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WASHINGTON: FRI DAY, JANUARY 6, 1837.


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N o


S, PUBLISHED BY
"'ALE'S & SEASON.
uICE, FOR a YAnB, TEN oIz JLABS ; ,FOR SIX MONTHas, SIX
ac F '- DOLLARS. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
Those subscribing for a.year, who do not, either at the time of
Ordering the paper, or subsequently, give notice of their wish
to haie the paper discontinued at the expiration of their year,
'will ho presumed as desiring its continuance until counter-
Sanded, and it will be continued accordingly, at the option
S of the Editors.
*4" '' '" ..


RAILROAD ARRANGEMENT.
Until further notice the cars will depart as
follows:
From Washington for Baltimore,
AT JIALF PAST NINE O'CLOCK A.M.


AND
: AT HALF PAST THRFE O'CLOCK P. M.
F"" rom Baltimore for Washington,
AT NINE O'CLOCK A. M.

: AT A QUARTER PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
dec 28-d6t&w;t Alfex Gaz. & Met.]
--m RICHMOND AND FREDER-
ICK1UIIURG RAILROAD NEAR-
SY' COMPLETED.-Winter Ar-
Sraitgemenlf.-The Railroad is now in use
from Richmond to within one mile of Frede-
n cesburg: :The following we"i 'be tbh arrangement during the
winter: -
.At Washington, when the navigation of th Potomac is open,
passengerr'will rest at night on board the steamboat, which will
.leave aran early hour in the morning. When the navigation of
the Potomac is closed, stages will depart from Washington. As
soon as practicable, after the arrival of the mail and passengers
at Fredericksbug, the cars will leave the termination of the
railroad, and arrive in.Richmond the same evening. This be-
ing the main Southern mail line, is regularly connected by stages
to Petersburg, irhere passengers can proceed on the railway to
Blakely, and thence continue in stages to the South, by way of
Raleigh, Fayetteville, &c.
Ftont Richmond, the cars with the mail and passengers going
North, will continue to depart at 4 in'the morning, until it shall
be .ascertained that the passengers can leave at a later hour
while the navigation is open, and reach Washington in time for
the afternoon train of cars to Baltimore.
Besides the regular mail line, there will be, in-addition, a tri-
weekly line between Richmond and Eredericksburg, leaving
Richmond on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 9 A. M. and
teaching Fredericksburg to dinner; and leaving Fredericks-
burg on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, so soon as the cars
arrive with the mall from Richmond, which will be about a quar-
ter before 9 A. M.
With a view of making this tri-weekly line a pleasant one,
the trade in wood and other heavy articles between Richmond
anri Chickahominy will be separated from it, and this descrip-
Stion of trade will be accommodated by running cars for it at
such hours as may suit the Company, and not interfere with the
travel.
Charge for transportation from Richmond to Fredericksburg,
1$4 per passenger. The Railroad Company and the Stage and
Steaiboat Company receive the fare for each other to and from
Richmond and Washington City. Fare from Richmond to
W hington, when the navigation of the Potomac is practicable
for s 'ats.oas (including the transportation by omnibus in
Washington) -Pr passenger. Fare from Richmond to Wash-
ington, when the navigA~Th ..Wsteamboats on the Potomac is
impracticable, $10 per passenger -
dec 30-3taw4w J--W FOLK & Co.
NOTICE*TO WESTERN TRAVEL`j t
All seats taken at the office nextidtno-
to Gadaby's Hotel have a preference over
all other passengers to Wheeling or Pitts-
M burg. All passengers from the West,
coming across in the mail coach from
Frederick t6 Washington, will have the preference over all
others going South. JAMES FOSSETT,
.dec20-1m Agent.
FALL ARRANGEMENT FOR NOR-
t 'FOOK.-o-The Steamer COLUMBIA, James
tchell Master, will, for the remainder of the season, make
- but one tfip 'a week. Th'e Columbia will leave Wahiiagton on
Wednesday, the 19th inst., at 10 o'clock in the morning, and
will continue to do so the remainder of the season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at half past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of woodand provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage-and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15--dtf
S HHORT IHANI.--The Self-taught Stenographer, or Ste-
nographic Guide, explaining the principles and rules of the
hrt of Short Hand Writing. Just received for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, price 25 cents, with numerous engravings.
HRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S PRESENTS.
W. FISCHER has this day received from New York, by
railroad line, four cases of Goods, containing new articles, ex-
pressly for Christmas and New Year's presents; which, being
too numerous for an advertisement, he would respectfully invite
ladies and gentlemen to an inspection of them at Stationers'
Hall, where the most extensive assortment of the best Fancy
Goods are kept for sale on the most reasonable terms.
OTICE.-The subscriber having taken, in addition to his
Sold establishment on'4j street, the large and commodious
coach manufactory, on Missouri Avenue, formerly kept by Isaac
Bartlett, between 4j and 6th streets, and nearly opposite Gads-
by's hotel, is now ready to execute all orders in the coach mak-
ing line in the best and neatest manner. He also has on hand
a large assortment of excellent Coaches, Barouches, Buggies,
and vehicles of every description, &c. &c.
dec 21-eo2m MICHAEL McDERMOTT.
THE WAVERLY CIRCULATING LIBRARY,
immediately east of Gadsby's Hotel, is regularly supplied
with a number of copies of every new work immediately upon
publication.
Additions to the Library during the last week.
Delphine, by Madame De Stael, a novel, in 3 vols.
Harry O'Reardon, by Mrs. S. C. Hall.
Astoria, by Irving.
Giafar, a tale of the Court of Haroun-Al-Raschid.
Plebeians and Patricians, 2 vols.
Desultory Man, by James.
Mellichampe, by the author of the Partisan.
East and West, a novel.
Priors of Prague, 2'vols.
Andrew, the Savoyard, by Paul de Rock.
Memoirs of Lucien Bonaparte, by himself.
Second part of Cooper's Sketches of Switzerland.
the late volumes of Harper's Family Library.
The last numbers of the North American, the American Quar-
terly, the "Museum," and many other Periodicals and Reviews,
both American and English.
Terms-Five dollars per annum, or one dollar for a single
month; two dollars for three months. dec 9
I N. CARY, Professional Hair-Cutter and Sha-
ver, respectfully informs the Public that he can always
be found at his old stand, on 6th street, opposite the National
Hotel.
He feels confident, from his long experience and universally
acknowledged skill in the above branches, (and his desire to
please,) that he cannot fail to give satisfaction to all who may be
pleased to favor him with a call.


Cary has a. branch of his shop in that celebrated establish-
ment, Brown's-Hotel, which is conducted by his brother, whose
skill as Hair-Cuttq and Shaver is unsurpassed.
jyt Razors hone, at the shortest notice, and warranted to
shave well.
dec 24-3taw2w [Globe and Tel.]
C HILDREN'S BOOf S.-Several hundred different
kinds, selected from the st approved and popular wri-
ters, for youth; and several thous Toy Books, of all kinds
and prices. .sI
Paint Boxes, Dissected Maps, Drawg Books,
Juvenile Souvenirs, Chess, gold an lver Pencil Cases,
Penknives, Port Folios, Battledores, Bac ammon,
Dominoes, Graces, small sets Ninepins, Ac'rdions,
Pocket Books, Card Cases, Writing Desks, Pses,
And a great variety of goods suitable to the season for sale
at low prices; together with a large supply of Ornamenh' Edi-
tions of Books in every department of literature. ',
F. TAYLOR, .,


Bonnets, Hats, Caps, Flowers, Ostrich Featfiers
Birds of Paradise, of very superior quality
Silk, Satins, Ribands, Blonde Gauze, for evening dresses
Fur Capes, Boa Muffs, &c.
Which will be open this day, for sale, on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, between 9th and 10th streets.
dec 26-eolm
GOUGE'S HISTORY OF PAPER MONEY
SAND BANKING IN THE U. STATES, to-
gether with the Provincial and Continental, with an Inquiry
into the Principles and Effects of the System, the whole intend-
ed as an exposition of the way in which paper money and mo-
ney corporations affect the interest of different portions of the
community. An additional supply of the above (second stereo-
type edition) is just received in a cheap pamphlet form, and for
sale by F. TAYLOR, who has also for sale, at the lowest prices,
a large collection of the most esteemed works on Banking,
Currency, Commerce, Statistics, Taxps, &c. &c. and all other
branches of Political Economy, by Bentham, Say, McCulloch,
Adam Smith, Cooper, Phillips, Malthus, Raymond, Simpson,
Chalmers, Seybert, Marshall, Taylor, Oddy, Pitkin, &c. &c.
and many others, at the Waverly Circulating Library, immedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel. dec 28
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, pub-
lished by the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, is devo-
ted to the objects of Pharmaceutic research, viz. Chemistry,
(general and pharmaceutic,) Materia Medica, Zoology, Botany,
Mineralogy, &c. Intended for the benefit of the apothecary, it
merits his patronage and support.
F. TAYLOR will receive subscriptions to the above work,
which will be forwarded to any part of the United States, if ap-
plication be made at the Waverly Circulating Library, immedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel.


f.EAUTIFUL BOOKS.-Now opening at Stationers'
U- Hall the following beautiful Books, suitable for Christmas
and new year's presents:
The Souvenir Keepsake for 1837
The Religious Souvenir do
The Pearl do
The Violet do
The Christmas Box do
The Gift do
The Forget Me Not do
Friendship's Offering do
With a variety of Toy Books for children, and Almanacs for -
1837, at 6} cents. W. FISCHER.
dee 23 [Tel]
NTEW N OVELS.--Harry O'Reardon, or, Illustrations of
Irish Pride, by Mrs. Hall ; price 75 cents.
Plebeians and Patricians, ifn2 vols. ; price 81 25.
Delphine, by Madame de Stael, author of Corrinne.
Giafar al Barmeki, a'Tale of the' Court of Haroun al Raschid,
in 2 vols.
The above are this day published, and for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, or (together with manycothers for circulation among the
subscribers to the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
cast of Gadsby's Hotel. dec 7
NEW ARRIVALS.-Six Cases of Eplish Sta-
tionery and Fancy Goods, now landing at Baltimore
from the ship Potomac, from Liverpool, will be unpacked at
Stationers' Hall, on Friday next. Persons wishing to obtain
something new and- handsome, are respectfully invited to exa-
mine the extensive assortment, and low prices of articles con-
stantly for sale at'Stationers' Hall, where a strict uniformity of
dealing is observed. W. FISCHER.
dec 28 (Tel.)
B'OOT AND SHOE MANUFACTORY, opposite
B .the Seven Buildings.-ANDREW HOOVER begs
leave respectfully toinform his friends, and the Public gener-
ally, that he has made arrangements for carrying on the above
business in all its various branches, and in the most extensive
manner. He is now ready to supply his customers with Boots
and Shoes of every description, and of the very best quality, on
the most reasonable terms.
Wanted, immediately, fifty apprentices, from fourteen to
sixteen years of age, to learn the above business. Boys from
the country would be preferred.
dec 22-2aw8w (Met)
'JEW BOOKS.-Mrs. Sigourney's Letters addressed to
Young Ladies, 1 vol.
The Great Teacher, by the Rev. John Harris, with Introduc-
tory Essay, by President Humphrey, of Amherst College.
The German Tourist, a splendid Annual for 1837.
The Character and Religion of George Washington.
The Fairy Book, containing selection of the best Fairy Tales,
with several hundred engravings, silk gilt binding.
A Plain Manual of Divinity, by Joshua Dixon and Rev. Geo.
A. Smith.
The Pilgrim's Progress, a new and beautiful edition, with 50
engravings. F. TAYLOR.
dec 30
CII- ITARS AND ACCORDIANS.-Just opened at
L Stationers' Hall, a choice selection of fine-toned Spanish
Guitars, with Patent Screws, and handsome Accordians, with
suitable instructions, at very low prices.
dec 7 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.
"PE KINCHY, Confectioner, thankful for past favors,
K informs the ladies and gentlemen of Washington that he
continues at his old stand, where he has just received a large
assortment of French Bon Bons, and other confectionery.
Paper-shelled, Soft-shelled, and Shelled Almonds
Bunch Muscatel Raisins, in whole, half, and quarter boxes
S Bordeaux Prunes, in fancy and other boxes
aGrapes, in kegs and jars
Sultana -tn, Currants, &c.
FOREri-w RITITS IN SIRUP.
Canton Ginger, Chow Ch6w, Pineapplei Prunes, Limes,
Apricots, Chinios, &c., '
DRIED FRUITS.
Apricots, Cherries, Prunes, Chinios,Canton Ginger, Guava,
Currant, and Quince Jellies
Brandy Fruits, assorted
CORDIALS.
Mareschino de Zara, Cuarracoa, Absinthe, &e. -
LONDON SAUCES.
Cavice, Reading, Anchovy, John Bull Sauce, &c.
French Chocolate, French Mustard, Sweet Oil
English, French, and Domestic Pickles
Rose and Orange Flower Water
SIRUPS.
Lemon, Capilaire, Pineapple, Raspberry, &c.
ALSO.
A handsome assortment of French Sugar Ornaments, Fan-
cy Boxes, Toys, Dolls, &c.
Italian Vermicelli, Maccaroni, Oranges, Lemons, Citron,
Dates, Cranberries, Nuts, and other articles, in his line
of business.
Ice-Cream, Jellies, Blanc Mange, Fromage Bavorous,
Charlotte Russe, Pyramids, &c., made to order.
All orders for Balls, Dinner Parties, &c. will be thankfully
received and punctually attended to, at the shortest notice.
dec 20-3taw2w
1R RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of a deed of trust
from Benjamin Homans, dated January 5, 1832, and duly
recorded in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of the
District of Columbia for the county of Washington, I will offer
at public sale, for cash, at 12 o'clock M., on Saturday, the 21st
of January next, at the printing office of said"Homans, in the
city of Washington, several printing presses, a standing press,
and a quantity of type and type cases, as particularly described
in said deed. The terms of sale to be complied with before the
removal of the property; and, if not complied with in three
days, the property will be resold at auction for cash, after three
days' advertisement, at the risk and cost of the former purchas-
er. J. I. STULL,
dec 21-ts Trustee.
M RS. TYTE, from London, begs to acquaint the vi-
sisters and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with an elegant assortment of the newest and most FASH-
IONABLE MILLINERY, consisting of Bonnets, Head Dress-
es, Caps, Flowers, Feathers, &c., which are opened for sale,
on Pennsylvania Avenue,betwecn First and Second streets, and
near the railroad office.
Of Straws and Leghorns cleaned and altered to the newest
fashions. dec 20-eotf
FASHIONABLE MILLINERY AND FANCY
GOODS.-Miss MORLEY, from New York, grateful-
ly acknowledges the liberality of the ladies of Washington last
Season, and wishes to inform them that she has arrived again
with a good assortment of Millinery and Fancy Goods, consist-
ing of-


can have their Lusiness promptly attended to by letter, (post
paid,) and thus relieve themselves from an expensive and incon-
venient personal attendance.
Having obtained a commission of Notary Public, he is prepar-
ed to furnish legalized copies of any required public documents
or other papers. He has been so long engaged in the duties of
i2 agent, that it. can only be necessary now to say that economy
and prompt attentionn shall be extended to all business confided
to his care; and that, to enable him to render his services and
facilities more efficacious, he has become iammiar win asn uie
forms of office teb 26-ly
A ARON BURR.-Life of Aaron Burr, by MATTHEW L.
DIAvis, from his own papers and correspondence, is this
day received for sale by
dec 14 F. TAYLOR
RADLEY & CATLETT will have clothes made up
at the shortest notice, by experienced tailors, and in the
best manner, at a low price. Their stock of Cloths and Cassi-
meres at this times very large and complete.
dec l13-3aw3w (GI. & Tel.) BRADLEY & CATLETT.
CHEAP SOUVENIRS.-F. TAYLOR has just re-
ceived a few copies of Proof Impressions of some of the
most beautiful English Souvenirs for 1836, which have been im-
ported at the same time with the same works for 1837. They
are offered for sale at prices little exceeding one-half the rates
at which inferior impressions were sold a few months ago.
The German Tourist, for 1837, and several other splendid
Annuals for the new year, are also this day opened, and for sale
below the usual price, at the Waverly Circulating Library, im-
mediately east of Gadsby's Hotel. jan 2


