, during the engagement,
and, succeeding in getting on board the Santee, played up-
on the hostiles the six-pounder from the boat with great ef-
fect.
This action must have taken place before the information
of the truce could have been received by those Indians who
made the attack. Information of, it had not been then re-
ceived by Colonel Fannin.
The forces at Fort Mellon returned to Volusia on the
11th. No Indians having been seen about the fort from
the 8th up to the 11th.
It is the general opinion that the above affair will not
break up the truce now existing, nor have any effect on
the course the Indians will pursue in relation to closing
the war, by yielding themselves up for removal.

INSURRECTION AT HAYTI.-By a proclamation of Presi-
dent BOYER, issued under the date of the 31st January, it
appears that an insurrection had broken out in the city of
Cape Haytien, headed by Col. Isidor Gabriel, and support-
ed by a portion of the troops. It appears that Gabriel, with
his insurgent forces, had attacked and gained possession of
the arsenal, but that it was quickly re-taken at the point
of the bayonet, and the traitor Isidor and his accomplices
found safety only in flight."
The proclamation says the rebellion was stifled the
moment it was seen," and advises the Haytlans to be con-
fident in the wisdom and energy of the government of lib-
erty and order.
INAUGURATION DINNER.
Committee of Arrangements.
Gen. John P. Van Ness Henry M. Morfit
Major A. G. Glypq Col. D. A. A. Buck
John Ward Maj. H. C. Williams
John N. Moulder Wm. H. Dietz
John A. Donohoo W. A. Manning
J. H. Smoot Maj. Thos. R. Reilly
G. Ennis Owen Connelly
J. V. Maury Thomas Smallman
John C. Rives Col. H. Hungerford
Captain J. A. Blake James Mahler
Francis Ward Capt.H. Dumas.
Ambrose Lynch -
Geo. H. Smoot
Richard Stanton of Alexandria.
Robert Brockett
Those friends to the cause who are desirous of participating"
in the dinner upon this occasion, can become subscribers by ap- .
plying to any one of the Committee of Arrangements.
All democratic members of Congress and strangers now in
the metropolis; all democratic citizens and those of the vicinity,
who may not have had an opportunity to subscribe, are invited
to participate.
Price of subscription, three dollars. Dinner at Masonic Hall
at 4 o'clock P. M.
JOHN N. MOULDER, Chairman.
Ji. H. SMOOT, ?
SM. H. DIETZ, Secretaries.
G. ENNIS, Treasurer.
Hugh C. McLaughlin, declined.
The committee will meet this evening at the Globe Hotel.
The several subcommittees will be prepared to report their
progress. feb 27
E EXTENSIVE AUCTION.--Superior Liquors
and Wines.-Under A. Fuller's present Hotel estab-
lishment, we shall sell by public auction, on Monday, the 27th
instant, (Febyrary,) the entire and very extensive assortment
of superior Wines and Liquors, in part, as follows:
Orange Gin, Brandy, Gold and Pale Sherry
Teneriffe, Port and Madeira Wines in pipes and barrels
Star Madeira, Blackburn mark
Port Wine, Harrison and Son's Claret >
Cnrtinlia. Santerne's nale and brown Sherry










-.-
OFFICIAL PAPER.

THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO.

HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES.-FEB. 24.

The following is a copy of the Report of the Committee
on Foreign Relations, (Mr. HOWARD, Chairman,) present-
ed to-day, concerning our relations with Mexico:
The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was re-
ferred the message of the President of the United States
of the 8th of February, relative to Mexico, have had the
thme under consideration, and respectfully offer the fol-
lowing report:
The history of the relations between the United States and
Mexico exhibits an unbroken succession of good feelings, and,
as far as the occasion permitted, of kind offices, on the part of
the American Government, following out, in this as in other re-
spects, the disposition and wishes of the People. The first to
recognize Mexico as an independent Power, the Government
ofthe United States has been among the first in the unceasing
manifestation of friendship to this adjacent North American Go-
verniment. At an early period of her struggle for independ-
ence, the ports of the United States were open to her flag, even
at-the hazard of incurring responsibility for this act of impartial
neutrality.
But the committee perceive, with profound regret, that on the
part of Mexico there has been a long train of injuries to the
property of Ameiican citizens, and insults to the national flag,
for which redress, though often promised, has seldom been ob-
tained.
This omission has doubtless proceeded, in a great measure,-
from the unsettled condition of the Mexican Government, the
numerous and radical changes which have prevented a fixed
policy from being pursued in its foreign affairs. But the com-
mittee believe that it has also sprung, in part, from a knowledge
of the form of our Governmene ahd the limited powers of its
executive branch.
Canes might be mentioned in in vhe a demand for redress,
when made by nations whose executive had the power of de-
c l1aii'--gWar, and consequently the subordinate power of giving
large discretionary authority to its naval officers, has been
promptly met when the consequences of refusal were uncer-
tain. But'otr Constitution has wisely placed the war-making
power in the legislative branch of the Government, and no se-
vere measures are likely to be adopted towards any foreign
Power, unlefs upon much deliberation and repeated aggression.
It would'seem to follow from this, however, that in proportion
to the slowness should be the firmness of the voice of the na-
tion, when expressed through all the departments of its Go-
vernment.
Those nations which permit themselves to disregard the re-
monstrances of the President, when conveyed through agents
appointed by him,,and rely for their security upon the limited
powers which our Constitution has intrusted to that officer,
must be taught that his complaints against injury and outrage
do but speak, in anticipation, t'he voice of the entire People of
the country.-
It may be that, without reference to the limited powers of the
President, the Government of Mexico has been encouraged to
persevere in its course of aggression by the general absence
from itineighborhood of vessels of war belonging to the United
States, the interposition of which might have been more effec-
tual than a diplomatic note.
To illustrate this position, the committee will select, out of the
many cases of serious and flagrant injury inflicted upon the
commerce and rights of the United States, by officers of the
Mexican Republic, one of the very few in which that Govern-
ment listened to our demand for satisfaction.
On the 3d of May, 1836, the United States schooner Jefferson
anchor-edooff the port of Tampico, direct from Pensacola, having
,been sent out border of Commodore Dallas. Lieut. Osborn,
and his boat's crew, who went on shore, were seized and impri-
soned, and the vessel prohibited from entering the river. A
demand for satisfaction made by the American consul was
haughtily refused. The Jefferson left the port, but communi-
cated with the sloop of war Grampus, of eighteen guns, which
came to off the bar; and on the following day there arrived
another American corvette, and both anchored there.
The commander of the Grampus directed a note to' the prin-
cipal of the port, informing him that, by order of the chief of
the division on the West India station, he had come to enter
into a correspondence with him relative to the insult which he
had inflicted on the American flag. A note followed from the
foreign department of the Mexican Government to Mr. Ellis,
requesting him to interpose his authority, and order the vessels
, to retire. Mr. Ellis very properly declined to do so. In a few
days an official communication apprized Mr. Ellis that the
Mexican Government had supplanted the officer in command at
Tampico, "by substituting in his stead a chief who, it flatters
itself, will know how to preserve greater harmony with the
agents and subjects of foreign nations ;" and announced that
"a summary investigation had been ordered to be instituted,
which, by putting in its true light the conduct of Mr. Gomez,
would apply to him the punishment he deserved, if he should
Prove culpable, as well as to all others who may have taken
any part in the affair treated uppn," renewing the request that
SMr. Ellis would then give his orders for the withdrawal of the
squadron from before Tampico, which was done, and the vessels
departed. The committee would be pleased if they could stop
here in the narrative; but they are compelled to remark that,
shortly afterwards, the individual whose punishment was thus
promised, as an atonement for the insult to the American flag,
was recalled into service, and assigned to a command upon the
coast, where his hostile feelings might again endanger the se-
'curity of American citizens or property.
The effect of this open withdrawal of the apology yielded to
the American Government was, as might have been anticipated,
soon made to appear in fresh outrages upon some American ci-
tizens, who were entitled to have been treated with peculiar
fIrbearance, not only because they were in the employment of
the American Government, but because they constituted a part of
th- crew ofone of the national vessels, whose services on board
might have been very essential. The arrest and imprisonment
of eight of the seamen belonging to the sloop of war.Natchez,
will not now be made the subject of comment, further than to
remark, that the prevention of the American consul from visit-
ing them, while sick and in prison, from ihe 4th to the 19th of
November, was an act of unpardonable 'inhumanity, and ap-
pears to have proceeded from the same officer whose fictitious
punishipent, but real promotion, had been offered as an atone-
ment for a previous insult to the American flag.
=Looking through the catalogue of complaints which the Uni-
tedStates have to make against Mexico, onr their own account,
as the party whose dignity and honor are assailed, the commit-
tee-re urftble to perceive any proof of a desire on the part of
the Mexican Government to repair injury or satisfy honor.
The merchant vessels of the United States have been fired


into, her citizens attacked, and even put to death ; and her ships
of war treated with disrespect when paying a friendly visit to a
port where they had a -ight to expect hospitality. It was the
inattention of the Mexican Government to complaints of this
description, that appears chiefly to have induced the return of
the late Charge des Affaires; for, in his note of December 7th,
he says: Ifthose (the claims) that might be presented should
be all acknowledged as just, yet so long as the several cases
of unprovoked and inexcusable outrage inflicted on the officers
andflag of his country, which have been heretofore submitted
to the Mexican Executive, remained unsatisfactorily answered,
he would have but one course to pursue."
It is possible that the claims for private property, which had
recently been presented anew to their notice, may have at-
tracted the serious attention of that Government; but if a cor-
dial disposition was-felt to adjust them, it is not easy to imagine
why those cases, where a decree of the Mexican authorities
had been for a long time passed for their payment, and a portion
actually paid, were not fully satisfied. The committee are will-
ing to hope, however, that the manifestation of serious discon-
tent on thO part ofth~ tiUited States, by the withdrawal of their
official repreaestativeSlt iinduce the Mexican Government to
engage in the active-'inves'tgation of all theV grounds of com-
plaintpressed upon them, for many years past. They fully con-
cur with the Presidenft that ample cause exists for taking re-
dres iutoeur ow ralaidh and believe that we should be justified,
in the opinion of other nations, for taking such a step. But
they are willing to try th experimentof another demand, made
in the most solemn form, upon the justice of the Mexican Go--
vernment, before any further proceedings are adopted. It is
their opinrionthat.a diplomatic functionary of the highest grade
should be appointed to bear this last appeal, whose rank would
indicate at once the importance of his mission and the respect
in which the Government To which he is accredited is held ;
for, notwithstanding the causeless ill feeling which appears to
prevail in Mexico towards the Government and People of the
United States, the latter wilicontinue as long as possible, to treat
with respect their ancient, though now estranged friend. In
conclusion the committee respectfully submit to the House the
following resolutions:
Reslved, That the indignities offered to the American flag,
and injuries committed upon the persons and property of Ame
rican citizens, by officers of the Mexican Government, and the
refusal or neglect of that Government to make suitable atone-
ment, would justify the Cong:ess of the United States in taking
Leasuresto obtain immediate redress, by- the exercise of its
own power.
Resolved, That, as an evidence of the desire of the Ameri-
can Government to preserve peaceful relations with the Go-
vernment of Mexico, as long as the same may be compatible
with that dignity which it is due to the People of the United
States t preserve unimpaired, the President be, and is hereby,


PASSAGE TO'C&HARLESTON, S. C.
The Steam Packet SOUTH
CAROLINA, Capt. Coffey, will
-leave Norfolk for Charleston, on
Friday, the 3d of March.
And the GEORGIA, Capt. Rollins, will leave on Friday, the
10th. Passage and fare $30. Due notice will be given of the
Summer arrangement. Small packages will be taken on
freight. Apply to


feb 24-2awtmar7


JAMES FERGUSSON, Baltimore.
DICKSON, HUNTER, & HIPKINS,
Norfolk.


FALL ARRANGEMENT FOR NOR-
FOLK.-The Steamer COLUMBIA, James
Mitchell, Master, will, for the remainder. of the season, make
but one trip a week. The Columbia will leave Washington on
Wednesday, the 19.h inst., at 10 o'clock in the morning, and
will continueto do so the remainder ofthe season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at half past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of woodand provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15-dtf
TO SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN TRA-
VELLERS-Washington and Richmond.
Richmond and Fredericksburg Rail-
road completed, and Navigation open.
The Railroad is now in use from Richmond
i to Fredericksburg and the navigation is open
on the Potom-ac. From Richmond the cars,
with the mail and passengers going North, depart daily at a
quarter past 4 in the morning, and arrive in Fredericksburg
usually in about five hours. Stages go thence to Potomac creek,
about 9 miles; and there is a steamboat from Potomac creek to
Washington city. It is anticipated that such an hour will be
fixed for the afternoon train of cars from Washington to Balti-
more, as will enable passengers leaving Richmond in the morn-
ing to arrive at Baltimore the same evening.
From Washington city, the steamboat, with the mail and pas-
sengers coming South, departs every day in the morning. Stages
are in readiness at Potomac creek, and, as soon as practicable
after their arrival in Fredericksburg, the cars leave Fredericks-
burg, and arrive in Richmond the same evening. This being
the main Southern Mail line, it is regularly connected by stages
to Petersburg, where passengers can proceed on the railway,
and thence continue in stages to the South, by the way of Ra-
leigh, Fayetteville, &c.
Besides the regular mail line, there is in addition a tri-week-
lyline between Richmond and Fredericksburg, for the transpor-
tation of freight andkway-passengers. The days of departure
from Richmond are Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday; and
from Fredericksburg, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The
present hour is 9 o'clock from each place. From the 15th of
March, inclusive, the hour will be 12 o'clock from Richmond,
and 5 A. M. from Fredericksburg. The trip is performed by
this train in about six hours.
Charge for transportation from Richmond to Fredericksburg,
$4 for passengers. The Railroad Company and the Stage and
Steamboat Company receive the fare for each other, to and from
Richmond and Washington city.
Fare from Richmond to Washington city, when the navigation
of the Potomac is practicable for steamboats, (including the trans-
portation by.omnibus in Washington,) $6 per passenger.
The equipages ot travellers (both carriages and horses) car-
ried in the freight train on low terms. Price for transportation
from Richmond to Fredericksburg, of carriage and two horses,
$6 50. Gig, with one horse, $3 50. Carriages and horses
must be at the depot at least an hour before the time fixed for
the departure of the train.
At Fredericksburg, the Western and Southwestern travellers
will find excellent lines of stages to take them to the places of
destination.
feb 18-3tw2w J. WOOLFOLK & CO.
L AW OF PATENTS, by Willard Phillips, including
.the remedies and legal proceedings in relation to patent
rights, in one volume, is just published, and this day received
for sale by F. TAYLOR.
MR. 1i S. TANNER'S UNIVERSAL ATLAS,
containing a diagram of the heights of Mountains, lengths
of Rivers, various Profiles of Canals, Maps of the principal
Kingdoms and States in the Old World, and of the"Discove-
ries by Columbus, with all the Improvements down to Novem-
ber,1836; plan of Palestine and the adjacent countries, Phila-
delphia, ;New York, and Washington cities. All are full color-
ed. Specimens may be seen at Messrs. Brown's and Gadsbv's
Hotels. Gentlemen who wish to gain accurate knowledge of
any part of the Globe can do so by perusing the aforesaid.
All orders left at either of the Hotels, or at Mrs. Orme's
Boarding House, between 7th and 8th streets, Louisiana Ave-
nue, will be thankfully received, and punctually attended to, by
J. ROBERTSON,
feb 20--3t Agent.
STOCK OF VALUABLE GOODS, AT COST
and charges, fbr Private Sale, and first-rate Stand
for Rent.-The subscriber, intending to disengage himself
from the retail business, which he has prosecuted for many
years past, offers to dispose of his entire stock in trade, (at pri-
vate sale,) on very accpmmodating terms as to time, satisfacto-
ry security for ultimate payment being the only indispensable
requisite. With the stock, the store will be let for a moderate
rent.
To a person of business talents, with a small capital, a better
opportunity for engaging it a successful business seldom pre-
sents itself. Those disposed, to treat on the subject, will receive
every information upon application in person or otherwise.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Old Snuff, Tobacco, and Fancy Store, between Eleventh and
Twelfth streets, Pennsylvania Avenue. feb 22-3t


PRING GOODS.-Opened this day-
25 pieces new style painted Muslins
25 do do do Lawns
10 do Lyonaise
20 do French Chintz
50 do neat London do
1 Cartoon Capes and Collars. J.
feb 23-3t ,(Globe)


H. NOYES.


W ENDELL'S DIGEST of Cases decided and re-
ported in the Supreme Court of Judicature, and in the
Court for the correction of Errors, in the State of New York,
from May, 1828, to May, 1835, with Tables of the names of the
Cases reported, and of Cases determined in the Court for the
correction of Errors, from the commencement of the Reports
in the State of New York, until January, 1835, by John L.
Wendell, Counsellor 'at Law, in 1 volume, is just published,
and this day received for sale by
;.'feb 13 F. TAYLOR.
FANNING'S VOYAGES TO THE SOUTH
SEA, containing, also, information relating to important
late discoveries between 1792 and the present time. 1 volume
octavo, with engravings.
A few copies of the above publication (particularly interest-
ing at the present time) are this day received, and for sale by
feb 8 F. TAYLOR.
INDIAN TREATIES, LAWS, &c. &c.-For sale
by F. TAYLOR, in one volume, all the Laws relating to
SIndians and Indian Affairs, by the Colonial, State, and General
Governments, (including those of the Congress of the Confede-
ration,) from 1633 to the present time, one octavo volume of 330
pages; price only $1 25.
Also, Indian Treaties and Laws and Regulations relating to
Indian affairs, showing also the proceedings of the Old Con-
gress on the same subject'; and many other important State Pa-
pers relating to Indians and Indian affairs, one octavo volume.
Speeches on the Indian Removal Bill of 1830, one volume,
price 62' cents, containingSpeeches of Frelinghuysen, Sprague,
Robbins, Storrs, Ellsworth, Evans, Huntingdon, Everett, and
others. feb 13
EW MAP OF MICHIGAN.-Colton's new en-
larged edition of Farmer's large Map of Michigan, exhi-
biting the sections, is just published, (February, 1837,) and this
day received for sale by F. TAYLOR, and will be found to contain
all the recentsettlements and improvements, and is alsoon a much
larger scale than Farmer's Route Book and Traveller's Guide
between New York and Washington, accompanied by a map;
1837.
An additional supply of the large sectional Map of Illinois is
now on the way from New York, on rollers, for office use, as
well as in a portable form for the pocket. feb 13
UPERIOR STATIONERY.-Thesubscriber has on
hand from recent purchases-
400 reams best American and English Letter Paper
160 do Cap Paper
100 do Demj and Medium Paper
40 do Folio Post
100 do Envelope Paper
C0,000 Quills
10 gross Inks in quart, pint, and half-pint bottles
200 pounds best American and English Sealing Wax
100 do Wafers
360 dozen Otfice Tape
500 cards most approved Steel Pens
20 gross best Lead Pencils
500 pieces India Ink
24 dozen Mouth Glue
28 do Cut Glass Inks, for office use
800 pounds of superior Black Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders


Bank of Columbia, Feb. 9, 1831.
SIHE Stockholders in the Bank of Columbia are hereby
notified that an Election for five directors of this Bank
will be held at the office of the Bank of the United States, in
Washington, on Thursday, the second day of March next, be-
tween the hours of 1 and 2 o'clock P. M.
feb 10-eot27th-dtmar2 RD. SMITH, Cashier.
ELLING OFF AT COST.-The undersigned, hav-
ing made his arrangements for leaving the city within two
weeks, with a view of locating in the West, will offer his stock
of Dry Goods and Shoes at cost.
Families wishing to supply themselves by the piece, orother-
wise, will find it to their advantage to call.
On hand a complete assortment of Dry Goods.
2,000 pairs Shoes
200 ready made Vests, for winter and summer
200 do Pantaloons, do
50 fine and superfine Cloth Coats.
WM. DOUGHERTY.


feb 13-d2w


[Tel and Glo]


THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
has obtained from the Orphans' Court of Prince George's
county, letters of administration on the personal estate of Hugh
W. Drummond, late of said county,deceascd. All persons having
claims against the said deceased are hereby notified to exhibit
the same to the subscriber, with the vouchers thereof, on or be-
fore the 20th day of' June next ; they may otherwise, by law,
be excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Giv
under my hand, this 13th day of January, 1837.
MATILDA DRUMMOND,
jan 17-w4w Administratrix.
RICH FRENCH EMBROIDERY.-Just received
5 Cartoons of Muslin Capes, small size
2 do Lace, new work
2 do Fine Collars
25 Ladies' Dresses
10 Muslin do
50 handsome infants' Worked Dresses.
This assortment of goods was selected in Paris expressly for
this market. DARIUS CLAGETT.
feb 23-3t
BOARDING TO BE HAD.-MRs. IUNGERFORD,
at the corner of 5th and E streets, can accommodate se-
veral families. Some of her rooms are large and commodious,
and admirably adapted for the purpose. Her price will be $2
per day for board, fire and light included. *
feb 23-3t
BRUSSELS AND INGRAIN CARPETINGS.
Just received-
2,500 yards best Brussels
1,500 do do Ingrain
25 rich tufted Rugs
20 do Imperial
Gilt Goods for Curtains.
50 Gilt Rods
100 pairs Gilt Ends
50 dozen Gilt Rings
7Moreens for Hangings.
25 pieces Crimson Moreens
25 do Damask do
Fringes and bindings to match.
feb 23-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
N ELDERLY GENTLEMAN wants a situation
in a private family as Tutor, or the place of Assistant, in a
Classical Seminary. Satisfactory references will be given as to
capacity and moral conduct. Address J. B. near Mechanics-
ville, Montgomery county, Maryland. jan 10-d&c20t
ORPORATION STOCK will be exchanged forBank
of Washington stock on the most liberal terms.
Persons wishing a safe six per cent. stock can be supplied as
above.
feb 23-eo3t C. S. FOWLER & CO.
SPLENDID SPRING GOODS.-Just received,
50 pieces new style Muslins
25 do Printed Lawns
50 superior Worked Crape Shawls
25 Twisted Silk Worked Shawls
10 Camel's Hair Embroidered Shawls.
feb 23-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
Circuit Court of the District of Columbia for the
County of Washington.-In Chancery, November
Term, 1836.
John P. Van Ness,
Vs.
John Carothers.
THE Trustee in this cause having reported that he has sold
to Pringle Slight Lots Nos. 10 and 11, in Square east of
Square six hundred and forty-two (642,) for one hundred and
twenty dollars, ($120,) and to John P. Van Ness Lots Nos. 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 18, 19, 20 & 21, with the improvements
and appurtenances thereunto belonging, being all in said square
east of square six hundred and forty-two (642) for three hun-
dred and fifty-two dollars and twenty cents (352 20 :)
It is therefore this third day of December, 1836, ordered that
the said sale be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the con-
trary be shown on or before the fourth Monday in March next:
Provided, a copy of this order be published twice a week for
four weeks before said day.
By order of the Court,
feb 16-2aw4w Test: W. BRENT, Clerk.
In Prince George's county Court, as a Court of
Equity-February Term, 1837.
Henry Mitchell,
vs.
Mary Ann Mitchell and others.
HE object of this suit is to obtain a decree for the convey-
ance of part of a tract of land called Mitchell's Adven-
ture." The original bill states that a certain Tilghman Mit-
chell, being seized in fee of a tract of land called Mitchell's
Adventure, conveyed the same unto a certain Thomas L. Mit-
chell, with power to dispose of it for his benefit; that said land
was patented to Tilghman, and held by him individually ; that
Singleton Mitchell having defrayed one-half of the expensesof
said patent, a deed for his part was executed by the said Thomas
to the said Singleton, with the consent of the said Tilghman; and
that Singleton hath since conveyed the same to a certain Hen-
ry Mitchell; that Tilghman and Thomas have sold the balance
of said land to a certain Mary Ann Prather, formerly Butler,
and executed a bond of conveyance to her for the same; that
Prather and wife have assigned the said bond to a certain Lib-
bgrn Mitchell, who hath since transferred the same to the said
Henry Mitchell; that the whole of the purchase money for the
same has been paid by the said Henry, excepting $100, with
same interest for which the said Tilghman holds his single bill,
and which he is ready to pay when he can obtain title to the
said land. The supplemental bill states the substance-of the
'original bill, and also that a decree was passed by Prince
George's county Court, at November term, 1836, against-the
said Tilghman, for the conveyance of said land ; that, before
the said decree was rendered, the said Tilghman died, leaving
the following heirs, to wit: Mary Ann, wife of the said Tilgh-
man Mitchell, and Sarah Mitchell, Rebecca Mitchell, John Al-
exander Mitchell, Maria Ellen Mitchell, and Thomas Morti-
more Mitchell, minors under twenty-one years of age, and who
reside in 'the State of Ohio. It is thereupon ordered by Prince
George's county Court, sitting as a Court of Equity, this 14th
day of February, 1837, that the complainant, by causing a copy
of this order to be inserted in some newspaper published in
Washington city once a week for four successive weeks before
the first Monday of April next, give notice to the said absent
defendants, Mary Ann Mitchell, Sarah Mitchell, Rebecca Mit-
chell, John Alexander Mitchell, Maria Ellen Mitchell, and
Thomas Mortimore Mitchell, of the object and substance of the
original and supplemental bill, and warn them to be and appear
in this Court, in person or by guardian, on or before the second
Monday in July next, to answer the premises, and show cause,
if any they have, why a decree should not pass as prayed.
EDMUND KEY.


True copy-Test; A. BEALL,
feb 21-w4w Clerk.-
OVELS, etc.-Just published and received, The Tuggs
Sof:Ramsgate, by Boz, and other Tales, by distinguished
authors. :
Henrietta Temple, by D'Israeli, new.
Goetz Von Berlichingen, a Drama in five acts, from the Ger-
man of Goethe. For sale by


feb 17-3t


GARRET ANDERSON,
Penn. Av. between llth and 12th sts.


T HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
hath obtained from the Orphans' Court of Charles county,
Maryland, letters of administration on the personal estate of
Benjamin A. Lancaster, sen., late of Charles county, deceased.
All persons having claims against said deceased are hereby
warned to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof, to fhe
subscriber, on or before the first day of July next; they may
otherwise by law be excluded from all benefit of the said estate.
Given under my hand the 23d day of November, 1836.
ELIZABETH H. LANCASTER ,
jan 3-w6w Administratrix.


T HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
has obtained from the Orphans' Court of Washington
county, in the District of Columbia, letters of administration
on the personal estate ofPhilip H. Williams, late of Washington
county, Dist. of Columbia, decease~. All persons having claims
against the said deceased are hereby warned to exhibit the
same, with the vouchers thereof, to the subscribers, on or before
the 3d day of February next; they may otherwise by law be
excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Given


Navy Agent's Office,
Washington, Feb. 22, 1837.
TONE MASONS.-Wanted at the Navy Yard in this
city, from fifteen to twenty Stone Masons, who will proba-
bly find constant employment during the greater part of the en-
suing summer, to commence from Monday next. Apply at the
Navy Yard. feb 24-d4t
C OCHRAN'S RIFLES.-One dozen of Cochran's
many-chambered Rifles have just arrived, and may he ob-
tained by immediate application at Gadsby's Hotel. They are
of the most perfect workmanship, and will never disappoint the
expectation of the purchaser. The price is one hundred dollars
each. feb 25-d3t
71O GENTLEMEN OF THE WEST AND
I SOUTHWEST.--A young man who is a practical
printer, and who possesses a thorough knowledge of the routine
of a newspaper establishment, wishes to procure employmentin
the West or Southwest. The entire management of any con-
cern where the proprietor has other engagements, with a share
in the business, contingent on its success, would be undertaken
at a moderate salary. A permanent situation is what is desired.
Satisfactory references given. Address B. Y. through the
Post Office. feb 25-3t
I S!S A!HWO,li p :eupectuliy informs the Ladies of
Al Washington rliat she has a great variety of evening Head
Dresses, Caps, and other articles. No. 3 Varnum's Row,
Pennsylvania avenue. feb 16-eo7t
A LCESTIS OF EURIPIDES, with notes, for
the use of Colleges in the United States, by Professor
Woolsey, of Yale College, price 37 cents, is just received for
sale by F. TAYLOR, who also has for sale one of the best col-
lections in the United States of Greek and Latin authors, of
every variety of edition, as used in different colleges and schools,
with or without notes, translations, &c. Also, the Leipsic
Greek and Latin editions, noted for their correctness. His col-
lection of instruction books, in every language, dictionaries,
lexicons, &c. is equal in extent, variety, value, and cheapness of
price to any in the country.
At the Waverly Circulating Library immediately east of
Gadsby's Hotel. feb 20
ULES AND HORSES FOR SALE.-Throe
Mules, young, and of a fine size, perfectly broke to har-
ness.
Also, a superior Saddle Horse, well gaited, and perfectly
sound. They can be seen at the stable of
MAYNADIER MASON,
feb 16-dlw Georgetown.
-1%ADEIRA WINE.-This day received, by the brig
A11 Chili, from Madeira, 2 pipes, 22 half pipes, and 8 quarter
casks of Wine, warranted equal to any from that island.
In store, a few casks of former importations, some very old.
Orders by mail will receive immediate attention, and be sup-
plied with the above.
Also, Port in cases of one dozen each; Sauterne, Leoville,
and St. Julien; Champagne, and other Wines.
A. C. CAZENOVE & CO.
feb 20-6t Alexandria.
OR SALE.-Bank of Metropolis stock
Patriotic Bank do
Corporation 6 per cent. stock, interest payable quarterly
Do 5 do do do do
WANTED,
Illinois and Arkansas Land Patents.
Inquire of JOHN F. WEBB.


feb 25-3t


FOR CHARLESTON-Regular Line.-The
line brig General Sumter, Captain Goodlwin, will sail
on Monday morning, the 27th instant. For light freighter pas-
sage, having superior accommodations, apply on board, or to
JOHN K. RANDALL,
feb 24-3t 104, Smith's wharf, Baltimore.
PUBLIC SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ES-
TATE.-Under the authority of a decree of the Circuit
Superior Court of Law and Chancery for the county of Lou-
doun, rendered at November special term, 1S36, in the case of
James garrison and others against Jno. Thomas, W. W. Kitz-
miller, and others, the undersigned commissioner therein nam-
ed will, on the llth day of March, 1837, at 12 o'clock M. upon
the premises, expose for sale, at public auction, to the highest
bidder, the property in said decree mentioned. It consists of a
Lot of about two acres, in the town of Leesburg, Loudoun coun-
;y, Virginia, with a comfortable and spacious Brick Building,
nd good out-houses, a large and valuable Tan-yard, with all
suitable buildings. It is situated in a populous and flourishing
country, and would lie, to an active and competent Tanner, a
profitable establishment. As the sale must take place, there is
little doubt but a bargain will be had.
Terms: One-third cash, and one and two years, without in-
terest for the residue, the purchaser giving bonds for the credit
payments.
jan 10-tds T. ROGERS.
LATED GOODS, GUNS, LAMPS, &c.
Plated Tea Sets, Waiters, Cake Baskets, Candlesticks,
Branches, Spoons, Table and Dessert Forks.
Single and double barrel Fowling Pieces, Rifles, Holster Belts,
and Pocket Pistols, in great variety.
Gold and silver mounted Canes.
Astral, mantel, reading, and suspending Lamps, Candlebras,
Brackets, Curtain Poles, Cornice Ends, Curtain Rings,
Bands, and Pins.
Superior Table Cutlery, large Pier Glasses, &c.
For sale by E. LINDSLEY.
feb 24-d&c3 (Globe)
VALUABLE FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL
Trees, Flowers, Shrubbery, &c. of the most valua-
ble and choicest variety.
The subscriber, about to leave his present residence, would
make known to the Public generally that he intends to dispose
of his entire stock of Fruit, Ornamental, and other Trees,
Shrubbery, and choice Flowers; many of which are choice Fruit
Trees, and a great many choice and beautiful Flowers and
Plants.
The collection embraces Pears, Plumbs, Cherries, red and
white Currants, Gooseberries, and several choice variety of
Grapes. Also, choice multiflora Greville, Moss Monthly, daily
and annual Roses, embracing sixty different varieties; Shrub-
bery of all kinds; Herbaceous Plants and Bulb Flowers;
Double Tube Roses; Hyacinth, Parrot, and other Tulips; Car-
nation Pinks, &c. in the ground; Jacobin Lilies; Tiger Flow-
ers; a general assortment of good Garden Seeds, as Vegeta-
bles and Flowers; together with garden and other implements
of husbandry, flower pots and boxes, with flowers and trees,
and boxes and pots.
The whole are offered at private sale in lots to suit, until the
day of sale, which will be made known in a few days.
JOHN BASTIAN, Horticulturist,
Lexington street, near Cove street, Baltimore.
feb 24-2aw2w J. H. NAFF, Auct
A TEACHER WANTED.-The Trustees of West-
wood School wish to engage a Classical Teacher for the
present year. The situation is healthy, and the neighborhood
agreeable. Apply to JOSEPH A. TURNER,
Near Horse-head, or to
JOSIAS YOUNG,
feb 21-3tawlmo Near Upper Marlborough.
LEXANDRIA FOUNDRY and STEAM EN-
GINE MANUFACTORY.-Locomotive and Sta-
tionary Engines, heavy Iron and Brass Castings, Church Bells,
and Machinery of every kind. Gentlemen visiting Washing-
ton are invited to call and see the works.
THOMAS W> SMITH & Co.
mar 4-eoly Alexandria, March 1.
i FOR RENT.-The new two-story brick house on
SG street, a few squares west of the War Department,
at present occupied by John Laub, Esq. Possession
can be had on the 1st of March. For terms, &c. apply to the
subscriber.
feb 2-2aw2w EDMUND HANLEY.
REASONABLE DRY GOODS.-We are receiving
this day-
250 pieces Irish Linens (very cheap)
50 do Sheetings and Diapers
150 do Cambric Muslins (cheap)
75 do Jaconet
30 do Mull Muslin
50 do Plaid Swiss Muslins
100 do Plaid Cambric Muslins
50 do Bishop Lawns
20 do Linen Cambrics
50 dozen Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs
100 pieces Painted Muslins
150 do superior French Muslins
70 do French Cambric
20 do Muslin Delane-small figures
160 do Ginghams
500 do Calicoes-all prices.
FRENCH GOODS.
10 pieces beautiful colored Silks, full 5-4 wide
50 do low priced Plaid Silks
10 do black Pouldesoi
10 do blue-black do
20 do Italian Lustrings
100 pieces French Lawns
100 Spring Shallies
100 pieces Muslin Delano
50 do rich French Worked Collars
50 do Thread Laces
l oon unrlQ ,aYnmhr~r T,, ,rt;nrr nnrl i.Arlnrt


E DODGE, Dentist and Artificial Palate Manu-
*facturer, from No. 2, Park Place, New York, informs
the citizens and visitors of Washington that he has taken rooms
seven doors east of Gadsby's Hotel, where he will be happy to
perform all operations in his profession.
References of the first respectability given on application at
his rooms (Globe) jan 18-eotf
BY P. MAURO & SON, TRUSTEE'S SALE.
On Wednesday, 26th April next, at 4 o'clock P. M. on
Lhe premises, I shall sell, under a deed of trust, dated October
1833, and for the purposes therein mentioned, all that lot or
parcel of ground, in the city of Washington, known as lot num-
bered 24, in square No. 517, containing 1,800 square feet, more
or less; together with the buildings, improvements, &c. apper-
taiiing to the same.
Terms of sale cash. BENEDICT MILBURN,
Trustee.
P. MAURO & SON"Eiuctioneers.
feb 22-leowts
DORIFEROUS COMPOUND.-Just received at
Stationers' Hall a fresh supply of Ede's Odoriferous Comg
pound, or Persian Sweet Bag, a most grateful perfume for
scenting clothes, drawers, wardrobes, &c. and is an effectual
preventive against moth; price 50 cents.
feb 13 ITel] W. FISCHER.
AUTION.--Lawrence's Hanging Lamp.--The
-subscribers, having purchased the right to the above
Lamp or Chandelier, take this mode to caution the Public
against the use of certain others which have been recently in-
troduced into the market, constructed upon the same principle,
and intended as an invasion of their exclusive privilege. They
have instituted a suit in the Circuit Court of the United States
against Josiah Danforth, of Middletown, the assignee of Platt's
Union Lamp, so called, and others, for making and vending
that lamp. They consider that as a plain and palpable viola.
tion of their rights. It is known by this peculiarity, that the
reservoirs for the oil are, generally, made in the form of fishes.
Their duty to themselves, and to those to whom they have
granted privileges under patent, requires that their rights, con-
ferred by the law of the United States, should be protected;
and they hereby admonish all, who make, sell, or use their
hanging lamp, without authority from them, under whatever dis-
guise, that legal measures will be adopted for redress.
NATHANIEL BACON,
WILLIAM PLUMB, 2d.
Middletown, Jan. 31, 1837.
P. MAURO & SON, agents for the District of Colum-
bia, for the proprietors of Lawrence's Patent Hanging Lamp or
Chandelier, receive and supply orders of dealers or others.
feb 9-eo3w

RADLEY & CATLETT have received
200 pieces Irish Linens, very cheap
100 pieces English Cotton Shirtings
500 do domestic Long Cloth Shirtings.
Also,
20 pieces superior blue Cloths, superior make
30 do. do. black do.
50 do. do. fancy colored do.
Also,
100 pieces striped, ribbed and plaid, and plain Cassimeres
80 pieces Ingrain Carpeting, very cheap
120 do. Brussels do. do.
150 do. damask and worsted Moreens.
All kinds of clothes made up at the shortest notice, and by
the most fashionable tailors.


jan 21-3aw4w


BRADLEY & CATLETT,
Opposite the Market House.


OTICE.-I. MUDD & CO. have associated with them,
in the Lumber, Wood, and Coal trade, Mr. Alexander
Shepherd; the business will hereafter be conducted under the
firm of Mudd, Shepherd & Co. Mr. Shepherd is fully author-
izad to collect any debts due to the late firm.
\ I. MUDD.
6. MURRY.
The business heretofore carried on by the late firm will be
continued at the old stand, Market Square, 7th street; and, in ad-
dition to the large and well-seasoned stock of lumber now on
hand, the undersigned have given orders for a considerable in-
creased supply, which they will doubtless receive as soon as the
navigation opens. They also intend to deal largely in Wood,
Coal, and Lime; to. facilitate which, they have leased the ex-
tensive wharf and warehouse on the Potomac river, at the foot
of 7th street, known as Cana's wharf. By this arrangement, and
close application to business, they flatter themselves they will be
able to sell all articles in their line on the most reasonable terms.
They particularly invite their old customers and dealers to give
them a call. MUDD, SHEPHERD & CO.
jan 20-3taw4w (Glo. & Met )
ASH FOR 400 NEGROES, including bothsexes,
from twelve to twenty-five years of age. Persons having
servants to dispose of will find it to their interest tdogive me a
call, as I will give higher prices, in cash, than any other pur-
chaser who is now in this market.
I can at all times be found at the MECHANICS' HALL, now
kept by B. 0. Sheckle, and formerly kert by Isaac Beers,'on
Seventh street, a few doors belowLLloyd's Tavern, opposite the
Centre market. All communicationspromptly attended to.
JAMES H. BIRCH,
nov 7- dtf Washington City.
EjEAUTIFUL BOOKS.-Now opening at Stationers'
S Hall the following beautiful Books, suitable for Christmas
and new year's presents:
The Souvenir Keepsake for 1837
The Religious Souvenir do
The Pearl do
The Violet do
The Christmas Box do
The Gift do
The Forget Me Not do
Friendship's Offering do
With a variety of Toy Books for children, and Almanacs for


1837, at 6) cents.
dec 23


[Tel]


W. FISCHER.


FOR SALE.-HOUSE AND LOT on Bridge
Street, Georgetown.-A three-story Brick House,
with the adjoining Lot, making sixty-nine feet on Bridge street,
and running south to the Canal Basin one hundred and twenty
feet.
Also, a Tract of Land in Montgomery county, Md., containing
two hundred and forty-eight acres, situated on the Paint Run,
about 14 miles from Washington, and 13 miles from Ellicott's
Mills. Apply to MAYNADIER MASON,
feb 16-d2w Georgetown.
BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Christ-
mas and New Year's Presents, consisting, in
part, of Annuals, Albums, Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
and keys, Ladies' Work Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
nished and unfurnished, richly inlaid with pearl and ivory,
from $1 to $30 each; splendid Card and Needle Boxes, of
pearl, ivory, and shell, beautifully inlaid, from $2 to $10 each ;
Gold and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
50 cents to $12 each; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps ;
Arabesque (new) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
variety of new Games ; Dissected Monuments, &c. neatly put.
up; Writing and Travelling Desks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Dressing Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands;
splendid China Figures for centre tables; ToiletBoxes; China
and Bronze Inkstands; Ladies' and Gentlemen's Pocket
Books; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets; Silk and Bead Purses;
Bouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets; Sil-
ver Instruments; Pearl and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
folders; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes; Chessmen;
Backgammon Boards; Battledores; Damask, Tinted, and Em-
bossed Note Paper; Perfumery of every description; Ladies'
and Gentlemen s Penknives and Scissors; with many other
Fancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at fair prices at Stationers' Hall.
dec 24 W. FISCHER.


SPRING GOODS.-BRADLEY &
this day received--
20 pieces black and blue Satins
20 do black Italian Silks
30 do plain Silks
30 do figured do
30 do new style figured Lawns
3 cases painted Muslins
3 do Calicoes.
ALSO.
100 dozen Towels
30 pieces Dowlass, for Towels.
300 dozen Silk and Cotton Hosiery.
feb 13-2w BRADLEY


CATLETT have











& CAPTLETT.


C OPY BOOKS.--2,000 Foster's Elementary Copy
Books.
500 Bascom's Writing Books, which are designed to lead the
learner, upon simple principles, from the first rudiments of
penmanship to a perfect knowledge of the art: being a new
and improved plan of teaching; by which the trouble and loss
of time in ruling horizontal and diagonal lines, and setting co-
pies, are avoided, and the attainment of penmanship is greatly
facilitated. The above named books are preferred to all others,
and are now in general use in all the principal schools at the
North. The highest testimonials of the superiority of these
books may be seen at Stationers' Hall, where they will be con-
stantly kept for wholesale or retail, at the publishers' prices.
jan 13 (Tel) W. FISCHER.

I LARGE MAP OF ITLINOIS-Newly publish-
L i '__F.,..rPr rrnm. tlh Gnv..rnmant rarvouc-i-. n


American Life Insurance and Trust Company.
OFFICES-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and Wal!
street, New York.
AGENCY--Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite Fuller's Hotel, anc
two doors from the Buildings occupied by the Treasury Depart.
ment, Washington city.
CAPITAL PAID IN $2,000,000.
PATRICK MACAULAY, President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBINSON, Vice President, New York.
IONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
be allowed, payable semi-annually. The Company als(
Insures lives, grants annuities, sells endowments, and executed
trusts
Of the rates of insuranceof $100 on a single life.
ANNUAL PREMIUM.


Age.
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37


1 year. 7 years.
72 86
77 88
84 90
86 91
89 92
90 94
91 95
92 97
94 99
97 1 03
99 1 07
1 00 1 12
107 1 17
1 12 1 23
1 20 1 28
128 35
131 1 36
1 32 1 42
1 33 1 46
1 34 1 48
1 35 1 50
1 36 1 53
1 39 1 57
1 43 -1 63


For life.
1 53
1 56
1 62
1 65
1 69
1 73
1 77
1 82
1 88
1 93
1 98
2 04
2 11
2 17
2 24
2 31
2 36
2 43
2 50
2 57
2 64
2 75
2 81
2 90


Age.
38
39
410
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60


1 year.
1 48
1 57
1 69
1 78
1 85-
1 89
1 90
1 91
1 92
1 93
1,94
1 95
1 96
1 97
2 02
2 10
2 18
2 32
2 47
2 70
3 14
3 67
4 35


7 years.
1 70
1 76
1 83
1 88
1 89
1 92
1 94
1 96
1 98
1 99
2 02
2 04
2 09
2 20
2 37
2 59
2 89
3 21
3.56
4 20
4 31
4 63
4 91


For life.
3 05
3 11
3 20
3 31
3 40
3 51
3 63
3 73
3 87
4'01
4 17
4 49
4 60
4 75
4 90
5 24
5 49
5 78
6 05
6 27
6 50
6 75
7 00


Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
MACAULAY, Esq., President, Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
BINSON, Esq., Vice President, New York; to which imme-
diate attention will be paid.
Applications may also be made personally, or by letter, post
paid, to FRANCIS A. DICKINS, Agent for the Company in the
City of WASHINGTON. His oAfice is on Pennvslvania Avenue,
opposite Fuller's Hotel, an en doors from the buildings occu-
pied by the Treasury Dep t oct 16-26-dly

E LISHA LEE, Coach-In ker, of Baltimore, has
taken a room in the carriage establishment of Mr. Thos.
Young, on Maine street, near Mayvland Avenue, will keep a
constant supply of Fashionable Carriages, frorh his owi manu-
factory, which he will warrant equal, at least, to any brought to
this city. Persons wishing a good article will do well to call, as
none other will be disposed of there. jan 14-20t
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY,
JOHN J. DONALDSON, PRESIDENT,
NSURES LIVES for one or more years, or for life.

Rates for One Hundred Dollars.
Age. One year. Seven years. For life.
25 1.00 1.12 2.04
30 1.31 1.36 2.36
35 1.36 1.53 2.75
40 1.69 1.83 3.20
45 1.91 1.96 3.73
50 1.96 2.09 4.60
55 2.32 3.21 5.78
60 4.35 4.91 7.00
GRANTS ANNUITIES.
Ratesfor One Hundred Dollars.
60 years of age, 10.55 per cent.
65 do. 12.27 do. per annum.
70 do. 14.19 do.
SELLS ENDOWMENTS.
For One Hundred Dollarsdeposited at birth of child, the Com-
pany will pay, if he attain 21 years ofage, $469
At six months, 408
One year, 375
The Company also executes trusts; receives money on depo-
site, paying interest semi-annually, or compounding it, and
makes all kinds of contracts in which life or the interest of mo-
ney is involved.
WILLIAM MURDOCK, Secretary.

AGENTS.
James H. Causten, City of Washington.
Dr. B. R. Wellford, Fredericksburg, Virginia.
John 0. Lay, Richmond, Va.
D. Robertson, Norfolk, Va.
A. S. Tidball, Winchester, Va.
George Richards, Leesburg, Va.
Neilson Poe, Frederick, Md.
feb 3-ly

SECRET JOURNALS OF THE OLD CON-
GRESS, on Foreign as well as on Domestic Affairs, in
four volumes octavo, running from 1775 to 1778. A single copy
of the above scarce work is for sale by F. TAYLOR.
In Montgomery County Court, sitting as a Court ot
Equity-December Term, 1836.
Hanson Clarke
vs.
Benjamin B. Beall, Washington B. Beall, Gideon Beall, George
W. Dashiell and Deborah his wife, and Thomas B. Dashiell.
HE object of this bill is to obtain a decree to convey all the
interest of the said defendants in and to certain lots of
lands sold by a certain Benjamin Berry, jr. trustee, to Frederick
Dawes, by a good and lawful deed, to the complainant.*
The bill states that, some time in the year 1817,Benjamin Ber-
ry, senr. and Robert B. Beall conveyed by a deed of trust cer-
tain lots in said deed particularly mentioned and described, to a
certain Benjamin Berry, junr. as trustee for the benefit of Robert
B. Beall and Elizabeth his wife, and their children, with power
to said trustee to sellsaid lots. That, in.pursuance of said power
the said trustee did sell said lots to a certain FrederickDawes,
then an alien, in the year 1817, and gave him possession of the
same. That the said Robert B. Beall and Elizabeth his wife
have departed this life, leaving the above named defendants,
their children, heirs at law. That, in the year 1825, the said de-
fendants, by the request of the said Dawes, he being still an
alien, having obtained no deed from said trustee, executed a
paper writing purporting to be a deed of conveyance for his the
said Dawes's benefit, to a certain Thomas Simpson, for said lots.
That said writing was not acknowledged according to the laws
of Maryland, and consequently was void. That the said Dawes
has since sold the said lots to the complainant. And that, by
the consent of the said Dawes, this complainant files this bill for
the purpose of obtaining from the said defendants a good and
sufficient deed to said lands or lots of ground. That all the de-
fendants are non-residents.
It is, therefore, Ordered, that the complainant cause a copy
of this order to be inserted at least once in each of three succes-
sive weeks, in some newspaper printed in Rockville, in Mont-
gomery county, and also in Washington city, in the District of
Columbia, before the first Monday of July next, to the end that
the said non-resident -defendants may have notice of the com-
plainant's application to this Court, and the subject and object of
this bill may be warned to appear in this Court in person, or
by solicitor, on or before the said first Monday in July next, to
show cause, if any, why a decree should not pass as prayed.
CHARLES J. KILGOUR.
Copy, test: B. SELBY,
jan 25-law3w Clerk.
In Chancery, February 10, 183T.
Robert Wallace, Jesse Leach, and John J. Harding,
vs.
Madison Cutts and Eleanor his wife, -- Greenough and Mary
Rosetta his wife, and others, heirs at law of John O'Neall.
7j HE bill in this case states that, about the year 1819, a cer-
- tain John O'Neall, of Montgomery county, Maryland, died
intestate, largely indebted to sundry persons, among others, to
the complainants, in eiural sums ofmoney therein mentioned;
that the said John (EhBSbl leti considerable real estate in Mont-
gomery and Alleghany'counties, but did not leave personal es-
tate sufficient to pay his debts ; the said John left the following
children, who are his heirs at law, viz. Susanna Henrietta, since
intermarried with a certain James Peter, whom she has surviv-
ed, of Montgomery county; Eleanor Elizabeth, wife of Madison
Cutts, and Mary Rosetta, wife of Robert Greenough, all of
Washington city; and Mary Ann O'Neall and John Eliza
O'Neall, of Montgomery county aforesaid ; that a bill was filed
in Montgomery county court, in the year 1819, by certain credi-
tors of John O'Neall, charging that his personal estate was in-
sufficient to pay his debts, and praying that his real estate in
Montgomery county might be sold; upon which a- decree, was
passed as prayed, and Benjamin S. Forrest, Esq. appointed trus-
tee; that a sale was made, and, upon reference to the Auditor,
the proceeds of sale, in the trustee's hands for distribution, were
found to be ($2,794) bearing interest from 25th October, 1823,
and the whole amount of debts due by said John O'Neall $6,839


671 cents, leaving large balances due to the complainants and
other creditors. The bill prays tl~he real estate of said John,
lying in Alleghanycounty and elEwhere, not heretofore sold,
may be decreed to be sold, for the payment of the residue due
to the complainants and other creditors, and that subpoenas may
be issued against the resident defendants. And whereas it ap-
pears to this court that the said J. Madison Cutts and Mary Ro-
setta his wife, and Robert Greenough and Eleanor his wife, are
citizens of the District of Columbia, whereupon it is ordered that
they be and -appear in this court on or before the 20th day of
-T.-a -t m ... -h---- r- ,*- -,U--1--- -- 1


Biuker.




Daily national intelligencer
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Title: Daily national intelligencer
Alternate title: National intelligencer
Sunday national intelligencer
Physical Description: v. : ; 50-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Gales & Seaton
Place of Publication: Washington City D.C.
Creation Date: February 27, 1837
Publication Date: 1813-
Frequency: daily (except sunday)[feb. 6, 1865-]
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Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1813)-
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 Related Items
Related Items: Weekly national intelligencer (Washington, D.C.)
Related Items: National intelligencer (Washington, D.C. : 1810)
Related Items: Universal gazette (Philadelphia, Pa. : Nov. 1797)
Succeeded by: Washington express
Succeeded by: Daily national intelligencer and Washington express

Full Text










S&tiipnL


WASHINGTON: MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1837.


-aa,l~c~i"i.anZI~FP(" rE I


LTIONAL INTELLIGENCE,

e find in the Fianklin Repository of Penn-
nia, the following beautiful stanzas, in which
enitus of Poetry celebrates, in strains worthy
eir subject, the achievements of Eloquence
Patriotism. The verses claim too, a higher
;ure of admiration from the circumstance of
being, as we understand, from the pen of
ung Lady:
FROM THE FRANKLIN REPOSITORY.
ce rescue our own names, character, and honor from all
icipation in this matter; and whatever the wayward char-
r of the times, the headlong and plunging spirit of party
otion, or the fear or the love of power, may have been able
ring about elsewhere, we desire to thank God that they
e not, as yet, overcome the love of Liberty, fidelity to true
ublican principles, and a sacred regard for the Constitu-
,, in that State whose soil was drenched, to a mire, by the
t and best blood of the Revolution."
MIa. W~ESTrR's PaOTEST.
4 Old ilassacrhsetts aears it.
Within her .*d"c5i'ri., '"
Sl M a Si;,.s'..-' .

Ay,-lhonestly, an. tc'rles'ly,
Thy duty hath '. n Jondon.!-
Champion-of Truth-ind Liberty,
New England's gifted son !
Well may the State that gave thee birth
Exhlting hear thy name-
That to the farthest bounds of earth
Her glory shall proclaim !
Firl leader of that Roman band
Who in the lawless hour,
(When ev'n the Guardians of our land
Cringed to the nod of power;)
True to their country's grateful trust
Disdain'd to bend the knee,
And saw with indignation just
The shameful mockery-
What though in Freedom's holy cause
Thy voice was raised in vain-
For when did Party-spirit pause
At Truth's persuasive strain?
That voice, in every patriot soul
Hath woke an answering tone;
And still the echoes onward roll,
Ev'n to the Idol's throne.
And blench thou not-though darkly now
The sway of Power hath spread,
A spirit it can never bow
Is rising from the dead;
And men are murmuring ofthe.past,
And rousing them to see
The fearful doubts that overcast
Their future Liberty.
Then ohward 1 Thou whose warning cry
Hath broke that heedless rest,
Until thy own true energy
Glows in each freeman's breast!
Until the faithfulness of yore,
Our Fathers' only guide,
Inspires Coumbian hearts once more
With all thy patriot pride! -
Ay, point them to the Pilgrim Rock!
And to the hallowed mound
Where Warren met the battle shock,
In death with glory crown'd !
Let every burning word recall
The struggles of the brave,
Who nobly dared and suffered all
Their-dearestrights-to'save.---
The glorious dead !-It shall not be
That they have liv'd in vain,
While on the page of Memory
Their thrilling deeds remain!
Hath not each State some sacred spot,
Her Freedom's chosen shrine?
Some record ne'er to be forgot,
Proud as the boast of thine .
Yet all should only serve to keep
More true our Unity;
Ev'n as our own bright rivers sweep
On to one blending sea ;
So should the splendors of the past -
With present hopes combine,
And round our Unibn-ever cast
A halo all divine.
And when in future years thy name
Shall fill the poet's song,
And roll with all thy country's fame
On Hist'ry's page along;
Ev'n as thy own expanded mind
Now sheds its cheering rays;
Not to one narrow spot confined,
Shall be thy well-earned praise.
No-though the North may claim thy birth,
The Star's ascending gleam I
As just to all thy gifts and worth,
The South shall hail its beam!
From every lip-from every heart,
The glowing tribute won--
That thine has been a Patriot's part-
CoiulrAt's noble Son!
SB 1, 1837. B.

PANISH BOOK-DON OQUIXOTE.-El Inge-
enso Hidalgo Don Quijote De La Maneha, compuesto per
uel de Cervantes Saavedra. Nueva edition clasica, ilus-
a con notas hisioricas, gramaticales y critics, per la.Acade-
Espanola, sus individuos de numero Pellicer, arrietta, y cle-
icin. Enmendada y corregida peor Francisco Sales, A. M.
rimotor de Frances y Espanol en Ia Universidad de Harvard,
'ambrigia, Estado de Massachusetts, .Norte America. En
Tomas. ,
PANISH HIVE; or Select Pieces from various authors,
al, instructive, and amusing; witli the various idiomatic
.ses at the bottom of each-piece, and also in the general in-
; the whole accented with the .E- care for the use of
winners. By F. Sales, A. TM., .. "
-ITERARY FABLES of Don Thomas de Yriarte; contain-
al the posthumous literary fables oftheauithr; accompanied
explanations in English of all the words and idioms which
not found in the Dictionary of Neumann and Baretti, and a
I showing the difference between the ancient and modern
.ography. In continuation will be found the dramatic mas- "
iece, entitled "ThIe Consent of the Young Ladies by. De
ndro Fernandez de Moratin. Prepared for the use of b
Mols and colleges in the United States of North America, by
ales, A. M. For sale by R. PARNHAM,
Between 9th and 10th streets, Penn. Avenue.
n 20-2aw4w (GlobI)
SAKALL SQUARE FOR RENT, situated or I
te heights af Georgetown, the adjoiRing. square East of
Washington s. There is on it a' cmmodious dwelling, an o
ard of select fruir, and a large garden well supplied wim
different kinds of shirubbery and other fruit. The beauty
me prospect and a '* .: ,:r.-.e.. of shady forest trees in the
I, renderit a n ost delightful residence. There are good
Ies, carriage house, &c. Possession can be given the first
Say next.. For terms, apply to Mr. Brooke Mackall, in
rgetown, who will show the place to persons wishing to
it. jan 27-d2aw3w&claw3w
OR SALE.j superior Spanish Jack, from the Island
of Majorca, five years old next May. He has been proved
foal getter, therefore the more valuable. He is thirteen
Is in height, stout, active, and finely formed, indeed beauti-
proportioned, and very. docile in disposition. He was
id in the most careful manner, from the-finest strain, in the
d of Majorca, taken from thib Jennet immediately, and suck-
>y a fine brood mare. The Spanish nobleman who procured
for the gentleman whio brought him over to this country, de-
ed to himn, personally, that he was got Iby his Jack, which
pointed out, a superior animal of the kind, and out of an
illy fine Jennet. There is a'great difference between the
rnmon Jack and those raised by gentlemen to improve the
*d, which carm be easily discovered by looking at this fine
sal. He can be seen on a farm abomt four miles "from Bal-
re, on application to the ihscrib'-r.
hl23t-dt4thmar J, H, NAsP, Act .


DEBATE IN THE SENATE.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1837.
The PRESIDENT having announced the special order
of the day, being the bill limiting the sales of the public
lands, and having stated the question to be-on the follow-
ing sections, moved by Mr. MooRE, as amendments to the
bill :
And be itfurther enacted, Thatall lands ihich have been
offered for sale twenty or more years and iomain unsold, shall
hereafter ie sold- at fifty events per arer; all lands which have
been offered fifteeni or more years, and less than twenty years,
shall be hereafter sold at seventy-five cents per acre ; and all
lands which have been offered ten or more years, and less than
fifteen years, shall hereafter be'sold at one dollar per acre;:
Provided, That not more than one hundred and sixty acres
shall be sold to auy onte purchaser, nor to any other than actual
settlers, at such reduced prices.
And be it further enacted, That any person who shall
make tie necessary proof, as required by the fourth section of
this bill, that lie has occupied or cultivated any portion of the
public lands, subject to entry at private sale, such person shall
have the pre-emptive right in the purchase of one quarter sec-
tion, to include the land so occupied or cultivated at oneo dollar
per acre."
Mr. MOORE addressed- the Senate as follows:
Mr. PRESIDu T : When I had thie .honor to present to
the Senate last evening the amendmentss now under its
consideration, I said great'injustice had been done that
class of our fellow-citizens who first emigrate and take pos-
session of the public domain, by that severe denunciation
that had been so liberally dealt out against them from se-
veral quarters upon this floor. Having been an earlyemsi-
grant myself to the section of country in which I reside,
and having some knowledge of the character of the many
privations which those with whom I have been associated
had to encounter, and which are common with all early
emigrants to a new country, it was natural that my sym-
pathies and sensibilities should be excited. But, sir, I am
Well aware these missiles and censure were not thrown par-
ticularly at, Alabama, and as they have been met and re-
plied to by others, I shall endeavor only to give a brief ex-
planation of the operation of former pre-emption laws as
relates to the State of Alabama.
Sir, the only pre-emption law in that long catalogue
brought to view by the Senator from Missouri (Mr. BEN-
TON,) in which asy portion of the citizens of this State
have had any interest, is the law of May, 1830, which was
limited in its operation to one year only ; and the act of
June, 1834, which re-enacted the provisions of the law of
1830, and continued its operation for two years.
These laws have had an application in one or two coun-
ties only in the whole State of Alabama; and, in truth, it
may be said that the citizens in but one county have been
benefited to any considerable extent.- These citizens, al-
though not in affluence, are as honest, as worthy and re-
spectable as the population in any other quarter.
And what, let me ask, is the character of the boon pre-
sented by the pre-emption laws, to which I have referred .
The only advantage has been the protection it gave the
poor man from a competition with .tie.more wealthy and
land speculator in the purchase of his little home, one quar-
ter-section, which had been made valuable only by means
of his own labor bestowed upon it.
Sir, it is due to my constituents that I-should state one
fact, which is much to their credit afnd honor, which is this:
I have never heard of any attempt to perfect titles under
these pre-emption laws bye resort to "corruption, perjury,
subornation of perjury, or other improper means," about-
which we have heard so much as having occurred in other
quarters.
There is another fact, which I take great pleasure in
bringing to the view of the Senate: This very county of
Jackson, which has enjoyed greater benefit from the pre-
emption laws than any other, has also furnished a greater
number of soldiers for the defence of the State than any
other county: she has now (unless they have recently re-
turned)-about four-hundred of'her brave and patriotic citi-
zens, breasting the perils of the Indian war in Florida, and
what I fear is more appalling to them than the dangers of
war, is the unhealthy climate which is the scene of their
operations.
These are volunteers, not draughted meq. As soon as
the call for men was made known, more volunteered than
were required ; and, in this county, I have heard it said,
that, "if any draught should ever be resorted to, it would
be a draught to see who should stay at home."
But it has been intimated by the honorable Senator from
Georgia (Mr. KIGo) that this class of our fellow-citizens
have, by their disorderly and criminal deportment, provok-
ed the Indian wars inu which the Government has been,
and yet is, involved.
Mr. President, as regards the Black Haewk war, I know
nothing, and therefore I say nothing-; but, sir, as relates to
the Indian war in the South, I think I hazard nothing in
saying this can be traced to a different, origin-this has ori-
ginated from the manner in which your Indian treaties
have been made, and the bad faith, yes, sir, the bad faith
in which their requirements have been executed. One
circumstance which has contributed greatly in exciting that
ill-blood which finally resulted in open depredations on the
part of the Indians, has been the countenance given to thee
most gross and flagrant frauds practised upon them by un-
principled land speculators, in the pretended purchase of
their reservations. And, sir, I think I may assume the
responsibility of saying that some of the constituents of
the Senator from Georgia participated largely in these spe-
culations. Well, sir, the war having been brought about
by the means to which I have referred, who, except that
very class of-our fellow-citizens, so much abused, to whom
the opprobrious epithet of "squatters" has been applied,
first shouldered their muskets to do the fighting,. The
silk-and-purple gentry, unless they can be so fortunate as
to obtain the command of a regiment or battalion, find it
more convenient to enjoy theirease upon their cotton farm.
If they contribute any thing, it is by way of substitute;
their person is too sacred to be exposed to the cruel hard-
ships of a campaign : they therefore do all their fighting
by substitute. Yes, sir, although this traduced class" do
not, as has been charged, originate the war, they are truly
active and principal agents in bringing it to a close.
But it has been alleged by the honorable Senator that
they pay no taxes to the Government," &c. Now, sir, I i
demand to know if this be so ? I desire to..know of the
Senator frotit Georgia (Mr. KING) whetlser the tax impos- I
ed by the tariff does not operate upon this class of our fel-
low-citizens as well as any other By what means are
they exempted from its influence 1 Sir, does not the poor
man pay a tax for the hat upon his head,the coat (although
it may be a coarse one) upon his back, and the shoes upon
his feet ? Is he not required to pay a tax for the plough
and weeding-hoe, the axe, and other farming utensils with
which he cultivates his little cornfield ? the sugar with
which he sweetens his coffee, and the salt that is put in his i
bread 1 Yes, sir, he pays a tax almost for evety thing he I
and his family either eat or wear; and this is-not all, for ]
he is taxedfor the very last nail that is driven in his coffin,
or the coffin made for any branch of his family. And yet -
we are to be told that they pay no taxI!" .I am willing i
toadmit that they may not pay as much in amount as the I
man who wears a beaver hat, a broadcloth cloak, a ruffle t
shirt, and silk stockings, and who uses his wines and other
luxuries; yet I will venture the assertion that the tax paid
sy the poor man who may have a large family to support, i
alls as heavy and is as oppressive upon him as the tax
paid by any other class of the community.
Well, now, a few words as regards the amendment sub- t
mitted for the consideration of the Senate. Its operation t
s confined to lands that havebeen in market for ten, fifteen,
and twenty years, and which theGovernment has not been i
able to sell at the minimum price, and which, I hesitate c
not to say, will never be sold unless the price be reduced. .
This provision will enure mainly to the benefit of that class I
or whom ilis more imperiously our duty to legislate; those .
n indigent circumstances, who have heretofore been driven t
out of lthe public land market by the wealthy, the capitalist, v
tnd land speculator; for, sir, it cannot be disguised that a
these have heretofore possessed, themselves of all the most
valuable, rich, and fertile lands, to the entire exclusion of v
hose who have been unable to compete with them, And
now, when they have picked, and culled it over and over m
again, until nothing remains but the refuse lands, which c
hey will not purchase, but which a poor man is both will- I
ng and able to purchase at its fair value, you refuse, and I:
unreasonably insist that this is worth as much as you sell q
he cotton and sugar land and best Mississippi low grounds c


for. This policy is as inconsistent as it is adverse to the
interest of the-new States.
What, let me ask, would be the course of an intelligent
individual, under similar circumstances, who, having ob-
tained a large quantity of public lands, and, having sold
out the best at the highest price it would command, would
hold up the refuse with the view of obtaining the same price
for this? What lhas been the practice of every State in
the Union which has sold its public lands 1 Have they
not reduced the price according to its quality ? And what
would be the course of any ithcr individual who might
put in market any other commodity? Suppose he be a to-
bacco-planter, or a flour-merchant, would either of these,
having made sale of all the prime, think of holding up the
ground leaf tobacco, or the old and sour flour, with any
reasonable hope of ever obtaining the save price for this 1
Or would he ,..t ..Jc... the price of this article to its fairly
market value 'i I,,, t seems to me, would be the dictate
of prudence and common sense.
But, sir, we claim, and with great propriety, too, a re-
duction, upon- the ground and principle upon which you
have reduced the tariff, in order to reduce the amount of
surplus revenue, and to bring down the rate of taxation to
the actual, economical wants of the Government. The
public domain is the article in which the people ofthe new
States deal i1..i..L., and while you have extended a scale of
reduction to every- other article of consumption, this has
been left alone utlnouched at its' oAginal high price. A
price fixed when the G.. rn: i ..i 1i a large public debt
unliquidated ; for the a,,. it. i I0 hi. Ii, the public domain
was pledged. This pledge is now redeemed, and tle citi-
zens of the new States have the right to demand a reduc-
tion in the price of the public domain in a ratio correspond--
ing with at applied by the tariff to other articles.
But there are other and higher considerations which
should influence gentlemen in the support of this measure.
The citizens of the now States, although they pay their
equal proportion of the tax collected, have no interest in
the large appropriations of thousands and millions that are
made annihally out ofthe public treasure for harbors, forti-
fications, breakwaters, forts, &c. on the seabord. This
amendment also proposes to place the means in the hands
of thousands of our fellow-citizens to become freeholders,
arid thus increase their pride and independence, their at-
tachment to the soil, and to the Government, and, at the
satne time, remove that odious relation that exists between
landlord and tenant.
But some gentlemen have argued in opposition to this
measure as if it were confined in its operation alone to the
citizens of the new States, and as if the citizens of no other
State had any interest in the matter whatever. But gen-
tlemen should recollect that the population of the new
States is composed of the good people from every other
State in this Union; and that emigrants from every quar-
ter are to participate in tme wholesome provisions proposed to
beincorporated in this bill.
Sir, I was surprised to hear the honorable Senator from
Delaware. (Mr. BAYED) repudiate these enactnients be-
cause they hold out extravagant inducement to emigration
from the old to the new States. And I would submit it to
the honorable Senator whether this not a very contract-
ed view of the subject ? and whether it is not our duty to
legislate here upon the broad principle of promoting the in-
terest and prosperity of all 1 And whether he does justice
to his constituents in withholding his support to the project
on account of the extravagant advantages it tenders them
for emigration ? And ought not the State he so ably re-
presented be willing to part with that portion of her popu-
lation who, seeing the avenue opened wide fot the improve-
ment of their fortunes-in the West and Southwest, feel de-
sirous of availing themselves of it And ought he not ra-
ther to be inclined to lend his aid in giving them encou-
ragement than to impede their progress ? What, suppose
some rich landlord lose a tenant, and someof the manufac-
tories some of their hands, who labor for a mere pittance
for support, when, by eon'igration to the new States, they
become independent freeholders and landlords themselves.
SSir, I will repeat what I intimated on a former occasion,
-that the People ofthe now'States.havo .a right to appeal to
the justice of the majority on this floor and in the other
branch of the National Legislature, who are now dominant,
and hold the power, for their aid in support of this mea-
sure. They have done much for the Administration, aund
particularly has Alabama done every thing, and more than
could have been expected; she has sacrificed her feelings
and her principles; her citizens have sacrificed their at-
tachment for an individual pure and spotless-whose de-
portment either in the private walks of life or the public
councils of his country no honorable man will dare assail or
impeach. Yet they have sacrificed their attachment for
him, their neighbor, their friend, to gratify-General Jack-
son. And I think I have the right now, in behalf of my
constituents, to make the appeal to the friends of the Ad-
ministration for aid in favor of a measure more intimately
connected with their interest than any other provision of
this bill.
I Now, sir, one word more as to the other amendment pro-
posed as an additional section to the bill. Mr. President,
the provisions embraced by this are so obviously just and(
proper, that I cannot anticipate opposition from any quar-
ter. In this there is no principle, the propriety of which
will be considered doubtful by gentlemen coming from ei-
ther the old or the new States.
If will be seen that this amendment proposes to secure to
an individual the pre-emptive right in the purchase of one
quarter section, t"at he has improved and cultivated, at one
dollar per acre, of the land subject to be entered at private
sale, at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. This
will be of little or no service to other new States, which
will enjoy a more important advantage from that section in
the bill which secures to occupants the right of pre-emp-
tion in the purchase ofthi best lands in the country. But,
as regards Alabama, these golden days have passed ; the
good lands have long since been sold. I have known ma-
ny worthy and respectable citizens who had made improve-
ments upon the public lands, who were able to give from
five to ten, fifteen, and twenty dollars per acre; yet were
unable to secure their homes-were turned out and driven
off by the capitalist and land speculator, under the auction
system, being unprotected at that time by any pre-emption
law.
This amendment would be viewed as a modest proposi.
tion compared with other features in the bill, and I hope
it will receive the favorable consideration oufthe Senate.
[Mr. KING, of Georgia, in a subsequent stage in the de-
bate, having submitted two amendments to the bill, viz. one
requiring that the applicant for a pre-emption shall make
oath before the register and receiver that he has not re-
ceived the benefit of any pre-emption law heretofore
passed by the Congress' of the United States ;" and the
othar, providing that no pre-emption shall be granted to
lands from which the Indians had not been removed at
' the commencement of such occupancy."]
Mr. MOORE said ho had already declared that the
interest which the State of Alabama would have in this
law compared with that which other new States and Ter-
ritories would enjoy was very inconsiderable. Yet he had
given the bill his hearty support from principle. He was
willing to do justice to other citizens, the early emigrants,
n whatever quarter they may be located. But now the
honorable Senator from Georgia (Mr. KmIN) proposes so
o modify the bill as to destroy even that small interest
which the State from which he came might claim to have,
and to exclude his constituents from any participation in
ts wholesome provisions whatever.
Mr. M. solemnly protested against the adoption of any
uch amendment; he hoped the Senate would not gratify
he Senator from Georgia in effecting such manifest injus-
ice to the citizens of his State.
That Senator had again renewed his unwarranted de-
munciations against that meritorious class of our fellow-
itizens, whom he again reproaches by calling them "pro-
essional squatters." And by this amendment proposes to -
ureak up and destroy what he is pleased to call their
urofessiona and livelihood." And, sir, he is desirous also
o put ran nd to the improper trea tment and cruelty with
which "the poor aIndians" have been made to suffer, and
re liable to be treated by these early emigrants, many of
whom hlie has intimated have left Georgia because they
sere no better than they ought to be."
Mr. M. said he would not vouch for the correct deport-
nent of the people of Georgia in any manner; but for the
-onsolation of the Senator from Georgia he would inform
mim that tho salubrious climate of Alabama had a most
mappy influence upon those who emigrated from that
quarter; as soon as they-crossed the line and became ac-
limated, they then cease to be "professional squatters,"


e and become honest and respectable citizens, and were
worthy the protection this bill proposes to give them.
t But if the Senator succeeds in his proposed amend-
ment, his (Mr. M.'s) constituents, few as they were, who
Shave obtain any pre-emption under any former law, are
Snow to be excluded from any benefit or protection given
a by the pre-emption clause in this bill, and left entirely at
thie tender mercies of the land speculator.
Now, sir, where is the propriety of this, where the pro-
priety of excluding a poor man from a pre-emption under
this law, merely because he has been compelled to make
sale of his. land heretofore paid for, in order to improve his
condition and provide more effectually for the permanent
prosperity of his family ? Sir, the gentleman canr with
much more propriety change the character of his amend-
ment, by modifying it in such manner as to exclude and
render the land speculator incompetent, instead of the pre-
emptioner, to purchase in any future sale, and with such a
modification Mr. M. would vote for it.
Again, another portion of his constituents were to be
made step-children of, and excluded from the provisions of
this law, because they have made their settlements before
the Indians are removed from the territory they have, sold.
And the gentleman had -..:., ,.......,.ri, v :n h sacidIJ hI
amendments would only 'i.'i' ti. 'liat .oa..i n '1 .:.oOnirvy
recently acquired- from the Cherokees, situated in the State
of Alabama. And he would inform that S..i,' 'r i'tla,
small as this slip" of country was, the General Assem-
bly had organized three new counties out of it, which
were settled by honest and respectable citizens in every
manner worthy the favorable consideration of Congress.
The treaty had been ratified long since, many had gone
there since the purchase and since the ratification, 'and
yet the Indians 4re not removed, and no one can tell pre-
cisely when they will be entirely removed. The people
nevertheless are subject to all the restraints; responsibili-
ties, payment of axes, &c. in the same manner that others
are in any othe part of the State, and were entitled to
equal participation in the important provisions of. this
bill.
But Mr. M. said he had felt the peculiar force of that
argument of the/Senator from Georgia resulting from his
tender sympathies and compassion for the poor Indians
which inspired his bosom with such a strong and laudable
desire to put a itop to those cruelties heretofore practised
upon them.
Mr. M. thought, looking to the history of the times,
'and reviewing the legislative action of the Slate of
Georgia, promptedd doubtless by none other than the most
tender and humane considerations for the poor Indians,
for whom the Senator would make us believe he also feels
much sympathy,) that such arguments came with very
bad grace froan that quarter. That Georgia should feel
more than othlpr States for the welfare of the Indians, andt
that her delegation should be disposed to withhold from
honest occupants pre-emption rights in the purchase ofthe
public lands, lest encouragement should be given to im-
proper treatment to the poor Indians, was among the very
last argument he had supposed the Senator from Georgia
would have resorted to in support of his proposition.

LAST DAY.
T HE SIAMESE TWIN BROTHIERS-CHANG-
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1, as positively the last day of their stay in this city.
Hours of admission, from 10 to 12 in the inning, arid from
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At the Globe Hotel, (Mailer's,) directly opposite the New
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Admittance 25 cents. No re-admission to the Room.
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XHIBITION.-RUSSELL'S stupendous and magnifi-
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Tickets 50 cents, to be had at the door.
Arrangements can be made for entire Families and Schools.
Admittance forchildren under 12 years of age, half price.
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Of House of Representatives.
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DEC. 1836.
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DEBATE IN THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
SPEECH OF Mr. THOMPSON, (or S. CAROLINA,)
On the right of Slaves to petition.

TUESDAY, FEB. 7, 1837.'
Mr. Speaker : I am reluctant, sir, to throw myself again
upon the indulgence of the House. The original resolu-
tion which I submitted upon this subject, and which seems
so much to have shocked the delicate sensibilities of some!
gentlemen, was dictated by the irrepressible feelings which
the conduct of the honorable member from Massachusetts
was so well calculated to excite. More calm reflection has
only served to confirm me in the opinion that the course
which I adopted was that which duty demanded; and al-
though I should not be sustained by a single vote, it would
not in the slighest degree shake my purpose. No, sir, in
this as in e-,ery other contest of duty, honor, and right,
there is consolation, if in nothing else, in the glorious sen-
timent of Henry at Agintourt : The fewer men the
greater share of honor." It is not the first time that, in
the moment of conflict, I have found myself abandoned
by some of those who had urged me into it. I am some-
what in the condition of Richard before the fatal day of
Bosworths: my allies dropping off one by one. Like him,
I hope, in nothing else. Gentlemen who yesterday reprov-
ed my flagging zeal, and urged a resolution for the expul-
sion of the member from Massachusetts, to-day find my
resolution too strongby half. All.I desire is, the formal
and unequivocal expression of the House, that to present
a petition from slaves is unauthorized by the Constitution,
a disrespect to the House, and a violation of the rights and
feelings of a'portion of its members.. I have no personal"
feelings of vengeance against the honorable member (Mr.
ADAMS)) to gratify, although his habitually harassing the
House, and irritating conduct on this subject of abolition,
have been well calculated to rouse such feelings. How
great have been his trespasses during this session upoh
your patience, and that of the House, is in the knowledge
of every member.
My honorai'le friend from Virginia (Mr. Ro3ERTasoN)
admits that tihe conduct of the member from Massachusetts
was a wanton trifling with the House, and unjustifiable
torturing of the feelings of its members, and that the sub-
sequent explanations of the gentleman nothing extenuate
the offence." Now, sir, I beg to be informed, if a wanton
trifling with the House- and torturing the feelings of its
members is hot a disrespect deserving censure, what is 1?
The honorable member from Massachusetts (Mr: LIN-
COLN) has urged with much zeal and force that there was
no offence in the question which was'asked; that there
can be no violation of the decorum of the House in asking
a question, a question which may or may not be answer-
ed. Is this true, sir ? No offence in a question Can
greater offence be o!rered than by asking some questions E?
There are some questions not to be asked, and this is one
of them. Is it no disrespect to ask a member if he is notes
destitute of honor or truthl None whatever, according
to the argument, because the question may be answered or
not. -
Slaves have no right to petition. They are property,
not persons ; they have no political rights; and even their
civil rights must be claimed through their masters. Hav-
ing no political rights, Congress has no power in regard to
them, and therefore no right to receive their petitions.
They are property, not persons, under the Constitution.
The Constitution is the paramount rule of the House, and
any attempt, however made, to present petitions from them
is a violation of that Constitution, and a flagrant disres-
pect and insult to a portion of its members. Does any man
dare to claim that the House, of which I am a member, is
a tribunal to which appeals from my slaves are to be ad-
dressed, and in which their denunciations of me are to be
received 1 This i a question that I willnot argue. From
the position" that slaves have a right to petition, to that
which should assert their right to vote, the step is short
and natural." They can have no, such right, unless they
have political rights. If-they have, -to-refuse them ar agena-
cy in making the laws by which those rights are guarded,
is to violate the great fundamental principle of our Re, .:I.,
tion. If they'have the right to petition, the principle must
be carried out to that extent. I repeat, sir, I will not ar-
gue such a question for any other purpose than to show the
enormity of the act of offeringsuch a petition.
The gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. LINcoLN) ob-
jects that the charge is indefinite, intangible. How, says
he, did the member trifle with the House ? I will tell you,
sir. After presenting various abolition petitions, the ntem-
her (Mr. A.) stated that he had a petition from twenty-
two slaves, and asked if it came within the resolutions of
the gentleman from Kentucky, (Mr. HuAWES,) thus giving
to thie House an additional reason to believe that the-pray-
er of the petition was for the abolition of slavery. I in-
quired if it was an abolition petition, and requested that it
might be read. Thie honorable member from Massachu-
setts declined to answer. My friend from Alabama (Mr.
LEWIs) inquired of the Chair whether the petition did
pray for the abolition of slavery. He was informed by the
Chair that it did. The honorable member was silent, and
permitted the misapprehension of the Chair into which lie
had led both you, sir, and the whole House, to remain un-
corrected, when he alone had it in his power to set the
House right. One word from him would have sufficed.
He refused to give that one word. He allowed more than'
one resolution to be submitted and speeches to be made on
th..t supposition ; and not until he supposed the House suf-. r
ficiently embarrassed and entrapped, did-he condescend to ]
state what was the nature of the petition. Is not this tri- c
fling with the House ? Let every member honestly an-
swer the question. But, sir, I take broader ground. To I
present any petition, for any object, (and it is perfectly in-
different what that object is,) from slaves, is without au- i
thlority or right, and an unjustifiable and insolent trifling
with the House.
Thehon. member from Kentucky(Mr.GRAVEs) has replied t
to an argument which no one has used. I certainly have
not. He seems to suppose that the act of the honorable
member from Massachusetts is regarded 1as offensive, be-
cause it is calculated to bring into contempt the resolutions t
of his honorable colleague, (Mr. HAWEs.) I have not j
heard any such ground afsuined. I shall certainly bo one of j
the last to break a lance in defence of those resolutions.
The same honorable member has also argued that it could
be no disrespect, as the member from Massachusetts dis- I
claims any such intention. Does not every one see this t
would excuse any, the greatest violation of decorum s A .
member may ask another if he is not guilty of falsehood,
and is not a knave, and in his defence say he meant no of- 1
fence, is he to pass without censure ? e
The honorable member is a slaveholder, and represents '
slaveholders, and on that account I must say that I have n
heard no speech on this floor which has grated so harshly a
on my car. I regretted it, deeply regretted it, as coniing
from a slaveholder. It concedes, in my judgment, the
most vitalprinciples for which theabolitionists contend. Look 1
at their petitions. They say that slavery is an evil, a na-
tional sin, and a disgrace. Will these be cured by aboli-
tion in this miserable ten miles square 1 Does any man
believe that their purposes arcconfinedto that Younmight
as well tell me that you would set fire to ten feet square in
a dry prairie, and that you designed and expected that it
would extend no further. No, sir, these men, fanatics as (
they are, understand their game. They know that this is
our weakest point-that upon which their strongest show v
of plausible argument can be made; and, like a skilful
commander, they first assail the weakest point of the eno-
my, as diseases settle upon the weakest part of the system,
and a more pestilent disease than this does not exist. It is
a foul aud blasting malaria, which is prostrating the jus- '
ice, virtue, and independence of a portion of the country.
Is there not at least one member on this floor, who last ses- f
uion was opposed to these wretches,hut who,at the last elec-
tion was obliged to give in Ins adhesion or give up his seat
tore-a painful alternative to any but a patriot-to a pat-
iot, a proud occasion of sacrificing the poor honor of a
meat in this body, to his sense of justice and right-to the t
aeace and harmony of the Union.
They regard abolition in thIe District as a first but deci-
sive step to abolition in the States. So do I. So does tIhe
whole slaveholding country. The gentleman concedes s
lhem the power here, and we are only tenants at stuf-
brance, at will-and at the will of those who we know
will strike the blow whenever they dare do it. They are
adders fanged and coiled, and only do not strike because
lhey dare not. Is this the aid which slaveholders in this


VoL. XXV.


'*e~iTj~PL~OIIL~iMI~(m-B~fYBW~i~i~B=T :~I~7laF~LPV~FII..i~- -----a~-iBn~(TTi~d~i~la~naml~;r*~;*?i


No. 7502.


body give to each other? "Call ye this backing your
friends A plague of such backing, say I."
I think, Mr. Speaker, I may say that I am not respon-
sible for the erratic and discursive course of-this debate. I
have endeavored to confine myself to the subject before the
House, and I now reluctantly advert to some topics not-
strictly pertinent, but which have not been first involved by
me. The gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. LINCOLN)
has complained of severe denunciations of his State. Not
by me, sir. I am guiltless on this, as on all former occasions.
I would not wantonly assail thle character of any State,
and especially of that ancient, enlightened, and renowned
Commonwealth. But when these vile assassins are excit-
ing our slaves to revolt-to murder-infanticide; when
their poisoned shafts are daily aimed at our lives, and, what
is of infinitely more.value,-at our characters, when I strike
back, and gentlemen choose to interpose their State to
receive the blows aimed at them, they must take the'con.
sequences. I shall bate no jot of the force of my blows on
that account.
The gentleman has given us another eulogy upon these
amiable fiends-these most respectable assassins. Now,
sir, allow me to say that I have read a work.on the subject
of slavery, written by a man than whom none is more hon..-
ored at the North, and.one whom the South, too, once de-
lighted to honor, and who,-f doubt not, is the best of the
infamous brotherhood; and I vfnt-ure to say that no book
of th, same number of pages, in anv lnc.,ige, contains
libels more foul and false. As as l .:, they ..,, fools or
knaves, and there is no escape from -the alternative. If
they do not know how worse than vain are their efforts,
and that they only tend to make worse the condition of
those whose friends they profess to be, they are entitled to
the former-if, knowing it, they persist in their vile purtio-
ses, with no hope of good, but at the risk of tearing down
the proudest temple which human wisdom lis reared to
human liberty, none will deny their right to the latter ap-
pellation. g r .
The- gentleman from Massachusetts, as if entirely un-
conscious of the offensiveness of such topics, speaks of the
right of the People of the North-to sympathize with hu..
man suffering-with the oppressed-with those improperly,
held in bondage. Now, sir, what does all this mean when
translated ? It means this: that we of the South are op-
pressors; holding men in bondage so cruel and unlawful
as to enlist the sympathies of the generous, the warm-heart-
ed People of the North-sympathies of which we must be
destitute, or we would cease from such wickedness. Now,
sir, gentlemen must expect these charges to be repelled.
Rosseau, I believe it was, regretted that he had not been -
born a Roman. I am thankful and proud that I'was born
an American, a slaveholder, and a South Carolinian. I
regard African slavery, in all its bearings, as a blessing-as
a blessing to the slave himself; and I challenge a denial of
the proposition, that nowhere on the earth, in his native
land or any other,-is the African. so elevated in the scale
of being, or in the enjoyment of as much comfort--so vir-
tuous, enlightened, or happy-as those who are slaves in
this country. I am satisfied that in no country where do-
mestic slavery does not exist, has the character of man
ever been, or ever will be, found in its highest development.
I believe it essential to the maintenance of liberty. Where,
let me ask, when the liberties and honor of this country
have been assailed by enemies, foreign or domestic, have
they flown for refuge? I feel that I am treading on deli-
cate ground. It may be invidious in these times, when the
whole North is so clamorous about the freedom of speech
and the press, to remind gentlemen of the sedition law;*
and when they seem to have taken American honor exclu-
sively under their keeping; to remind them of the part
which their States bore in the late war-that second strug-
gle for independence-for we should have ceased to have
had the most essential attributes of a nation if we had'not
waged that war. Northern commerce was assailed, and
Northern seamen impressed. The North counted the cost,
and was opposed io war. The national honor wa rassail-I-
and the rest of the nation counted not the cost, but rushed
into the conflict, and came out of it triumphantly, with the
N:,il al rl,.. while hanging upon their skirts. I know,
sir iH it... re were illuatrious-exceptions. I I ek not of
individuals, but of the c.:.r,.1,, .Jf'States ..
When the gentlemar, iQ.!, Lliteo.N) .pe.,-. of thesym-
pathies of theNorth for human suffering, i... tlL. oppressed
and those held in unlawful bondage, 1 cannot forbear to
congratulate him upon the return of those feelings-for, if
aught that's true in history be," it Was not always so.
There would seem to have been a time when these honor-
able feelings had fled from their land. And emen now, it
seems to be a most modified benevolence, a most restricted
philanthropy, which demands as indispensable that their
objects should have a red or a black skin ; for their own
color and race, their hearts are as cold as they ever were.
How, Mr. Speaker, if it should turn out that slavery has
been brought upon the country by this most tender-hearted
people? How, if 1 shall show that the blackest and the
bloodiest pages in the history of this country, or of man,
are to be found in the treatment of the aborigines by New
England ? That, as long as the slave trade was profitable
and tolerated, it had no horrors in their sight? That they
had no sympathies with the poor Indians until they had lit-
erally exterminated all the tribes, by whom their fathers,
flying from another land, were kindly and hospitably re-
ceived-ere yet the untutored savage had learned the arts,
the frauds, the rapacity of the white man, which they first
taught him? Now, when they are no longer incommoded
by the vicinity of the savage, their sympathies are not with
their brethren, circumstanced as their fathers were. Their
philanthropy and their selfish interests are never opposed,
however there may be such opposition to the interests of
others. I like not your courtezan turned prude, after
ability to be vicious has ceased, and trust her nothing the
more that she claims to be of the unco quid, the rigidly
righteous," and is seen at church meetings and christen-
ings, sanctified and demure to a proverb.
Are gentlemen ignorant that mainly on New England
rests the responsibility of the great importation of slaves to
this country ? that the colonial Legislature of Virginia
passed twenty-two acts against it? and that it was through
the power and influence of the New England colonies that
the trade was not stopped ? It was a business in which
they could turn a penny, and their humanity slept. When
gentlemen are daily regaling the House with their pathetic
jeremiads on the horror and atrocity of slavery, are they
not disturbing the bones of their fathers ? Are they not
guilty of that worst of parricide, the murder of a father's
fame ? I should think that, if they believed in spirits, as
they once did, they would expect the ghosts of their fathers

Freedom of opinion and of speech, and sympathies with the
Indian and African are the three great topics of New England
caut of the present day. How long has it been thus, vide the
following extracts from Neat's History of New England ; to say
nothing of that glorious net for oreinirn the freedom of opinion
and the press, the sedition law. ,I...'h Id the united support of
New England. ."
The New Englanderspetitiont, heir magistrates to take speedy
measures against the Anabaptists.-Neale's History of New
England, 1 vol. 279.
Three were punished shortly afles for religious opinions, viz.
John Clarks, fined 20 or to be whipped.
John Crandall, 5 or whipped.
Obadliah Holmes, 30.-1 vol. 280-1.
Holmes received 30 lashes at the whipping post.-t vol. 283.
And John Stone amnd John Hazwell, were each fined 40 shil-
ings, or to be whipped for sthakinghands with him and praising
God for his courage and constancy.-l vol. 283.
The Government of New England proceeded against the
Qoakers as it lihad done against the Anabaptists, by fines, im-
misonment, and whipping, and these proving ineffectual, they
lut three or four to death.-1 vol. 291.
They imprison and banish Mary Fisher and Ann Austin, for
being Quakers.-1 vol. 292-3.
Laws against Quakers.-1 vol. 293-4.
Nicholas Upshall, aged 60 years, was fined 30 and banished
or speaking against that law.
Mary Clarke, whipped 20 stripes for being a Quaker and
omiog into New Englaid, 1057.-vol. 1, 295.
Ch. Holder aNd John Copeland each received 30 lashes and
1 weeks imprisonment for tie same.-295.
Leave pa sed to cut off the ears of Quaker men, and whip
he women, and for boring their tongues with hot irons.-296-7.
Holder, Copeland, and Roane, lost their ears.-297.
Several others whipped and imprisoned.-1 vol. 301.
Law to ship them to Barhn and Virgieia, and sell them as
laves.-30t4.
Families ruined by fines.-305.
Law to pit them to death.-306-7.
Marmaslukeo Stevenson and Wim. Robinsn, hanged.-309.
Mary Dyer also hanged.-309.
Others banished.-312, 13, 1..