FRESH FRUIT, WINE, &c.-
50 kegs Malaga Grapes 10 boxes Olives
20 boxes Lisbon do 5 do Capers
100 do Raisins 5 do Anchovies


N OTICE.-The PATENT OFFICE is removed to thew
west wing of the City Hall, where fire-proof rooms are
obtained for the Records and Models.
HENRY L. ELLSWORTH,
dec 30-dlw Commissioner.
PATENT OFFICE, DEC. 27, 1836.
h ERSONS who have entered CAVEATS are notified that
Sthe same were destroyed by fire on the 15th instant, and
they are requested to transmit duplicates as soon as possible.
HENRY L. ELLSWORTH,
dec 30-dl wc2w Commissioner.
N NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all persons hold.
ing Certificates of Stock of the Corporation of Washing-
ton, that the interest on the same, due for the quarter ending on
the 31st instant, will be paid to the stockholders, on or after tha
10th day of January, on application at the Bank of Washington.
Given under my hand this 27th December, 1836.
WM. HEWITT,
dec 28-tJan0 Register.
SWEDES IRON.-Just received, per Swedish brig
SGeorge, from Stockholm, and now landing, 220 tons of
Swedish Bar Iron, Plough Plates, and Landsides, which, with
120 tons of Swedish and English Iron in store, makes my as-
sortment very good, For sale on liberal terms.
PHI NEAS JANNEY,
dec 30-eo7t Alexandria.
SA MOQS, QU.E, or, American -M1usical Annual.
LL Just received at Stationers' Hall, a few of the above bean-
tiful Books. The Music they contain embraces pieces of vari-
ous styles, by the most popular masters of the age i and it is be-
lieved that the engraving and printing are at least equal to the
finest specimens of these arts. W. FISCHER.
dec 30 (Tel.)
F RESH FRUITS, CIGARS, &C.-Just received by
-- the subscriber, immediately east of the Bank of the Me-
tropolis, on F street, a small invoice of fresh Suyrna Figs and
Prunes in fancy boxes; Raisins, in whole, half, and quarter'
boxes ; together with a fine stock of Principia and other Cigars,
of the most approved brands. Also, fresh Pickles, Sauces,
Catsups, and a general assortment of family Groceries, Wines,
and Liquors, of the best quality, all of which will be sold at a
small advance for cash, or to punctual customers, by
dec 30-dlw G. W. STEVENSON.
a ROSSBURG FOR RENT.-ThisTavern and
Farm, situated 8t miles from Washington, on the
Washington and Baltimore turnpike road, will be rent-
ed to a good tenant on accommodating terms. The tavern atd
farm will be rented together, or the tavern alone, if the tenant
should prefer it. The house is already furnished, and possession
will be given on the 1st of January next.
GEORGE CALVERT,
dec2-dtf Near Bladensburg.
VALUABLE FARMS AT PRIVATE SALE.-
V The subscriber will sell at private sale all or any portion
of the real estate left by Thomas Cramphin, deceased, remain-
ing unsold at this time, consisting of the late residence of said
Cramphin, and other lands adjoining, together with two or
three very valuable Farms on Rock creek.
The Dwelling-house Farm'is situated about eleven miles
from Washington, on the Washington and Rockville turnpike
road, and contains 375j acres of land, a large portion of which
is in wood. The improvements consist of a brick dwelling-
house nearly new, with all the necessary out-buildings.
The Rock creek Farm, situated six miles from Georgetown
immediately on the Georgetown and Rockville turnpike road,
is one of the most valuable and desirable farms in the county,
being composed of a large portion of the finest timber and mea-
dow land. The improvements consist of a commodious frame
dwelling-house, and all the necessary out-houses.
These lands have been recently surveyed, and laid off into
farms of from 200 to 400 acres; but should it be found advanta-
geous for the disposal of them, they will be subdivided to suit
purchasers. Any communications addressed to the subscriber,
at Bladensburg, or left at the National Hotel, Washington, will
be promptly attended to. GEORGE CALVERT,
dec 21-dtf Trustee.
BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Christ-
mas and New Year's Presents, consisting, in
part, of Annuals, Albums. Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
and keys, Ladies' Work Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
nished a-nd T'-un-ft shed, richly i-laid with pearl and ij~g,
from $1 to $30 each ; splendid Card and Needle Boxes, of
pearl, ivory, and shell, beautifully inlaid, from *2 to j1D each ;
Gold and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
50 cents to $12 each; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps ;
Arabesque (new) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
variety of new Games; Dissected Monuments, &c. neatly put
up; Writing and Travelling Desks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Dressing Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands;
splendid China Figures for centre tables ; Toilet Boxes; China
and Bronze Inkstands; Ladies' and Gentlemen's Pocket
Books ; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets; Silk and Bead Purses ;
Bouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets; Sil-
ver Instruments; Pearl and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
folders; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes; Chessmen;
Backgammon Boards; Battledores; Damask, Tinted, and Em-
bossed Note Paper; Perfumery of every description ; Ladies'
and Gentlemen s Penknives and Scissors ; with many other
Fancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at fair prices at Stationers' Hall.
dec 24 W. FISCHER.
HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
hath obtained from the Orphans' Court ofPrince George's
County, in the State of Maryland, Letters of Administra-
tion on the personal estate of the late Henry W. Yost, deceased,
of said county and State. All persons having claims against
the said deceased are hereby warned to exhibit the same,
with the vouchers thereof, to the subscriber, on or before the
1st day of March next; they may otherwise, by law, be
excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Given
under my hand, this 8th day of December, 1836.
dec 13--w3w RACHEL YOSiI.
AGENCY AT WVASHINGTON.--JAMES H.CAUS-
TEN, (late ofBaltimore,) having made this city his perma-
nentresidence,and located his dwellingand office directlyopposite
to the Department of State, will underake, with his accustomed
zeal and diligence, the settlement of claims generally; and
more particularly claims before Congress, against the United
States, or the several Departments thereof, and before any board
of commissioners that may be raised for the adjustment of spo-
liation or other claims. I-He has now in harge the entire class
arising out of French spoliations prior to the year 1800;
with reference to which, in addition to a trass of documents and
proofs in his possession, he has access to those in the archives
of the Government.
Claimants and pensioners on the Navy fund, &c. bounty
lands, return duties, &c. &e. and those requiring life insurance,


Until quite lately people had to go to the doctor to get help.
This was to them great trouble.
Absence from home, and business neglected.
Danger of travelling.
Running the risk of getting sick from home, which often hap-
pened.
Being obliged to stay with the doctor at times, from one to
three weeks, and sometimes longer.
Generally cost from 20 up to 30, 40, 50 dollars, sometimes
ullO .,
Now, by this in.W plan of sending help to people, at their
homes, all this is saved, and costs so little that 'tis not worth
mentioning. C. F. BAKER.
State of Pennsylvania, Sept. 10, 1835.

All printers who publish the above will receive the remedy
gratuitously, and free of postage also. Ir will be placed at their
optional disposal, as at times their neighbors may be in want of
some. nov 15-wly
TO JOURNEYMEN CABINETMAKERS.-
Wanted immediately, 6 or 8 journeymen cabinetmakers
to go to the western part of South Carolina-to a very healthy
place-where the best wages and constant employment will be
given, and money sure. None need apply but good workmen.
For further particulars apply by letter, addressed to A. B. and
left at the office of the National Intelligencer.
dec 24-eo2w (Alex. Gaz.)
T O THE AFFLICTED.-Anti-dyspeptic Aperient
Pills, No. 53, approved by the Medical Faculty. Prepar-
ed and sold only by BARNARD & RAYMOND,
No. 2 Varnum's Row, Pennsylvania Avenue.
dec 21-2aw3w
EW STEEL PENS.-W. FISCHER has just re-
ceived a large lotof New Steel Pens (superior to all others
in uneT made by the original and incomparable Manufacturers,


Bank of the Metrop6lis,-
January 2, 1837. S
HE Board of Directors of this Bank have declared a
dividend of five per cent.- on the capital stock, for the
half year ending the 31st December last.
jan 3-d2w GEO. THOMAS, Cashier.
W I LLIAM BUIST, Florist, lately from Phila-
delphia, begs leave to inform the Citizens of Wash-
ington, and the Public in general, that he has for sale at his
Green-house, corner of 12th and H streets, one hundred sorts
of the choicest Roses, including the Monthly Caboage Rose.
One hundred sorts of the finest Geraniums, some ofthem very
splendid.
Seventy sorts of Camilla Japonica, of the rost beautiful colors,
several of which are now in flower.
Hyacinth ant other bulbous roots; with an extra assortment
of Plants for the garden, green-house, and parlor windows.
All orders promptly attended to, and packages put up withcare
for any part of the United States.
N. B. Plants and Bouquets for parties, &c furnished on the,
shortest notice.
jan 3-3. (Globe)
T HE HOTEL, known as "Strother's," :situate
on Pennsylvania Avenue, (adjoining the General Post Of-
fice, opposite the Treasury Department, and immediately con-
tiguous to the President s House,) is now elegantly fitted up,.
arid will be hereafter known as the Columbian."
The subscriber (late proprietor of the American Hotel) takes
pleasure in announcing to his friends his ability to entertain vis-
iters in the best manner, either transiently or permanently; and
hopes by his assiduity to continue to receive that patronage
which has ever been so liberally extended towards him.
A. FULLER.
N. B. Attached to this establishment are several handsome
parlors, appropriated to families. A. F.
jan 3-d3w (Gxlo&Tel)
The editors of the Patriot, at Baltimore; Poulson's Daily Ad-
vertiser, Philadelphia; Courier and Enquirer, New York; and
Richmond Whig, at Richmond, Va., will please insert the above
advertisement every other day for three weeks, and send their
bills as above.
XMDEIRA, SHERRY, AND CHAMPAGNE,
M WINES.-The subscriber has in store a choice selec-
tion od superior old Madeira and Sherry Wines, of his own im-
portation, and in order for immediate use, viz.
OldL. P. Madeira, March" brand, in pipes, half pipes, and
quarter casks.
Old L. P. Madeira, of various ages, in boxes of one and two
dozen bottles each.
Burgundy and Tinta Madeira, do do.
Gold, Brown, and Pale Sherry, in boxes of one and two doz-
ens each, very old and superior; "Romano" and "Yriarte"
brands.
Sparkling Champagne, the most approved and favorite brands.
Red Hermitage, very old and fine flavored.
dec 7-3taw4w WALTER SMITH.
DEAFNESS.-A York paper sayeth, that a remedy for
the restoration of hearing is to be had of Doctor Green,
Reading and Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Enquiry has frequently been made as to the principles of
-cure, and the nature of the cases in which hearing has been re-
stored.
It proves effectual when the affliction is caused by nervous
weakness, as the remedy gives health and strength to the whole
nervous system.
On the other hand, when the affliction is owing to other causes
-other means of help must be sought for-but-and it may be
repe'ated-that, in cases where deafness is caused bly nervous
weakness, the remedy will restore hearing, as hath been expe-'
rienced in the editor's own family-as well as in the families of
many o(his neighbors also.
Now-according to the Doctor's practice and principles, that
MUCH OF THE ART
OF PHYSIC
CONSISTS
IN KNOWING,WHEN
( NOT TO GIVE IT.
The restoration of hearing is brought about without giving any
physic I-without giving any medicine-as hath been ascertain-
ed in numbers and numbers of instances. Therefore, and in
part return for such grest benefits received, we make the above
known for the good of our fellow-citizens in similar distress.
Assistance is sent-free of postage, for as many as are afflict-
ed in 4 family, including the relatives of such family also, for a
fee of five dollars.
For a fee of ten dollars assistance is sent-free of postage al-
so-for 3 or 4 persons more-in addition-as at times neighbors
may be in want of some.
And in case other sickness besides deafness and loss of eye-
sight happening, help is sent for such sickness without any
charge.
The fee pays for all and every help sent to families from time
to time.
This is considered a praiseworthy plan. And in conclusion,
it will, no doubt, be very satisfactory for people to know that the
assistance is not to be applied to the ears-nor the eyes.
NOT AT ALL.
Consequently no danger whatever can happen to them-no-
none whatever.
And during the time that people are using his assistance at
home, and learning how to help themselves to restore and re-
cover their hearing, their eye-sight and their health again :
They can follow their customary business;
They can live as usual;
And they can also eat and drink what tastes best.

The following is an extract of a letter from Mr. Baker, to the
printer :
My friend-The method of using Dr. Green's remedy is in-
nocent, is easy, and performs the cure by strengthening the
nerves. My neighbor Jones's wife thought she would try it
too, being a long time troubled with weak and sore eyes, a long
time troubled with dimness and failing of sight, and over one
eye a film (a skin) was beginning to grow and spread itself.
This affliction, together with her deafness, caused by nervous
weakness, very much alarmed the family, insomuch that help
was sent for, and which arrived per mail free of postage; and
which help in little more than a week made them as good and
as strong as ever, doing needlework now without spectacles,
and now is restored to her eyesight as well as to her hearing.
C. F. BAKER.

N. B.-With the remedy the patient receives an instructive
and easy way how to preserve health in general, throughout
the whole year. This is of great value to families, (both to pa-
rents and children,) and'tis sent without any charge whatever.
It always accompanies the remedy for deafness tnd eyesight.