I? 011* e --












and accuse them.n Ier own ties, let, me ask,
has it been since the pple of a State, now the
ters of thq abolitionists, b1way of showing their
e of slavery and the slave de, placed the sov-
f that State in another br h of Congress in
of a convicted, a notorious notorious in all the
of the word) slave-dealer and kidnapper ?
fir, as to the other point on which these philan-
are most sensitive e-the treatment of the poor In-
their hearts seem to have two subdivisions-one
es, the other for Indians. Speak ofthepoor Afri-
I are in paroxysms of charity ; ofthe poor Indian,
r philanthropy is almost spasmodic; a most rare
nee, which uses as its means murder end rapine;
which does its alns with money rifled from the
if others. What think you, sir, of Indian chiefs,
omen, too, taken prisoners in "war, and shot or
slaves in the West Indies 1 What think you of
which the,historian thus speaks with truly Spartan
-" the whole tribe was exterminated 1" The Narra-
Mohegans, Pequods, Wampanoags-where are
Exterminatedg It is fitting-there is a beautiful
r in the sons of those who exterminated them, set-
for philanthropists asthe exclusive friends of the
What think you, sir, of a civilized and most-re-
'oldiery, made up of men who had left their native
indulge here, without restraint, a religion of peace,
.d charity, firing into thie wigiams of squaws and
i- enriching their sterile soil with the blood of wo-
id children1 What, sir, of rewards being offered
for Indian scalps, indifferent (of course, for it could
known) whether torri from the heads-of warriors or
of decrepit age or sleeping infancy 1 We of tihe
who boast not of our humanity, have never gone
than to offer rewards for the scalps of wolves-ne-
human scalps. Thei heart sickens, and human na-
udders at the picture And from what history, I am
are these elegant-extracts ?-. From the history of the
iate descendaintsof -'thePilgrims; 'and what may be
I even a higher, honor ith:,n t it, they were thus de-
id, the'aneestois ofn;- 'Ih .-r ,,t philaisthropists-as
lia boasted more of being the mother of the Gracchi
.he.daughter of. Scipio. It is no. excuse to say that
colonies.were then, subject to Great Britain. The
f their government may have been.in some particu-
fferent, but these were the acts of the colonists them-

peat, sir, that Icongratulate the gentleman on the reo-
fthese humane feelings.. I would, in all deference,
mend his people to beware lest the reaction may lead,
actions are-apt to do, to extremes. This spirit of phi-
'opy thesegood people may be unaccustomed to. Let
not drink of it too deeply at first. I take no special
ire in these topics, but I am tired, sir, of defending,
know of no better way of defending than to attack.
immend the.chalice to the lips of gentlemen them-
:, and desire that they should realize, by actual expe-
l, how pleasant it- is. If there is any thing which is
[ated to wound gentlemen, it is the truth of history
offends, and not I who have referred to it.
ADAMs inquired whethie Mr. THomrPsoN still ad-
to the opinions heretofore expressed by him, which.
v :
oces the gentleman, even in the latitude which he gives to
ght of petition, think that it includes slaves?- If le does
te has wilfully violated the rules of the House and the feel-
if its members. Does thatgentleman know that there are
in all the slave States, and here, for Ihe punishment of
who excite insurrection? I can tell him that there are
things as grand juries ;. and if, sir, the juries of this Dis-
lave, as I doubt not they have, proper intelligence andi
he u,,.,, -t I.-e made .amenable to another tribunal, and
may jyct .C. a', incendiary brought to condign punishment."_
r. T. reph:.il, as. to the first: When those remarks
i made, I did not believe that there could be any man
rnmirtiin.:d h, ',.v,nria,, that slaves have the right of
s.r.,: rii,,: ,;.',[l.:ul.,n has since avowed that most
:,r-I mriii; oprni'-.r He had not, however, done so be-
in,' reiak- wtre m:.j,d. An opinion so extraordinary,
I could n.:.l have su[,p:.p.',:d hI ei tinted it on any
r auih:.roly it'n hthlis ar.n ,i.':it aim :.rn As to the see-
I hae ,'nlvy i:. --, thmi'. rn i --'o..: ofthe liability
li- 'entillman .to 1 :.,iTnn l p r : :.1. t:, I understood
d itn : :itlt} I'ult of rl he hi. m-irn.,, h.me- If that I so un-
it.'l] itt hit 1i v- : .ri ab:.l.i'ion p, ilton. As it was
, the remarks hdve no.application to him. If it had
n, the ~-.prtsic.hl ': -I by me were just, and well'de-
,ed ; a.J I rei.e"t t opinion, as broadly as it is there
restedd, that the presentation of a petition for.abolition-
furnish sufficient evidence-of.correspondence and con-
ac iiiL ala .: o inmSr ih.i p,:.,m i .- .. 'li.:I 1 oTs at'ainst
e "wb.. cite irie ;n ,,iiiNe n. N. lo:.r their a,.i Jdoe Mi these
'e, bu f' the ': i.J'-i.: r. ni.' h i!i- ,.i ion thie H oluse
i a C u f;n' ,- o mIP-:..-l l ,rJ o .0 t' t, i-I.'.u _. _. orimVe-
.--toVrUr ar',st'-menmo'r ti-It,.- -.el I rin.I a man -
my kitchen urging my slavesto sign a petition denoune-
me as an oppressor and tyrant, and asserting that sla-
is avio-latiro ...ftlh right: s ,fuian :u-i thie i.ws of his
'ator.. What cimi.ng-.r ;nceritm,- io, insurcrii.:.r, ? Would
fact of I be,n2 a s.i erir ofl'.'. o.ebe .ri I him imnpu-
? -Suppose lie acknowledges on'i he floor that he had
.e this with the purpose of exciting insurrection ; or sup-
he d-oe. sonie c.]uialcnt ol c.- us-cs words which
all, a iJt.l h i-n,' ti l.r u%: ,1as evidence? Sup-
ad ukier i ld u 1,- a1. .a a..1 onthefloor that
ta d ria muani-may thiihot be given in evidence
pose a member to denounce another in debate as a
-or; and to say that he will give five hundred dollars to
one who will assassinate him-the member thus de-
tord i, i',.-:-i':..J h.- -, bravo in the rotundo, whode-
Is ,th reC.iTd-, this act to pass with impunity be-
e ml.- gulht 'I ac.:essary consisted in words.spoken in
ite, though not the less clearly the guilt ofa accessa-
What is the object of the provision of the Constitu-
1 The great' |r-ileg -i ,lme f'r.:dirr, .-,." debate ? Sure-
ol iit;rPn;Iv' I.,r cni; Su'jr.:1 3 ri-tmr-: could be more
ilUInf ilt ,n 11 'n ..ri,e r ,J [hal: Ihi criri.o n:ai I ,I 1.f sl-i ,n J
b ,. t..l tc ., .n r n 't .: r ,: -.. r .. l i h _
. And the dJ ', ] .:-'nno ".:-:,i... I .:d.rJi i:, it-,' T ,
leman puts the .case of a member being brought before
and jury for denouncing the President. Would the
leman ,sy tha:, would be a violation of any criminal
of the lard Unless he can, the case is not parallel,
the gentleman knows it. -If, however, it can answer
any purpose, he is perfectly at liberty to pervert my
iment., .
:hiill -nti.u, as I have done, to denounce the many
art :' .J at-oio._u: usurpations of this Government
lout fear of criminal prosecution ; and I venture to say
if the.honorable member from Massachusetts regards
cases as parallel,; no other human being does. But, sir,
t scorn would he not deserve and receive who should
npt to screen himself behind his privileges from the'
- ties of the criminal laws of the land ?-to interpose
privilege of a member of Congress between a felon and
gibbet-a privilege intended to secure perfect freedom
-bought and of speech,, claimed as an' immunity for
aes? Themoral guilt w.:.-,i.ll.. lth samni, and the same,
ist, would also be the :nti-...N. .lthe act and the penal-
of the law. :
Extracts from Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts-ac-
.t of the Pequod war. -
The Indians soon climbed to the topof the palisades to avoid
fire, and so exposed;.themselves to the English bullets ;
:rs forced their way out olihe.tort, and if any of them broke
ugh the English, the allied Indians were in a ring at sore
ance, so that few, if any, escaped. There were 60 or 70
vams, and it was imnagined.foaee roh'ive hundred Pequods,
, women, and children. Few, if any, escaped."-1i vol.
Th.: In...in- in alliance with-the English (i. c. Colonists)
taken ten males andi eight- females; four of the males were
osed of, onrie to each of our Sachems, thIe rest put to the
:d. Four of the females were leftat the fort-the other four
led to Connecticut, where the Indians challenged them as
Prize ; they were sacrificed to end the dispute. 79. Many
e captives were sent to Bermudas and sold for slaves. The
tod tribe was wholly extinguished." 80.
'1 these atrocities were perpetrated in the name of God, and
-him service. Hear E. G. That it was evident that God
chosen New-England to plant his people in, and that ji
.d be displeasing unito him thathis work should be hindered."
ae account of the war with the Narragansets this is found :
aey began to fire the wigwams-in many of them the Indian
en and children perished." 298.
ie termination of Philip's war.--"A great many of the
Fs were.executed at Boston and Plymouth, and most of the
were sold and shipped off for slaves to Bermudlas, and other
s." 307.
The hand of the great Philip, a hero and patriot, was cutoff;
says the historian, produced a handsome penny, many
ng a curiosity to see it." "The ruling passion strong in
as in deathl"
The Government increased tIme premium for Indian scalps
captives to one hundred pounds. This encouraged John
well toraise a company ofvolunteers to go out unon an In-
huning Jauar lii, e bougt t B~tona cpoiv andI-


nunting. January 5th, he broughtto Boston a captive and
Sip. Going out a second time, he discovered ten Indians
d a fire, alf asleep; lie ordered part of his company to fire,
killed three : the other sever, .'as they were rising up, were
to rekt again by the other part of the coiupany. The ten
is were brought to Boston."
Being whipped. by the Indians in one of these Indian
-s," the historian says, "Thi mis fortunee discouraged In-
huntlings. '
OPYING PAPER.-20 Reams of the best English
Copying Paper, for sale at Stationers' Hall.


PROCEEDINGS ON CONGRESS.'
IN CONT~ TION. .

FRIm FEBRUARY 24, 1837.

IN SENATE.
TARIFF.
The Senate having resumed the considerations the bill
to reduce the duties on certain imports-
.Mr. DAVIS spoke at length in reply to Mr. CALHOUN
and others, in relation to the history of the tariff of 1828,
and the course of New England in reference to that bill.
SHe denied the authority of any Senator to pledge tu -: "i
to an observance of the compromise law of 1833. fi, 1
was for the Legislatures of the States to do.
Mr. BENTON went into a lengthy reply, in which he
quoted the journal to show that the present bill was more
advanced in proportion.to the date of the session than the
compromise bill had been in 1833; from which he took oc--
casion to vindicate the committee who reported it from the
chiar'ge of delay. He denied the binding force of the. com-
pronise act, against which he spoke with some severity.
He warmly commended the policy of regulating commerce
by equivalents, and expressed a determination to commence
a'regular system of operations with a view to-have that
policy extensively pursued -by this Government.
After a few remarks from Mr. NILES, the question was
taken on striking out the duty on salt, and decided in the.
nec.tive, by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Buchmana, Calhoun, Clay, Clayton,
Crittenden, Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Kent, Knight, Mc-
Kean, Nicholast,.Robbins, Robinson, Southard, Webster
-15. -
NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Benton, Brown, Cuthbert,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Mouton, Niles,
Norvell, Page, Parker, Prentiss, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier,
Strange, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Walker, WVhite,
Wright-28.
Mr. BENTON moved to amend the bill by inserting a
particular kind of blankets, (specified in his amendment,)
used principally by the Indians; which amendment was
agreed to-Ayes 23, noes 14.
Mr. NILES moved to insert an amendment to reduce
the duty on coal, coke, &c. to $1 within the present year,
and to 75 cents a ton the succeeding year, &c.
Mr. NILES spoke at length in support of his amend..
meant, inveighing with great severity against. the duty on
coal, as leading to monopoly, and oppressive to the poor.
In the course of his speech he adverted to the influence of
capitalists over the legislation of Congress. He went not
for wealth, but for numbers.
Mr. BUCHANAN replied,, and dwelt upon the neces-
sity of a protecting duty to the coal miners of Pennsylva-
nia. On the faith of that protection, a great amount of
capital had been investedin cutting railroads and canals to
the coal region. The business gave employment to a large
numtiber of poor and industrious people, while the small,
vessels engaged in transporting the coal coastwise formed
an invaluable nursery for ibur seamen. It was no mono-
poly. The i:.-'1 r-.,= i.oin vas of vast extent, and open to all
who choose '.. fpur.:,s-o.'
Mr. NILES briefly replied, and insisted that it was a
monopoly, because the canals and railroads were in the
hands of wealthy companies; and as to.a nursery for sea-
men, that would be only increased by a reduction in the
price of coal.- '
Mr. WEBSTER opposed the amendment, and argued
that the only true way to bring down the price of Ameri-
can coal was to free it from the competition from England
and Nova Scotia, wheresthe late Duke of York owned a
coal mine, whi.:h l, 1. C ..it.:.- -, :. p.r.:.i would soon have
command of t1 Anri. ,.:.-rn i'a.., -.. soon as the protect-
ing duty-should be removed. He inveighed against the
perpetual vacillations in our policy, and argued to show
that those who had invested extensive capital on the faith
of our laws were entitled to something like stability in the
course of the Government. He protested against the cry
of taxes-being for the rich against the poor. In a country
like this, if the Government did not protect capital when
employed to supply the great wants of the country, we
must sit down contented to be forever a poor nation.
Mr. NILES -briefif'replied, insisting that protection was
needed o-tnly vr. rli-i there wvas an exertion of skill and inge-
nuity, -i -dn.n.t fu,, the supply of coarse material which the
hand of the Almighty had scattered profusely over mountains
-and valleys. He was not the representative of capitalists;
he went for the mass, for numbers, not for money, &c.
I Mr. Pf1 E.STON supp.:.i-d tlh. a,.ii..Jin.:. mot'Mr. NLEs,
:and declar,- o ahn,4f his-hands were free from the restraint
of rt.' cir,,rpr..--ian act, he shouLd move not merely to re-
du'., tbut to take, off the-tax entirely. He then went into
f p.'li:.h', I view of the subject, and contended that the va-
riant courses of the four bhairmen.-of the Committees -on
:Finance, on Manufactures, on Foreign Relations, and on
Naval Affairs, in reference to the tariff, showed that, with
the party having the ascendency, the tariff was an open
question, on which the members of that party were per-
mitted to differ; whence he argued that the South could
have no pledge that the policy of the coming Administra-
.tion would be decidedly an anti-tariff policy. Pennsylva-
nia was irreclaimably tariff; Virginia unalterably anti-ta-
riff: and these two great States had combined to put in a
President who was to stand, like a great Colossus, with one
foot on tariff Pennsylvania, and the other on anti-tariff
Virginia, while the little States of the South might creep
about between his legs, and seek them out dishonorable
graves.
Mr. WEBSTER spoke with great earnestness, and
with unusual warmnthanid some severity, in reply to Mr.
NiuEs, whom he accused as having misrepresented him on
this and other occasions, as advocating the cause of capi-
tal against that of labor; thIe poor against the rich.- If he
thought that it was the true interest of the poor to reduce
the protection on American coal, he would cheerfully vote
for the amendment; but believing exactly the reverse, he
should oppose it. He- reminded Mr. N. that the whole
system of protecting policy, nay, the Constitution itself,
had had its origin in the desire to protect Americanindus-
try against overwhelming British competition. The adop-
tion of the Constitution had not been owing to their rich
men, but to the mechanics, the laboring men of this coun-
try, The true way. to benefit the poor was to protect their
industry, to secure to them a reward for their toil. He re-
minded Mr. N. of the large protection enjoyed by the work-
ing men of Connecticut-the heavy duties on hats, on
tin ware, imported woollens-and reprobated the idea of
attacking a general policy to accomplish a mere temporary
* purpose. The way to make Amecrican coal cheap was to
protect it from foreign competition until the capital em-
ployed had completed'the means of supply, and domestic,
competition reduced the article to its minimum price. It
was very true that coal was scattered through the moun-
tains, and there it would lie forever, until the hand of Ia-
-bor, guided and employed by the combination of capital,
brought it out. The object of the protecting policy vas to
secure those brawny arms and. industrious hands steady
employment and a fit reward; and it was a false and inju-
rious representation of the policy, and of those who ad-
vocated it, to hold them up to odium as favoring the rich
against the poor.
Mr. BUCHANAN replied, with some wintath, to a re-
mark of.Mr. PaRESTON which he considered as personal,
but Mr. P. promptly.explained.
Mr. B. proceeded to vindicate his course, as having been
prescribed to him lby no party arrangements or party tram-
mels, but dictated solely by a sense of duty, and a regard
to tie interests of his constituents.
Mhi. PRESTON followed, in fuller explanation of what
he had before said as to the tariff being an open question,
and in regard to the obligation imposed by the compromise
act.
Mr. NILES replied to Mr. WnEBSTER, denying any in-
tention to misrepresent him, or to have inade a personal
reference to him in his former remarks, yet insisting on the
influence of capitalists over the legislation of Congress.
He commented in rather a humorous manner on the course
of Mr. PRESTON, whom he represented as endeavoring to
awaken the ghbst of nullification, and as wandering all
around the points of the compass until he got to a point
that was not in the compass. [A laugh.]
Mr. EWING, of Ohio, here moved to adjourn. The
motion was lost-Yeas 10, nays 33.
The question was then -taken on the amendment pro-
posed by Mr. NIt.Es, for a gradual reduction of the duty oh
foreign coal, coal screenings, and coke, and decided in the
negative, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton, Hubbard,
King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Lyon, Niles, Page,
Rives, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange, 'ipton, Walker-15.
NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Benton, Buchanan, Critten-
den, Davis, Kent, Knight, Linn, McKean, Nicholas, Nor-
vell, Parker, Prentiss, Robinson, Southard, Tallmadge,
Wall, Webster, White, Wright-20.
Mr. KENT moved to strike out the article of fancy and


other soaps, Windsor soap, and washball ; but the amend-
ment did not prevail.
Mr. NILES made', -i.r.ih eO...-t in regard, to enimmon
tinned andI japanned ., I' .If L... the amcnd'mefitwasre-,
jected,
Mr. KNIGHT moved tQ strike out palm leaf brooms.
Here was an article made by the poor, almost exclusively,


and, if gentlemen wanted to benefit the poor, here was an
opportunity. .
Mr. PRESTON i Oi,,.] what duty that article paid.
Mr. WRIGHT phli-.J '15 per cent.
SThe amendment was rejected. -
Mr. KNIGHT moved to strike out the article of button
-moulds. The motion was negatived-Ayes 16, noes 19.
Mr. CRITTENDEN moved to strike out all spirits
made of vinous materials imported into the Uuited States."
Mr. WRIGHT explained that the object of the com-
mittee had been to reduce the revenue as far as they could
with-safety, and, as this article bore a protecting duty of
from 53 to 85 cents, they supposed it might be reduced one
half, and still sufficiently protect the domestic article made
from grain; in which case, without injuring any one, the
revenue might be reduced half a million of dollars. He
demanded the yeas and nays; which being taken, stood as
follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Buchanan, Calhpun, Crittenden, Hen-
dricks, Kent, Knight, Morris, Prentiss; Preston, Robbins,
Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tipton, Tomlinson, Webster,
White-17.
-NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Geo., Linn, Nicho-
las, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier,
-Strange, Tallmadge, Walker, Wall, Wright-21.
Mr. KENT moved to strike out the article of wines.
After some -remarks by Messrs. NORVELL and
SOUTHARD, the question was taken by yeas and nays,
as follows: c
YEAS-Messrs. Buchanan, Crittenden, Hendricks,
-K,: ilK.i1a e, itl.-'rri iRobhbins, Robinson, Southard, Swift,
T t.i.:,n T.rr.l;r..:,n- 12. ,
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Davis,
Fulton, Huibbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia,
Linn, Lyon, Nieho61s, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Pres-
t.. R; R.-.- ., i-.ier, Strange, Tallmadge, Walker,
"-il, V,:."in.[v Vhii.,:, Wright-26.
ThI. t,,ll .;. i',ca i- ported hto the Senate, and all. the,
amenddi,,,. ,ar, iJ t.. ;th ik.. ,i-ception of the following-
1. ,,U" 'n l.na *,od pi:-. ..l 'in, earthen and stone ware.
Mr. WVl:-Tl--.iT I;..I. J i',, as the Senate was now
very ti.n, .11:..u-l r't.' rit, hi t-.ppmn that a different 'ote
would b, obtained from what had been given in committee
when the Senate was full, yet it would-be better to adhere
to the former vote, to avoid a reconsideration or other diffi-
culty when the seats should be full again to-morrow.
To this it was replied that one Senator (Mr K aNIGHT)
had avowedly changed his vote, and another was present
now who had not been in committee. I
The question on concurring with the Commiitee of the
Whole in the amendment which struck out this article
from the bill, (thereby retaining the protecting !duty upon
it,) was decided by yeas and nays, as follows: D
YEAS--Messrs: Bayard, Buchanan, Crittenlen, Davis,
Hendricks, Kent, Linn, Nicholas, Robbins,, Robinsol,
Southard, Swift, Tallmadga' Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall,
Webster, White-18. .
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert* Fulton,
Hubbard, King. of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Knight,
Lyon, Morris, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rivoe, Rug-
gles, Sevier, Strange, Walker-19.
So china and earthenware were retained in the "bill, as
free ofduty.
2. Blankets chiefly used among the Indians.
On this Mr. DAVIS demanded the yeas and niys. He
objected to the amendment as injurious to the int rests of
several manufactories of blankets established within the
United States. .
Mr. BENTON, Mr. LINN, and Mr. NORV LL ex-
plained the great difference between Indian blankets and
those of a'domestic manufacture, and the very dec ded pre-
ference which the Indians expressed for the one yver the
other, and which precluded all competition from pur fac-
tories, with what were usually known among thcmyas Mac-
inaw blankets. They were thick, finely woven, anl of the
finest wool, and impervious to-the rain. )
After some desultory conversation, the amendment was
concurred in by the Senate-Yeas 23, nays 14.
So the Indian blankets were inserted in the bill as free,
of duty.
3. On striking out cigars. Amendment agreed to: Yeas
18, noes 16. -
Mr. DAVIS renewedTn the Senate the motion he had
made in Committee of the Whole, to strike from the bill
olive oil, and demanded the yeas and nays.
Mr. WEBSTER advocated the amendment to take off
the duty on this article, while it would afford but a very
trifling relief in point of revenue, went to interfere with the
great whaling interest, which it was so important to
cherish. :
Mr. NORVELL also supported the motion, and the
question being taken,,it was carried by yeas and nays, as
follows : ......- .- I -. .-
YEAS-WMessrs. Bayard, Buchanan, Crittenden, Davis,
Hendricks, Kent, Knight, Linn, Nichiolas, Norvell, Rob-
bins, Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tallinadge, Tipton,
Tomlinson, Webster, White-19.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Lyon,
Niles, Page, Parker, Rives, Ruggles, Sevier, Strange,
Walker, Wall-17.
Mr. KENT moved to strike out sulphate of quinine and
calomel, but the amendment was rejected; when at about
8 o'clock the question was at length obtained, and the bill
was ordered to be-engrossed for its third reading by the fol-
lowing vote:
YEAS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Fulton,
Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of Georgia, Linn,
Lyon, Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives, Rug-
gles, Sevier, Strange, Tahllmadge, Walker, Webster,
White, Wright-23.
NAYS-Messrs. Buchanan, Crittenden, Davis, Hen-
dricks, Kent, Robbins, Robinson, Southard, Swift, Tipton,
Wall-11.
And then the Senate adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

FORTIFICATION BILL-IN coNTINUATION.
Mr. BELL moved to add an additional section to ,the
bill, providing that the money which should be in the Trea-
sury of the United States on the 1st of January, 1838, re-
serving five millions of dollars, should be deposited with
the several States, according to the 13th, 14th, and 15th
sections of the bill to regulate the public deposits, approv-
ed June 23, 1836.
The amendment-was debated by Messrs. BELL, CAM-
BRELENG, WILLIAMS, of North Carolina, GAR-
LAND, of Virginia, and UNDERWOOD. '
Mr. A. MANN moved to amend the amendment of Mr.
BELL, by adding after the word States" in proportion to
the ratio of representation of such States in the House of
Representatives of the Congress of thb United States." ,
The subject was further debated by Messrs. McKEON,
A. -MANN, G. LEE, -W. THOMPSON, CRARY, -
ROBERTSON, BOULDIN, arid LANE.
When, the question being taken, the amendment to the
amendment was rejected.
And the question was taken on the original amendment,
and decided in the negative-Ayes 71, noes 75.
So the amendment was rejected. *.
On rr':di.,:.n ,:.f ,l CA i\Ml BRELENG, the committee
then rose:, an'i report. in: tI o bills to the Housei (i. e.
the Arm,' au-I F.ili;:.mi.-, Appropriation bills.) ,
And, o,, im'otlio,,n of 1r. iV I L-.LIAMS, of North Carol
lia, at nine o'tclock, '
TI lt II..,.. ..djo,..I..J ,

SALE OFP CARRIAGES, BAROUCHES, &c.-
On Thursday, 2d March, at 4 o'clock P. M. I shallsell, at
the stables of Mr. Hard, (formerly Mr. Fuller's,) on Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, the following -handsome carriages, barouches,
&c. viz.
1 close quartered coach for two or four horses ; an excel-
lent article for gentlemen travelling
3 handsome coaches, (only in use a few months,) Northern
built, in thorough order and repair
3 do do single and double Barouchesbrass
and silver mounted
2 do Buggy Wagons, just finished. "
Terms atsale. The above articles are allin first-rate order,
are built of the very best materials, and will be sold without re-
serve. They will be ready for inspection the day before the
sale, at the above place.
feb 27--dits EDWARD DYER. Auct.
AN OVERSEER AND GARDENER WANT-
ED.-A sober, steady man, of middle age, with or with-
out a small family, is wanted at Arlington, opposite to Washing-
ton. city. To one of this description, acquainted with the cul-
ture of the market garden, good accommodations and.liberal
wages will be given. fob 27-3t
-)X-CART, HARROW, PLOUGHS, etc., Fur-
niture, HIerrilgs.-On Tuesday next, 28th instant, at
9 o'clock A. M. in front of lhe Centre Market, I shallsell, with-
out reserve, viZ.
1 Ox-cart, riearly new


1 large Harrow, 3 Ploughs, 1 Cuiltivator
Lot of Wagon Gear
Lot of Grubbing and Weeding Hoes
Urames, Swingletrees, &e.
5 Goarts, 1 twivo-horse Wiagoni
A large and general assortment of good Furniture
20 barrels Potomac Herrings
mn,)WInj'am.,IIe 5L.R


feb 27-2t


Ammetion seer-.


TWENTY-FQURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2.5, 1837.

IN SENATE.
Mr. TALLMADGE presented the credentials of the
honorable Silas Wright, re-elected a Senator of the United
States from the State of New York, for six years from and
after the 3d of March next.
The following petitions, praying the abolition of slavery
and the slave trade in the District of Columbia, were pre-
septed :
By Mr. McKEAN, from ladies of Pittsburg and of Phi-
ladelphia, and from citizens of Pennsylvania, amounting
in all, to 6,000 or more petitioners.
By Mr. SWIFT, from inhabitants of Vermont.
By Mr. EWING, of Ohio, from inhabitants of Lucas*
county, Ohio.
Which petitions were not received; the question of re-
ception being successively laid on the.table on motion of
"Mr. BAYARD.
Mr. McKEAN having called for the yeas and nays on
laying the motion to receive his petition on the table,'they
were ordered, and it was laid on the table by the following
vote:
YEAS-Messrs. Bayard, Black, Calhoun, Clayton,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, -IHubbard, King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Norvelf, Parker,
Robinson, Ruggles, Sevier, Tallmadge; Walker, White,
Wright-21. .
NAYS-Messrs. Clay, Ewing, of Ohio, 'Hendricks,
McKean, Morris, Prentiss, Robbins, Southard, Swift,
Tipton, Wall, Webster-12.
On motion of Mr. HUBBARD, the Committee on Pen-
sions was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of Benjamin McCall.
Mr, PRENTISS, from the Cominittee on Pensions, to
wvho:0 was referred the petition.of Jonathan Crow, reported
.a bill granting him a pension'; which .vyas read a first time,
and ordered to a second reading.
Mr. SOUTHARD, from the.Committee on Naval Af-
fairs, reported the bill referred to them for organizing the
navy, with amendments, which were read. .
Mr. TALLMADGE, from the Committee on Naval
Affairs, reported a bill to adjust and settle the accounts of
Horatio N. Crafts, which was read twice by consent, and
ordered to be engrossed for a third reading.
On motion of Mr. DAVIS, the Committee on Com-
merce was discharged from the further consideration of the
memorial of the weighers of the port of New York, pray-
ing an increase of compensation; from the further conside-
ration of the memorial of the General Hospital Society of
the State of Connecticut, praying a grant from Congress of
$20,000; from two memorials of the Mayor and City
Council of Baltimore, one having reference to Chesapeake
bay, and the other to a depot for the use of revenue cutters;
from the memorial of John H. Clarke, of Boston, in rela-
tion to telegraphs, this subject being already in progress;
and from the petition of Daniel P. Drown, for an increase
of compensation, which Mr. HUBBARD stated was not suf-
ficient to pay his expenses.
Mr. DAVIS observed that many cases similar to this
had been brought before the committee, who were fully
persuaded that there ought to be a general law on the sub-
ject, in regard to which the committee had not yet all the
requisite information ; and he observed, further, that a bill
for this particular case would at once be embarrassed.by a
multitude of amendments.
On motion of Mr. SEVIER, the Committee on Pensions
was discharged from the further consideration of the-peti-
tions of Alexander Eskell, and of S. Newrisha.
On motion of Mr. TOMLINSON, the Committee on
Pensions was discharged from the further consideration of
the petition of John Edmonds, for arrears of pension.
Mr. DAVIS presented the proceedings and resolutions
of the Legislature of Massachusetts, urging on Congress
the importance of observing the faith of the compromise
tariff act, and of a steady and.uniform policy in relation to
commerce. Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
LAND LAWS AND DECISIONS.
The following resolutions were offered by Mr. WEB-
STER:
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury cause to
be prepared a collection of the instructions which have been
issued from time to time, either by the Secretary of the
Treasury or the Commissioner of the Land office, except-
ing only such as refer exclusively, both in principle and
application, to particular or individual cases, together with
the official opinions of the Attorney General on questions
,,,,i underthe land laws.
Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate cause the
general public acts of Congress respecting the sale and dis-
position of- the public lands, together with the instructions
and opinions mentioned in the foregoing resolution, to be
printed for the use of the Senate.
In offering these resolutions, Mr. WEBSTER said it
. was his object that the general acts, the instructions given
under them, and the official opinions of the Attorney Gen-
eral on questions arising in the administration of these laws,
should be collected and published, and made available to
all. These instructions and opinions are in manuscript.
They are only known at'the Land Office, and may govern
questions arising there without any means on the part of
thoseinterested, to possess themselves fully of their character
and contents. The laws, although contained in the two vol-
umes commonly called the volumes of the land laws, were
yet mixed up.with such a mass of treaties, ordinances, and
private acts, that it is not always easy to bring them to-
gether, or to get a connected view of their provisions.
The subject was getting to be very important. Interfer-
ing claims were constantly arising,; especially under pre-
emption acts; and it was understood that an appeal, in these
cases, lay to the Commissioner, or to the Secretary of the
Treasury. The land office was thus becoming an import-
ant judicature; and it was essential that its course and its
rules of proceeding should be known. Interesting rights
were decided by it, and it became Congiess to look into its
proceedings, and to see that the laws were openly, fairly,
and ably executed. The first step to reach this end, was
to make public, in some accessible form, the instructions
and opinions under which the land officers acted. Any
further provisions to insure a proper administration, could
then be adopted, which Congress shouldjudge necessary,
if, indeed, any should be thought necessary.
The resolutions were agreed to. :
The following bills were read a third time, passed, and
sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence :
The bill to authorize the President of the United States
to ascertain and designate the boundary between Michigan
and Wisconsin,
The bill to establish a port of entry at Jersey city, New
Jersey, and for other purposes. .
The-bill adjusting the land claims of Baron Bastrop, the
Marquis do Maison Rouge, and others in Louisiana and
Arkansas.
The bill to continue the office of Commissioner of Pen-
sions ; and
The bill to ratify and confirm certain official acts of John
, Pope, former Governor of Arkansas .
REDUCTION OF THE REVENUE.
SThe bill to alter and e,,,indJ 'ih,: several acts imposing
dti,'i on imports, (for reducing the'ditties,) came up on its
th,,li reading and final passage. ,
Mr. SOUTHARD having called for the yeas and nays
on the question, proceeded at some length in opposition to
the bill, and especially those portions of it whish affected
the arrangement of the compromise act of 1833, urging that
the duty on sugar ought as much to be repealed as the duty
on salt; that the bill would favor the rich far more than
the poor; and that the faith of thecountry, as well as high
individual interests, required that the provisions of the com-
promise tariff act, so called, of 1833; should not be violated.
Mr. CLAY went int6 a history of the inception and
adoption of the compromise bill. and the general under-'
.standing with which it had been received throughout the
Union, and argued to show that if the present bill should
pass, the friends of the protecting policy would be free,
hereafter, to augment protecting duties, as they might deem
the interests of the country to require. He concluded a
very animated appeal by moving that the bill be recommit-
ted to the Committee on Finance, with instructions to strike
out all articles on which the duty is now 20 per cent. or
above, in accordance with the provisions of the compromise
act of 1833.
Mr. CLAY'S motion to recommit the bill was negatived
by the following vote:
YEAS-Messrs. Bayard, Black, Calhoun, Clay, Clay-
ton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Hendricks, Kent,
Knight, McKean, Moore, Morris, Prcntiss, Preston, Rob-


bins, Southard. Spence, Swift, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall,
Webster-24.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Ewing, of
Illinois, Fulton, Hubbard, King, of Alabama, King, of
zGeorgia, Linn, Lyon, Mouton, Nicholas, Niles, Noivell,
Pateo, Parker, Rives, 1onbinson, Ruggles, SeviCr, Strange,
Tallmnadge, Walker, White, Wright-25.
The debAte was further continued by Messrs. CAL-
HOUN, PRESTON, BLACK, aid TIPTON.
Mr. KNIGHT moved to recommit the bill with instrue-
tions to strike out common salt, stone and porcelain ware,


palm leaf brooins, button moulds, tinned, and japansned
saddlery, and spirits madefiom vinous materials, which mo-
tion was.negatived .by yeas and nmays, as follow,: "
YEAS--Messrs. Bayard, Black; Calhoun, Clay, Clay-
,ton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, 'Hendricks,
Knight, McKean, Prentiss, Preston, Robbins, Southard,
Spence, Swift, Tipton, Tomlinson, Webster-20.
NAYS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Cuthbert, Ewing, of
Illinois, Fulton, Grundy, Huhbard,. King, of Alabama,
King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, M'.:i,, Mouton, Nicholas,
Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, I-h. RPobinson, Ruggles,
Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Walker, White, Wrighlt-27.
The bill was then passed by the following vote :
YEAS-Messrs. Benton, Black, Brown, Cuthbert,
Ewing, of Illinois, Fulton, Grundy, Hubbard, King, of
Alabama, King, of Georgia, Linn, Lyon, Moore, Mouton,
Nicholas, Niles, Norvell, Page, Parker, Rives,. Ruggles,
Sevier, Strange, TallmadJge, Walker, White, Wright-27.
NAYS-Messrs. Calhoun, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden,
Davis, Ewing, of Ohio, Hendricks, Knight, McKean, Mor-
ris, Prentiss, Preston, Robbins, Robinson, Southard,
Spence, Tipton, Tomlinson-18.
On motion of Mr. LINN, the 3Scnate proceeded to the
consideration of the bill to establish a Surveyor General's
office for the Territory of Wisconsin.
On motions of Messrs. ROBINSON, TIPTON, and
NORVELL, the bill was successively so amended as to
provide for the establishment of Surveyor General's offices
in the States of Illinois, Indiana, andJlichigan respective-
ly, and having been still further amended, it was ordered
to be engrossed for a third reading.
On motion of Mr. WHITE, the bill to authorize and
sanction the sales of reserves provided for Creek Indians in
the treaty of March 24, 1832, in certain cases, and for
other purposes, was considered as in Committee of the
Whole, and ordered to a third reading.
On motion of Mr. WALKER, the bill to amend the
act for laying out Fort Madison and other towns in Wis-
consin, and for other purposes, was considered as in Com-.
mittee of the Whole, and ordered to be engrossed for a
third reading.
Also, the bill to establish two additional land offices in
Wisconsin, west of the Mississippi.,
On motion of Mr. WEBSTER, .the bill to approve 'and
confirm three several acts of the Legislative Council of
Wisconsin, establishing three banks in that Territory, was
considered, as in Committee of the Whole, and ordered to
be engrossed for a third reading.
Also, on the motion of Mr. HENDRICKS, the bill es-
tablishing certain roads imn Wisconsin. (Amended with
additions.)
On motion of Mr. TALLMADGE, thb joint resolution
for the relief of Lieut. Horatio N. Crabbe,was, by consent,
read a third time and passed..
On motion of Mr. MORRIS, the bill for the appoint-
ment of an additional -,it..r for the Territory of Wis-
consin, was considered, ;-, n Committee of'the Whole, and
lost.
On motion of Mr. HUBBARD, the. bill explanatory of
the act granting half-pay :to the widows and orphans of
those whi died in the military service of the United States,
was considered as in Committee of the Whole, explained
by Mr. TOMLeNs.ON, and opposed by Mr. CAtnouN, who
moved to strike out the'second section of the bill, but the
amendment did not prevail and the bill was ordered to its
engrossment.
The Senate then proceeded (about 5 o'clock) to Execu-
tive business.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
MEXICO.
The unfinished business of the morning hour was the
report,-with the accompanying resolutions, reported yester-
day by Mr. HowARD, from the Committee on Foreign Af-
fairs, on the subject of the relations between the United
States and Mexico. --' .
Mr. CAMBRELENG-said he did not see the chairman
of the Committee on Foreign Affairs in his place, and he
would therefore move that the further consideration of the
subject be postponed until to-morrow.
Mr. McKIM said he would state for the information of
the House-that his colleague (Mr. HowARn) was very uin-
well, and not able to attend to his duties here.
Mr. ADAMS hoped that the chairman of-the Commit-
tee of Ways and Means (Mr. CAMBRELENG) would name
some other day than Monday; Tuesday, if he pleased. He
hoped that, as so many weeks had passed over without an
opportunity having been given to present petitions, and as
Monday was the last day on which they could be present-
ed during the present session, another day would be fix-
ed on.
Mr. CAMBRELENG then moved Tuesday; which
motion was agreed to.
And so the further consideration of the subject was post-
poned until Tuesday next.
On motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, the Committee of
the Whole on the state of the Union was discharged from
the further consideration of the bill making appropriations
for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the Government
for the year 1837, with a view to its recommitment to the
Committee of Ways and Means, for the purpose of adding
thereto certain amendments.
The motion was agreed to; and Mr. CAMBRELENG
thereupon reported the bill back again to the House, with
certain amendments. 'And the bill and amendments were
committed.
Mr. THOMAS, from the Committee on the Judiciary,
reported a bill for the relief of James P. Carlton. Read
twice, and committed.
Mr. HOWELL, from the Committee on Invalid Pen-
sions, moved that the committee be discharged from the
further-consideration of the petition of Charles Larabre,
iand that the same do lie on the table, Agreed to.
Mr. CASEY, from the Committee on Public Lands,
to which was recommitted the bill to authorize the Illinois
Central Railroad Company to construct a railroad through
the public lands, reported the same with amendments.
Committed, and ordered'to be printed.
Mr. LINCOLN, from the Committee on Public
Lands, moved that the committee be discharged from the
consideration of the petition of inhabitirits of Chenango
county, New York, for a law limiting the sales of public
lands to actual settlers; of the trustees of the Franklin
Manual Labor College, in Illinois;.and also of the petition-
of Bishop Chase, of Illinois. Agreed to.
Mr. JARVIS, from the Committee on Public Buildings,
reported upon the petition of John McArann, concluding
with the following resolution, the consideration of which
was postponed until Tuesday next:
Resolved, That' it is expedient that the public ground
between the Pennsylvania and Maryland Avenues, the
west Capitol square, and Third street, should be enclosed,
for the purpose of being improved as a botanic garden, and
for the establishment of a national museum ; and the Pre-
sident of the United States is hereby requested to cause a
survey of the grounds, and a plan of the grounds and suit-
able buildings to be made, with estimates of the expense;
and that lie also be requested to cause the collection of
plants and natural curiosities belonging to John McArann,
of Philadelphia, to be examined by competent judges, for
the purpose of ascertaining their value; the whole to be
submitted to this House at its next session.
S CULTIVATION OF. SILK..
Mr.- ADAMS, from the Committee on Manufactures, to
whom lhad been refoterred a resolution of the House, in-
structing them to inquire into the expediency of promoting
the culture and manufacture of silk in the United States,
reported thereon at length.
Mr. A. said that this report had been made at the pre-
sent session, though probablyit was not perfectly in order.
The resolution referring this subject to the Committee on
Manufactures had been adopted at the last session of Con-
gress; and the committee, at that time, charged one of its
members, (Mr. JUDSON, a Representative from the State of
Connecticut,) who had offered the resolution, with the du-
ty of collecting the information alluded to. That gentle-
man had been subsequently transferred to another depart-
ment of the Government, and had resigned his seat in this
House. He had not ceased, however, to prosecute his in-
quiries; and, at a late period of the present session of Con-
gress, the chairman of the Co nmittee on Manufiactures
Mr. AnaurmS) had received a letter from him (Mr. Judson)
containing the substance of the information which had
been collected, and which was very valuable. Mr. A.
therefore, as the chairman of the committee, reported that
letter as a part of his report, and asked that it might be re-
ceived as such. The letter was short, and- he asked that
it might be read.
The same having been read, Mr. A. moved that the re-
port, together with the letter, be laid on the table, and
printed; which motim n was agreed to.
Mr. A. moved that 5,000 extra copies be printed.
The House consented to consider the motion at this time,


and the sase was agreed to.
Mr. HARD, from the Committee on Roads and Canals,
reported the following resolution : '
Resolved, That 5,000 copies of Senate document No.
333, entitled a Report of a geological reconnaissance made
in 1835, from the seat of Government, by way of Green
Bay and the Wisconsin Territory, to the Coteau du Prai-
rie, by G. W. Featherstonhlaughl United States Geologist,
for the use of the members of this House," be printed, un-
derthe direction of Mr. Featherstonhaugh.
Mr..H. asked that the resolution be considered at thistime.


Objection having been made, the resolution was ordered
to lie over.
Mr. CONNOR, from the Committee on the Post Office
and Post Roads, reported the following resolution:
Resolved, That the House will go into Committee of the
Whole on the state of the Union on Monday, immediately
after the reading of the journal, for the space of one hour
and a half,-for the purpose of considering two bills reported
by the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, for
the erection of a building for the Post Office Department,
and a bill to provide for additional clerks in the Post Office
Department and Auditor's office, and for other purposes.
The SPEAKER said the resolution would require a
vote of tvwo-ttlirds for its adoption.
Mr. STORER moved to amend the resolution by add-
ing and all the bills reported from the Committee on Re-
volutionary Pensoiions-,wb4ich amendment was rejected.
Mr. JARVIS suggested to the gentleman from North
Carolina (Mr. CONNOR) to modify his resolution so as to
name "1Monday, immediately after the reading of the jour-
nal," and then to say 'I and all other bills which the com-
mittee may see fit to take up."
The SPEAKER said that this resolution having been
reported from a committee, it would not be competent for
the gentleman from North Carolina to modify it.
Mr. CONNOR said he would adopt the first suggestion
of the gentleman from Maine, (Mr. JABVIS,) and moved to
amend the resolution by striking out the hour of eleven,
and inserting immediately after the reading of the jour-
nal."
Mr. ADAMS hoped that no other business would be
allowed to interfere, with the presentation of petitions on
Monday.
And the question on the amendment of Mr. C. was ta-
ken, and decided -in the affirmative. So the amendment
was agreed to .
Mr. JARVIS moved to amend the resolution by adding
at the end thereof and all such other bills as the commit-
tee may see fit to take up for consideration which amend-
ment .was rejected.
Mr. JOHNSON, -.:iVirg;hii, ,,:.,,:d to :irmend the reso-
lution, by including ith. L;ill i nl.,:i.un to. il,. extension of
the pension system:; r [ii :,% ,,_Ai,-,nj ..rr,t --'ejected.
Mr. CAVE Ji,' tNS(N...n.)m-i:d tu I .\ the whole sub-
ject on the tabl.: lhich_.;, u i n "aS i tu..l
Mr. LANE rmi.:\.J c. attend te.: n :,-utei,n. by including
the bill granting a r.ght ofm \i\ thro fi1 ii.h public lands
to the Maumnce b.in h R.,ilr.r..d _..r,,,., ,nh-ch namend-
ment was agreed to. .
Mr. BOON asked if it was in order to restrict the com-
mittee, by specifying in the resolution the time whiich should
be allotted to them for the consideration of these'bills.
The CHAIR said the matter was within the power of
the House.
Mr. ADAMS called for the yeas and nays on the adop-
tion of the resolution; which, were refused.
And the question on the adoption of the resolution was
then taken, and .decided in the negative--Yeas 88, nays
57; [two-thirds not voting in the affirmative.] So the re-
solution was rejected.
I UNITED STATES BANK.
Mr. GALBRAITH, from the select committee upon,
the subject of the United States Bank, reported the follow-
ing joint resolution:
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of
the United States of America in Congress assembled,. That
until the notes of the late Bank of the Uniited States, which
may have been returned since the 3d day of March last,
redeemed from the funds of the said bank, shall cease to be
re-issued by its officers, directors, trustee or trustees, and
until the amount due to the Government from said bank
shall be settled to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the
Treasury, the notes of said bank, and the notes of any
bank to which its funds and estate may be transferred in
trust for the payment-of its debts and discharge of its obli-
gations, shall not be received in payment of any debts due
to the Government of the United States, or taken in ex-
change or deposit in any of the banks selected as deposi-
tories of the public money; and the Secretary of the Trea-
sury is hereby directed to adopt such measures as he may
deem necessary to carry this provision into effect. .
The resolution having been read the first time, and the
question being on the second reading,
Mr. LINCOLN said he was somewhat surprised that a
report should have been made from a committee of which
he was a member, without his having had either the honor
or the opportunity of being-present when it was agreed to.
It was one of the most extraordinary propositions he had
ever heard. It proposed that no bank, which should re-
ceive the outstanding bills of the late United States Bank,
should have its own money receivable in payment of debts
of any kind due to tle Governmentn it was, in. short, to
discredit the notes of b theeUnion which should
receive such bills. But, before heentered into_a consider-
ation of the character of the resolution, he begged leave to
put one or two interrogatories to the chairman of the select
committee. And, in order that that gentleman might see
the pertinency of the. interrogatories, he (Mr. L.) would
state what had been his own observation of the course of
proceeding in relation to this resolution.
Immediately after the constitution of this committee, a
notification yeas made to its members to meet, for the pur-
pose of considering the various propositions committed to
it for examination, discussion, and action. At that meet-
ing, he believed, all the members but one were present. No
distinct action was had, but there had been a general sen-..
timent, so f.r as lie had understood the remarks of the dif-
ferent members of the committee, unfavorable to any defi-
nite action at that time ; but there had also been a-distinct
understanding that, whenever the chairman of the com-
mittee should think it advisable that thee committee should
again be assembled, a meeting should take place on notice.
given by him. The committee voted no adjournment, but
left it to th discretion of thechairman, (Mr. GALBRAITI,)
enlightened as lie (Mr. L.)had hoped that gentleman would
show himself to be, to re-assemble the committee at such
time as he might elect. Accordingly,'some time afterwards,
Mr. L. received a notice to meet the committee in one of
the rooms of the House. Within fifteen minutes of the
time appointed for the meeting of the committee, coming up,
he umet the chairman of the committee going down from the
Capitol, who informed him that the committee had not as-
sembled ; that he had been at the room, but that no one
was there. Soon afterwards, he (Mr. L.) was again noti-
fied to meet the committee. He came up, looked into the
room in which the committee was to assemble, and in eve-
ry other committee room on the first and second floor. Ho
then came into the House. He beat up messenger-boys
.and door-keeper;, to inquire for the chairman; but he could
neither see nor hear of him ; and, after wandering about
the purlieus of the palace for some time, lie gave up the
search as fruitless. Heo found neither the chairman nor'
any member of the committee; and, whenhe e did at last
chance to meet him, lie (Mr. L.) told him he must rclurn a
non est inventus against him. He (Mr. L.) was then no-
tified to meet on. another occasion. He came the third
time. In the committee-room he met the chairman and two
other members of the committee'; and, after discussing the
subject, (not a word of a report was said,) and after inquir-
ing what it was proposed to do, lie was informedtat at this
resolution was -one thing which hlie wished to bring for-
ward. But th. rt ,n'rn onhi fogur members present ; three
at first, one cr.e-,n.,- mI onil-w.i.J teanmd he was notified
that a meetir, in.:.iilI i. h- :l.t-is the private chambers of
the committee n ons that evening. But he heard nothing
about a report, nothing about a bill.
[It is necessary hero to explain, that Mr. L. alludes to
the report and bill which were presented by Mr. GaLn-eahrtr
a feow days since, from thle same select comnittce ; the lat-
ter of which provides for the infliction of pecuniary penal-
ties for re-issues of the noes of the late Bantik of the Unit-
e d S t a t e s ] -.. .
Oms the evening referred to, Mr. L. said it was impracti
cable for hin to attend, usin consequence, of other duti
The next evenisig he understood that report had bc '
made, not one word of which had bees submitted toJsisi
and that a short bill of a single section had also accompan-
ied the report. Of this, no notice had been given to him;
nor ehad he been notified of any other meeting on the sub-
ject, save that in the private chamybhr alluded to.
He now wislted to inquire from tlychairman of the coin-
mittee whether a majority of the committee were present
when the report and bill were agreed lo ? Whether the
report was read before la majority ? And whether a mna-
jority agreed that the report and resolutions both should
be reported to the House ? And, if so, why thie resolutions
were not reported at the same time as the report accompa-
nied by the bill ?.
Mr. GALBRAITH made some explanations in reply,
which were very impmrfcetly heard; but he was understood
to express his astonishment at the nature of the observma-
tions which had fallen from the gentleman Irom Massa-
clmsetts, (Mr. LiNcoeN,) and to say that it evas true that
thie commnittcce had met very shortly after they had been
constituted, and that the subject of the bill had beem fully
discussed between himself and that gentleman. None of
the other members of the committee said any thing about


it at that time. Some time afterwards, the committee met
again. He (Mr. G.) suggested the propriety of address-
ing a communication to the officers of the bank on the sub-
ject of reissuing the notes. The gentleman from Massa-
chusetts (Mr. LmNCOLNa,) had objected, and some conversa-
tion ensued amongst the members. Nothing was decided
on at that time, further than thlit lih (Mr. G.) should no-
tify the members when he thought they should meet agair.












uis elapsed before he notified them. He had no ti-
:m two or three times. and at last, there were four
rs present, namely, the gentleman from Maine, (Mr.
,) liJe gentleman. fromNew York, (Mr. A. MANN,)
ilteman from Massachusetts, (Mr. LitNcot.,) and
.I It was mentioned at that time that the gentleman
vlassachusetts and the gentleman from New York
3tAl members of another select committee, and that
uld not attend in a morning. It was then proposed
t in the evening.
G. here explained as to the places previously pro-
for the meeting of the committee, before the meeting
ivate chamber on the evening alluded to. At tins
mentioned meeting, (Mr. G. said) a majority of the
ittee were present; that was to say, five members out
nine who composed the committee. The report was
the bill and resolution were both read, and agreed to
the members present, and art amendment, suggested
m ofthe members, had also been agreed to. He (Mr.
ad been instructed by all the members, constituting
majority of the committee, to report the bill, the report,
lhe resolution.
answer to the question of the gentleman from Massa-
tts, why the resolutions were not reported at the same
as the report and bill, hlie would say, that they would
been reported on the same morning, but that the hour
-tioned for reports from committees expired before an
"tunity was given to him to present the resolution to
.louse.
r. LINCOLN was proceeding to make some further
Lrks, when,
he hour having elapsed, Mr. CAMBRELENG call-
,r the orders of the day.
BANK OF THE UNITED STATES.
It. INGERSOLL rose and stated that he learned from
Speaker that he had in his possession a memorial from
President, Directors, and Company of the Bank of the
.ted States, which might obviate the necessity in the
md of every gentlcman, of further proceedings upon the
lution offered from the select committee. He, therefore,
ed leave oftLm HO.ui,: .r ihe Sf ,k-r I.:-. p.:senttlice
norial, and r,"-,i-. i,, ? 'is aker 'Io Jo -:,
eavee being gr ,rl-.l thI SFi F ',sd prI: ir,il.] IL.:. follow-
m em orial, w:m :1, ... ,s r ,,id. -;4 r --
ths Senate a ,.; 11.: r' .1r;l.il. ,. ..;. Congress
rime memorial .1 mtih pm : i.,,' [,. :., -, a,,. '.npany of
S Bank of the I.-i. J ..m m ', ,:|.ctfu1I,' r...r- .,,'t : That,
ving recently seep among the documents printed by Con-
ess, a reportof tme Secretary of the Treasury, in which he
vents that helias not been able to settle with the bank, and
vokes the didl of Congress, they deem.it proper to state that
ey are now, as they always have been, ready and anxious to
tle ; aild that not the slightest delay, nor the least obstacle of
,y kind, can justly be ascribed to them. This they propose to
underr obvious in a few words.
In a settlement between thIe Government and the bank, one
Stwo courses was necessary. -The first was to wind up-the
hole business of the institution and divide the proceeds; a
sode inevitable, had the bank ceased its operations on the 4th
f March. Butt, as the institution continued, with no change
except the retirement of single partner, it was deemed a pro-
ess equally harsh and useless to force the country to pay sixty
millions of debts at a moment of general embarrassment, mere-
y to balance the books of the bank: and the second mode was
therefore preferted-that of estimating the value of the stock
4n the 4th of March, and paying the Government its proportion.
fhia was the easiest, and. simplest, and fairest mode of adjust-
nent. It was obviously the mode contemplated by Congress,
vho, on the 23d of June, 1836. authorized the Secretary of the
treasury to receive payment in such instalments, and payable
tsuech times, aid with such rates of interest as he shall see hit
o .agree to." To estimate the value of the stock was, therefore,
he first step towards the settlement. Accordingly, soon after the
secretary received his authority from Congress, a report was
ade by a joint committee of three members of the late bank,
iree of the new, and three impartial umpires connected with
,either, stating the value, of the stock. This valuation on the
art of-the bank was transmitted to the Secretary, with an offer
That all the materials upon which it is founded will, of course,
e submitted to any examination which you may desire to
ake;" and that the bank wou!d be equally ready to adopt any
ode which may be deemed expedient for making such a divi-
ion of the assets of the bank as may assure to the Government
ts just and ample proportion." To this communication the Sec-
!etary answered on the 19th and 20th Sept.-as follows : I have
heerfmilly accepted your offer to permit an examination to be
ade of the materials upon which that report is founded;" and
vill appoint three gentlemen ." to investigate t ose materials
nd report to me their views upon them, and also the proper
asis of a settlement." These commissioners accordingly vis-
,ed the bank, and, after nearly four months, reported. It was
naturallyy presumed that when th-, ,. ivi~ m, i,:p....1, i,. See-
etary would inform the Board o6 I'i..:.. 'r-. h, l, .-r .alun
'tion accorded with that of the '.ii.k, .:r n 'i t .. p: ::i..: mi dif
ered, so as. to enable the Board a., '---r pt-i tll- ,tt.. ffer
others, or in some mode advanr i,h.: -iulnm- ,,, IP ,; mucl
a be regretted that such a course .'S-i-r:,r p'.,. '.. Bui, nc
he month of September,- when '.h.. ; i.:, -. -...I .
board of the coming of the C1.- .,, "-:.:.:, m', ". I. .:. r.: -
ort their est;im in:. : n-. r:. -.:...r a ',. ,,,..r. of any kind what
over was im.ti t... it..; i-y the Secretary; 'but while'thim
vere waiting to know.whether their valuation wasaceaeplable et
him, or in what it was deemed deficient, they were surprised
py a communication, not to them, but to Congress, statingrthe
failure of his'negotiation. They regret this, .because, if the
oard had been made acquainted with- the wishes of the Go
,.ernnent, as explained in the report now made to Congress
hey would have instantly and cheerfully acceded to them
1hat regret is deepened by another measure of the Secretary
which seems alike unauthorized and unfortunate.
The act of Congress of the 23d June, 1836, directed the Se
eretary to "receive the capital stock belonging to the Unitem
States in the late Bank otthe United States, in such instalments
'and payable at such times, and with such rates of interest, a
he shall see fit to agree to, and also to settle and adjust th
claim for surplus profits, astrniic. on said capital stock, o,
such terms as lie may think f-...'' .
When this act passed it was perfectly -well.-known to ev
ery member of Congress that, for nearly four years preceding
there had been a disputed question oflaw between the Govern
ment and the bank, in re.'-d to ital- .d-r ,n a bill of exchange
which the bank had in v -. .-- tt .- C .: ,': .:. .,trsue be
fore thejudicial tribunaL -,TI..: -o.j ..i. -.1 l-.e-r. c.i'--n boror
Congress-before the C ...-.,',....m..1Ai ,..dJ Meanr in 1833
who proposed not measure in regard to it-before the Committe
on Finance of the Senate, who, in their report of the 18th o
SDecember, 1834, declared that the right of the bank was "found
s ed in strict law ;" that "the retainer was avowedly made t
procure a submission to the courts and juries of the country ;
and that "if the Government thinks itself wronged by sue
proceedings, the law prescribes the manner in which it shall
seek redress." With the full knowledge of these facts, ivwhe
Congress authorized the Secretary to settle with the bank fo
tthe capital stock,- aid the surplus profit-, they certainly coul
not have intended to refuse the receipt nf this capital stock an
surplus profits, unless the bank should surrender, unconditidn
ally, its right to a judicial trial ofthe question which one of the
own standing committees hati decided in favor of the bank
Yet, without any, the slightest authority from Congress, the Se
rotaryy, as appears by the public documents, has determined tha
f he will never settle. with the bank without a previous surrender
S of its rights-declaring that, "preliminary to a final adjus
u meant of this interest, the Treasury Department would require
that the -bank should pay that portioii of the dividend on th
Stock of the United States which. ad been withheld for damn
ges on the draft upon the French Gorvernment." Now, it
manifest that this is a proceeeding owhibh Congress did.not au
isthorize, eo'-! -- crCe", ',-sw.tian5 It 'e~nnriot be that the Con
tgress of ,- U, *J ':." .i.:~- .''* .- r.,. ':r.' in'., ..,'l- ring th
Sh...- in i.:tl .... = t...r: .... i .'.: m ibh O. ev.er an nt-land the cit
S...- n are .* ',. .-J l ",. a. i m, 1aIm 'l t.:, i, : : -. r' *. m r. k pursue
; exactly t.i l s -,. 1, y .1 .6 .. J.. ,'r...t tl If.,.:e ,i h.. ,ustitutio
out of the path of law, by refusing to adjust other interest
which have no connexion whatever with that controversy.
The original claim of damages was a necessary act of duty b
Sthe bank in favor of the Governent,.who, if there was an
Right to draw the bill had an equal right to tIe damages. Th
pecuniary interest involved was and is a matter of indifferene
It was only the tone assumed in regard to it, and the evident d
sign of forcing thle bank to abandon its rights, which gave is
portance to the claim and forbade the surrender of it. Tt
Board of Directors would deem themselves faithless, notmere
to tlle institution, hut to the cause of constitutional freedom)
... could be thus driven frm the courts ofjustice by any m
S, from an executive.oticer. Theyhlave accordingly decide,
St-. question deliberately and irrevocably. If the proffer of
juicial decision is accepted by the'Government,-thIe bank w
I" cheerfully.abide the result; But until-then there should not b
m.-I there cannot be, any surrey r, or concession, or compr
a Th", Board of Directors will now make one final offer to Se
il. iid they make it directly to yonr Imoorable bodies, sn as
: a...,, tie hazard of any further mrediatian. Timey lea'nsfIo
m ,.. i-inted report of the Secretary, that the commission
i s... J have recommended the following terms of settlement:
T... value each share of the stock.at $115 58, and receive pa
...,.t for it by equal instalmetIs, payable in September 183
ei-i, 1839, and 1840, with sixmper cent. interest until'paid.
f The Board of Directors agree, at once, to those -terms, a
! :are ready to carry them into execution. -
They dmu not stop to. inquire whether this, be, not too muc
They prefer that it should bu too mumlch. They will never dif
with Congress about mitre sums of money, and are special
anxious to terminate .their connexion with the Government in
manner -.in'....r 'all parties. .
B" B r .-:. ,' m,-_ Board: '"
N; BIDDLE, President.