INERALS.-The undersigned has just opened a large
collection of brilliant and rare Minerals, chiefly from
foreign countries. Among the specimens are that very scarce
mineral Elastic Bitumen, from Castleton, -England, the only
locality known; several magnificent samples of the crystallized
and iridescent Iron of Elba ; Fluates of Lime, from England ;
the Lavas and Volcanic Sulphur, from Italy; Yenite, from El-
ba; splendid specimens of Stelbite, from Scotland ; also, Car-
bonate of Strontian, &c. Together with an extensive variety of
American Minerals.
Cabinets complete, price $10, carefully put up, and forward-
ed to order. JAMES RIORDAN,
Antique Bookstore, Penn. Avenue.
" SHELLS.-A few rare Shells from the sunny isles of the In-
dian Ocean. dec 23
MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, in one volume,
price 75 cents, isjust received, for pale by F. TAYLOR,
by S. W. WILLIAMS, M. D. Professor of Medical Jurispru-
dence, being principally a compendium of the opinions of the
best writers on the subject, with an essay on the importance of
the study of Forensic Medicine. Designed for physicians, law-
yers, jurymen, coroners, &c.
Also, Chitty's Medical Jurisprudence, Beck's Medical Juris-
prudence, together with a large collection of the latest editions
of the best law books, most of which have been purchased at the
lowest prices, at the recent Northern trade sales, and will be
sold invariably at the lowest prices at which they can be pro-
cured either in New York or Philadelphia.
Purchasers are invited to call and examine for themselves on
this point, before sending their orders to the North, at the Wa-
verly Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's Ho-
tel. dec 26
W ASHINGTON COFFEE HOUSE.-The Pro-
prietor of the above establishment begs leave to make
known to the travelling Public that he has several vacant rooms
which he will let with or without board; he addresses those


Tr'O PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.-The sub-
1 scriber respectfully inforimsthe Public' that he will open,
on the 1st day of October next, a Frenchand English Board-
ing School for Young Ladies, at Bordentown, N. J.
SThe advantages of Bordentown as a place fitted for the esta-
blishment of schools, if equalled, are certainly not surpassed by
any in the whole country. Situated on the Delaware, and eigh-
ty feet above its level, proverbial for health, at the head of
steamboat navigation, accessible .from Philadelphia and from
New York twice in every day, and at all seasons of the year,
furnishedd with excellent boarding-houses forthe accommodation
of parents and visitors, this beautiful village offers, indeed, all
that can be desired for the purpose.
The buildings occupied by this institution were recently
erected by the Count de Survilliers; they stand on a hill,
immediately opposite his mansion, and are, in fact, a portion ot
his splendid estate. In preparing them for the reception of
young ladies, nothing was omitted that could contribute to their
health and comfort. There is on this property a chalybeate
spring, whose water was analyzed, and found to be equal, in
every respect, to that of Schooley's Mountain.
The distinctive features of this institution will consist in its
being essentially a French School. It is generally admitted
that the French language has now become-an important, not to
say indispensable, branch of a polite education. Yet it is a truth
no less indisputable, that the attention it usually receives in
schools is comparatively small, and attended with little or no
success. Ten years' experience, and much reflection-upon
the subject, have led us to act according to the following propo-
sitions :
1st. The knowledge of a language is two-fold: it embraces
theory and practice.
2d. Theory may be learnt in less than ode-fourth of the time
needed to acquire practice. I
If this be true, we may draw from them the following con-
clusions :
In studying the English, the American youth have only theo-
ry to learn. In studying the French, both theory and practice
are to be acquired: from which it necessarily follows that the
attention given to the foreign idiom should be at least four times
as great as that given to the vernacular. We therefore use the
French language in our intercourse with our pupils, and, as far
as is practicable, French text books of History, Geography,
Mathematics, &c. are made"use of in the tuition of these
branches.
Bordentown, N. J. August, 1836.
A. N. GIRAULT.
REFERENCES.
Bordentown-Joseph Bonaparte, Comte de Survilliers; Rev.
Edwin S. Arnold, A.M.; Rev. John C. Harrison; E. Dubarry,
M.D.; William Cook, Esq.; Lucien Murat, Esq.; John L.
McKnight, Esq.; Nath. Dayton, Esq.
Burlington-Right Rev. George W. Doane, D.D.; Rev.
Samuel Aaron; Samuel R. Gummere, Esq.; Hon. Garret D.
Wall; Capt. John T. Newton, U. S. N.
Bristol, Pa.-Rev. Charles Williams, D.D.
Philadelphia-Hon. Joseph Hopkinson; Peter S. Dupon-
ceau, LL.D.; Hon. John Sergeant; Charles Picot, Esq.;
Charles J. Ingersoll, Esq.; William Fry, Esq.; George McClel-
lan, M.D.; Professor Walter R. Johnson; Joseph P. Engles,
Esq. ; Samuel M. Stewart, Esq.
Cincinnati, Ohio-J. Reese Fry, Esq.
New Orleans-Achille Murat, Esq.
Charleston, S. C.-William Lance,;Esq.
Natchez, Miss.-Hon. Robert J. Walker.
Galena, IUl.--Major Legate, U. S. A.
N. B.-A Prospectus of this Institution may be had at the
stores of Henry Perkins, Chestnut street, and E. Durand,
corner of Sixth and Chestnut streets. nov 15-10t
RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of a decree of Saint
Mary's County Court, sitting as a Court of Equity, the un-
dersigned as trustee will expose at public sale at Leonardtown,
on Tuesday, thd 31st day of January next, between the hours
of one and five o'clock P. M. if fair, if not, the next fair day
thereafter, all that tract or parcel of land called "Part of Broad
Neck and Nun's Oak," containing one hundred and nine acres,
more or less, being part of the land of which the late Sympho
Rosa Millard died seized and possessed. This tract of land
is situated in Medley's Neck, immediately on the Potomac river,
and is one of the finest little farms in Saint Mary's county, being
highly improved, and capable of being still more so, from the
immense quantity of sea ore that is washed upon the shore, and,
independently of that, has the benefit of every convenience and
luxury which the river affords. The improvements are in tole-
rable repair. A further descriFtion is deemed unnecessary, as
is ;o p-o umod thoge disposed to purc'hasweiill Vliw th- r 0.
previous to the day of sale. Terms of sale are, lhal one-fourth
of the purchase money shall be paid on the day of sale, or on the
ratification thereof, and the residue in two equal annual instal-
ments, with interest from the day of sale, exclusive of that part
which shall fall to the share of the two infant representatives,
which shall be paid them on their arriving at age, or on the day
of marriage, the interest to be paid'to their guardians annually;
the whole to be secured by bond with security, to be approved
by the trustee ; and, on the payment of the whole purchase
money, and not before, the trustee is authorized to convey to the
purchaser and his, her, or their heirs, the property to them sold,
free, clear, and discharged from all claim of the complainants or
of the defendants, or of those claiming by, from, or under them,
or either of them.
dec 24-w5w JOSEPH FORD, Trustee.
THE SCHOOL FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS
heretofore connected with the Georgetown College, Ky.
will henceforth be connected with the institution lately estab-
lished at the same place and denominated BACON COLLEGE,
Georgetown, Kentucky.
FACULTY.
Walter Scott, President, and Professor of Hebrew Literature.
Dr. Knight, Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.
S. G. Muliins, do Ancient Languages.
C. R. Presrimenski, do Modern Languages.
Dr. S. Hatch, do Chemistry.
M. Sawseski, do Drawing and Painting.
TF F. Johnson, do Maths. and Civil Engineering.
J. Crenshaw, Principal of the Preparatory Department.
The Sessions commence May 1st and November 1st.
T. F. JOHNSON,
nov 26-8t Prof. Civil Eng. Georgetown, Ky
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
hath obtained from the Orphans' Court of Charles county,
Maryland, letters of administration on the personal estate of
Benjamin A. Lancaster, sen., late of Charles county, deceased.
All persons having claims against said deceased are hereby
warned to exhibit,the same, with the vouchers thereof, to the
subscriber, on or before the first day of July next; they may
otherwise by law be excluded from all benefit of the said estate.
Given under my hand the 23d day of November, 1836.
ELIZABETH H. LANCASTER.
jan 3-w6w Administratrix.


T. JOHNSQ -, '
Professor of Civil Engineering, BaopCo1w.4t. -

The following extracts of letters from two of the i
fic men in our country will show the utility.of thisciu44 -' a
FBANKFQBT, JULi- f
DEAR SIR: The four young gentlemen from the'Gf!
Mathematical School, who are engaged as asistantsr
heer corps of the State, have performedl the diltiesaaig its .
in a very satisfactory manner. Among the yoqing 'B. .,
ofmy acquaintance who have embraced the prfesol
engineering, those wlio have been educated at-f'_8.to i- '
schools have generally succeeded better than thegrd o
our common colleges.
A -:"' d chemitFry.,3o4,' ,.
tage to the engineer; anl it' aDbsulvaty .,uiut i f 'ytul
shr.uld be acquainted with architectural or line drawing. The
student should be taught the principles of construction t the
same time he is taught to make his drawing.
Very respectfully, your ob'tserv't,
SYLVESTER WELCH,
Engineer in Chief for the State of Kentucky.
To T. F. JOHNSON, Esq. .
Professor of Civil Engineering, Georgetown, Ky.
LOUISVILLE, JULY 29, 1886.
SIR: It affords me pleasure to testify to the very correct and
satisfactory manner in which the two young gentlemen from
your school have conducted themselves during the time they
have been in the service; and the ability manifested by the
prompt and skilfuJ discharge of their several duties is alike cre-
ditable to them and the character of the institution in which they
were instructed.
The books comprised in your course of studies are appropri-
ate and well selected. I am pleased to hear topographical and
architectural drawing is to form a part of your future course.
This is an elegant accomplishment to an engineer, and'-An the
early part ofhis career will frequently bring hinmt into notice,
and hasten his promotion to more responsible stations, where
his talents may be fully developed.-
Appreciating as I do your efforts to elevate the profession, I
trust they will be crowned with success, and I assure you it will
afford me very great pleasure to render any aid in my power to
second your views.
Your most obedient, THOS. P. PURCELL,
Engineer in Chief Lexington and Ohio Railroad.
To T. F. JOHNSON, Esq.
Professor of Civil Engineering, Georgetown, Ky.
From a Graduate of the last session.
INDIANAPOLIS, OCT. 1836.
DEAR SIR: We are about to commence the loca.
tion of a canal 34 miles in length, to meet the Central caial,
which will take us till late in the fall. I am perfectly satisfied
with my situation, and shall never regret the money spent in
obtainingit. I consider the fact of my having attended your school
one session to have saved me at least three years' hard labor,
for it would have required that time (had I not joined your class)
to qualify me for the discharge of the duties I now have 6n hand.
I believe this is the opinion of each member of the class which
graduated last session.
Respectfully, yours, &c.
From a correspondent of one of the students.
GENEVA, N. Y. OCT. 29, 1836.
Your intention of going to Georgetown, Kentucky, is, think,
an admirable one, and you would be very much to blate 'not to
go through with it; for, from all accounts, the school in George-
town is better adapted for preparing engineers than any other in
the United States. I have spoken to several engineers on the
snbhjert anl they ail gro in-l oowanonding it very strongly.
dec 8-8t
OUR HUNDRED DOLLAR S tRWl4RD.-
Ran away from the subscriber, living near Barinsille,
Montgomery county, Maryland, on the 17th instant, two bright
mulatto servants, RYNALDO and LORENZO. Rynaldo is
about 5 feet 10 inches high, a well-made fellow, about 22 years
of age, has a number of freckles on his cheeks near his nose,
and rather a down look when spoken to. Lorenzo is about 5 feet
6 inches high, an active lad of about 18 years old, pleasant coun-
tenance, and a very bright mulatto. They are. brothers, and
will no doubt keep together. Their working clothes are homes-
made diab cloth pantaloons, new, their coats made last fall.
Rynaldo has a green close coat and fur hat. Lorenzo has a
brown frock coat and an old fur cap. The other clothing not
recollected. The above reward will be given, and all reason.-
able charges paid if taken out of the State, and one hundred
dollars each if taken in the State, or lodged in any jail, so thatI
get them again. NATHAN S. WHITE, ,
dec 29-wl2w Barnesville, Montgomery county, Md.
NEW GUITAR MUSIC.-
While this heart its joy revealing, from the opera of Som-
nambula.
Oh Love for me thy power, do do do
Still so gently o'er me stealing, do do do
The Gipseys' Wild Chant.
The Bride (a popular song.)
Auld Robin Gray.


a*-


j


I rrc~-a~b~ll~arssp I~i~ cp-~e-~-,--- -c----e --~ ---~--~n-ar----


pi~a~--~nCac-- --~_,--- ,5~,_,~ _-~rsaark~-r iL- IC-I~C -L-~~l c -- -


C


SCHOOL FOR CIVIL ENGINCER9S,'G -
town, Kentucky.-Tbis school was opened ip Gj
1835, in connexi,n with the Georgetown College, Kentucky.'--
It will hereafter be connected with the Bacon Collegelately es
tablished at the same place. .;
SThe great and increasing demand for CivilEngin'eerst .
out the United States afford to young gentlemen whod eJ i -
in this business a more'lucrativesalary thanan nj, othet '.r
sion in our country. '- :
Well-instructed assistant Engineers now receitt *it. iC' -"
to $3,000 per annum, while Principal -Engineers readily o 0aiit-
from $4,000 to 810,000 a year. '
Several young gentlemdrl havefinikhed .thir9lrie "
School and immediately obtained emp lymert at. '.0I S
$2,000 per annum.,
The favorable manner in which they haven beer qu
the most scientific Engineers in the Union, has n mud
scriber to extend the course of s tiies-to increase.
for acquiring a thorough and correct practlical and
knowledge of the science, and to adapt many iil.t.i
portant improvements,'suggested by the mpst-il:
neers in the United States. "
A Student who has completed a.regular course 6'l-....
tics may graduate in this school in-six months at.p :
$120 or $150. Otters will reqNire at least twel.e |':
things being favorable. .
COURSE OF STUDLES AND I STR.NCTIRIPs. 0 ,,_-=...
1st. The full course of MaxlhrmatiUc-studied at-iWa Pour ':
(Davies' Mathematics,) from Arbtimetic to Fluionai '
2d. Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Geology, sana .s'I
ralogy. .
3d. Drawing and theaprinciplea of Constriuctien .-
4th. Civil Engineering, theoretical and practicall, .' __
The Text Books in Engineering are Sganziaj Long,i~d Ig '
han, (Pn roads, (Amnerican Edition) "Inlaud Navigation," wf irn'iwt.W."
ster'a Enc)clnpedia, and various other standard wati, iB.'.it'.
ditrerent departments of Civ.l engineering, 'whioh.a ti 6f :.
for works of reference. -. --'
The practical course will be attended to in !the.'*v
(April and October.) During these months the tibsc~r Wit~. -
bp engaged with he class in a regular tour,-withthe Th l
Cmnpass, ajid Level, making preliminary, definitivqx 'r .
surveys foir railroads, canals, and turnpikes-inspect, lg _i j. -,
lic works of the State, the railroads and canal, the urej MI .
verts, bridges, embankments, excavations, Inclined plaptt.pi
lockp, dams, &c. to conclude with a reportof.the srvey., r. .i.
The students of this school have the priviliga of altndinig.
gratis, any other department of the Bacon College, wlsicbi,pe-..
haps the most fully organized institution in the W t.W'.-
'culty consists of a President and Professor of Hebrew.i:a,-
ture ; a Profe.-sor of Ancient Languages; a Professor.oftl -.
Languages (a foreigner;) a Professor of. Metaplhysics, i -
Lettues, Political Economy, &c.; a ProfessororMalheiiial
Civil Engineerinrg; a Professor of TopogrAphical ao4 I
tural Drawinig and Painting, and as Assistant. They h I.S '
wise the fiee use of the Library, Philosophical and C
Apparatus. They are required to observe the Rules antid.eWA
nations of the College. Each student who complet~eso
will be furnished with a certificate of his qualififealtd i~ato j
on parchment. .:.
ExPENSE.-Tuition for the first session will be $50Din'ads
vance, which will include the regular college fee of lif
fee for the-practical tours, drawing, drawing instrtmlenb "Iaate.
trials, stationery, &c. Tuition for every subsequent seein~iD wt.f
be $30 in advance, including the above items', and eve x-,.
pense incident to the school except text-books. .1"
Board can be had in private famiilies at frotn'40 to .0 dolaa,
a session. Fuel, lights, and washing a separate chargeum~ oi t-.-
books about $5 per session. -
A student may enter at any time. -.,.


'














.------
iATIONAL INTJLLIGENCER,

STATE OF OHIO.

It seems to be due to the-long and meritori-
ous seivicgs of General VAICE in the National
Councils, that we should spread before our read-
ers and iis'late associates the following exposi-
tion of his feelings and his opinions on taking
the Chair'Of Governor, to which he has been
called by the voice of his fellow-citizens of Ohio :
Inait Addrss of Joseph Vance, Governor of
Ohio, delivered before the General Assembly,
December 14, 1836.


GENTLEMEN OF THE SENATE
AND OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:
In appearing before you to take the oath of office, custom
has made it necessary that I should make to our common
coiistirtehts, ri you presence, a declaration of what is to
be my course of policy in the discharge of the various duties
confided to my care by the Constitution and Laws of our
State.
3y oui Constitution, the duties of the Executive are
plainly set forth. Fortunately for the political tranquillity
of ourpeople, his.power is confined within narrow limits.
He has no patronage to draw around him a crowd of hun-
gry expectants, ministering to his vanity, and lauding his
patriotism. -T'Pfe framers of our Constitution have wisely
gurdedd against this, and those of them that have lived to wit-
uneA the beneficial effects of this restriction on Executive power,
and to compare our peaceable contests in the election of this
officer with the violent and bitter contests in some.of our sister
states, have reason to be proud of having had an agency in giv-
Singto'the State an instrument of such inestimable value. And
yet, Wvith ll the prudent and salutary restrictions contained in
'his nisriumeht,. it has still conferred upon the Executive a pow-
er of fearful responsibility--a power that authorizes him to step
betweenthe law and its victim, setting at defiance the verdicts
ofyour-juries and the decisions of your courts. Gentlemen,
the very thought of exercising this power causes me almost to
shrink back and- withdraw from the station I am about to as-
saume'. Iknow my own weakness, and fear that I shall lack
that nerve and energy that will enable me to resist the strong
supplications that will be made in favor -of the culprit. The
-!eourityof property and the peace of society rest upon the in-
'flexibilitygand sternness of your Executive officer, and in the
certainty that the:penalties of the law will be enforced and car-
'ri*intOr execution. It is alone in the certainty that punish-
ment will follow conviction that you can hope to restrain the
"vicious and arrest crime; and all interposition of Executive cle-
mercy"otit warranted by a stern regard to the principles of jus-
tioe loosens these restraints, and gives encouragement to the
evil passions and propensities of the profligate and the lawless.
Capital punishment is a subject of grave import; it co-nes in
convict with the opinions uF a large and meritorious class of our
fellow-cckizens, and it is not my purpose to call in question the
truth of these opinions.
It is sufficiefit for me to say, that the policy of the law is dif-
ferent, and that they, in common with other citizens of the State,
have a deep-interest'in its faithful execution. I will only add,
that, with all the reflection I have been able to bestow on this
subject, I have.come to the conclusion that the case must be
strong indeed that can justify the Executive in interposing his
clemency, and thus virtually take the-administration of justice,
into his own hands.
In my general course of administration, I will Uffow in the
path of my predecessors. All must-agree thit, let what may
have eenh'the difference in opinion owodgst them, in their indi-
.vidhal preferences f men, and general -politics, their State
policykas.been the same. ft will be my duty to follow their
lead, and-i will be my ambition not to fall short of them in my
exertionss togive stability and permanence to our institutions and
'State: policy, and peace, security, prosperity, and happiness to
-our people.
One prominent characteristic of our people is, their love of'
order and obedience to law ; and yet, by the thoughtless and
Sintemperate conduct-of a few restless individuals, the repose of
a portion of the citizens of our State has been seriously inter-
rupted. 'We, to be sure, have not had that fearful violence and
disregard of law stalking over our State, uprooting the very
foundations of civil ,government, setting at defiance all order
and restraint, that have been the fate of some of our sister States;
but enough has beer dine to show our citizens that it is alone
in the supremacy of- our laws that they can rest securely in
their persons and property.
Let us see, gentleinen, what ha been said upon this subject
:by one of the most enlightened statesmen and profound jurists
of the present age : It is a trite observation, but not on that ac-
count less correct, that the greatest of blessings become the
worse of curse when perverted andd abused. Without freedom
man is a poor, miserable, abject thing; the sport and-victim of
o ihistfellow man's rage, caprice, and cruelty, having neither vigor
of thought, motive for exertion, nor rational hope to grgtify. But
there can be no freedom without law.' Unrestrained liberty i*
anarchy; domination in the strong, slavery in the weak, outrage
and plunder in the combined oppressors, helpless misery in the
oppressed, insecurity, distru, and tfe.- et ,l-fyw, o" .... -
S rt a w t iro.wsts broad shield over-the rights
and interests of the humblest, the proudest, the poorest, and the
wealthiest in the land. It fences round what every individual
has.already gained; and it insures to him whatever his industry
may acquire. It saves the merchant against ruinous hazards;
provides security for the wages of the mechanic and the laborer,
and eiablea the husbandman to reap his harvest without fear of
plunder. The sanctity of the marriage tie, the purity of virgin
modesty, the leisure ofthe student, the repose of the aged, the
enterprise of the active, the support of indigence, and the de-
cencies of Divine worship, are all under its guardian care. It
makes.every man's house his castle, and keeps watch and ward
oveihis life, hid name, his family and his property. It travels
with him by land and bysea, and arrays, in defence of him and
his, the physical strength of the entire State."
HOw plainly does this eminent man show that the very foun-
dations of our social- compact are based upon our obedience to
i:the*;oonstittion and law. And here permit me to say, that that
man, be hixcharaoter or station in life what it may, that gives'
aiclandd:contenanoe to popular excitements, for the purpose of
putting down any grievance, pretended or real, is doing more to
sap the foundations of.our prosperity, shake the confidence of'
our people in our institutions than can the preaching of all the
misguided philanthropists, with all the combined aid and influ-
enee of the press attheir command throughout the United States.
If rd laws want etfciency, the corrective is in your hands; if
our judiciary want power, Jit rests with you to strengthen its
arm. But save, I entreat you-save this People from that vio-
-lence, anarchy, and confusion, which, if. not arrested, must end
(or al "alery'is ftlsified,) in sinking this Government into a
cruel and heartless despotism.
Gentlemen, die character of this State stands too high as a
member of the Confederacy not to call forth your whole ener-
gies to gfve peace and security to its citizens, permanency to
it* credit, and stability to its institutions. With States, as with
individuals, one false-step play indict a wound that years of ton-
trido_ and.repentance will beunable to heal. The.greatsources
'of our. present prouperity are to be traced to the stability of our
-lep1slation, the integrity of our judiciary, and the good faith
with whic.a.U our engagements have been kept, and our credit
sustained. Those diligent and intelligent servants of the State,
who haire bad charge of our-public improvements, have, by their
economy rmd judicious applcation.of our funds, placed our cre-
dit abroad ust oity upon elevated hbut enviable grounds; whilst
.the stern integrity and persevering industry of our judiciary
have been crowned with equally beneficial and salutary effects.
I havesagaHa ano again, whilst- oni business in the eastern cities,
heard'or judiciary spokenefin terms that made me proud that
.1 was a citizen of,0Ohio.


Nocqellusuioor fraud, sir," says-an eminent merchant of
mne'ofoiurealtern cities, can stand before your judiciary."'
This is the character, gentlemen, that causes capital to seek em-
ploymemt here; this is the character that givessecurity to our
rights, and.alnde. i nnoa p tir e ,b d pa.nmeu
are to be attributed a large. -pition of that flowing prosperity
thatis felt throughout avery portion ofour commonwealth.
The pe' Wif o rbur State are strictly republican. In their
b habDue iodstrnous, economical. and enterprising; they make no
unreasonable exactions -t the hands of their .public servants ;
they ask nothing, and watt nothing: but a well-regulated Go-
vernment of Itas-,fithfuliy, economically, and impartially ad-
mimnisred-imposing equal burdens, and conferring equal be-
nefits. They have nobly borne themselves through a system
of improvement that has thrown upon the background some of
their more wealthy and powerful sister States. A few more
years of patience and perseverance will diffused the benefits of
thia system throughout eyery section of our State. It cannot
then be doubted that those in the receipt ofthe benefits of works
already constructed, are- too just to: askat the hands of their
neighbors that which they, will note Wiilling to repay; and too
patriotic to fold their arms'in the enjaymeint of unlimited pros-
perityj the fruits oFa combined 'effort of the whole body of our
people, whi t anyportion of them resaiaunprovided for--
GeBttenren, there is-one other subje-ct: feel itto'bemy duty
to bioig to your consideration:
Under law of Congress, thatportion f-the surplus revenue
of the country belonging to Ohio' is about to be placed at your
diannam.l wdar~n l.... i.... .. r .., e ced.. -a


should be applied'to their exclusive benefit, a to no other use
or purpose whatever.
This find has been commonly, but erroneously, called the
surplus revenue. It is in reality the avails of.our great land
capital converted into money, and not revenue, which is the or-
dinary income of a country from jiposts and taxes on her pro-
perty, her trade, and her business. Thirty-five millions of the
balance, now in the Treasury of the United States, has arisen
from the sales of the public lands, since the payment of the na-
tional debt, for which these lands were pledged. This sum, at
least, is the inheritance of the People, originally gained by the
toil and suffering, and blood of their revolutionary fathers.
It is a sacred gift to us, now freed from encumbrance, and be-
longs alike to the whole body of ouir People,-"the humblest and
the proudest, the wealthiest and the most destitute." That
which we have received by the uncompromising fidelity of those
in whom the guardianship and trust was reposed, it is our duty
to invest and preserve, for ourselves and for our posterity.
Then, gentlemen, it is your duty to make the computation,
and see what portion of it belongs to the poor and the destitute.
Remember that you are now about to become their trustees and
guardians, and that a heavy responsibility rests upon you, to
make such application of their means as will enable them to be-
come worthy members of society, and enlightened and useful
citizens of the State. This can only be done by building up our
common schools.; and when we reflect that the very foundations
of our political system rest upon the virtue and intelligence of
ourPeople, and that the interest at stake is no less than the per-
petuation ot our free institutions, you cannot falter in your exer-
tions to accomplish the great object in view.
Read our Constitution, and there learn what were the feel-
ings of our fathers upon this subject. The twenty-fifth section
of the eighth article reads thus : "No law shall be passed to pre-
vent the poor in the several counties'and townships in this State
from an equal participation in the schools, academies, colleges,
and universities of this State, endowed in whole or in part from
the revenues arising from donations made by the United States."
How has this injunction been regarded? We, to be sure,
have not passed a law to prohibit the poor from entering our col-
leges and universities; but from a want of that system and or-
ganization so necessary to give efficiency to our common schools,
they are as much excluded as if they were prohibited by positive
,statute. --
Our school system has had great difficulties to encounter-it
has been met by the combined force of avaricei.wealth, and ig-
norance ; but I now congratulate its early advocates that their
labors are about to be crowned with success. A fund is now
within their reach that avarice has no claim to, wealth cannot
control, and which will make ignorance itself acknowledge its
fatal error, and bow in perfect submission. Then let the grumb-
ler no more talk about his heavy contributions for the education
of the poor; if the poor and the destitute get their rights, they
will be no longer quartered upon his bounty; but rather let it
be our ambition to vie with each other in our exertions, to bring
into form a system of education, which will ensure a faithful and
impartial application of the means now at our command, with
those in prospect, so that the diffusion of the benefits and bless-
ings of a thorough common school education shall reach every
child throughout every section of our State.
No person can appreciate more sensibly than myself the want
of an early education; even in the place in which I now stand,
it is felt with a pungency and force more easily understood than
explained. This whole matter is now about to be committed to
your care; and I have a strong confidence that it will meet with
that favor that its high claims upon your consideration so loudly
call for.
Gentlemen, you-have been so fully advised of the condition
and wants of the State by my predecessor, that any thing further
froes me atp'resent will not be expected. In the course of the
session information coming into my possession, which the du-
'ty'ofmy station makes it necessary to lay before your body,
shall be done with that freedom and good faith that ought to
characterize the intercourse between the Legislative and Exe-
cutive branches of ourState Government. That your delibera-
tions may be conducted with harmony and mutual forbearance
towards each other, and your labors such as to build up the in-
terests and prosperity of our State, and diffuse the benefits of onr
free institutions equally arid impartially amongst all classes of
society, is the earnest wish of your friend and fellow-citizen.

P. ORD,
MINIATURE PAINTER,
Room 2d door from the corner of Pennsylvania avenue and
4J street. dec 22-eo2w
M RS. AULD, on Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite
the Athenaum, has several pleasant rooms unoccupied.
jan 3-3t
EMACK'S OFFICE,
Sign of the Flag of Scarlet and Gold, three doors west of
Brown's Hotel.
VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
To be drawn at Alexandria on Saturday, 7th January.
'Capital Prize $25,000.
Tickets only $8--shares in proportion.
The most splendid set of solid Silver Ware, perhaps, in the
United States, will be awarded to the first number drawn in the
above Lottery.
Emadk has constantly on hand a supply of Tickets in all the
Lotteries now drawing.
Wanted, a lad of 1'5 or 16 years of age, who can come well
recommended. Apply at my office.
jan5-d3tif
4'TNp NUT3ALS FOR CHRISTMAS.-The German
,-t Tourist, edited by-Professor 0. L. B. Wolff and Dr. H.
-Doering, illustrated with seven splendid engravings, from
drawings.
The Fairy Book, illustrated with eighty-one cuts, by Adams.
The Wreath-of Friendship, a literary album.
The Juvenile Scrap Book, by Bernard Barton, with 17 splen-
did engravings.
The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, with 12 embellishments.
The Gift, with 10 engravings.
The Pearl, with 7 engravings.
The Violet, with 5 engravings.
The Christmas Box, with engravings.
The Pilgrim's Progress, with a Life of John Bunyan, by
Robert Soutlbey, illustrated with 50 cuts, by Adams.
Letters to Young Ladies, by Mrs. L. Sigourney.
The Young Husband'sBook.
The Young Wife's Book.
The English ,version of the Polyglott-Bible, with marginal
readings and plates, bound in elegant calf.
Mrs. Hemans's Poems, bound in elegant calf.
Book of Flowers, with 24 plates.
The Christian Florist, with plates.
For sale at the School and Juvenile Book Repository, No. 5,
Varnum's tow, Pennsylvania avenue, between 9th and 10th


streets. R. FARNHAM.
dec 24-eo6tif
W ILLIAM B. TODD, six doors west of-Brown's
Hotel, has'lately received a fresh supply of-
Gentlemen's Beaver and Silk Hats, Otter, Fur, Seal,
Muskrat, Sealette and Cloth Caps
Ladies' Bea*er and Silk Plush Bonnets
Medicated.Russia Hare Skin's
Ladies' Fur Cloak Linings, Capes
Lynx Boas and Muffs,' Swansdown Trimming
Splendid white Cashmere Boas
Carriage Mats, Buffalo Robes
Leather Hat Cases. dec 23-7tif
F HOWARD'S Improved Chemical Chloride
S Soap.-This deservedly celebrated Soap may at all
times be had, wholesale and retail, of the subscriber, inventor
and sole proprietor. For sale, also, at most of the Drug and
Fancy stores in Washington, Georgetown, and Alexandria.
N. B.-The genuine will have the signature of the proprie-
tor on the envelope of each cake.
FLODOARDO HOWARD,
Chemist and Druggist, near Seven Buildings.
dec 20-2aw3wif


INES.-Sifpendid Madeira,'Slhrry, and Port.
The subscribers beg leave to notify members of Con-
gress and others, that they have on hand, remaining from the
sale on the instant, a few of the splendid wines then offered,
and have since ree'ive'd, o6f-4aire importations, anadditional lot
of other sorts, which they were then unable to supply the de-
mand for; all of which will be disposed of at very low prices.
Among them are splendid old East India Maderias, Sherrys, and
Ports, which they hesitate not,to-say canubt .be surpassed .in
quality.
They are authorized to hold themselves pledged for the cha-:
racter and reputation of these particular wines.
P. MAURO & SON,
dec 26-dtfif Opposite Brown's Hotel.
P OLK'S. HOUSE.-This establishment is designed,
particularly, for the accommodation of Ladies and Gen-
tlemen visiting Washington at any season, transiently or as so-
journers-for whose comfort no trouble or-expense is spared.
A mess of Members of Congress can be accornmodaied, as
-usual, without interfering with the other arrangement.
It is so rear the Railroad Depot,'that none coming that way
need to ride; andsa porter will be in attendance to receive all
baggage intended for this house. dec 3-d4wif
M RS. TYTE, from.'London, begs to acquaint the vi-
siters and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with anlegant assortment of the newest ani most FASH-


__ ,"'" """,."*- --r-in ---, --
HOUSE ,OF REPRESENTATIVES.

REMARKS OF MR. REYNOLDS, (or ILLINOIS:)
On his presentation.of the preamble and resolutions
on the subject of the National Road.-Dec. 22.