Mr. INGERSOLL then proceeded to state that t
tleImorial went the whole length of adopting the sterns
Settlement which the Secretary of the Treasury was u
d derstood to desire. The stock held by the Governom
lias been valued by the commissioners appointed by t
Department at $115 58, and they propose that paymi
shall be made by equal instalments in September 183


1838, 1839,q and 1840, with six per cent. interest till paid. concurring with the Committee of the Whole in their said -Hi
To this the bank distinctly accedes. "Wihat more can Ieo amnscdments. H.
desired He, therefore, moved that thememorialbereferred The first amendmentwas as. follows: Strike out the Le
to the Committee of Ways and Means, and that it be ..n'Isi item a ding i rtc
printed. WcVhich was a~recd to. .rcidental expeitses attending repairs of fortifica-Son,
On motion of'.r. CA.iMBRESLEN, the Hoese then i,.ns, and for thepur;ase ofad:ti;n:d land in theirneigh- Re
proceeded to the orders Of the day. b-r d, one humndre,l thmsand dollars." Shi
ARMY P TON BLL. which a- dent wsconcturred St
TheI-louseook up for considerate theThe next amendment made in committee, was that ap- W
appropriations for thesupport of theArmy for the year priatig "ity Connecticut at N
1837, which had been returned from the Senate with cer L don harbor, on g on concurrence,
tain amendments which amendments had again been Anmd the question being on concurrenee,
amended by the House in Committee of the Whole on thIe Mr. M cAY oved to amend the amendment by adding to
state of the Union. at the emd thereof, a proviso "'that the above sum should eo
The pending question was on concurring with the Con- be expended in the repair of Fort Griswold, or in the crec-
mittee ofthndinge Wholquestion th aendents to the amendments tion of a new work which, as a system of public defence, to
mittee of the may take its place;" which was agreed to.
of the Senate. Arid the amendment, as amended, was concurred in. th
And the first, as amended, having been concurred in- Mr the amendment, as amended, was concurred i. th
Mr. TOUCEYmoved to. amend the second amendment Mr. PARKS moved to ao end the amendment by add-t the
(which provides for the payment of certain volunteers of ing an appropriation riof $v50e 000 for fortification at the
Kentucky,, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi, clled mouth of' the Penobscot river, in the State of Maine. mm
Kentucky, Tennessee, lab anap" And the question being taken, it was decided in the-af- th
out during the past year for service in the'Creek and Semi- And th question being taken it was decided in te f- th
nole wars) by adding an appropriation of $100,000 for the ffrmati\Ie: Ayes 71, noes 59. tit
payment of the Connecticut militia, called into the service So.the amendment was agreed to. to
during the last war, in the following cases: First, those SURPLUS REVENUE.
called out to repel actual invasion; secondly, those called Mr. BELL renewed his motion, made in Committee otf
out under State authority, and afterwards received into the the Whole, and there rejected, to amend the amendment th
service of the United Stal., i,+3J thirdly, where they were by adding thereto an additional section, providing that tne
called out under the r, oflmmt..n of the President of the money which may be in the Treasury of the United States L
United States, or any ,i.thi r .:.i.:r of the United States, on the 1st of January. 1837, reserving five millions, shall L
After some remarks from' Messrs. TOUCEY, LIN- be deposited with theStates in conformity with the provi-
COLN, HARDIN, INGHAM, A. MANN, WHIT- sions of the act approved 23d June, 1836. [See Friday's th
TLESEY, of Connecticut, UNDERWOOD, and Mc- deferred proccedings.] .
KAY-the question was taken, ahd the amendment was Mr. BELL did not desire to enter into further debate, but
agreed to. h oped the House would take the vote at once. t
Mr. McKAY moved to amend the amendment by add- Some remarks were submitted by Messrs. GRAVES te
ing an appropriation of $30,000 'for the payment of the and REYNOLDS, when, the hour of three having arrived,
claims of the militia of North Carolina, who served during the House took e r,:.:: ,,,,I half past four o'clock.
the late war with Great Britain, in the cases enumerated EVENING SESSION.
in the act of the 31st of May,. 1830, which authorizes pay- The House met at half past four o'clock. The pending
ment of the claims of the State of Massachusetts for the question was on the.amendment to the amendment propos-
payment of her militia, &c. ed by Mr. BELT, and-awhibhl was under discussion when-
Mr. BOON demanded the previous question, the House took a recess.
The SPEAKER said the effect of that motion, if agreed Mr. HARDIN moved a call of the House. f
to, would be to cut off the whole amendment of the Sen- Mr. E. WHITTLESEY suggested that the House P
ate, as amended by the Committee of the Whole in this should take up, with a view to reference, the bills on the th
House. Speaker's table; passing over such as would create debate. d
Mr. BOON thereupon withdrew his motion; and, after Mr. YELL objected. The bill first on the list was the
a few remarks from Messrs. McKAY, OWENS, and land bill, and he would not consent, under any circum- a
PARKER- stances, that that should be passed over.
The question was taken, and decided in the affirmative- Mr. E. WHITTLESEY said he would then withdraw -
* Ayes 86, noes not counted. his motion. If the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. YELL) C
So the amendment was agreed to. was willing to sacrifice the whole business of the country a
Mr. DUNLAP moved to amend the amendment by add- to that one bill, so be it. 1
ing that the Tennessee volunteers who equipped and arm- Mr. McCARTY said there was a Senate bill on the ta-
cd themselves, marched to the place of rendezvous, and ble, to the reference of which his friend from Arkansas
tendered their services in the year 1836, but who were not would, he was sure, not object; and that was the bill mak- t
S received into the service of the United States, should be ing appropriation for the Cumberland road. Mr. McC.
paid the same sum allowed in this act to those-volunteers moved that it be taken up, and referred .
S who had been mustered ntothe service ofthe United.States Mr. YELL objected. He had himselftwoor three bills m
and immediately discharged. on the fable, which he was very anxious to have referred;
After some remarks front Messrs. DUNLAP -and E. but he would rather that they should all go down together, o
WHITTLESEY, the question was taken, and the amend- than that the land bill should be put aside. t
ment was rejected. And, the question on the motion of Mr. HARDnm having
'Mr. BELL renewed the proposition made in Commit- been taken, a call of the House was ordered.
* tee of the Whole by Mr. PEYTON, to amend the amend- And the roll having been called, one hundred and one
meant by adding an appropriation-of $150,000 for arrears of members answered to their names.
e pay of the Tennessee volunteers, raised December 10th, Mr. ANTHONY moved a suspension of the procecd- W
1812, and discharged December 10th, 1813. wings on the call; which motion was rejected.
t The question was then taken, without debate, and the The Clerk proceeded to call the names of the absentees;
S amendment was rejected. When Mr. GRENNELL again moved a suspension;
Mr" LAWLER moved to amend the amendment by which motion was rejected.
adding an appropriation of $15,000 as one month's pay to The roll of absentees were gone over, "and there appear-
the volunteers of the State 'of Alabama, who marched to ed one hundred and sixty-two members present.
the place of rendezvous at Vernon,.but who were notmus- On motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, all further p'ro-
S tered into the service of the United States, in consequence ceedings on the call were suspended. t
Sof the neglect of the officer of the .Government to whom The amendment to the amendment having, on motion
that duty had been assigned. of Mr. MERCER, been read,
I Mr. DENNY wished to inquire from the gentleman Mr. HARDIN called for the yeas and nays; which 1
from Alabama (Mr. LAWLER) to what officer allusion was, were ordered, s
made in this charge of neglect. He (Mr. D.) would like Mr. BOON inquired if it was in order now to offer an- I
to know whether there was any foundation for the charge. other amendment. r
He was not disposed to pass censure, even by implication, The SPEAKER said it was not in order to offer an _
" without- knowing why, and of what nature the charge amendment to an amendment. K
might be. Mr. C. ALLAN said-that, as the question before the
* Mr. LAWLER said that the evidence in this case had House'was extremely important, and as there was not a
r been referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and it laroe number of members present, he would move a call of S
-was not in his power at this moment to turn to it. He the House ; and on that motion he asked for the yeas and S
. v.h.'id, however, state the facts as they were known to ex- nays; which were ordered, and being taken, were: Yeas
iin Hl was not prepared to give the name 'of the officer 71, nays 115.
alluded to. The troops had been called on to rendezvous So the bill was referred.,
r.at Vernon, in Alabama; they had marched a hundred The question then recurred on the.adoption of the k
1 miles for that purpose, and the Government officer failed to amendment to the amendmneni, and, being taken, it was de-' J
attend to muster them. They remailiid some days, and cided in the affirmative: Yeas 113, nays 90.
then were compelled to disband.G
then wr e compellY said he had o object YAS-on to pay these vo tsrs. Adams, AlfordChilton Alln, H. Allen,An-
Mr. DENNY said he had no objection to pay these vo- ony, Bailey, Bell, Bond,'Boon, Bouldin, Briggs, Buchaan,
lunteers if'they had performed any service which entitled Bunch, John Calhoon, William B. CalhounCampbell, Carter, J
y them to'be paid. But he objected to any member's getting Casey, George Chambers, John Chambers, Cbetwood, Childs,
up in his place here and charging an officer of the United Nataniel H, Claiborne, Cn, Conn Corwin, Crane, Cushing,
SStates Government with neglect of his duty. This was Darlington, Dawson, Deberry, Denny, Dumlap, Everett, For-
e not doing justice to an officer of the Army ; let him .be ar- ester, Fowler, French, Graham, Granger, Graves, Grayson,
e raigned before the proper tribunal. The gentleman from Grennell, Griffin, Hiland Hall, Hard, Hardin, Harlan, Harper, T
"Alabama got up here, and, for the 'purpose probably of S. S. Harrison, Hawkins, Hazeltine, Henderson, Hiester, Her-
making his claiming this case stronger than it really was of rod, Hoar, Hunt, Huntsman, Ingersoll, rN. Jackson, Janes, Je-
itself, made an indirect charge against an officer of the Luke Lea, Lewis, Lincoln, Love, Lyon, Job Mann, Sampson
United States, He (Mr. D.) thought this proceeding was a, Lri, L .c Larty, McComas, McKenn, Mercer
Mason, Maury, May, McCarty, MoComas, MtcKennan, Maerer,
gratuitous. Montgomery, Morris; Parker, James A. Pearce, Pearson, Pet-
d It might be as the gentleman had stated, that they as- tigrew, Phillips, Pic ens, Potts, Reed, Rencher,JohnReynolds,
S, sembled at the place alluded to, and were not mustered in- Robertson, William B. Shepard, Augustine H. Shepperd,ShieIds, P
s to service; and, if so, he (Mr. D.) would say, let them be Slade,Spangler, Sprague, Standefer, Steele, Storer, Sutherland,
e paid, if the case came within the provisions adopted for the Taliaferro, Waddy Thompson, Underwood, 'Vintori, Washing-
n regulation of the claims of volunteers. But it was impro- ton, White, Elisha Whittlesey, Lewis Williams, Sherrod Wil- c
per thus indirectly to make a charge of neglect, when no liams, Young-11i3.
Evidence of the kind appeared. There were not facts be- NAYS-Messrs. Ash, Barton, Beale, Bean, Beaumonmt,Black, t
'fore the House tojustify it in sanctioning such a charge; Bookee, Borden, Bovee, Boyd, Brown, Burns, Camabreleng, i
and why should the words of the amendment be at war I lhney, Chapman, Chapmn, John F. HClaiborn, Cl
With the facts If the gentleman was in possession of any land, Cols, Craig Cramer, Crary, Cushman, Doubleday,
Fairfield, Farlin, Fry, Fuller, Galbraith, Jaumes Garland, Ghol-t
e facts,-let him make them known in the proper place. son, Gillett, Grantland, Haley, Joseph Hall, A. G. Harrison, P
3, Mr. LAWLER said hat, in proposing this amendmen t Haynes, Holt, Hubley, Huntington, Jarvis, Joseph Johnson,
e in its present shape, he had'no' n.-h *t,, ,t ..:.u.niJVngthe Cave Johnson, John W. Jones, B. Jones, IKlingensmith, Lan-
of sensibilities of the gentleman lc.,'l- Piei !..n,',, ITMr. sing, Lawlet, G. Lee, J. Lee, Leonard, Logan, Loyall, Lucas,
DENNY,) or of making a charge against the conduct of any Abijah Mann, Martin, William Mason, Moses Mason, McKay,
o officer of the Government. He had- simply intended, in McoKeon, McKim, MeLene, Miller, Mnhlenberg, Owens, Parks,
justification of the rightful claim of these volunteers on the Patterson, Patton, Franlimn Pierce, Dnteo J. Pearee, PPhelps,
justice of-Congress, to state what the fact was, without Pinckney, Joseph Reynolds, Rogers, Shenck, Seymour, Shinn,
any purpose of array gnin this officer before the country Sickles, Smith, Thomas, John Thomson, Toucey, Turrill, Van-
r for tie ncgloct:of Ihis duty. derpoel, Wagener, Ward, Wardwell, Webster, Thomas r.
I" Butif this was the true and only objection of the gentle,- Whittley, Yell-O.
d man to this amendment, he (Mr. L.) would obviate all So the amendment to the amendment was adopted.
n cause for objection, by modifying the language in that par- Mr. A. MANN moved further to amend the amendment
ai ticular, and he would then see whether any other objec- by adding after te words States," in the sixth line, the
k. tion would be raised against one of. the plainest and most words "in proportion to the ratio of representation in the
e- just propositions that had ever been presented to the House. House of Representatives of the Congress of the United
at Mr. L. then modified his amendment so as to leave out. States."
er the words "because of the neglect of the United States Some remarks were submitted by Mr. M. in favor of his
t- officer towhom the service was assigned." proposition, and-by Mr. YELL in opposition to it (of which
re After some remarks from Messrs. MERCER, CRAIG, a report will appear hereafter;)
e LAWLER, CAMBRELENG, MARTIN, CHAP- When Mr. WILLIAMS, of Ky., raised the question
a- MAN and C. JOHNSON that the amendment was not in order.
i The question was taken, and the amendment was re- After some conversation thereon, Mr. A. MANN, with
Sjacteed. a view to remove all obstacles on the question of order, mo-
S Mr. OWENS renewed his motion, made in Committee dified his amendment so as to read, "Provided that the said
i- of the Whole, to amend the amendment by adding the fol- deposites shall be made," &c, l- DR.
ae lowing: T Rhe suIbject was di, d .1.',' M.-Ns,' DENNY, MER-
n That the sum of twenty thousand dollars be appropriat- GER, HARDIN, L;'TN A I AN NPBOULDIN, Mc
s, ed to re-imbursc the State of Georgia for money expended KEON, WARDWELL, and VANDERPOEL.
or to be expended, by said State, in payment for the servi- Whereupon, Mr. TURRILL demanded the previous
y cos o'f volunteers in the Creeock and Seminole wars, for los- question. .
.y ses sustained by them, and medical attendance furnished The Chair (Mr. BmUCs) stated that tlhe effect of the
e them, during said service, or in going to or returning from previous question, if ordered, would hbe to cut off theamend-
e. the place of rendezvous ; the said volunteers not having ments of the Committee of the Whole as amended by the
o- been regularly musteredintothe armyor the. United States House.
e and, under the existing laws, not entitled to pay; but au- And, the question being taken on the demand for the
ly thorized to be paid by an act of the Legislature of the previous question, there appeared-Yeas 75, nay 110. So
if State of Georgia, passed 36th December, 1856; provided there was no second. t
e- that good and sufficient evidence bh furnished the War And, the question recurring on the amendment to hec
ed Department that the said volunteers, in said act designat- amendment, .A
a ed, have been paid by said State in conformity with its pro- The House was further addressed by Messrs. VAN-
ill visions. DERPOEL, McCOMAS, PICKENS, D. J. PEARCE,
a, And, without debate, the amendment was rejected. DENNY, CAMBRELENG, and HOAR, (of whose re-
0o Mr. FORESTER moved to amend the amendment by marks, also, a report will appear hereaft er.)
m inserting after the words which relate to the payment of Mr. A. MANN demanded the yeas and nays, 'which
e*- the volunteers of Kentucky; Tennessee," &c. the words were ordered and, being taken, were as follows :
inclning the companies in the State of Mississappi mus- YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Ash, Barton, Bale, Beaumont,
ms tered intod'the service." Agreed to. Black, Bookee, Bovee, Brown, Buchanan, Cambreleng,Chaney,
The question then recurring on, concurring with the Chapin, Cleveland, Coles, Connor, Cramer; Doubleday, Drom-
y- Senate-in its amendment as amended by.the House, goole, Dunlap, Evans, Fairfield, Fry, Fuller, J:Garland, Gra-
7, Mr. HARDIN asked the yeas and nays; which were ham, Graves, Haoe', Hawkims, Haynes, Hazeltine, Hubley,
ordered Huntington, Jurvis, Joseph Johnson, C. Johnson, JohnW. Jones,
ad And, O after some remarks Tfotss Messrs. MASON, of Kilgore., Klingesmitb, Lsnsing, Gideon Lee, Joshua Lee,
To, LINCOLN, CRAIG, TOUCEYVn and GRAVES Leonard, Logan, Loyall, A. Mann, J. Mann, W. Mason, McKay,
h. The question was ke, an d decided in te affirmative MeKeon, MeLene, Miller, Montgomery, Moore, Morgan, Muh-
S The question was taken, and decided in te affirmative lenberg, Patterson, Patton, Rogers, Seymour, A. H. Shepperd,
SYeas 123, nays 56.n a a Shields, Sickles, Sutherland, Taliaferro, Taylor, Thomas, J.
So the amendttent, as amended, was agreed to. Theom, son, Underwood, Vinton, Wagener, Ward, Wardwcll,
And the question :recurring on concurring with the S. Williams-74.


Senate in their several amendments, as amended by the NAYS --Messrs. John Quinn.y Adams, Alford, C.-Allan, H.
House, it was decided in the affirmative. Allen, Bailey,. Bean, Bell, Bond, Borden, Bouldin, *Briggs,
the So the several amendments, as amended, were agreed' to. Bunch, Burns, John Calhoon, Campbell, Carter, Casey, George
Fo oRTItFICATION BILL. Chiambers, John Chambers, Chapman, Clhetwoodm Childs,
of N. H. Claiborne, John F. H. Claiborne, Clark, Corwin,
in- The House proceeded to the consideration of the bill Crane, Crary, Cushing, Cushman, Dawson, Deberry, Denny,
ent making appropriations for certain fortifications for the U. Elumoe, Everett, French, Gholson, Granger, Grantland,
the States for the year 1837, which had been reported from the Grayson, Grennell, Griflin, Haley, Joseph Hall, Hiland Hall,
ent Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union with Hannegan, Hard, Hardin, Harlan, Harper, Samuel S. Harrison,
37, sundry amendments; and the pending question was on Albert G. Harrisoh, Henderson, Hiester, Herod, Hoar, Hunt,


ntsman, Ingersoll, Inghlam, V. Jackson, Janes, Jenifer,
.Jolnson, Kennon, Laoe, Laporte, Lawlcr, Lawrence, Lay,
wis,- Lincoln, Love, Lyon, Martin, S. Mason, Maury,
,C.rty, McCommas, McKnnan, Mlercer, iMmlris, Owen.',
rker, Fianklin Pierac,, 1). J. 'earp, J:unes A. Peace, Pear-
i, Pettigrew, Phelips, Phillips, Pi.cit- ; Pincktny, Peot!s,
ed, Rencher, John licynolds, R-boe:tsuon,Williaui i.Shepard,
inn, Slade, Sloane, Spangler, Spragie, Stan.leftr, Stclep,
orer, Thomas, Waddy Thon.pson, Vinton, V.as-.inmg',,
white, E. Whittlesey, Thomas T. Whiilesey, Len'is Williamns,
ell, Young-119.
So the amendment to the amendment was rejected.
Mr. CAMBRELENG then offered, as an amendment
time amendment, the provisions (in substance) of the bill
mmonly called the Tariff bill."
Mr. HARDIN thought it was very late in the evening
commence regulating the whole tariff of the country.
Mr. BELL rose to point of order. He contended that
e bill proposedas an amendment was entirely irrelevant,
having reference to a wholly different subject.
The CHAIR (Mr. BRIGGS) decided that, as the bill was
ot the same as had been committed to the Committee of
le Whole on the state of the Union, but had been essen-
ally modified, it was in order to offiler it as an amendment
the amendment.
Mr. MERCER appealed from the decision.
Mr. VANDERPOEL demanded the yeas and nays on
ie appeal; which were ordered.
The appeal was debated by Messrs. BELL, CAMBRE-
ENG, MERCER, REED, PATTON, JOHNSON, of
:a., HAYNES, and WARD;
When, the question being taken, "Shall the decision of
me Chair stand as the judgment of the House '" it wih
decided in the negative-Yeas 94, nays 97.
So the House reversed the decision of the Chair ; and
he proposed amendment to the amendment was declared
Sbe out of order.
Mr. MARTIN offered as an ~,-,,:r..m1,i. 'n o the amend-
.ent the provisions (in substam,. t.-.f ,,. till commonly
oiled the "Land bill."
The CHAIR (Mr. BRIaGs) decided h- i'.l the ne ...-i.J
ot be in ii6rder, under the decision just :r, .l- I.', ,' ill. H. e.
'ho subject-matter was totally different and independent.
Mr."MART IN appealed from the division, and, after a
ew remarks thereon, asked for the yeas and nays on the
p.", '. which were ordered.
mm.i i. question being taken, "Shall the decision of
ie Chair stand as the judgment of the House it was
decided in the affirmative-Yeas 112, hays 70. f
So the decision of the Chair was affirmedby those House;
nd the proposed, amendment to the amendment was de-
lared to be out of order.
The question then recurred on the concurring with the
Committee of the Whole in the amendment as amended,
nd, being taken, was decided in the affirmative-Yeas
12, Nays 8.1. '
So the amendment. as amended, was concurred in.
The next and last amendment made in Committee of
he Whole, and coming up on the question of concurrence
was, the appropriation of $40,000 for fortifications at the
mouth of Connecticut river.
After a few remarks from Mr. McKAY, expressing his
position to the appropriation at this time, on the ground
hat a survey had not yet been made,
The question was taken, and the amendment was non-
oncurred in.
Th -.i.. ~i ..,n then recurring on ordering the bill to be
ngrossed for a third reading,
Mr. VANDERPOEL demanded the yeas and nays;
which were ordered.
And, after some remarks from Mr. PATTON in justi-
ication of his intended vote, the question was taken, and
decided in the affirmnative-Yeas 111, -Nays 70.
YEAS-Messrs. Adams, Alf, d, Chi,iton Allan, Heman Allen,
Anthlon, Bailey, Bell, Bond, Boon, Borden, Bouclin, Briggs,
lunch, John Calhoon, Campbell, Carter, Casey, George Cham-
bers, John Chambrers, Childs, Nath. H. Clhiborne, Clark, Con-
or, Corwin, Crane, Gushing, Darlingto, Daringen Dawson, Deberry,
Denny, Elmbre, Evans, Everett, Forester, French, James Gar-
and, Graham, Granger, Graves, Grayson, Grennell, Haley,
Hiland Hall, Hard, Hardin, Harlan, Harper, Samuel S. Harri-
on, Hazeltine, Henderson, Heister, Hoar, Hunt, Huntsman,
.ngersollf William Jackson, Henry Johnson, Kilgore, Lane, La-
porte, Lawrence, Lay, LukeL, Lewis, Lincoln, L* L. L.
Job Mann, Sampson Mason, Maury, McCarty, .M::' -..., i.-
Kennan, Mercer, Montgomery, Morris, Parker, Patton, D. J.
Pearce, J. A. Pearce, Pearson, Pettigrew, Phelps, Phillips, Pick-
ens, Potts, Reed, Rencher, John Reynolds, Rolertson, WV. B.
ihepard, A. H. Shepperd, Shields, Slade, Sloane, Sprague,
itandefer, Steele, Storer, Sutherland, Taliaferro, Waddy Thomp-
son,_ Underwond, Vinton, Washington, White, E; Whittlesoym
Thomas T. Whittlesey, Lewis Williams, Shlrrod Williams,
Yotng-111.
NAYS-Messrs. Ash, Beale, Bean, Beaumont, Black, Boc-
kee' Boyd, Brown, -Burna, Osmbroleng, ChO.ancy, Chapman,
John F. i.' Claiborne, Cleveland, Coles, Cramer, Cushman,
Doubleday, Dromgoole, Dunlap, Faimfield, Fry, Fuller, Gholson,
Gillett, Grantland, Jos. Hall, HAier,. Hannegan, Albert ,G.
Harrison, Hawkins, Haynes, Holt, Huntington, Jrvyis, 'Ios.
olhnson, Cave Johnson, Klingensmith.Lansing, Lawler,'Gidl-
on Lee, Leonard, Logan, Loyall, Lucas, Abijah Mann, Martin,
Williem Mason, MIc ay, McKim, Moore, Owens, Parks, Frank-
in Pierce, Pinckney, Joseph Reynolds, Rogers, Schenek, Sey-
momr, Shinan, Sickles, Smith, Thomas, Johin Thomson, Toocey,
Tnrrill, Vanderpoel, Wagencr, Wardwell, Yell--70.
So the bill was ordered to a third reading.
And, on motion of Mr. CAMBRELENG, the bill
'having been previously engrossed) was read a third time
and passed.
On motion of Mr. BELL, the title of the bill was so
amended as to add to the end the words "and for other
purposes."
A motion was made to adjourn, but was withdrawn to
enable the Speaker to present to the House the following
communications:
A Message from the President-of the United States,
transuittiung a letter froen the Secretary of War ad interim,
n relationtto the survey of the mouth of the Mississippi
river.
On motion of Mr. JOHNSON, of Louisiana, referred
to the Committee of Ways and Means, and ordered to be
printed, exclusive of maps.
A communication from the Secretary of State, trans
hitting a list of persons who had invented new, or usefu
arts or machines, &c. Laid on the table, and ordered to
be printed.
A communication from the Secretary of State, transmit
ting a list of all patents for useful. discoveries, &c. Laid
on the table, and ordered to be printed.
On motion of Mr. CAVE JOHNSON, at 10 o'clock,
The House adjourned.

ERRAUTUM.-By an unaccountable accident, one page o
the manuscript report of Deferred Proceedings in th
House of Representatives, on Thursday evening, anm
which appear in bur columns of Saturday, was lost. W
were thus led into an error which was discovered too lat
to be remedied.
The correct statement of the proceeding's, as given in th
mislaid manuscript, was substantially this :
Tho amendment of Mr. PEYTON to the Army Appropria
tion bill, for provision n for arrears of pay to the old Tenmsc
see volunteers, being under discussion, the committee, o:
the suggestioIn ofT Mr. MERCEa, laid that bill aside, to giv-
tise tor the better consideration ofthe antendmept referred
to, and took up the bill providing for the .l:,i,|]l- tmii ,
Hospitals on the Western waters. One r.n..hLu.;h[ m'i '
made, and othiirs were offered, and rejected Th,,: ,:,'i,'tm
tee then rose, and reported that bill to the House, anid als
reported progress on time Army Appropriation bill. T-h
formerbill was taken up by the House on the question
engrostsmnt, and it was Ilhen that Mr. PATToN moved t
strike out the enacting clause; and not on the Army A]
propriation bill, as erroneously stated, and which at thb
time was still under the dominion of the Committee of th
Whole.

THE DELAWARE BREAKWATER AND M;
SUTHERLAND.

It having been incidentally stated in the House, in th
course of debate on the ship Pennsylvania, that the Del;
ware Breakwater had had the effect of diminishing th
depth of the channel of the Delaware, this was by mistah
attributed by our reporter to Mr. Sutherland. Mr. SUTI
ERLAND only spoke of a depesite made in the neighborho
of the navy yard, at Philadelphia, by the erection
wharves, &c.; but never stated, nor intended ever to state
that the breakwater had injured the navigation of the riv
Delaware. On the contrary, that work has been of im
mense advantage to Philadelphia; and, so far from t]
navigation of tihe river being deteriorated by it, the eni
neer hasreported "that the water om the bhr is at this tir
deeper than the pilots ever before knew it."


. EDITORS' CORRESPONDENCE.

WASHINGTON. NEW YORK, FEB. 23,1837.
i ticIrt.3- anitd nioiin, ov a.d forever, one a Wd 'e have had /snow, hail, wind, and rain,
ise.ra since I last wrote you, and the rain is now fall-

MONDAY,. FEBRUARY 27,: 1837. ing in torrents, and gives us a prospect of open-
ing the" Northern and Eastern rivers. The wea-
Our readers will perceive by the report of their, indeed, for the past week, promises an early
Saturday's proceedings-of the Senate, that the Spring, which will do much towards diminish-
P' i g the distresses of those who have not the
bill to modify and reduce the existing tariff of ng th distresses high rices for th e neessa-
duties on imports hasp dthat'hotdy,and ready means to pay high prices for the necessa-
duties on imports has passed thatbody, and ries oflife. Wheat is selling in Rochester for
been sent to the other branch of the Legislature $2 a bushel, and sells for $2 25 at retail in
for concurrence.. Almost all" of- the articles New York.
comprised in the bill are those coming within The city to-day is exceedingly dull. Half
the class of non-protected articles. On these of our world were up till early morning,, at-
it is proposed to abolish the duty entirely, and tending the Balls, Theatres, Museums, Private
t is proposed to abolish the duty entiSoires, &c. in honor of the Birth-day of'the
about this there was no division of sentiment great Washington. This has done one-half to-
and no debate. A few of the articles in the wards making to-day dull, and the bad weather
bill, however, such as salt, spirits, and some has done the other half. Stocks to-day low-
others, bearing a duty of twenty per cent. or sold at slightly reduced prices. But every thing
upwards, fall within the protected class, and on in our moitey market looks blighter-than upon
these it is proposed to reduce the duty at once Moriday and Tuesday.tion of the last E
ni d Upon a close examination of the last English
one-half. This reduction being deemed an in- papers,' comparing dates, &c.,-I am induced to
fraction of the compromise act of 1633, gave believe that the report of the loss of the Havre.
rise to all the able and animated debate which and New York packet-ship EliE, Capt. FunDck,
has occurred on the bill during the last week. of which I wrote you yesterday, is, at lea-s, pre-'
Mr. CLAY, the father of that beneficent measure, mature. There are good, reasons fpr hoping
(the compromise bill,) closed the debate on Sat.. that the Captain and creware not lost, and some
Seasons for believing-,hait evnr the 'ship. may,
urday by one of his most powerful and eloquent ese safe p
efforts, in a very impressive appeal to the Senate The Northern Mail is in,ibringing us Albany-,-
to preserveinviolatethatfavorite measure. But his papers of yesterday. They bring us ho newts.
efforts were not successful, his motion to exclude The Eastern' Mail is also in, bringing usBos-
the disputed articles from the bill being lost by a ton papers of Wednesday. They also contain
majority of one vote. The publication of the no important news.
deb -Yours.-Half past Three P. M.
debate (which will be given as early as practi- Yours. aif past Three P. Mi.
Gable) will disclose the various grounds on [The Express Mail from New Yorkfailed
which gentlemen voted on both sides of this' again last evening. So the above is our latest
question.' news from that city.]