Mr. SPEAKER : I a sorry that I am compelled, by a sense
of duty, to address the House oh this s-ubject, which, I fear, is
not very interesting to my friends, the members of this House ;
and I cannot promise them in my remarks any thing like elo-
quence or oratory, that will be entertaining to them.
This is a subject of great interest and importance to the whole
State of Illinois, and particularly to the district which I have
the honor to represent on this floor. Its interest to the People
is the reason I now address you.
The preamble and resolution now under consideration were
adopted by the General Assembly of the State by a unanimous
vote.
The State has assumed the principles and doctrines of State
rights, which I consider are constitutional and correct, and such
as can be maintained and demonstrated on a proper exposition of
the Constitution of our Government.
Without further comment or preface, I will read the pream-
ble and resolutions which passed the Legislature of the State of
Illinois by a unanimous vote :
Whereas, it is the opinion of the Legislature of the State of
Illinois, now in session, that the route which the National road
should pursue, if extended so as to cross the Mississippi river at
the town of Alton, would be in entire accordance with its ulti-
mate destination, the capital of the State of Missouri; would be
more advantageous to the commercial and agricultural interests
of this State, and afford to her inhabitants, and tffbse of her sis-
ter States, a more direct and convenient chain of intercommuni-
cation than any other route: and whereas the passage of said
road across the Mississippi river at St. Louis would not only be
highly detrimental to the prosperity of this State, but in violation
of her just pretensions and of her rights of sovereignty, contra-
ry to the avowed policy of the General Governmentj and in
open defiance of those principles of even-handed justice and
impartiality which have characterized her dealings with other
States in relation to this matter :
Therefore, be it resolved by the General Assembly of the
State of Illinois, That the consent of the State of Illinois is
hereby given to the Federal Government, to extend the Na-
tional road through the territory of said State, so as to cross the
Mississippi river at the town of Alton, in said State, and at no
other point.
"Resolved, That our Sen.tors in Congress be instructed, and
our Representatives requested, to use their best exertions to
procure the passage of a law authorizing the survey of the route
from Vandalia to Jefferson city,.by the way of Alton, and for the
continuation of the National road upon said route."
It will be perceived by every member of this House, that this
resolution presents a subject of much importance, and one on
which various opinions have been entertained.
This subject being new, and of difficult solution, I have the
same pleasure in presenting it to this learned and intelligent
assembly as the celebrated personage of antiquity had in defind-
ing himself before King Agrippa. St. Paul said that he was
happy to have the privilege to address ajudge who was leirn-
ed in all the laws and customs of the Jews. So do I tlink
myselfhappy" to have the honor to present this subject before
an assembly that are intelligent and learned in the laws and
Constitution of their country.
It is a principle, acknowledged by all constitutional lawyers.
and constitutional writers, that the Congress of the United SRat es
possess no power of action further than is expressly giyen them
by the Constitution. And on an attentive and careful exaraina-
tion of that instrument, it will be found that there exists no
power in Congress to force on a State such improvements as are
contemplated by this National road.
I would ask any gentleman in this House if he would vote
for an improvement of the country, such as the National road
is, contrary to the express will and consent of the State in which
the road was to be located? I do not believe there can be a case
found in the history of this Government, where the General
Government has forced on a State, contrary to the will and con-
sent of the State, a road, or any such improvement.
The United States possesses the power to make all necessary
roads for her military operations. This power arises from her
exclusive and constitutional authority over the subject of war and
all its consequences. -
The National road which is new under consideration is not pre-
tended to be a military road, or in any manner connected with
the military operationsof the Government. The Constitution
of the United States expressly authorizes Congrss "to estab-
lish post offices and post roads." Congress having the constitu-
tional authority and jurisdiction over this subject, must, as a ne-
cessary consequence, have the power to establish" postroutes
or post roads. The Congress, at their last session, established
a great many post-roads all over the Union. This is the estab-
lishment which, in my opinion, is contemplated by the Consti-
tution, and not the making of a road such as tkie National road is.
It would not be seriously contended by a.ny one that, under
the provisions of the Constitution on this subject, Congress
would be bound, or would have the constitutional competency,
to make and cttout a road wherever they establish a post route.
The National road is, in fact, no more a post road than it is a
military road; and, consequently, the General Government,
under the provisions of the Constitution, have no power to force
it on. the States. .. -..... ..
If C'Ol~ I U ~-yii p-uwel, wIIIouILL mn consent of the
States through which th's road passes, to make and open.it in
the States, then it must follow as a matter of necessity that Con-
gress also possess the power to keep these roads in repair ; and
in order to do this, they must establish toll-gates and toll-collec-
tors on them. They must also possess the jurisdiction and oe'-
trol over them; and, consequently, must establish courts, and
appoint officers ..to enforce the acts of Congress, in the exercise
of their jurisdiction over them. If Congress have the power,
without the ,consent of the States, to make these roads, they
must exercise all the jurisdiction and power above enumerated,
in exclusion of the State authorities. This must be the neces-
sary consequence, if they have the power, in the first instance,
to make the roads. .
I believe that there is no American citizen who would be -wil-
ling to see the United States assume and exercise-the exclu: mive
jurisdiction and control over these national improvements, ;,ad
deprive the States of their constitutional sovereignty and rig its
within the limits of their own territory.
I have heard intelligent gentlemen contend that, if the Unit ed
States had the power to make the National road at all, th, y
would have it as well without as with the consent of the Stat e-
through which the road may pass. I consider this position to Ile
without foundation and untenable.
A State has the power and right to admit any individual, oIr
set of men, to expend their money in the State in such way or-
manner as the State may think proper and right. We see com-...
panies frequently incorporated by State authority to make roads,,
canals, and such improvements. They act under the authority
of the State. They may be considered the agents or servants of"
the State, as they act under the control and laws of the State, and


not by their own authority.
In the same.manner, when the State gives her consent to the
General Government to make a road within the. limits of the
State, the United States acts not by its own authority, but by the
power and authority delegated to it by the State Government.
The General Government act under the authority of the State,
and, like all other agents, cannot transcend the power given.
This view of the subject is demonstrated by an act of the Ge-
neral Assembly of the State of Maryland, passed in November,
1802, which is in the following words, to wit:
"That this State do hereby give and grant their full approba-
tion and consent that the Congress of the United States may ap-
propriate, towards repairing, and keeping in repair, the post
roads, or any one or more of them, within this State, such sum or
sums of money as they in their wisdom may deem right, and to
lay out*and apply the same to said purpose in any manner they

by law direct: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall
extend, ormay be construed to extend, to authorize Congress to
pass any law for the changing the direction of the roads, or any
of them, as now established, or to authorize them to pass a law
for the opening of a new road."
The above recited act gives a construction to the constitutional
power of Congress, and demonstrates the position that Congress
is governed in its action on this subject by the authority of the
State Government.
This view ofthe subject is also fortified by Congress trans-
ferring the National road to the States east of the Ohio, through
which the road passes. Congress, by this act, disclaims'the
jurisdiction and exclusive control over this road, and transfers
all her claim to it to the respective States in which it is located.
This is an 'acknowledgment that the General Government
had not the power or jurisdiction over this improvement, to the'
exclusion of the State Governments.
It isa principle acknowledged by all that the construction
and exposition given to a law, or to a constitution, at or near the
time the law or constitution was made, is of greater force and
validity than a construction given at any other time.
In eighteen hundred and six, which is not a great length of
time after the Constitution of the United States was adopted, an
act of Congress passed on this very subject, and gave a con-
struction to that instrument. Thisis the first act which was
passed on the subject, and it is the act that established the Cum-
berland or National road.
'I will readto-you, Mr. Speaker, a part of the act of Congress
which requires the President of the'United States to obtain the
consent of the States through which this road was to be located.
Commissioners were to be appointed by this act: and. on their


Cumberland, in the State of Maryland, t3 the State of Ohio,' I
appointed Ibomas Moore, of Maryland, Joseph Kerr, of Ohio,
and Eli Williams, of Maryland, commissioners to lay out the
said road, and to perform the other duties assigned to them by
the act. The progress which they made in the execution of the
work, during the last session, will appear in their report now
communicated to Congress. On the receipt of it, I took mea-
sures to obtain consent for making the road, of the States of
Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, through which the com-
missioners proposed to lay it out. I have received acts of the
Legislatures of Maryland and Virginia, giving the consent, de-
sired ; that of Pennsylvania has the subject still under consider-
ation, as is supposed. Until I receive full consent to a free
choice of route through the whole distance, I have thought it
safest neither to accept nor reject, finally, the partial report of
the commissioners. Some matters suggested in the report be-
long exclusively to the Legislature.
"TH. JEFFERSON.
"January 31, 1807."
It is-almost useless to observe, that no person everstood higher
for splendid talents, and for a complete and perfect knowledge
of our Constitution, and the nature of ur Government, than Pre-
sident Jefferson did ; and he deemed it necessary to have the
"full consent" of the States to a free choice of the route,
through the whole distance," before he could cause the road to
be made.
S Mr. Speaker, I will trouble the House with only a few acts
of the State Governments in which this road was located.
The following is an act of the General Assembly of Mary-
land, which passed January 4, 1807, and fully recognises the
principle that'the General Government has na power to make
the improvement without the "consent" of the State :
"Whereas a law passed the Congress of the United States on
the 29th of March, 1806, directing the laying out of a road from
Cumberland, on the Potomac river, to the Ohio; and the con-
sent of this State being necessary to the opening of the same, so
far as it may run within her limits: therefore,
"Be it enacted by the' General Assembly of Maryland,
That it shall be lawful, and the full and entire consent of the
State of Maryland is hereby given to the opening and improv-
ing the same ; and-the President of the United States is hereby
authorized to cause the said road to be laid out, opened, and im-
proved, in such way and manner as by the before recited act 'of
Congress is required and directed."
An act passed the General Assembly of the State of Pennsyl-
vania on the 9th April, 1807, on this subject, and is as follows,
to wit:
That the President of the United States be, and he is here-
by, authorized to cause so much of the said road as will be in
this State to be opened, so far as it may be necessary the same
should pass through this State, and to cause the said road to be
made, regulated, and completed within the limits, and according
to the intent and meaning of the before recited act of Congress
in relation thereto."
Mr. Speaker, I will not trouble the House by reading any of
the acts or resolutions of the General Assemblies of the States
of Virginia, Ohio, or Indiana, through which this road passes.
It will be found, on examination, that the consent of all the States,
from one end of this road to the other, has been given to the
General Government to construct the road, before the United
States commenced it.
It seems to me there cannot exist a doubt in the mind of any
one that will examine the subject attentively, and see the course
of the General Government, and of the States also, on this sub-
ject, that Congress has not the constitutional power to force an
examination of this character on any State.
If Congress assume this power and exercise it, State rights
and State sovereignty might be prostrated. If Congress can
force a road on a State four rods wide, it can force into a State
one of forty miles wide, and must, of necessity, exercise exclu-
sive jurisdiction over it. This would be ufireasonable, and de-
structive to our system of Governments. It would have a ten-
dency to the formation of a consolidated Government, which
would destroy State rights and State Governments.
The President, in his late message, of December, 1836, re-
cognises this principle where he says that "the great struggle
was begun against that latitudinarian construction of the Consti-
tution which authorizes the unlimited appropriation of the re-
venue of the Union to internal improvement within the States;
tending to invest in the hands, and place under the control, of
the General Government, all the principal roads and canals of
the country, in violation of State rights, and in derogation of
State authority."
This principle being demonstrated, that Congress has no pow-
er to make these works without the "consent' of the State in
which they are located, the necessary consequence is-growing
out of the above resolution-that the National road must cross
the Mississippi river at Alton, in the State of Illinois. If the
road does not cross the river at Alton, the consent of the State is
given to locate it "at no other point."
It is proper ard right to mention that there is a contest be-
tween the States of Illinois and Missouri ab9ut the location of
this road. The State of Illinois, as I have before remarked, is
unanimous in her resolution to locate it at Alton ; and the rep-
resentativ's of the people of Missouri wish it located so as to
cross the Mississippi at St. Louis, in that State.
The people of Illinois entertain no unfriendly feelings to-
wards the State of Missouri or the city of St. Louis. We are
proud of the growth and prosperity of the State and of their city,
but we are not so friendly to them as to advance their interests
to the disparagement and destruction of our own rights and in-
terests. We do not love Caesar less, but Rome more."
We, the people of Illinoia,-consider it our-duty to advance our
own happin..c a d :mterest, when it is not to do an injury or
wrong to the State of Missouri or to the United States. We do
not wish to injure St. Louis, but we are anxious to advance our
own State and Alton.
At a recent election, under a statute law of the State of Illi-
nois, a vote was taken for the location of the seat of Government
of the State, and Alton received mome votes than any other place;
by which proceeding, it is almost certain that Alton will become
the seat of Government for the State; and as the policy of the
States through which the Natidrial road passes, and that also of
the General Government, is, to locate it so as to pass the seats
of the State Governments, this policy will, I hope, be extended
to Illinois, as well as to other States.
Alton is one of the most flourishing and commercial towns ini
the State of Illinois. I am informed that it and its environs con-
tain a population of four or five thousand souls; and I know it
is rapidly increasing in populatiori, business, and importance.
And although Alton may not contain as great a population as
St. Louis, yet there is in the State of Illinois an immense num-
ber of people more than in the State of Missouri, which ought
to be a strong argument in favor of the State of Illinois.
Mr. Speaker, it is almost unnecessary for me to state to this
House at this time, that the National road has been located no
farther west than to Vandalia, the seat of Government of the
State of Illinois; and the resolution before us gives the consent
of the State to continue it'in that State to Alton, towards its
ultimate destination, Jefferson City, in the State of Missouri;
and, judging from the best information I can obtain, the route by
Alton from Vandalia to Jefferson City will be found, on actual
survey, to be the best and shortest for the continuation of the


road*
If this resolution gave the consent of the State to cross the
Mississippi river at a point entirely out of the direction from
Vandalia to Jefferson City, then I would say it was unreason-
able, and ought not to be urged on the consideration of this
House. On such occasion, I should regret to find myself advo-
cating a course of policy so absurd and unjust. But when I am
clearly satisfied that the route by Alton is the nearest and best
from Vandalia to Jeffersen City, and that the General Govern-
ment will take into consideration the will, interest, and "con-
sent" of the State, in tke location of this road, I feel a conscious
rectitude in my course, and will pursue it uncaring of conse-
quences."
I consider it my duty to pursue this course at this session of
Congress, in conformty to the resolution of the General Assem-
bly, and in accordance to the voice of the People, expressed in
a meeting had on the occasion. The proceedings of this meet-
ing were printed and laid on the table of each member.
Having finished my remarks on this resolution, I move to re-
fer it to the Committee on Roads and Canals.

T RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue f a decree of Prince
SGeorge's County Court as a Court of Equity, the Subscrib-
er will sell at public auction, to the highest'bidder, in the ; ag- e
f Piscataway, on Friday, the 27th instant, th `ctflrng Planta-
Th in o'f the late Joseph Edel'-, -ii ourit X1Ar, onirtaining-
:about twelve hundred acres.
Terms of sale : Cash, on the day of sale, or the ratification
thereof by the court; when a deed will be given, conveying all
the right and estate of the late Joseph Edelen, and those claim-
ing under him. NICHOLAS STONESTREET,
jan 0-cpts Trustee.
W ELL, IT DON'T SIGNIFY, I. S. Nicholls
can doit, for he has done it again, this day.
2 39 45
a whole in the Grand Consolidated Lottery, Class 1, for 1837, a
Capital Prize of $500.
I say again, come and let him do it for you ; he can do it, and
*'an do it over and over again.
GRAND CONSOLIDATED EXTRA draws to-morrow.
$20,000 Capital.
With an innumerable quantity of rich prizes.
And the VIRGINIA on Saturday. Capital $25,000. A splen-
did scheme. Only $7 a ticket.
I can sell the prize. Oh, do call at my office, three doors
above the Union Hotel, Georgetown. jan 5-3t
M 0 UI'WI,. ,... -


POLITICS OF THE DAY.


ON THE FUTURE SURPLUS.


S FROM THE SOUTHERN WHIG, (GEORGIA,) DEC. 24.
Mr. JONES : I perceive that many of the Slates,
and Georgia among the rest, protest against any
further accumulation and distribution of the sur-
plus revenue of the General Government. If
this disclaimer refer to the taxes which that Go-
vernment has a right to impose, it is just and
proper; but if the proceeds of the public lands
are included, the States are yielding a right
which is not justified by any consideration of
propriety or sound policy. I believe it a posi-
tion not difficult to establish, that the proceeds
of the public lands (at least that portion of them
northwest of the Ohio river, ceded by the State
of Virginia in the year '84, before the adoption
of the Federal Constitution, to the States, then
held together by the articles of confederation,)
belong to the respective States, and not in their
federal character. I believe, further, that the
General Government is a trustee of this fund for
the benefit of the several States, and if it were
suable in a Court of Equity, it could be made not only to
divide the present amount of money in hand, derived from
the sales in that territory, but to account for all sums ex-
pended in behalf of the Federal Government. To sustain
these views I offer the following evidence, and only request
that the case be considered as pending in a Court of Jus-
tice, the States being plaintiffs, and the General Govern-
ment the defendant.
1st. I submit the articles of confederation, adopted on the
9th day of July, 1778, and from them the following clau-
ses, to wit : Each State shall maintain its own delegates
in a meeting of the States [Congrees,] and while they actas
members of the committee of the States," [in the recess of
Congress.] Again, all charges of war, and all other ex-
penses that shall be incurred for the common defence or ge-
neral welfare, and allowed by the United States in Con-
gress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common Trea-
sury, which shall be supplied by the several States, in pro-
portion to the value of all land within each State, granted
to or surveyed for any person, as such land and the build-
ings and improvements thereon shall be estimated, accord-
ing to such mode as the United States in Congress assem-
bled shall, from time to time, direct and appoint. The taxes
for paying that proportion shall be laid and levied by the
authority and direction of the Legislatures of the several
States within the time agreed upon by the United States in
Congress assembled." I quote these clauses for two pur-
poses: 1st. to show that, under the articles ot confedera-
tion, the States, in their individual capacity, supported the
Federal Government, and that it had no other resources or
means of support. 2d. (the use of which will be seen here-
after,) to show the rate or measure of the charges and ex-
penses of each State.
I next present the articles of cession executed on the 1st
of March, 1784, between the State of Virginia on the one
part, and the Congress of the United States, under the ar-
ticles of confederation, on the other.
1st. The State of Virginia authorized certain commis-
sioners (which was done under their hands and seals,) "to
convey, transfer, assign, and make over unto the United
States in Congress assembled, FOR THE BENEFIT
OF SAID STATES, VIRGINIA INCLUSIVE,. all
right, title, and claim, as well of soil as of jurisdiction,
which the said commonwealth hath to the territory or tract
of country within the limits of the Virginia charter, situate,
lying, and being to the northwest of the river OHIo, to and
for the USES and purposes, and on the conditions of the
said recited act."
Now, 2d. One of the uses and conditions of the said re-
cited act is in the following words, viz. That all the lands
within the territories so ceded to the United States, and
not reserved for, or appointed to, any of the beforemen-
tioned purposes, or disposed of in bounties to the officer--
and soldiers of the American Army, shall be c as
a COMMON FUND for the USE and' JE'3rriof such of
the United States as have bear-Me, or shall become, mem-
bers of the Conjed-f-aodn or Federal alliance of the said
States, VJRCoNIA INCLUSIVE, according to their usual respec-
tive proportions of the GENERAL CHARGE and EXPENDITURE,
and shall be faithfully and bona fide disposed of for that
purpose, andfor no other USE or PURPOSE whatsoever."
Can words be more explicit? I said the General Gov-
ernment was a TRUSTEE for the States. Here are the legal
and technical-words that not only imply but absolutely
create a trust. I grant to the United States in Congress
assembled for the use and benefit of said States, (myself in-
cluded,) so said Virginia. Now, if it was intended for the
United States in their confederated character, it was only
necessary to stop at the words United States," and the
rest followed as a matter of course; but when Virginia
takes the pains specially to include herself, and particular-
ly specifies the measure and manner of division, we can be
at no loss to arrive at her intention to distribute the com-
mon fund," (once all her own,) among her sister States,
especially if we bear rh mind, as already cited, that each
State had to furnish her quota of money to defray the
charges and expenses" ofthe Federal Government. The
then Federal Government could have no'funds, or, in the
language of the Articles, no Common Treasury," but in
the way provided by that instrument. It was to be sup-
plied by the several States," and it may be boldly affirmed
that no other method can be found in that compact.
But there is a view of this question which is perfectly
conclusive. Suppose the States had remained under the
articles of confederation, and had never adopted the pre-
sent Federal Constitution, what would have become of the
proceeds of the public lands thus ceded by Virginia ? What
would the old Congress, having no powers to raise revenue,
and no right to use or retain money but in a way specially
provided in the charter of their authority, have done with
the money arising from the sales ? How could it have
evaded this unequivocal clause in the contract made with
Virginia, to wit: "the lands thus ceded shall be consider-
ed as a common fund, for the s e and benefit of such of the
United States as have become, or shall become, members


of the confederation or federal alliance of the said States,
Virginia inclusive, according to their usual respective pro-
portions of the general charge and expenditure, and shall be
faithfully and bonafide disposed of for that purpose, and for
no other use or purpose whatsoever?" Does not every one
perceive that the Federal Government would have been
compelled, if it acted faithfully, to pay over to the States
their respective shares of the proceeds of the lands as they
were disposed of for the use and benefit of said States,
Virginia inclusive It is no good objection to say the
States would have had to pay it back to the Federal Gov-
ernment; that might or might not have been the case;
there might have been a surplus then as there is now. The
Federal Government was largely indebted to some of the
States, and that, at least, had to be exhausted in the way of
supplies from the creditor State, before her dividend of the
land proceeds could be touched. But apart from these con-
idatinons, it was the terms of the bond," and it was obli-
ged to be complied with.
This view of the subject is obliged to settle the case, un-
less the change of Government, or,in other words, the adop-
tion of the Federal Constitution,has conferred upon the pre-
.sent Government a title to these lands and their proceeds,
aramount to the one above shown to exist in the States.
f so, let it be shown. It is incumbent upon the defendant
to produce his grant. Let him show the instrument by
which the right has passed out of the States, and vested in
himself. We might safely conclude the cause here, under
the utmost confidence that no deed can be shown which
revokes the articles of cession made by Virginia, the title
under which the States rightfully claim, but plaintiffs can
show that they have been extremely mindful of this inte-
rest, for in the Constitution agreed to in September, '89,
nearly six years after the Virginia cession which changed
the Government, or rather abrogated the articles of con-
federation, they expressly provide these saving clauses, to
wit: All debts contracted, and engagements entered into
before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid
against the United States, under this Constitution, as under
the Confederation."-6th Art. Again, in the 4th article,
it ; la 3 rlM.l .t ...... ._ 1 t. ... ... t -


the pledge given by Congress to the States, before a single
cession was made; that it abrogates the conditions upon
which some of the States come into the Uqion; and that it
sets at naught the terms of cession spread upon the face of
every grant under which the title to that portion of the
public lands is held by the Federal Government ?V Again,
he says, alluding to the deeds of cession: the Constitu-
tion of the United States did not delegate to Congress the
power to abrogate these compacts. On the contrary, by
declaring that nothing in it 'shall be construed to prejudice
any claims of the United States, or of any particular State,'
it virtually provides that those compacts shall remain-un-
touched by the legislative power, which shall only make
all' needful rules and regulations' for carrying them into
effect."
Now, however, things are changed, because he wants to
reduce the surplus revenue he recommends in his late mes-
sage to diminish the price of the public lands, and to dis-
pose of them only to actual settlers. This will be a fraud
upon the States, and ought to be resisted, as well as all at-
tempts to give any portion of the lands or their proceeds,
over and above their rightful share, to any of the new
States. Congress has already violated the Virginia com-
pact by the vast cessions of land for various purposes, made
to the new States, as well as a donation to them of large
sums of money arising from their sale. An immediate stop
should be put to such a.faithless disposition of that com-
mon fund," so generously reserved by Virginia for the
"use and benefit" of the whole of her sister States. I can-
didly admit that the States should lay no claims to any
other lands, or their proceeds, than those derived from the
sales northwest of the Ohio river; for, although oihel
States, and particularly Georgia, have made similar ces-
sions, and almost in exact terms, yet, as they were made
subsequent to the adoption of.the Federal Constitution, I
think the question, by reason thereof, is very materially
varied. If, however, we can get what justly belongs to us,
it will be enough for all useful purposes. The vast amounts
which have accrued for the last forty years, since the adop-
tion of the Federal Constitution, in which the Government
had ample power to raise means for its support, independent
of the land fund, will greatly lessen the qualms of con-
science which some seem to have about taking any part of
the surplus revenue, and protesting that such another dose
must not be put before them. Surely, since that timethere
can be no excuse either to use or withhold the land reve-
nue from the States. For my part, I believe we have not
obtained our own by many millions; and although, in the
distribution now about to be made, there is part of it that does
not rightfully belong to the States, because it is revenue
from other sources than that of land sales, yet there is
enough behind, which we ought to have, that will compen-
sate for the gratuity, if it be so considered, ten times over.
Let us come to a fair settlement, and we may and ought to
refund whatever is received over and above a fair division
of the proceeds of the public lands, under the solemn com-
pact of the State of Virginia. This is our right. In this
there is no degradation, no servile dependence on that Go-
vernment, and, poising ourselves upon our just rights, we
should exact their strict observance.
A. S. CLAYTON.

IANY-CHAMBERED PISTOL STOLEN.-
One of Mr. COCHRAN'S Many-Chambered Pistols was
stolen from his room at Gadsby's Hotel, on Wednesday, the 4th
instant. It has the maker's name on it; "Cyrus B. Allen,
-Springfield;" there are seven chambers in the cylinder; the up-
per stock strap which confines it is a straight piece ofmetal, and
opens by a hinge. There is not any provision for a ram-iod.
It is the only Pistol of the description which has been made.
Thirty dollars reward will be given for the detection of the
thief and return of the pistol, or ten dollars for the pistol alone,
and no questions asked.
Apply to Mr. Cochran, at Gadsby's, or to Dr. Thomas P.
Jones, corner of E and 8th streets.
jan 6-3t
BB Y P. MAURO & SON.-BOOKS-Historical, Clas-
sical, Medical, Miscellaneous, Arts and Sciences, c,-
On Saturday evening, 7th inst. at the auction house, opposite
Brown's Hotel, we shall sell, without reserve, a chin oollfec-
tion of Works, in part as above, rare, valuahit ~ and new, too
numerous to enumerate, and meritin .Pliar attention.
The whole collection is o 0 a inspection during the day,
and catalogues man on Saturday morning. Sale at half
past 6 o'c P. MAUIO & SON.
i-
JOHNSTON'S SCRAPS, No. t, FOR 183T, or
Phrenology Exemplified and Illustrated in upwrdalsof forty
engraved caricatures, with accompanying narratives, anecdotes
&c. is this day received, and for sale by P. TAYLOR, price
$1 25.
*** The postage by mail on a package of 'four copies of the
above will be only 35 cents for the lot to any part of the United
States. jan
UENRY CLAY WINE.-50 cases '(to dozen bot.
tles each) old and very superior Henry Clay" Madei:
ra Wiie, having had the benefit of an India voyage. For sale
by WM. FOWLE & SON, Alexandria.
jan 6
ENGINEER'S PRACTICAL ELEMENTS.-
A small additional supply of the above is this morning
opened and for sale by F. TAYLOR.
jan 6
PROFESSOR HOLLAND'S LIFE OF VAN
BUREN, in 1 vol. with portrait.-An additional supply
of the above is just opened and for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Also, of Andrew Jackson's Annual Messages, Protest, Vetoes
&c. &c. complete in 1 vol. octavo; price'$1.
Life of General Harrison, of Ohio, 1 vol. price 62 cents.
Endicott's newly engraved lafge sized portrait of Van Bures;
price $1 25. -.. .
Apply at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately east
of Gadsby's Hotel. jan 6
RARE EDITIONS OF CLASSICS-continued.
Aristophanis Comcedia undecim, cum Scholiis Antiquis
Studio et Opera. Biseti et Emilii Porti. I vol. folio. Aure-
lire, MDCVII. $12.
Demosthenis et iEschinis, Principum fraciw Oratorum, Opera.
Ulpiani commentariis, variis Lectionibus, et Annotationibs il-
lustrata. Edit. per HieronynumWolfumn. Franeofurti, MDCUII.
1 vol. large folio, $24.
On sale at the Antique Bookstore,. Pennsylvania Avenue.
jan 6 JAS. RIORDAN.


N EW BOOKS.-The Chinese. A general description
of China and its inhabitants, with maps and illustrations,
2 vols. Price $1 25.
Excursions in Cairo, Jerusalem, &c. by George Jones.
Mrs. Sigpurney's Letters to Young Ladies, new edition, by
Harper.
Pilgrim's Progress, new and good edition.
For sale by GARRET ANDERSON,
Pennsylvania avenue, between 11th and 12th sts.
jan 6-3t
TOCKS! I-FRANCIS DUGENT, Stock Manufacturer,
from Baltimore, respectfully announces to the citizens of
Washington that he has arrived here with a splendid assortment
of Fall and Winter Stocks, of the latest iand most approved pat-
terns, and taken lodgings at Mr. Beuji A. Tborn's, Penn-
sylvania Avenue, nearly opposite to Gadsby's Hotel, where he
may be found until 12 o clock in the forenoon, and after 3 o'clock
in the afternoon of each day in the week, until Saturday next,
when he will return to Baltimore, and will not be here again
until next Fall.
Mr. D. has on hand, besides the articles mentioned above, a
good assortment of Silk Socks and Gloves, and superior Silk
Pocket Handkerchiefs.
Mr. D. will sell stocks, warranted of the best materials and
of the latest fashion, wholesale or retail, at prices lower than
they can be had for any where in this city, or in the District 'of
Columbia. jan 3-4tif
Circuit Court of the District of Columbia, Washing.
ton County.-November Term, 1886.
Edward S. Bird,
vs.
James Greenleaf and Ann P. Greenleaf.
H ENRY NAYLOR, trustee, having reported to this Court
that,opursuant to the decree of this Court made-in this
cause, he hath sold all that part of a tract of land called For-
tune Enlarged," which is described and set forth in the pro-
ceedings had in said cause, and that James McCormick, Jr. was
the purchaser thereof, for the sum of four tbousandninety'five
dollars and ninety cents, and that the sid McCormick hath
complied with the terms of sale prescribed by the decree of this
Court: it is by this Court, this fohtf day of January, in the
year eighteen hundred and thirty-Aven, ordered, that tile tal
so made and reported, by the spid trustee, be ratified and ou-
firmed, unless cause to the 'catrary be shown to this Court, on
or before the first Mond -in February next: provided a -popy
of this order be publisbd in the National Intelligencer at least
twice a week for thrrd weeks, successively, before the sa4i first
Monday in February next.
Rv ordnr nofthC Court. Test:








COMMUNICATIONS.

PTO THE EDITORS.

Messrs. GAIEs & SEATON: In your paper of
this morning you express a wish that the truth
may be-ascertained, of an intimation; to which
it seems a' Boston paper has -given countenance,
that the Hobn. CHARLES J, HOLMES, one of the
Massachusetts Electors, held an office under
the United States, at the time of giving lis
vote, as Elector, for President and Vice Presi-
dent of the United States. Mr. HLMES is a
gentleman of great intelligence and respectabi-
lity, and nobody who kndows him would sup-
pose for a moment that he could be guilty of so
gross an incorrectness. Will you now please
to state that, in point of fact, Mr. HOLMES, who
had held the office of postmaster for the town
of Rochester, in the county of Plymouth, an
being nominated as an Elector, immediately re-
signed his office of postmaster; that another
person was appointed postmaster in his place
on the llth day of October; that Mr. HOLMES
was chosen an Elector on the 13th day of No-
vember, and gave his vote for President and
Vice President on the first Monday in Decem-
ber, according to the provision of the Consti-
tution.
MASSACHUSETTS.

ON AFFAIRS IN FLORIDA.

TALLAHASSEE, SEPT. 18, 1836.
Messrs. GALES & SEATON: Gentlemen: In your paper
of the 27th of August you did mte the favor to publish a
communication in relation to the ftate of the war in Flo-
rida. The reason which formed one of the considerations
with you for the admission of that article, viz. "the na-
tural sensibility felt by the writer for the honor of his
fellow-citizens of Florida, which he deems to have been
assailed," operates more cogently now with him to offer one
more piece for publication in your paper.
In the Intelligencer of the 31st of August there appeared
a well-written piece by a writer signing himself "Aris-
tides," which, besides reiterating the old charge against the
Florida volunteers for misconduct at the battle of the
Wythlacoochee, introduces a new matter of accusation
against the Territory, because of the failure of the contem-
plated summer camDaign. The sole design of this writer
seems to be to throw discredit and disgrace upon the popu-
lation of Florida. No other motive is discernible. Itap-
pears not to be designed to justify or vindicate any man or
party of men, except very remotely and by reaction, and so
far as the failure of a mere contemplated campaign can
furnish ex post facto" justification for the failure of a
former one actually undertaken.
But, let me ask, in the first place, who are the citizens of
Florida thus denounced-as recreant and degenerate from the
characteristic valor of their countrymen ? Very few of
them are native to the soil of Florida. In Middle Florida,
which contains more than half the population of the whole
Territory, there exists not one native citizen old enough to
bear arms. Whence are they derived From the States
of Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and the Carolinas, prin-
cipally. They are emigrants from these and other States,
who, from a spirit of adventure, have encountered the hard-
ships and perils of a new country; and strange, indeed,
would it be, andcageinst all experience, if such men pos-
sessed less enterprise andi couwge than the other citizens of
their native States. In point offatq, the citizens of Flo-
rida are men of the-same physical, intellect..l, and moral
qualities with those of the States whose soil nurture their
bodies, and gave them their temperaments, and whose in-
stitutions fashioned and formed their minds. They claim
no greater share of patriotism or valor than belongs to their
fellow-citizens of the other States, and they will not tamely
submit to the imputation of possessing less. This general
consideration alone should, with reflecting men, vindicate
them from the imputations which have been so unjustly
cast upon them; but I will proceed to give a more specific
answer to the charges of this writer.
It is not my purpose to discuss the-expedienoy of a surm-
mer campaign now that the summer season has passed away,
and as I have in my former piece stated some reasons in its
favor. But is it a fair subject of censure and ridicule, that the
Governor of Florida, when the lives of his fellow-citizens
were daily exposed by the cruel inroads of the savages,
should have sought, at the earliest possible period, to rally
a force for their defence But, whatever may have been
the merits or demerits of the scheme, its failure is not to be
ascribed to the citizens of Florida, nor to their Executive.
The extract from the proclamation of the Governor of
Florida, furnished by "Aristides," shows that its citizens
were merely invited to act as auxiliary to a large volunteer
force expected from Tennessee. Thesummer passed with-
out the appearance of any such force. The Tennessee
volunteers, for reasons which reflect no discredit upon them,
are only now (20th September) near Tallahassee.
But this writer charges that, in answer to the proclama-
tion of their Governor, but one single man in Middle Florida
volunteered for the summer campaign." Now, the point
of this charge turns upon the artifice or error of this writer,
in confounding the term for which the citizens of Florida
were, in the proclamation of the 18th June, called on to
volunteer, with that of the summer campaign." And yet
the services were very different. By the proclamation, the
citizens of Florida were invited to volunteer, not for a
summer campaign," but for the term of twelve months, un-
der a law of Congress authorizing the levying of 10,000
men for the defence of the Western frontier. This was a


very different engagement from that of a summer cam-
paign" But why is it a charge against the citizens of
Florida that they have not enrolled themselves under this
law 1 Have the citizens of other States, who have been
also appealed to, been more eager for this service ? So far
as we are yet informed, there is not one corps, one compa-
ny, one man, that has volunteered for twelve months; and
if there was one single man in Middle Florida" who did
volunteer for that term, he stood alone in the United States,
and Florida may claim the honor of the exception. The
sneering quotations, then, of this writer, and of his corres-
pondent, from Governor Call's proclamation, and the
changes rung, or the ordinary terms of incitement used in
such a paper, and on their failure to produce the desired ef-
fect, become mere verbiage and declamation, without mean-
ing, but for the malice or levity they indicate in their au-
thors.
It is not true, however, that but a single man in all
Middle Florida volunteered for the summer campaign."
Since May, when the danger of the country became appa-
rent, there have been constantly in the field hundreds
of volunteers from Middle, as well as from East and West
Florida, ready for any service. They have sallied forth
from their comfortable domicils," (to use the sportive term
of this very jocose writer,) with the fixed purpose "of
seeking their enemy," though.the delay of assistance from
other quarters did prevent them from seeking him "in his
stronghold." And there is not the least doubt that, if the
expected auxiliary force had arrived in the dog days," even
under their malign influence, there would have been other
volunteers to the full extent of the ability of the country to
furnish them.
Can it be knownto the writers who so cruelly and un-
justly abuse this peop that more than one-third of all the
people capable of bear a arms in Middle Florida have
been constantly carrying oh a summer campaign, traver-
sing hammocks, swamps, an abyrinths," more intricate
and impenetrable in themselves n those of the dreaded
Wythlacoochee ? That, besides t services of these men
engaged for a term of from four to si months, other por-
tions have been, during the whole period, ed out on emer-
gencies, from 10, 15 or 20 days, to defend dheir comfort-
able domicils" against the Creeks, as well a against the
Seminoles ? Comfortable domicils," indeed! hhen not
a man, from Tallahassee to the furthest East, coul v his
head on his pillow, without the fear of being roused b e
yells of the savage, of the Seminoles from the South a
East, or of the equally savage Creeks from the North and
West! When men were shot down in their fields, and
.1 1 ,1 i i .


In what miserable taste then, are all these sneering,
ironical epithets of brave Floridians," &c. &c., as applied
to these men! and how unbecoming the tone of levity which
pervades this piece, and id genus omne I"
And what is the provocation we have given to this wri-
ter, and to the army to which he manifestly belongs ? None
whatever. The service of the Army in Florida has not
been a thankless service," as this writer btates-P for here
they are respected and admired, and their valuable services
are acknowledged with gratitude by all. As to the epithet
of" rascally regulars," which Aristides uses as a quotation;
no man with whom I have conversed ever before heard of
it. If ever used in Florida, it was the inconsiderate re-
mark of some light-minded vulgar man. Aristides himself
disparages the Army by supposing it obnoxious to such
low abuse, and in deeming them worthy of notice. I aver
that, since thefirst battle of the Wythacoochee, I have
not conversed with a single individual who has not spoken
in the highest terms of praise of the Army generally, ex-
cepting only a few of its highest officers, against whom
they do urge well-grounded cause of complaint. And every
"affair" in which detachments of the regular Army have
since been engaged, (and in each of which they have been
successful,) they have exhibited even more than their cha-
racteristic valoi, and have increased those favorable senti-
ments.
It only remains that I attempt to answer the charge last
in order, but "the primal eldest" one in date, made by
"Aristides" against the citizens of Florida-their conduct
at the battle of the Wythlacoochee, in December, 1835.
After referring to the statement in General Clinch's offi-
cial report, that only three officers and twenty-seven men
of the volunteers joined the "regulars" in combat with the
Indians, this writer adds, "but he (Gen. Clinch) does not
,explain why the residue of the Florida volunteers remained,
as it would seem, mere spectators of the fight." Not ha-
ving the means of referring to Gen. Clinch's report, I do
not undertake, from recollection, to say how he explains a
matter so simple and susceptible of explanation, or whe-
ther he attempts to explain it at al, But I do undertake
to say, that no part of that report gives the least color to
the imputation'conveyed in the last clause of the above ci-
tation from "Aristides," that "the volunteers were mere
spectators of the fight." This is the language of "Aris-
tides," and not of Gen. Clinch.
Not having been with that expedition to the Wythlacoo-
chee, it may be rash in the writer of this piece to attempt
to answer the questions which Aristides" propounds, but
he has heard the affair so often described by unexception-
able eye-witnesses,kthathe deems a satisfactory answer most
easy.
The questions put by this writer are : Why did any of
the volunteers remain on the opposite bank of the river
out of the action ?" and "why did the main body, which
is said to have crossed over, not advance to engage the ene-
my ?" A simple and summary answer to these questions
would be in the following terms, and would be justified by
the facts of the case :
The volunteers were on the opposite side of the river
when the action began, and they did not there remain one
moment after it was possible to cross, and after they re-
ceived orders or permission to cross; and
The main body which is said to have-crossed," (and
which did cross over,) did advance to engage the enemy so
soon as they had crossed.
These assertions can be proved beyond doubt, and I
venture to assert, that no one who witnessed the affair will
gainsay them, and they contain a full vindication of the
Florida volunteers. But a more detailed explanation of
this affair is proper, as much for the justification of the of-
ficers in command, as of the men.
When this army marched to the Wythlacoochee, the In-
dians had afforded to their troops no demonstration of a de-
termination to fight a battle. At that time, the fatal affair
of the lamented Dade was unknown, and the universal im-
pression was, that the resistance of the Indians would be
merely passive. No man expected an attack from them;
or even a pitched battle. This explanation is wanted to
account for the want of caution in the subsequent advance.
On arriving at the river, a deep and rapid stream, the only
means of transportation was a canoe, capable of conveying
eight men at a freight. The regulars (infantry) were pass-
ed over, and they, without waiting for the mounted volun-
teers to make good their passage, marched in advance from
300 to 400 yards, piled their arms, and reposed themselves
on the ground. In this state of fancied security they re-
mained until the attack was made.
In the mean time, the volunteers, most of them entirely
inexperienced in this species of service, had to swim their
horses over, or wait until a bridge could be built. The
day was cold, and it was found exceedingly difficult to
make the horses take to the water, and impossible for their
riders to swim them over without wetting their arms and
ammunition. Trees were being cut and floated to form a
foot bridge by which the men could take their arms over,
leading their horses; and the boat soon after the regulars
crossed was employed in towing the logs to their position.
In this state of things, after a few of the men had with
great difficulty and peril swam their horses over, but were
separated from their arms and clothes, while others were
engaged in constructing the bridge, and only the gallant
27," who had the good fortune to have the use of the boat
after the regulars, and before it was directed to the con-
struction of the bridge, were in condition to join'in the
fight, the attack was made.
And let it be borne in mind that the attack was simul-
taneously made, on the volunteers on this side, and on the
regulars on the opposite side of the river. The first, it is
true, was a feint, but it served the purpose of embarrassing
and delaying the passage of the river. The fight continued
just one hour, and in that time the main body of the vol-
unteers" repelled the attack on them, built the bridge, cross-
ed over at imminent peril, and joined the regulars at the
close of the fight. It is undeniable that the main body of
the volunteers were eager to cross, and did cross, as soon
as they possibly could, and would readily have advanced to
another fight, had the commanding General deemed it ad-
visable to order it.
This is believed to be a strictly true account of the first
affair of the Wythlacoochee, and it must serve to retrieve
the Florida volunteers, as a body, from any imputation of
misconduct or want of courage. It is not my purpose to
give any detail of this fight, when it is admitted that the


twenty-seven volunteers and the three officers fought brave-
ly. But it may be proper to remark that Colonel Warren,
and not Colonel Warner, is the officer meant by Aristi-
des," and that, besides the officers named, Colonel Park-
hill, M~ rr (now General) Read, and Majors Gamble and
Wellford, were also present; and that some of these last
attracted the special commendation of the regulars them-
selves on this occasion.
I shall now, Messrs. Editors, take leave of this subject,
to which I should have been invited by an abstract love of
truth, even if I had not felt impelled to do justice to a
much abused and suffering People.
DECEMBER 17, 1836.
The foregoing remarks were written at the time they
bear d ae, but,owing to engagements which called the wn-
ter suddenly from his home, they could not be transmitted
before this for publication. Permit him to indulge the
hope that you will not deem them yet out of season; that
at this time, most especially when the claims of his much
injured and suffering fellow-citizens to pecuniary redress
from their Government for their unmerited losses have been
so forcibly urged upon Congress by the Chief Magistrate
of the nation, an attempt to disabuse the Public,in relation
to the moral wrongs they have endured, may meet with
countenance and support. And, as illustrating and con-
firming the views he has advanced, he is now enabled to
refer to the events of the last campaign, to place the char-
acter of the Florida militia upon the same elevated ground
with those of their brave auxiliaries. He can appeal with con-
fidence to every officer and man of every corps engaged in
the late affairs of Florida, to bear witness that where all
behaved well, no troops in the Army exhibited more cour-
age, or endured with more patience the sufferings of the
service, than did the volunteers and militia of this Territo-
ry. The same recent events afford' a striking practical
commentary on the disputed question of a summer cam-
paign.
A force of about 1,200 volunteers march through the
country about the middle of September, the most sickly
and oppressive season of the year, and, except from the
measles, which accompanied them from their homes, they
suffer but little from disease. In fact, they enjoy a greater
degree of health than any similar army have ever experi-
enced in any country. Their advance at once relieves a
rich, extensive, and most exposed country from the pre-
sence and pressure of the savage foe, whose previous de-
vastations were spreading ruin and dismay throughout the
SJand. Thewhole armyengaged in active operations'suf-
ked less from disease than did one of the small detach-
1 --- - -Th.T -


TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1S37.