In the House of Representatives,' an effort ANOTHER AFFAIR-IN FLORIDA.
was made in Saturday evening's sitting to have -
the body of the Senate's bill, with some slight FROMA THE JACKSONYVILLE COURIERE, FERARY 16.
BLACK CRaEE, FEB. 14,1837.
modification, annexed as an amendment to the The steamboat J'oHN STONEY arrived at this place this
fortification bill; but it failed by a vote of the morning, in which Lieut. Col. FANNIN and Capt. PIERCY,
House, (against the decision of the Chair,) de- of the United States Navy, came passengers. They report
declaring it not to be in order to propose it as an that a battle took place on the morning of the 8th at En-
amendment to that bill. campment Monroe, at the head of Lake Monroe. This
post was attacked at five o'clock in the morning, .and a
The adroitness with which Mr. LETCHER sue- -brisk firing kept up by both parties until eight o'clock,
ceeded, in the House of Representatives, four when the Indians retired. 'Colonel FANN was in tc.m-
u i th mand of about two hundred and fifty regulars, and Capt.
years ago, in engrafting upon the stock of a Pmrcy in command of thirty-nine friendly:Indians. Capt.
House bill the Senate bill, which by this means MELLON, United States Army, eas killed. Lieutenant J;
became a law, unow-known -by the title of the T. McLAUGILIN [of the Navy, a volunteer, acting as
Compromise Act, has been much celebrated, quartermaster] and fourteen privates were wounded
nd not more han the cleverness of the achieve- The hostiles-were estimated at three or four hundred strong.-
and not more than the cleverness ofthe achieve- When the Indians retired, the friendly Indians yelled at
ment deserved. But we doubt whether it equal- and taunted them all they could, to make them renew the
led in dexterity a movement of the member attack; but not a syllable or gun was heard from them.-
from Tennessee, (%Ir. BELL,) whose familiarity This account, as far as it goes, you inay depend upon. I
with Congressional tactics enabled him, on Sa- had i from Captain Piercy haste, yours, &c.
turday last, having the majority on his side, In haste, yours, &c.
turday last, having the majority on his side,(as The above intelligence is confirmed by the arri .1 -a ihis
the event proved,) to incorporate in the bill place, on Tuesday night last, of the steamer Cn.minrn.li,
making-the annual appropriations for fortifica- Captain Curry. The attack on Fort Mellon (Encamp-
tions, a provision for distributing the surplus re- ment.Monroe, at Lake Monroe) was made, it is supposed,
I by PHILIP and his gang. The battle was furiously contest-
venue which shall be in the Treasury on the 1st y P and lhs gang T of battle ho s furiously otest-
f J 188 thi b ed.. The loss on the side ofite hostiles is nbt known.
of January, 1838, on the same principles as by The Santee was ly.ng .'i .i ni the lakc not far i'rum, the
the act of last session the surplus in the Trea- fort, in wait for the e.Tt,.rE.tuon of the trios t:o, Iransport
sury on the 1st of last January was directed to them to Volusia, inot1,:Ji..n:.. t,. an ,:.r.J. r.i':fG,n r J..-up.
be distributed (or deposited) with the several Lieutenant THOMAS left th'e post, during the engagement, -
States. and, succeeding-in ;ii. mg on. board the Santee, playedup-
o tates.- on the hostiles the six-pounder from the boat with grtat ef-
To understand-the importance of that experi- feet. ,
mental knowledge of the rules which enables a This action must have taken place before the information
member to get such a proposition before the of the truce could have been received by those Indians who.
House at this. period of the session, it should made the attack. Information of, it had not been then re-
LM IYU .,UUIU 5l-uil


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FOR NORFOLK. -Steamer
COLUMBIA, Jas. Mitchell, master,
... will leave Washington for Norfolk
--S- on Sunday, March 5th, at 10 o'clock.
Passage and fare, $8. feb 27
ASHINGTON LIGHT INFANTRY, Atten-
tion !-An adjourned meeting of the Company will be
held at Buker's Franklin Inn, this evening, 27th instant, at half
past seven o'clock.
C LOVER SEED.-Two hundred and sixty bushels
prime Clover Seed, of the growth of 1836, just received,
and for sale by "
feb'27-eo3w S. G. KNELLER & CO.


be noted that, had he moved it as an independ-
ent amendment, the 'Previous Question might
have been called upon him, which, being agreed
to, would have precluded his or any other
amendment. He took advantage, therefore, of
a depending amendment, to move his proposi-
tion as an amendment to the amendment, which
contained within itself many important provi-
sions for particular objects of appropriation,
(not, technically, to the bill.) The Previous
Question would have cut off the depending
amendment (moved to be amended,) and other
depending amendments, in which some mem-
bers of the House felt a deep interest. The
consequence of this was, that, when the Pre-
vious Question was ultimately called, it was not
sustained by a majority. The House was there-
fore brought to a direct vote on Mr. BELL'S pro-
position, and it was carried. It became part of
the bill, and is a part, and a very material part
of the Fortification bill, as it'has passed the
House of Representatives, and is now before
the Senate.-

On Friday last the Legislature of Maryland
elected JOHN S. SPENCE a Senator in Congress
for six years from the 4th of March next. Dr.
S. is now in the Senate, having heretofore -been
elected to serve out the remainder of the term
of the late Mr. GOLDSBOROUGH..
Niagara Ship Canal.-Among the bills before
the House of Representatives is one, which we
are only lately apprized of, for the construc-
tion of a SHIP CANAL ROUND NIAGARA FALLS.
This bill was reported by Mr. HARD, of New
York, from the Committee on Roads and Ca-
nals. The bill proposes to appropriate half a
million of dollars, and directs the work to be
constructed under the-direction of the Secretary
of War, upon such one of the proposed routes
as will best promote the internal defence and
commercial interests of the country. We know
of few objects more-worthy of national expen-
diture, and fewer still, the value of which would
so far transcend the amount of any probable ex-
penditure upon it.
p The report of the Committee on Foreign
Relations of the House of Representatives, on
our Relations with MIVxco, of which we were
not able to obtain a copy entire for our last, will
be found on the fist column of the fourth page
of this day's.paper.

g Our attention having been called to a recent article
in the Globe* commenting upon a letter published in the
National Banner, and ascribing it to Mr. BELL, wreare au-
thorized to state that Mr. Bell is not the writer of the let-
ter, nor would he, as a member of Congress, feel himself at
liberty to communicate such an article for publicatior,'either
with or without the sanction of hits name.


ceive by Coonel F, annin. -
The forces at Fort Mellon returned to Volusia on -the
11th. No Indians having been seen about the fort from
the 8th up to the 11th.
It is the general opinion that the above affair will riot
break up the truce now existing, nor have any effect on
the course the Indians will pursue in relation to closing
the war, by yielding themselves up for removal.

INSURRECTION AT HAYTI.-By a proclamation of Presi-
dent BOYEn, issued under the date of the 31st January, it
appears that an insurrection had broken out in the ca.r u(
Cape Haytien, headed by Col. Isidor Gabriel, and support-
ed by a portion of the troops. It appears that Gabriel,with
his insurgent forces, had attacked and gained possession of
the arsenal, but that it was quickly re-taken at the point
of the bayonet, and the traitor Isidor and his accomplices
found safety only in flight."
The proclamation, says the rebellion was stifled the
moment it was seen," and advises the HaytTans to be con-
fident in the wisdom and energy of the government oflib-
erty and order.
INAUGURATION DINNER.
Committee of Arrangements.
Gen. John P. Van Ness Henry M. Morfit
Major A. G. Glynp Col. D. A. A. Buck
John Ward Mi, H C. Williams
John N. Moulder 'V.n 14 Dietz
John A. Donoboo W. A. Manning
J. H. Smoot Maj. Thos. R.: Reilly
G. Ennis Owen Connelly
J. W. Maury Thomas Smallman -
John C. Rives Cbl. H'. Hungerford
Captain J. A. Blake James Maher
Francis Ward Capt.'H. Dumas. a
Ambrose Lynch
Geo. H. Smoot '
Richard Stanton of Alextidria.
Robert Brockett -
Those friends to the cause who are desirous of participate
in the dinner upon this occasion, can become subscribers by t
plying to any one of the Committee of Arrangements.
All democratic members of Congress and strangers now
the metropolis; all democratic citizens and those of the vicmi
who may not have had an opportunity to subscribe, are invi
to participate. .
Price of subscription, three dollars. Dinner at Masonic I
at 4 o'clock P. M.
atJOHN N. MOULDER, Chairman
J H.S OO, Secretaries.
G. ENNxs, Treasurer.
Hugh C. McLaughlin, declined.
The committee will meet this evening at the Globe H
The several subcommittees will be prepared to report
progress. feb
-E EXTENSIVE AUCTION.--Superior Liqi
anatd Wines.-Under A. Fuller's present Hotel e
lishment, we shall sell by public auction, on Monday, the
instant, (February,) the entire and very extensive assort
of superior Wines and Liquors, in part, as follows
Orange Gin, Brandy, Gold and Pale Sherry
Teneriffe, Port and Madeira Wines in pipes and barr,
Star Madeira, Blackburn mark
Port Wine, Harrison and Son's Claret
Cordials, Sautcrne's pale and brown Sherry
Hock Champagne in boxes and baskets of one dozen
Together with many other articles which may be exal
any time previous to the sale. Sale at i11o'clock A. M.
msliberal. P. MAURO & SOA
feb 23- Au
"OSTON AND NEW YORK COAL COle
NY.-Notice is hereby given that a general mee
the Stockholders of the Boston and New Yrlk Coal O
will be held at the Fountain Inn, Light street, Baltial
Tuesday, the 28thli of February, 1837, at 1 o'clock P. I
the purpose of adopting by-laws for the government ofthe
pany. By order of the President and directors:
pay OMAS W. STORR0
feb t17--eotd Scr











OFFICIAL PAPER.

'HE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.-FEB. 24.

The following is a copy of the Report of the Committee
L Foreign Relations, (Mr. HOWARD, Chairman,) present-
to-day, concerning our relations with Mexico:
The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was re-
rred the message of the President of the United States
the 8th of February, relative to Mexico, have had the
,me under consideration, and respectfully offer the fol-
wing report:
The history of the relations between the United States and
.exico exhibits an unbroken succession of good feelings, andti,
; far as the occasion permitted, of kind offices, on the part of
ie American Govermnent, following out, in this as in other re-
jects, the disposition and wishes of the People. The first to
!cognise Mexico as an independent Power, the Government
f the United States has been among the first in the unceasing
manifestation of friendship to this adjacentNorth American Go-
ernment. At an early period of her struggle for independ-
nee, the ports of the United States were open to her flag, even
t the hazard of incurring responsibility for this act of impartial
entrality.
But the committee perceive, with profound regret, that on the
,art of Mexico there has been a long train of injuries to the
property of American citizens, and insults to the national flag,
or which redress, thoughoften promised, has seldom been ob-
ained.
This omission has doubtless proceeded, in a great measure,-
rom the unsettled condition of the Mexican Government, the
numerous and radical changes which have prevented a fixed
policyy from being pursued in its'foreign affairs. But the comn-
nittee believe 'i,' rt.. -:.. 'rn: ;.- part, from a knowledge
if the form of .-.r i .... orn.. ar', .,,.i it limited powers of its
executive branch. .
Cases might be mentioned in whieh a demand for redress,
when made by naor.'.; E.- 1. C,':.:.: hbad the power of de-
slaring war, and e..r.'-.i.q. nl o li, :t.-..:..,dinate power of giving
large discretionary authority to its naval officers, has been
promptly met when the consequences of refusal were uncer-
tain. But 'our Constitution has wisely placed the war-making
power in the legislative branch of the Government, and no se-
vere measures are likely to be adapted towards any foreign
Power, unless upon much deliberation and repeated aggression.
It would seem to follow from this, however, that in proportion
to the slowness should be the firmness of the voice of the na-
tion, when expressed through ill the departments of its Go-
vernment.
Those nations which permit themselves to disregard the re-
monstrances of the President, when conveyed through agents
appointed by him,.and rely for their security upon the limited
powers which our Constitution has intrusted to that officer,
must be taught that his. complaints against injury and outrage
do bet speak, in anticipation, the voice ef the entire People of
the country. -
It may be that, without reference to the limited powers of the
President, the Government of Mexico has been encouraged to
persevere in its course of aggression by the general absence
from iti'neighborhood of vessels of war belonging to the United
States, the interposition of which might have been more effec-
tual than a diplomatic note.
To illustrate this position, the committee will select, out of the
many cases of serious and flagrant injury inflicted upon the
commerce and rights of the United States, by officers of the
Mexican Republic, one of the very few in which that Govern-
ment listened to our demand for satisfaction.
On the 3d of May, 1836, the United States schooner Jefferson-
anchorcd-off the port of Tampico, direct from Pensacola, having
been sent out by order of Commodore Dallas. Lieut. Osborn,
and his boat's crew, who went on shore, were seized and impri-
soned, and the vessel prohibited from entering the river. A
demand for satisfaction made by the American consul was
haughtily refused. The Jefferson left the port, but communi-
cated with the sloop of war Grampus, of eighteen guns, which
came to off the bar; and on the following day there arrived
another American corvette, and both anchored there.
The commander of the Grampus directed a note to' the prin-
cipal of the port, informing him that, by order of the chief of
the division on the West India station, he had come to enter
into a correspondence with him relative to the insult which he
had inflicted on the American flag. A note followed from the
foreign department of the Mexican Government to Mr. Ellis,
requesting him to interpose his authority, and order the vessels
to retire. Mr. Ellis very properly declined to do so. In a few
days an official communication apprized Mr. Ellis that the
Mexican Government had supplanted the officer in command at
Tampico, by substituting in his stead a chief who, it flatters
itself, will know how to preserve greater harmony with the
agents and subjects of foreign nations;" and announced that
" a summary investigation had been ordered to be instituted,
which, by putting in its true light the conduct of Mr. Gomez,
would apply to him the punishment he, deserved, if he should
prove culpable, as well as to all others who may have taken
any-part in the affair treated uppn," renewing the request that
Mr. Ellis would then give his orders for the withdrawal of the
squadron from before Tampico, which was done, and the vessels
departed. The committee would be pleased if they could stop
here in the narrative ; but they are compelled to remark that,
shortly afterwards, the individual whose punishment was thus
promised, as an atonement for the insult to the American flag,
was recalled into service, and assigned to a command upon the
coast, where his hostile feelings might again endanger the se-
curity of American citizens or property.
The effect of this open withdrawal of the apology yielded to
the American Government was, as might have been anticipated,
soon made to appear in fresh outrages upon soae American ci-
tizens, who were entitled to have been treated with peculiar
forbearance, not only because they were in the employment of
the American Government, but because they constituted a part of
the crew of one of the national vessels, whose services on board
might have been very essential. The arrest and imprisonment
of eight of the seamen belonging to the sloop of war.Natchez,
will not now be made the subject of comment, further than to
remark, that the prevention of the American consul from visit-
ing them, while sick and in prison, from Ihe 4th to the 19th of
November, was an act of unpardonable 'inhumanity, and ap-
pears to have proceeded from the same officer whose fictitious
punishment, but real promotion, had been offered as an atone-
ment for a previous insult to the American flag.
Looking through the catalogue of complaints which the Uni-
ted States have to make against Mexico, on' their own account,
as the party whose dignity and honor are assailed, the commit-
tee are unable to perceive any proof of a desire on the part of
the Mexican Government to repair injury or satisfy honor.
The merchant vessels of the United States have been fired
into, her citizens attacked, and even put to death; and her ships
of war treated with disrespect when paying a friendly visit to a
port where they had a right to expect hospitality. It was the
inattention of tie Mexican Government to complaints of this
description, that appears chiefly to have induced the return of
the late Charge des Affaires ; for, in his note of December 7th,
he says : ifthose (the claims) that might be presented should
be all acknowledged as just, yet so long as the several cases
of unprovoked and inexcusable outrage inflicted on the officers
and flag of his country, which have been heretofore submitted
to the Mexican Executive, remained unsatisfactorily answered,
he would have but one course to pursue."
It is possible that the claims for private property, which had
recently been presented anew to their notice, may have at-
tracted the serious attention of that Government; but if a cor-
dial disposition was felt to adjust them, it is not easy to imagine
why those cases, where a decree of the Mexican authorities
had been for a long time passed for their payment, and a portion
actually paid, were not fully satisfied. The committee are will-
ing to h.-r.- 1,.. -.'.., i, it -, a infestation of serious discon-
tent on ]i.. / ,'i. t .i.i,.,.j M.a-. by the withdrawal of their
officials- it-f a: j.i. iI nri-u the Mexican Government to
engage ri ti, a.t .: ,...]g'i,.r. of all the grounds of com-
plaint pressed upon them; for many years past. They fully con-
cur with the.President that ample cause exists for taking re-
dress intoodr own hands and believe that we should be justified,
in the-'opinion of other nations, for taking such a step. But
they're willing to try the cxperimentof another demand, made
in the most solemn form upon the justice of the Mexican Go-.
vernment, before any further proceedings arc adopted. It is
their opinion that a diplomatic functionary of the highest grade
should be appointed to bear this last appeal, whose rank would
indicate at once the importance of his mission and the respect
in which the Government to which he is accredited is held;-
for, notwithstanding the causeless ill feeling which appears to
prevail in Mexico towards the Government and People of the
United States, the latter will continue as long as possible, to treat
with respect their ancient, though now estranged friend. In
conclusion the committee respectfully submit to thie House the
following resolutions:
Resolved, That the indignities offered to the American flag,
and injuries committed upon the persons and property of Ame
rican citizens, by officers of the Mexican Government, and the
refusal or neglect of that Government to make suitable atone-
ment, would justify the Congress of the United States in taking
measures to obtain immediate redress, by the exercise of its
own power.
Resolved, That, as an evidence of the desire of the Ameri-
can Government to preserve peaceful relations with the Go-
vernment of Mexico, as long as the same may be compatible
with that dignity which it is due to the People of the United
States to preserve unimpaired, the President be, and is hereby,
respectfully requested to make another solemn demand, in the
most impressive form, upon the Government of Mexico, for re-
dress of the grievances which have heretofore been ineffectu-
ally presented to its notice.
The consideration of the report was, as already stated,
postponed until to-morrow.


A GARDENER WANTED.-I wish to employ aman
skilful in the management of fruit trees, shrubs, and vege-
tables. To such a person, ofindustrious and regular habits, good
accommodations and liberal wages would be given. Inquire iof
Messrs.Sinclair &Moore, at Baltimore; of Mr. John Mason, Jr.
Goprgetown, D.;C.; or of Judge Neale, in Alexandria, D C.
J. MASON,
jan 24-3tw3w Clermont, Fairfax county, Va.


PASSAGE TO'CHARLESTON, S. C.
The Steam Packet SOUTH
--CAROLINA, Capt. Coffey, will
.... .leave Norfolk for Charleston, on
I Friday, time 3d of March.
And the GEORGIA, Capt. Rollins, will leave on Friday, the
10th. Passage and fare $30. Due notice will be given of the
Summer arrangement. Small packages will be taken on
freight. Apply to -


feb 24-2awtmar7


JAMiES ERGUSSONUc-, naltimore.
DICKSON, HUNTER, & HIPKINS,
Norfolk.


Ai FALLARRANGEMENT FOR NOR-
FOLK.-The Steamer COLUMBIA, James
Mitchell, Master, will, for the remainder of the season, make
but one trip a week. The Columbia will leave Washington on
Wednesday, the 19.h inst., at 10 o'clock in the morning, and
will continueto do so the remainder ofthe season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at helf past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of woodand provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15-dtf


TO SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN TRA-
VELLERS-Washington and Riclhmond.
Rilchmond and Fredericksburg Rail-
road completed, and Navigation open.
The Railroad is now in use from Richmond
to Fredericksburg and the navigation is open
on the Potomac. From Richmond the cars,
with the mail and passengers going North, depart daily at a
quarter past 4 in tihe morning, and arrive in Fredericksburg
usually in about five hours. Stages go thence to Potomac creek,
about 9 miles; and there is a steamboat from Potomac creek to
Washington cily. It is anticipated that such an hour will be
fixed for the afternoon train of cars from Washington to Balti-
more, as will enable passengers leaving Richmond in the smorn-
ing to arrive at Baltimore the same evening.
From Washington city, the steamboat, with the mail and pas-
sengers coming South, departs every day in the morning. Stages
are in readiness at Potomac creek, and, as soon as practicable
after their arrival in Fredericksburg, the cars leave Fredericks-
burg, and arrive in Richmond the same evening. This being
the main Southern Mail line, it is regularly connected by stages
to Petersburg, where passengers can proceed on the railway,
and thence continue in stages to the South, by the way of Ra-
leigh, Fayetteville, &c.
Besides the regular mail line, there is in addition a tri-week-
lyline between Richmond and Fredericksburg, for the transpor-
tation of freight andaway-passengers. The days of departure
from Richmond arb Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday; and
from Fredericksburg, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The
present hour is 9 o'clock from each place. From the 15th of
March, inclusive, the hour will be 12 o'clock from Richmond,
and 5 A. M. from Fredericksburg. The trip is performed by
this train in about six hours.
Charge for transportation from Richmond to Frederickshurg,
$4 for passengers. The Railroad Company and the Stage and
Steamboat Company receive the fare for each other, to and from
Richmond and Washington city.
Pare from Richmond to Washington city, when the navigation
of the Potomaucis practicable for steamboats, (including the trans-
portation by omnibus in Washington,) $6 per passenger.
The equipagesof travellers (both carriages and horses) car-
ried in the freight train on low terms. Price for transportation
from Richmond to Fredericksburg, of carriage and two horses,
$6 50. Gig, with one horse, $3 50. Carriages and horses
must be at the depot at least an hour before the time fixed for
the departure of the train..
At Fredericksburg, the Western ahd Southwestern travellers
will find excellent 'lines 'of stages to take them to the places of
destination.
feb 18-3tw2w J. WOOLFOLK & CO.
AW OF PATENTS, by Willard Phillips, including
the remedies and legal proceedings in relation to patent
rights, in one volume, is just published, and this day received
for tale by F. TAYLOR.
R. HL6 S. TANNER'S UNIVERSAL ATLAS,
containing a diagram of the heights of Mountains, lengths
of Rivers, various Profiles of Canals, Maps of the principal
Kingdoms and States in the Old World, and of theiDiscove-
ries by Columbus, with all the Improvements down to Novem-
ber 1836 ; plan of Palestine and the adjacent countries, Phila-
delphua, New York, and Washington cities. All are full color-
ed. Specimens may be seen at Messrs. Brown's and Gadsby's
Hotels. Gentlemen who wish to gain accurate knowledge of
any part of the Globe can do so by perusing the aforesaid.
All orders left at either of the Hotels, or at Mrs. Orme's
Boarding House, between 7th and Sth streets, Louisiana Ave-
nue, will be thankfully received, and punctually attended to, by
J. ROBERTSON,
feb 20--3t Agent.
QTOCK OF VALUABLE GOODS, AT COST
L9 and charges, ftr Private Sale, and first-rate Stand
for Rent.-The subscriber, intending to disengage himself
from the retail business, which lie has prosecuted for many
years past, offers to dispose of his entire stock in trade, (at pri-
vate sale,)'on very accommodating terms as to time, satisfacto-
ry security for ultimate payment being the only indispensable
requisite. With the. stock, the store will be let for a moderate
rent.
To a person of business talents, with a small capital, a better
opportunity for engaging in a successful business seldom pre-
sents itself. Those disposed. to treat on the subject, will receive
every information upon application in person or otherwise.
LEWIS JOHNSON,
Old Snuff, Tobacco, and Fancy Store, between Eleventh and
Twelfth streets, Pennsylvania Avenue. feb 22-3t
PRING GOODS.-Opened this day-
25 pieces new style painted Muslins
25 do do do Lawns
10 do Lyonaise
20 do French Chintz
50 do neat London do
1 Cartoon Capes and Collars. J. H. NOYES.
feb 23-3t (Globe)
W ENDELL'S DIGEST of Cases decided and re-
ported in the Supreme Court of Judicature, and in the
Court for the correction of Errors, in the State of New York,
from May, 1828, to May, 1835, with Tables of the names of the
Cases reported, and of Cases determined in the Court for the
correction of Errors, from the commencement of the Reports
in the State of New York, until January, 1835, by John L.
Wendell, Counsellor 'at Law, in 1 volume, is just published,
and this day received for sale by
.;"feb 13 F. TAYLOR.
[DIANNING'S VOYAGES TO THE SOUTH
b" SEA, containing, also, information relating to important
late discoveries between 1792 and the present time. 1 volume
octavo, with engravings. -
A few copies of the above publicat (parti(particularly interest-
ing at the present time) are this day received, and for sale by
feb 8 F.TAYLOR.
s NDIAN TREATIES, LAWS, &c. &c.--For sale
by F. TAYLOR, in one volume, all the Laws relating -to
Indians and Indian Alffairs, by the Colonial, State, and General
Governments, (including those of the Congress of the Confede-
ration,) from 1633 to the present time, one octave volume of 330
pages; price only $1 25. l '
SAlso, Indian Treaties and -Laws and Regulations relating to
Indian affairs, showing also the proceedings of the Old Con-
gress on the same subject'; and many other important State Pa-
pers relating to, Indians'and Indian affairs, one octavo volume.
Speeches on tle Indian Removal Bill of 1830, one volume,
price 62. cents containingSpeeches of Frelinghuysen, Sprague,
Robbins, Storrs, Ellsworth,' Evans, Huntingdon, Everett, and
others. feb 13
N EW MAP OF MICHIGAN.-Colton's new en-
larged edition of Farmer's large Map of Michigan, exhi-
biting the sections, is just published, (February, 1837,) and this
day received for sale by F. TAYLOR, and will be found to contain
all the recentsettlements and improvements, and is also on a much
larger scale than Farmer's Route Book and Traveller's Guide
between New York and Washington, accompanied by a map
1837.
An additional supply of the large sectional Map of Illinois is
now on the way from New York, on rollers, for office use, as
well as in a portable form for the pocket, feb 13
SUPERIOR STATIONERY.-T'hesubscriber has on
S hand from recent purchases-
2 400 reams best American and English Letter Paper
S 160 do Cap Paper
100 do Demi and Medium Paper
D 40 do Folio Post
100 do Envelope IPaper
CO,000 Quills -
10 gross In ks in quart, pint, and half-pint bottles
200 pounds best American and English Scaling Wax
100 do Wafers
S360 dozen Office Tape
q 500 cards most approved Steel Pens
20 grossbest Lead Pencils
500 pieces India Ink
24 dozen Mouth GCue
28 do Cut Glass Inks, fir office use
800 poutids of superior Black Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders
Letter Stamps, WaVfer, Pounce, and Sand Boxes
Pajuer Weights, Rulers
Blotting, Tracing, and Drawing Paper
And every other article in the Stationery line, all of whiich
will be sold on better terms than articles of similar quality can
bh obtained elsewhmre. Orders promptly executed at Station-
era' Hall. W. FISCHER.
F OR SALE.-The subscriber offers for sale those three
two-story brick houses situated on I street, between 19th
and 20th streets. This property is located in a healthy and
pleasant .part of the city, and will be sold on accommodating
terms.
The title is unquestionable. If not disposed of previously, it
will be offered at public sale on Monday, the 1ith of March.
jain 31-3talw J.C. McKIRLDEFN, 7th street.


Bank of Columbia, Feb. 9, 183I.
gtHE Stockholders in the Bank of Columbia are hereby
notified that an Election for five directors of this Bank
will be held at the office of th'e Bank of the United States, in
Washington, on Thursday, the second day of March next, be-
tween the hours-of I and 2 o'clock P. M.
feb 10-eot27th-dtmar2 RD. SMITH, Cashier.
SELLING OFF AT COST.-The undersigned, hav-
vlo ing made his arrangements for leaving the city within two
weeks, with a view of locating in thie West, will offer his stock
of Dry Goods and Shoes at cost.
Families wishing to supply themselves by the piece, or other-
wise, will find it to their advantage to cael.
On hand a complete assortment of Dry Goods.
2,000 pairs Shoes
200 ready made Vests, for winter and summer
200 do Pantaloons, do
50 fine and superfine Cloth Coats.
WM. DOUGHERTY.


feb 13-d2w


[Tel and Glo]


YITHIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
has obtained from the Orphans' Court of Prince George's
county, letters of administration on the personal estate of Hugh
W. Drummond, late of said county,deceased. All persons having
claims against the said deceased are hereby notified to exhibit
die same to the subscriber, with the vouchers thereof, on or be-
fore the 20th day of -June next ; they may otherwise, by law,
be excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Giv(s
under my hand, this 13th day of January, 1837.
MATILDA DRUMMOND,
jan 17-w4w Administratrix.
"R ICII FRENCII EMBROIDERY.-Just received
5 Cartoons of Muslin Capes, small size
2 do Lace, new work
2 do Fine Collars
25 Ladies' Dresses
10 Muslin do
50 handsome infants' Worked Dresses.
This assortment of goods was selected in Paris expressly for
this market. DARIUS CLAGETT.
feb 23-I3t
BOARDING TO BE HAD.-Mus. HUNGERFORD,
at the courier of 5th and E streets, can accommodate se-
veral families. Some.of her rooms are large and commodious,
and admirably adapted for the purpose. Her price will be $2
per day for board, fire and light included. *
feb 23-3t
BRUSSELS AND INGRAIN CARPETING.
Just received-
2,500 yards best Brussels
1,500 do do Ingrain
25 rich tufted Rugs
20 do Imperial
Gilt Goods for Curtains.
50 Gilt Rods
100 pairs Gilt Ends
50 dozen Gilt Rings
lMoreens for Hangings.
25 pieces Crimson Moreens
25 do Damask do
Fringes and bindings to match.
feb 23-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
A N ELDERLY GENTLEMAN wants a situation
in a private family as Tutor, or the place of Assistant, in a
Classical Seminary. Satisfactory references will be given as to
capacity and moral conduct. Address J. B. near Mechanics-
ville, Montgomery county, Maryland. jan 10-d&c20t
C ORPORATION STOCK will be exchanged forBank
of Washington stock on the most liberal terms.
Persons wishing a safe six per cent. stock can be supplied as
above.
feb 23-eo3t C. S. FOWLER & CO.
PLENDID SPRING GOODS.-Justreceived,
O 50 pieces new style Muslins
25 do Printed Lawns
50 superior Worked Crape Shawls
25 Twisted Silk Worked Shawls
10 Camel's Hair Embroidered Shawls.
feb 23-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
Circuit Court of the District of Columbia for the
County of Washington.-In Chancery, November
Term, 1836.
John P. Van Ness,
vs.
John Carothers.
T HE Trustee in this cause having reported thathe has sold
to Pringle Slight Lots Nos. 10 and 11, in Square .east of
Square six hundred and forty-two (642,) for one hundred and
twenty dollars, ($120,) and to John P. Van Ness Lots Nos. 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 18, 19, 20 & 21, with the improvements
and appurtenances thereunto belonging, being all in said square
east of square six hundred and forty-two (642) for three hun-
dred and fifty-two dollars and twenty cents (352 20:)
It is therefore this third day of December, 1836, ordered that
the said sale be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the con-
trary be shown on or before the fourth Monday in March next:
Provided, a copy of this order be published twice a week fos
four weeks before said day.-
By order of the Court,
feb 16--2aw4w Test: W. BRENT, Clerk.
In Prince George's county Court, as a Court of
Equity-February Term, 1837.
Henry Mitchell,
es.
Mary Ann Mitchell and others.
TNHE object of this suit is to obtain a decree for the convey-
J ance of part of a tract of land called Mitchell's Adven-
ture." The original bill states that a certain Tilghman Mit-
chell, being seized in fee of a tract of land called Mitchell's
Adventure, conveyed the same unto a certain Thomas L. Mit-
chell, with power to dispose of it for his benefit ; that said land
was patented to Tilghman, and held by him individually ; that
Singleton Mitchell having defrayed one-half of the expenses of
said patent, a deed for his part was executed by the said Thomas
to the said Singleton, with the consent of the said Tilghman; and
that Singleton hath since conveyed the same to a certain Hen-
ry Mitchell; that Tilghman and Thomas have sold the balance
of said land to a certain Mary Ann Prather, formerly Butler,
and executed- a bond of conveyance to her for the same ; that
Prather and wife have assigned the said bond to a certain Lib-
bgrn Mitchell; who hath since transferred the same to the said
Henry Mitchell; that the whole of the purchase money for the
same has been paid by the said Henry, excepting $100, with
same interest for which the said Tilghman holds his single bill,
and which he is ready to pay when he can obtain title to the
said land. The supplemental bill states the substance-of the
'original bill, and also that a decree was passed by Prince
George's county Court, at November term, 1836, against-the
said Tilghman, for the conveyance of said land ; that, before
the said decree was rendered, the said Tilghman died, leaving
the following heirs, to wit: Mary Ann, wife of the said Tilgh-
man Mitchell, and Saraih Mitchell, Rebecca Mitchell, John Al-
exander Mitchell, Maria Ellen Mitchell) and Thomas Morti-
more Mitll, minor, minors under twenty-one years of age, and who
reside hil he State of Ohio. It is thereupon ordered by Prince
George's county Court, sitting as a Court of Equity, this 14th
day of February, 1837, that the complainant, by causing a copy
of this order to he inserted in scone newspaper published in
Washington city once a week for four successive weeks before
the first Monday of April next, give notice to the said absent
defendants, Mary Ann Mitchell, Sarah Mitchell, Rebecca Mit-
chell, John Alexander Mitchell, Maria Ellen Mitchell, and
Thomas Mortimore Mitchell, of the object and substance of the
original and supplemental bill, and warn thnem to be and appear
in this Court, in person or by guardian, on or before the second
Monday in July next, to answer tihe premises, and show cause,
if any they have, why a decree should not pass as prayed.
EDMUND KEY.
True copy-Test; A. BEALL,
feb 21-w4w Clerk.-
OVELS, etc.-Just published and received, The Tuggs
of-Ramsgate, by Boz, and other Tales, by distinguished
authors. ''.
Henrietta Temple, by D'Israeli, new.
Goetz Von Berlichingen, a Drama in five acts, from the Ger-
man of Goethe. For sale by


feb 17-3t


GARRET ANDERSON,
Penn. Av. between 11th and 12th sts.


T HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber -
hath obtained from the Orphans' Court of Charles county,
Maryland, letters of administration on the personal estate of
Benjamin A. Lancaster, sen., late of Charles county, deceased.
All persons having claims against said deceased are hereby
warned to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof, to the
subscriber, on or before the first day of July next ; they may
otherwise by law be excluded from all benefit of the said estate.
Given under my hand the 23d day of November, 1836.
ELIZABETH H. LANCASTER,
jan 3-w6w Administratrix.
T HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
has obtained from the Orphans' Court of Washington
county, in the District of Columbia, letters of administration
of the personal, estate ofPhilip H. Williams, late ofWashington
county, Dist. of Columbia, deceased. All persons having claims
against the said deceased are hereby warned to exhibit the
same, with thie vouchers thereof, to the subscribers, on or before
the 3d day of February next; they may otherwise by law be
excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Given
under our hands, this 3d day of February, 1837.
SARAH A. WILLIAMS, Administratrix.
feb 6-w3w JOHN WILLIAMS, Administrator.
A ARON BURR.-Just received, and for sale, a nowsup-
ply ofthe Memoirs of Aaron Burr, by
GARRET ANDERSON,
jan 20 Penn. Av. between I th & 12th streets.
rr HE SUBSCRIBER has just received from the'
press the Examinatior.and Review of a Pamphlet printed
and secretly circulated by M. E. Gorostiza, late Envoy Extra-
ordinary from Mexico, previous to his departure from the
United Stales, respecting the passage of the Sabine by the troops
under the command of General Gaines.
For sale by GARRET ANDERSON,
jan 23 Boolk and Fancy Store, Penn. Av.


Navy Agent's Office,
Washington, Feb. 22, 1837. I
STONE MASONS.-Wanted at the Navy Yard in this
city, from fifteen to twenty Stone Masons, who will proba-
bly finil constant employment during the greater part of the en-
suing summer, to commence from Monday next. Apply at the
Navy Yard. feb 24-d4t
C OCHRAN'S RIFLES.-One dozen of Cochran's
many-cliambered Rifles have just arrived, and may lie ob-
tained by immediate application at Gadsby's Hotel. They are
of the most perfect workmanship, and will never disappoint the
expectation of the purchaser. The price is one hundred dollars
each. feb 25-d3t
0O GENTLEMEN OF THE WEST AND
A SOUTHWEST.-A young man who is a practical
printer, and who possesses a thorough knowledge of the routine
of a newspaper establishment, wishes to procure employmentit
the West or Southwest. The entire management of any con-
cern where the proprietor has other engagements, with a share
in the business, contingent on its success, wduld be undertaken
at a moderate salary. A permanentsituationiswhatistdesired.
Satisfactory references given. Address B. Y. through the
Post Office. feb 25-3t
IiS ASHWO.,15 :;especttully informs the Ladies of
1Washington iiat she has a great variety of evening Head
Dresses, Caps, and oiliher articles. No. 3 VaYnum's Row,
Pennsylvaina venue. feb 16-eo7t
A LCESTIS OF EURIPIDES, with notes, for
the use of Colleges in the United States, by Professor
Woolsey, of Yale College, price 37 cents, is just received for
sale by F. TAYLOR, who also has for sale one ef the best col-
lections in the United States of Greek and Latin authors, of
every variety of edition, as used in different colleges and schools,
with or without notes, translations, &c. Also, the Leipsic
Greek and Latin editions, noted for their correctness. His col-
lection of instruction books, in every language, dictionaries,
lexicons, &c. is equal in extent, variety, value, and cheapness of
price to any in the country.
At the Waverly Circulating Library immediately east of
Gadsby's Hotel. feb 20
ULES AND HORSES FOR SALE.-Three
Mules, young, and of a fine size, perfectly broke to har-
ness.
Also, a superior Saddle Horse, well gaited, and perfectly
sound. They can be seen at the stable of
MAYNADIER MASON,
feb 16-dlw Georgetown.
M fADEIRA WINE.-This day received, by the brig
Chili, from Madeira, 2 pipes, 22 half pipes, and 8 quarter
casks of Winey.warranted equal to any from that island.
In store, a few casks of former importations, some very old.
Orders by mail will receive immediate attention, and be sup-
plied with the above.
Also, Port in cases of one dozen each; Sauterne, Leoville,
and St. Julien; Chaimpagne, and other Wines.
A. C. CAZENOVE & CO.
feb 20-6t Alexandria.
OR SALE.-Bank of Metropolis stock
Patriotic Bank do
Corporation 6 per cent. stock, interest payable quarterly
Do 5 do do do do
WANTED,
Illinois and Arkansas Land Patents.
Inquire of JOHN F. WEBB,
feb 25-3t Broker.
FOR CHARLESTON-Regular Line.-The
Am a line brig General Sumter, Captain Goodwin, will sail
on Monday niorning, the 27th instant. For light freight or pas-
sage, having superior accommodations, apply on board, or to
JOHN K. RANDALL,
feb 24-3t '104, Smith's wharf, Baltimore.
PUBLIC SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ES-
TATE.-Under the authority of a decree of the Circuit
Superior Court of Law and Chancery for the county of Lou-
doun, rendered at November special term, 1836, in the case of
James garrison and others against Jno. Thomas,' W. W. Kitz-
miller, and others, the undersigned commissioner therein nam-
ed will, on the 11th day of March, 1837, at 12 o'clock M. upon
the premises, expose for sale, at public auction to the highest
bidder, the property in said decree mentioned. It consists of a
Lot of about two acres, in the town of Leesburg, Loudoun coun-
:y, Virginia, with a comfortable and spacious Brick Building,
and good out-houses, a large and valuable Tan-yard, with all
suitable buildings. It is situated in a populous and flourishing
country, and would lie, to an active and competent Tanner, a
profitable establishment. As the sale must take place, there is
little doubt but a bargain will be had.
Terms: One-third cash, and one and two years, without in-
terest for the residue, the purchaser giving bonds for the credit
payments.
jan 10-ts T. ROGERS.
PLATED GOODS, GUNS, LAMPS, &c.
Plated Tea Sets, Waiters, Cake Baskets, Candlesticks,
Branches, Spoons, Table and Dessert Forks.
Single and double barrel Fowling Pieces, Rifles, Holster Belts,
and Pocket Pistols, in great variety.
Gold and silver mounted Canes.
Astral, mantel, reading, and suspending Lamps, Candlebras,
Brackets, Curtain Poles, Cornice Ends, Curtain Rings,
Bands, and Pins.
Superior Table Cutlery, large Pier Glasses, &c.
For sale by E. LINDSLEY.
feb 24-d&c3 (Globe)
VALUABLE FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL
Trees, Flowers, Shrubbery, &c. of the most valua-
ble and choicest variety.
The subscriber, about to leave his present residence, would
make known to the Public generally that he intends to dispose
of his entire stock of Fruit, Ornamental, and other Trees,
Shrubbery, and choice Flowers; many of which are choice Fruit
Trees, and a great many choice and beautiful Flowers and
Plants."
The collection embraces Pears, Plumbs, Cherries, red and
white Currants, Gooseberries, and several choice variety of
Grapes. Also, choice multiflora Greville, Moss Monthly, daily
and annual Roses, embracing sixty different varieties; Shrub-
bery of all kinds; Herbaceous Plants and Bulb Flowers;
Double Tube Roses; Hyacinth, Parrot, and other Tulips; Car-
nation Pinks, &c. in the ground; Jacobin Lilies; Tiger Flow-
ers; a general assortment of good Garden Seeds, as Vegeta-
bles and Flowers ; together with garden and other implements
of husbandry, flower pots and boxes, with flowers and trees,
and boxes and pots.
The whole are offered at private sale in lots to. uit, until the
day of sale, which will be made known in a few days.
JOHN BASTIAN, Horticulturist,
Lexington street, near Cove street, Baltimore.
feb 24-2aw2w J. H, NAFF, Auct
A TEACHER WANTED.-The Trustees of West-
wood School wish to engage a Classical Teacher for the
present year. The situation is healthy, and the neighborhood
agreeable. Apply to JOSEPH A. TURNER,
Near Horse-head, or to
JOSIAS YOUNG,
feb 21-3tawlmo Near Upper Marlborough.


ALEXANDRIA FOUNDRY and STEAM EN-
GINE MANUFACTORY.-Locomotive and Sta-
tionary Engines, heavy Iron and Brass Castings, Church Bells,
and Machinery of every kind. Gentlemen visiting Washing-
ton are invited to call and see the works.
THOMAS W, SMITH & Co.
mar 4-eoly Alexandria, March 1.
1J:OR RENT.-The now two-story brick house on
G street, a few squares west of the War Department,
at present occupied by John Laub, Esq. Possession
can be had on the 1st of March. For terms, &c. apply to the
subscriber.
feb 2-2aw2w EDMUND HANLEY.
REASONABLE DRY GOODS.-We are receiving
this day-
250 pieces Irish Linens (very cheap)
50 do Sheetings and Diapers
150 do Cambric Muslins (cheap)
75 do JaconetI
30 do Mull Muslin
50 do Plaid Swiss Muslins
100 do Plaid Cambric Muslins
50 do Bishop Lawns
20 do Linen Cambrics
50 dozen Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs
100 pieces Painted Muslins
150 do superior French Muslins
70 do French Cambric
20 do Muslin Delane-small figures
160 do Ginghams
500 do Calicoes-all prices.
FRENCH GOODS.
10 pieces beautiful colored Silks, full 5-4 wide
50 do low priced Plaid Silks
10 do black Pouldesoi
10 do blue-black do
20 do Italian Lustrings
100 pieces French Lawns
100 Spring Shallies
100 pieces Muslin Delano
50 do rich French Worked Collars
50 do Thread Laces
1000 yards Cambric Inserting and Edging
500 do Thread Laces.
Also,
5000 yards Carpeting and Curtain Goods, which will be
made up and forwarded to any part of thie country.
Also,
300 pieces Cloths and Cassimneres
30 do Vestings.
Gentlemen's Clothing made up at the shortest notice, and in
the best manner. BRADLEY & CATLETT.
feb 24-3aw3w [Globe]
N EW YORK INFIRMARY lor Diseases of the
Skin, corner of Broadway and Courtland street, (en
trance No. 2 Courtland street,) open daily, from 1 till 2 o'clock
Physicians.-JoHN W.ScmIIInT, Jr. M.D., MINTURN POST
M. D., OHAnLes A. PORTEn, M. D. jan 26-dt


E DODGE, Dentist and Artificial Palate Manu-
0 facturer, from No. 2, Park Piece, New York, informs
the citizens and visitors of Washington that he has taken rooms
seven doors cast of Gadsby's Hotel, where he will be happy to
perform all operations in his profession.
References of the first respectability given on application at
his rooms (Globe) jan 18-eotf
-Y P. MAURO & SON, TRUSTEE'S SALE.
On Wednesday, 26th April next, at 4 o'clock P. M. on
the premises, I shall sell, under a deed of trust, dated October
133, and for the purposes therein mentioned, all that lot or
parcel of ground, in the city of Washington, known as lot num-
bered 24, in square No. 517, containing-l,800 square feet, more
or less ; together with the buildings, improvements, &c. aeer-
taifring to the same.
Terms of sale cash. BENEDICT MILBURN,
Trustee.
P. MAURO & SON'74Auctioneers.
feb 22-leowts
O DORIFEROUS COMPOUND.-Just received at
Stationers' Hall a fresh supply of Ede's Odoriferous Comin
pound, or Persian Sweet Bag, a most grateful perfume for
scenting clothes, drawers, wardrobes, &c. and is an effectual
preventive against moth; price 50 cents.
feb 13 I Tel] W. FISCHER.
C"AUTION.--Lawrence's Hanging Lamp.--The
.)subscribers, having purchased the right to the above
Lamp or Chandelier, take this mode to caution the Public
against the use of certain others which have been recently in-
troduced into the market, constructed upon the same principle,
and intended as an invasion of their exclusive privilege. They
have instituted a suit in the Circuit Court of the United States
against Josiah Danforth, of Middletown, the assignee ofFPlatt's
Union Lamp, so called, and others, for making and vending
that lamp. They consider that as a plain and palpable viola..
tion of their rights. It is known by this peculiarity, that the
reservoirs for the oil are, generally, made in the form of fishes.
Their duty to themselves, and to those to whom they have
granted privileges under patent, requires that their rights, con-
ferred by the law of the United States, should be protected;
and they hereby admonish all, who make, sell, or use their
hanging lamp, without authority from them, under whatever dis-
guise, that legal measures will be adopted for redress.
NATHANIEL BACON,
WILLIAM PLUMB, 2d.
Middletown, Jan. 31, 1837.
g3 P. MAURO & SON, agents for the District of Colum-
bia, for the proprietors of Lawrence's Patent Hanging Lamp or
Chandelier, receive and supply orders of dealers or others.
feb 9-eo3w

RADLEY & CATLETT have received -
200 pieces Irish Linens, very cheap
100 pieces English Cotton Shirtings
500 do domestic Long Cloth Shirtings.
Also,
20 pieces superior blue Cloths, superior make
30 do. do. black do.
10 do. do. fancy colored do.
Also,
100 pieces striped, ribbed and plaid, and plain Caiasimeres
80 pieces Ingrain'Carpeting, very cheap
120 do. Brussels do. do.
150 do. damask and worsted Moreens.
All kinds of clothes made up at the shortest notice, and by
the most fashionable tailors.


jan 21-3aw4w


BRADLEY & CATLETT,
Opposite the Market House.


OTICE.-I. MUDD & CO. have associated with them,
in the Lumber, Wood, and Coal trade, Mr. Alexander
Shepherd; the business will hereafter be conducted under the
firm of Mudd, Shepherd & Co. Mr. Shepherd is fully author-
izad to collect any debts due to the late firm.
\ I. MUDD.
46. MURRY.
The business heretofore carried on by the late firm will be
continued atthe old stand, Market Square, 7th street; and, in ad-
dition to the large and well-seasoned stock of lumber now on
hand, the undersigned have given orders for a considerable in-
creased supply, which they will doubtless receive as soon as the
navigation opens. They also intend to deal largely in Wood,
Coal, and Lime ; to. facilitate which, they have leased the ex-
tensive wharf and warehouse on the Potomac river, at the foot
of 7tj street, known as Cana's wharf. By this arrangement, and
close application to business, they flatter themselves they will be
able to sell all articles in their line on the most reasonable terms.
They particularly invite their old customers and dealers to give
them a call. MUDD, SHEPHERD & CO.
jan 20-3taw4w (Glo. & Met )
-ASH FOR 400 NEGROES, including bothsexes,
- from twelve to twenty-five years of age. Persons having
servants to dispose of will find it to their interest to-give me a
call, as I will give higher prices, in cash, than any other pur-
chaser who is now in this market.
I can at all times be found atthe MECHANICS' HALL, now
keptby B. 0. Sheckle, and formerly kert by Isaac Beers,'on
Seventh street, a few doors belowLloyd's Tavern, opposite the
Centre market. All communicationspromptly attended to.
JAMES H. BIRCH,
nov 7- dtf "Washington City.
EAUTIFUL BOOKS.-Now opening at Stationers'
Hall the following beautiful Books, suitable for Christmas
and new year's presents:
The Souvenir Keepsake for 1837
The Religious Souvenir do
The Pearl do
The Violet do
The Christmas Box do
The Gift I do
The Forget Me Not do
Friendship's Offering do
With a variety of Toy Books for children, and Almanacs for
1837, att 6 cents. W. FISCHER.
dec 23 [Tell
F"OR SALE.-HOUSE AND LOT on Bridge
._ Street, Georgetown.-A three-story Brick House,
with the adjoining Lot, makingsixty-nine feet on Bridge street,
and running south to the Canal Basin one hundred and twenty
feet.
Also, a Tract of Land in Montgomery county, Md., containing
two hundred and forty-eight acres, situated on the Paint Run,
about 14 miles from Washington, and 13 miles from Ellicott's
Mills. Apply to MAYNADIER MASON,
feb 16-d2w Georgetown.
B BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Christ-
mas alnd New Year's Presents, consisting, in
part, of Annuals, Albums, Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
and keys, Ladies' Work Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
nished and unfurnished,, richly inlaid with pearl and ivory,
from $1 to $30 each; splendid Card and Needle Boxes, oC
pearl, ivory; and shell, beautifully inlaid, from 2 to $10 each ;
Gold and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
50 cents to $12 each ; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps ;
Arabesque (now) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
variety of new Gaines; Dissected Monuments, &c. neatly put
up; Writing and Travelling Desks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Dressing Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands;
splendid China Figures for centre tables; Toilet Boxes; China
and Bronze Inkstands; Ladies' and Gentlemen's Pocket
Books ; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets ; Silk and Bead Purses ;
Bouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets ; Sil-
ver Instruments; Pearl and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
folders ; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes ; Chessmen;
Backgammon Boards; Battledores ; Damask, Tinted, nd Em-
bossed Note Paper; Perfumery of every description ; Ladies'
and Gentlemen s Penknives and Scissors ; with many other
Fancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at fair prices at Stationers' Htall.
dcc 24 W. FISCHER.
SPRING GOODS.-BRADLEY & CATLETT have
S Othis day received-
20 pieces black and blue Satins
20 do black Italian Silks
30 do plain Silks
30 do figured do
30 do new style figured Lawns
3 cases painted Muslins
3 do Calicoes.
ALSO.
100 dozen Towels
30 pieces Dowlass, for Towels.
300 dozen Silk and Cotton Hosiery.
feb 13-2w BRADLEY & CATLETT.
OPY BOOKS.-2,000 Foster's Elementary Copy
Books.
100 Bascom's Writing Books, which are designed to lead the
learner, upon simple principles, from thie first rudiments of
penmanship to a perfect knowledge of thie art: being a new
and improved plan of teaching; by which the trouble and loss
of time in ruling horizontal and diagonal lines, and setting co-
pies, are avoided, and the attainment of penmanship is greatly
facilitated. The above named books are preferred to all others,
and are now in general use in all the principal schools at the
North. The highest testimonials of the superiority of these
books may be seen at Stationers' Hall, where they will be con-
stantly kept for wholesale or retail, at the publishers' prices.
jan 13 (Tel) W. FISCHER.
L ARGE MAP OF ILLINOIS-Newly publish-
ed.-Engraved from the Government surveys, on a
scale which covers six square feet, exhibiting the sections, &c.
and pointing out thie woodland, prahiries, marshes, bottom lands,
&c. &e. Also, theic internal improvements, distance between
towns, post offices, &c. &c. in a style of perfection and accuracy
never attempted before with any of thie Western States. Is
just received and for sale by F. TAYLOR, in a portable form,
for the pocket, at their Waverly Circulating Library, iumiedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel. jan 16
1KEMBERS OF CONGRESS.-Members of Con-
I-. gress and strangers requiring boxes for packing books,
papers, &c, can be accommodated with any size, for less than hal,
the cost price, by applying at Stationers' Hall, where is con-
stantly kept the most extensive assortment of lhoiceo fincy ar-
ticles for sale in the District.
feb 17-law2w (Tel.) W. FISCHER.


American Litfe Insurance and Trust Company.
OFFICES-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and Wall
street, New York.
AGENcY-Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite Fuller's Hotel, ant
two doors from the Buildings occupied by the Treasury Depart.
ment, Washington city.
CAPITAL PAID IN $2,000,000.
PATRICK MACAULAY, President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBINSON,.-Vice President, New York.
ONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
i be allowed, payable semi-annually. The Company alsc
insures lives, grants annuities, sells endowments, and executed
trusts
Of the rates of insurance of $100 on a single life.
ANNUAL PREMIUat.
Age. I year. years. For life. Age. 1 year. 7 years. For life.
14 72 86 1 53 38 1 48 1 70 3 05
15 77 88 1 56 39 1 57 1 76 3 11
16 84 90 1 62 "40 1 69 1 83 3 20
17 86 91 1 65 41 1 78 88 3 31
18 89 92 1 69 42 1 85- 1 89 3 40
19 90 94 1 73 43 1 89 1 92 3 51
20 91 95 1 77 44 1 90 1 94 8 63
21 92 97 1 82 45 1 91 1 96 3 73
22 94 99 1 88 46 1 92 1 98 3 87
23 97 1 03 1 93 47 1 93 1 99 41)1
24 99 1 07 1 98 48 1,94 2 02 4 17
25 1 00 1 12 2 04 49 1 95 2 04 4 49
26 1 07 1 17 2 11 50 1 96 2 09 4 60
27 1 12 1 23 2 17 51 1 97 2 20 4 75
28 1 20 1 28 2 24 52 2 02 2 37 4 90
29 1 28 1 35 2 31 53 2 10 2 59 5 24
30 1 31 J 36 2 36 54 2 18 2 89 5 49
31 1 32 1 42 2 43 55 2 32 3 21 5 78
32 1 33 1 46 2 50 56 2 47 3.56 6 05
33 1 34. 1 48 2 57 57 2 70 4 20 6 27
34 1 35 1 50 2 64 58 3 14 4 31 6 50
35 1 36 1 53 2 75 59 3 67 4 63 -6 75
36 1 39 1 57 2 81 60 4 35 4 91 7 00
37 1 43 1 63 2 90

Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
MACAULAY, Esq., President, Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
BINSON, Esq., Vice President, New York; to which intme-
diate attention will be paid.
Applications may also be made personally, or by letter, post
paid, to FRANCIS A. DICKINS, Agent for the Company in the
City of WASHINGTON. His office is on Penuvslvania Avenue,
opposite Fuller's Hotel, and tws doors from the buildings occu-
pied by the Treasury Dep& tini'. oct l6-26-dly
E LISHA LEE, Coaclt-mnklteir,of Baltimore, has
taken a room in the carriage establishmentt of Mr. Thos.
Young, on Maine street, near Maiyland Avenue, will keep a
constant supply of Fashionable Carriages, fro-m his owrs manu-
factory, which he will warrant equal, at least, to any brought to
this city. Persons wishing a good article will do well to call, as
none other will be disposed of there. jan 14-20t
BALTIMORE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY,
JOHN J. DONALDSON, PRESIDENT,
NSURES LIVES for one or more years, or for life.
--
Rates for One Hundred Dollars.
Age. One year. Seven years. For life.
25 1.00 1.12 2.04
30 1.31 1.36 2.36
35 1.36 1.53 2.75
40 1.69 1.83 3.20
45 1.91 1.96 3.73
50 1.96 2.09 4.60
55 2.32 3.21 5.78
60 4.35 4.91 7.00
GRANTS ANNUITIES.
Rates.for One Hundred Dollars.
60 years of age, 10.55 per cent.
65 do. 12.27 do. ) per annum.
70 do. 14.19 do.
SELLS ENDOWMENTS.
For One Hundred Dollars deposited at birth of child, the Com-
- pany will pay, if he attain 21 years of age, $469
At six months, 408
One year, 375
The Company also executes trusts ; receives money on depo-
site, paying interest semi-annually, or compounding it, and
makes all kinds of contracts in which life or the interest of mo-
ney is involved.
WILLIAM MURDOCK, Secretary.

AGENTS.
James H. Causten, City of Washington.
Dr. B. R. Wellford, Fredericksburg, Virginia.
John 0. Lay, Richmond, Va.
D. Robertson, Norfolk, Va.
A. S. Tidball, Winchester, Va.
George Richards, Leesburg, Va.
Neilson Pee, Frederick, Md.
feb 3-ly
SECRET JOURNALS OF THE OLD CON-
GRESS, on Foreign as well as on Domestic Affairs, in
four volumes octavo, running from 1775 to 1778. A single copy
of the above scarce work is for sale by F. TAYLOR.
In Montgomery County Court, sitting as a Court ot
Equity-December Term, 1836.
Hanson Clarke
Vs.
Benjamin B. Beall, Washington B. Beall, Gideon Beall, George
W. Dashiell and Deborah his wife, and Thomas B. Dashiell.
HE object of this bill is to obtain a decree to convey all the
interest of the said defendants in and to, certain lots of
lands sold by a certain Benjamin Berry, jr. trustee, to Frederick
Dawes, by a good and lawful deed, to the complainant..
The bill states that, some time in the year 1817,Benjamin Ber-
ry, senr. and Robert B. Beall conveyed by a deed of trust cer-
tain lots in said deed particularly mentioned and described, tea
certain Benjamin Berry, junr. as trustee for the benefit ofRobert
B. Beall and Elizabeth his wife, and their children, with power
to said trustee to sellsaidlots. That, in.pursuance of said power
the said trustee did sell said lots to a certain Frederick.Dawes,
then art alien, in the year 1817, and gave him possession of the
same. That the said Robert B. Beall and Elizabeth his wife
have departed this life, leaving the above named defendants,
their children, heirs at law. That, in the year 1825, the said de-
fendants, by the request of the said Dawes, he being still an
alien, having obtaipcd' no deed from said trustee, executed a
paper writing purporting to be a deed of conveyance for his the
said Dawes's benefit, to a certain Thomas Simpson, for said lots.
That said writing was not acknowledged according to the laws
of Maryland, and consequently was void. That the said Dawes
has since sold the said lots to the complainant. And that, by
the consent of the said Dawes, this complainant files this bill for
the purpose of obtaining from the said defendants a good and
sufficient deed to said lands or lots of ground. That all the de-
fendants are non-residents.
It is, therefore, Ordered, that the complainant cause a copy
of this order tobe inserted at least once in each of three succes-
sive weeks, in some newspaper printed in Rockville, in Mont-
gomery county, amid also in Washington city, in the District of
Columbia, before the first Monday of July next, to the end that
tihe said non-resident -defendants may have notice ofthe com-
plainant's application to this Court; and thie subject and object of
this bill may be warned to appear in this Court in person, or
by solicitor, on or before the said first Monday in J.ly next, to
show cause, if any, why a decree should not pass as prayed.
CHARLES J. KILGOUR.
Copy, test: B. SELBY,
jan 25-law3w Clerk.
In Chancery, February 10, 1837.
Robert Wallace, Jesse Leach, and John J. Harding,
vs.
Madison Cutts andEleanor his wife, Greenough and Mary
Rosetta his wife, and others, heirs at law of John O'Neall.
F IHE bill in this case states that, about the year 1819, a cer-
.n- tain John O'Neall, of Montgomery county, Maryland, died
intestate, largely indebted to sundry persons, omong others, to
the complaitanos, .i ...'1 |I i.i,. aof money thereon mentioned
lhac the said JolhnOn N:tH I. 1 ...-.nsiderable real estate in Mont-
gomery and Alleghany counties, but did not leave personal es-
tate sufficient to pay his debts ; the said John left the following
children, who are his heirs at law, viz. Susanna Henrietta, since
intermarried with a certain James Peter, whom she has surviv-
ed, of Montgomery county; Eleanor Elizabeth, wife ofMadison
Cults, and Mary Rosetta, wife of Robert Greenough, all of
Washington city; and Mary Ann O'Neall and John Eliza
O'Neall, of Montgomery county afioresaid ; that a bill was filed
in Montgomery county court, in the year 1819, by certain credi-
tors of John O'Neall, charging that his personal estate was in-
sufficient to pay his debts, and praying that his real estate in
Montgomery county might be sold ; upon which a decree, was
passed as prayed, and Benjamin S. Forrest, Esq. appointed trus-
tee; that a sale was made, and, upon reference to thle Auditor,
the proceeds of sale, in the trustee's hands for distribution, were
found to be ($2,794) bearing interest from 25th October, 1823,
and thie whole amount of debts due by said John O'Neall $6,839
671 cents, leaving large balances due to the complainants and
other creditors. The bill prays thhhe real estate of said John,
lying in Alleglhany county and elsewhere, not heretofore sold,
may be decreed to be sold, for the payment of the residue due
to the complainants and other creditors, and thIat subpmnas may
be issued against the resident defendants. And whereas it p-
pears to lthlis court that thie said J. Madison Cutts and Mary Re"
sacta his wife, and Robert Greenongh and Eleanor his wife, arc
citizens of thie District of Columbia, whereupon it is ordered that
they be and appear in this court on or before the 20th day of
June next, to show cause, if any they have, why a decree should
not be passed as prayed by the said bill of complaint. Provided,
that a copy of this order be published, in some newspaper, once
a week for three successive weeks before the 20th day of March
next. True copy.
Test, RAMSAY WATERS,
feb 16-law3w Reg. Cur. Can.
jsR. T TE, romLosioct bea toacqalui tie v---


M R$. TYTE, from London, begs to acquaint the vi-
sitors and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with an elegant assortment of the newesnt'nd most FASH-
IONABLE MILLINERY, consisting of Bonnets, Head Dress-
es, Caps, Flowers, Feathers, &c., which tire opened for sale,
oil Pennsylvania Avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets, one
dcloor from Varnum's Row.
g-1 Straws and Leghornis cleaned and altered to the newest
fashions, dee 20-eotlf