SIN SENATE.
The CHAIR presented the letter of resignation of Hon.
ALEXANDER PORTER, Senator from Louisiana; which was
read.
Mr. SEVIER presented two memorials from the Legis-
lature of Arkansas; one of which asked an extension of
the national road to that Territory. Referred.
Mr. FULTON presented from the Legislature of Ar-
kansas instructions to her Senators in Congress to vote for
Mr. BENTON'S expunging resolution. Read, laid on the
table, and ordered to be printed.
SMr. PRENTISS presented the petition of Cephas Car-
penter, praying for a pension ; which was referred to the
Committee on Pensions. '
Other petitions and memorials were presented by Messrs.
KENT, ROBINSON, LINN, TALLMADGE, SOU-
THARD, and HUBBARD, and referred.
On motion of Mr. PRENTISS, the Committee on Pen-
sions was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of William Davis, for arrearages of pension.
On motion of Mr. WRIGHT, the Committee on Fi-
nance was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of sundry umbrella makers in Philadelphia; and
the petition was laid on the table.
Mr. DAVIS, from the Committee on Commerce, report-
ed a bill for the relief of Thomas H. Perkins and others;
which was read, ordered to a second reading, and the do-
cuments were ordered to be printed.
Mr. KING, of Alabama, from the Committee on Com-
merce, reported a bill making appropriations for custom-
houses at Philadelphia and New Orleans. Read, and or-
dered to a second reading.
The following resolution were offered, and, by rule, lie
over one day:
By Mr. RUGGLES:
Resolved, That the Secretary of War be requested to
communicate to the Senate copies of the surveys, estimates,
and maps of Owlshead harbor and Cabscook bay, taken
pursuant to a resolution of the Senate at its last session.
By Mr. HENDRICKS:
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of establishing a
port of entry or delivery at Fort Wayne.
By Mr. RIVES:
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of increasing the
salary of the District Judge for the eastern district of Vir-
ginia.
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of making addi-
tional provision by law fod the compensation of the clerks
of the Federal Courts held at Richmond and Norfolk, in
the State of Virginia.
The following were offered and adopted by unanimous
consent:
By Mr. NICHOLAS :
Resolved, That the Committee on Private Land Claims
be instructed to inquire into the propriety of confirming
the report of the Register and Receiver of the Land Office
at St. Stephen's, in the State of Alabama, acting as com-
missioners under the authority of the third section of an
act of Congress, passed the 2d of March, 1829, recom-
mending for confirmation the title of Andrew Demetry to
lands on the bay of St. Louis, which report was made on
the 16th of February, 1834.
By Mr. KING, of Alabama:
Resolved, That the Coim'ittee on Finance be instruct-
ed to inquire into the propriety of authotising the Secretary
of the Treasury to pay equitable commissions to the attor-
neys of persons the sums awarded to whom, under the
treaty with France, were taken by debts due by them to
the United States.
The CHAIR presented a comlnunication from the Navy
Department, with statements in relation to clerks employ-
ed in that Department.
Also, a communication from the same Department, with
a copy of a letter from the Navy Commissioners, relating
to an examination of the *aters of Narragansett Bay, in
accordance with a resolution of the Senate at the last ses-
sion.
MICHIGAN.
The engrossed bill to admit Michigan into the Union
having been read a third time, and the question pending
being upon its passage,
Mr. CALHOUN spoke in opposition to the bill, charac-
terizing it as eminently irregular in its principles, and revo-
lutionary in its tendency.
Mr. STRANGE replied, chiefly in vindication of his
own opinions in relation to this bill, and of the Baltimore
Convention.
Messrs. BUCHANAN, DAVIS, and KING, of Geo.
also spoke on the subject of the bill.
The bill passed by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS--Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Dana,
Fulton, Grundy, Hendricks, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
.King, of Georgia, Linn, Nicholas, Niles, Page, Parker,
Rives, Robinson, Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge. Tipton,
Walker, Wall, White, Wright-25.
NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Calhoun, Clay, Crittenden,
Davis, Kent, Moore, Prentiss, Southard, Swift.-10.
The Senate then adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
Mr. WHITTLESEY, from the Committee of Claims,
made an unfavorable report upon the petition of John S.
Horner and Elisha Ives.
Mr. HARPER, from the select committee on the Patent
Office, made an unfavorable report upon the petition of
Daniel Pease, jr.
Mr. HOAR, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions,
made unfavorable reports upon the petitions of Joseph M.
Rhea, James Bean, and Samuel Crapon.
Mr. HARRISON, of Pennsylvania, from the same


committee, made unfavorable reports upon the petitions of
James Allen and Moses Smith.
Mr. ANDERSON made an unfavorable report upon
the petition of the heirs of Reuben Chapman.
Which several reports were ordered to lie upon the table.
Mr. S. WILLIAMS, from the Committee on Invalid
Pensions, made a report upon-the petition of Freling Pratt,
accompanied by a bi for his benefit; which said bill was
committed to a Committee of the Whole.
SThe SPEAKER laid before the House a letter from the
Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of the
causes which have prevented the execution of the ninth ar-
ticle of the treaty of 1819, with Spain, and the two acts of
Congress passed in relation thereto, furnished in com-
pliance with the order of this House of the 26th of De-
cember; which letter was referred to the Committee on
Foreign Afflirs.
The SPEAKER laid before the House a letter from the
Secretary of the Navy, transmitting a list of the names of
the persons employed as clerks in the Navy Department
during the year 1836, with the compensation of each. Laid
on the table.
Mr. HALL, of Maine, moved that the Committee on
Enrolled Bills be now appointed. Agreed to.
Mr. A. MANN gave notice that he would to-morrow
move to take up the report of the select committee of the
last session on the rules and orders of the House.
Mr. TOUCEY gave notice that when the House next
resolved itselt'nto Committee of the Whole on the state of
the Union, he would ask leave to take up the bill No. 297,ex-
tending the provisions of the law adopted in the case of the
State of Massachusetts, for adjusting her militia claims
during the last war, to similar claims of the State of Con-
necticut.
THE PUBLIC LANDS.
The House resumed the consideration of the following
resolution, offered on yesterday by Mr. CHILTON ALLAN:
Beit resolved, That a select committee of one member from
each State be appointed, whose duty it shall be to inquire into the
justice and expediency of making to each of the thirteen origi-
nal American States, together with each of the States of Ver-
mont, Maine, Kentucky, and Tennessee, such grants of the pub-
lic lands, for the purposes of education, as will correspond in a
just proportion with those heretofore made in favor of the first-
named' States and Territories, and that said committee have leave
to report by bill or otherwise. But, to avoid the objrction of
one State holding land in another, the committee is directed to
insert a clause in the bill which they may report, providing
that the grants to be made thereby shall be subject to sale un-
der the laws of the General Government now in force, and that


By Mr. CLAIBORNE, of Mississippi, to amend. the
amendment by adding thereto the following:.
And provided that no such grant shall interfere with or be
located on the claim or improvement of any actual settler on' the
public lands.
Mr. HARRISON, of Mo., addressed' the House at
length in opposition to the resolution, and with a view to
show that the preamble was entirely erroneous in the as-
sumption which it contained, that the grants to the new
States were gratuities for which no consideration had been
received. He denied the position; and maintained that
the'States accepted the land, not as a gratuity, but under
a compact entered into under the ordinance of 1787, by
which compact the new States, in consideration of the
grants, had surrendered one of the greatest attributes of
sovereignty-the right to tax the public domain within
their limits.
Mr. HANNEGAN was of opinion no practical good
was to be obtained by the continuance of the discussion,
and moved to lay the whole subject on the table.
Mr. C. ALLAN called for the yeas and nays on that
motion, which were ordered; and, being taken, were-
Yeas 95, nays 99. So the motion to lay the subject on the
table was rejected.
On motion of Mr. GARLAND, of Virginia, the House
proceeded to the Orders of the Day.
EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATION.
The House resumed the consideration of the resolution
heretofore offered by Mr. WISE, together with the pending
amendment of Mr. D. J. PEARCE, providing for the appoint-
ment of a select committee to inquire into the administra-
tion of the Executive Departments.
Mr. ROBERTSON concluded his remarks, and the
House was addressed by Messrs. HANNEGAN and HA-
MER.
Mr. H. had not concluded, when he gave way to a mo-
tion for adjournment; and, on motion of Mr. ANTHO-
NY, the House adjourned.

WASHINGTON.


it Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and
inseparable.99
FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1837.

PROPOSED HOSPITAL AT WASHINGTON.

The measure proposed in the subjoined bill is
one which must commend itself as well to the
judgment as to the feelings of the gentlemen who
compose the two Houses of Congress. Sole Le-
gislator for this District, Congress is the only
authority competent to accomplish a purpose,
.the necessity of which must be admitted by all
who have examined, even ever so little, into the
subject. But the claim of Humanity is still
stronger upon Congress, in its federative cha-
racter as Governor of the whole country, than in
its local capacity. From every quarter of the
country; from the remotest bounds of civiliza-
tion, and from all the intermediate circles of so-
ciety of which Washington is the centre, indi.
viduals are drawn to this city, in pursuit of rights,
real or supposed, whose worldly means are too
often exhausted before they arrive here or before
they get away, and who become objects of cha-
rity, or victims to' want and suffering, which,
through ignorance of it, and the want of ~uch an
Institution as a public Hospital, charity itself is
not able to relieve. The relief of such objects,
besides, it needs no argument to show, ought
not to continue tq depend on individual benevo-
lence. The Government, which attracts such a
population to this city, ought to protect the
poor, the needy, and the unfortunate, as well
as reward the bold, the ingenious, the perse-
vering-ay, and the obtrusive applicants for
its favor. The worn-down projector, who finds,
after a travel of a thousand miles, that his che-
risbecd '&diSCO^b -h ae bon p* th -ar vu
ago as before he was born; the hapless mo-
ther or widow who seeks in, vain from Gov-
ernment a support which her son or husband, in
the public service, once afforded her; the revo-


lutionary veteran, whose


living evidences of


youthful service have descended to the grave be-
fore him; the less unhappy subject of some
mental delusion which impels him to seek fame
or fortune through strange eccentric paths-
these, and all the varieties of distress with which
a resident of the metropolis, in course of time,
becomes acquainted, are entitled to the regards
of Congress, and not the less so because it is
impossible that, either as a class or as individuals,
they can ever plead their own cause before that
tribunal. We rejoice that there have been found
those who are willing and able to do it for them.
We rejoice that there has been found a commit-
tee cf Congress, with one of the most experienc-
ed and faithful members at its head, that has
listened to the plea in behalf of the unfortunate,
and has sustained it, as far as it can, by report-
ing the bill to which we have now the pleasure
of directing the attention of our readers.

IN SENATE, JANUARY 4, 1837.
MR. KENT, from the Committee for the District
of Columbia, reported the following bill;
which was read, and passed to a second read-
ing:
A BILL to authorize the erection of an hospital in the
city of Washington, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted, Buildings be, and he is hereby, authorized and required,
under the direction of the Proeident of th.-Tnitod-States,
and upon a plan and site to be by him approved, to erect a
building in the city of Washington, suitable for an hospi-
tal, for the reception and accommodation of the insane of
the District of Columbia, and of such sick, disabled, and
infirm seamen, soldiers, and others, as may, by competent
authority, to be hereafter prescribed, be deemed proper to
be received therein.
SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That, on the comple-
tion of the said building, the President be authorized to
appoint three respectable persons, residents of the city of
Washington, to be a board of inspectors of the said insti-
tution, who shall hold their offices two years from the date
of their appointment; and whose duty it shall be to have
a general supervision of the concerns of the said hospital;
to appoint the necessary subordinate officers thereof; to
prescribe rules for the admission and due regulation of pa-
tients therein, and to make an annual report to Congress of
their proceedings, and of the condition of the said institu-
tion.


At this moment, when a surplus of money has
been declared to be in the Treasury, to an amount,
-singularly contrasting with the predictions of
the opponents of the Distribution Bill, and far
exceeding the most sanguine anticipations of its
friends, the Letter of Judge CLAYTON, of Geor-
gia, which we have copied into the preceding
page, will be found to be of considerable inter-
est. He is not only not opposed to further dis-
tribution, if there be further accumulation of
revenue beyond the amount required for the
necessary purposes of Goveinment, but he is of
opinion that the States have a legal title to all
the proceeds of the sales of public lands in the
territory Northwest of the Ohio, and could re-
cover them from the United States if there were
any Court in which such a case could be impar-
tially tried.

It is a subject of regret that, at this interest-
ing period of the session, Mr. Senator EWING,
of Ohio, should be obliged to absent himself (for
a week or two, at least,) from his seat in the
Senate. Afflictive intelligence from home hav-
ing reached him, he immediately left this city,
for his residence i.a Ohio, on Wednesday
evening.

THE MAILS.-No newspaper has been received in
this city from the city of New York of a later date than
Sunday last, except only the New York Courier and En-
quirer of Monday'morning. Where all the rest of the
papers of Monday, and where all the papers of Tues.
day, due at this office yesterday morning, are, we cannot
pretend to say. The Philadelphia papers are all up to time.

The Little Rock (Ark.)-Advocate of the 16th
ult. states that Col. Wi:. WHITsoN was killed on
the 5th in an affray, which took place in Craw-
ford county.
The same paper states that the U. S. troops
at Camp Sabine have been ordered by-Gen. AR-
BUCKLE to abandon that station and return to
our Western frontier.

0~(i We copy the following from the Balti-
more papers, as well in justice to Captain SUT-
TON, who has earned such testimony to his good
conduct, as because it establishes the where-
abouts of a number of distinguished and respect-
ed citizens of different parts of our common
country :
Meeting of the passengers on board of the steam-
boat Pocahontas, Jan. 3, 1837.
On motion, General EDMUND P. GAINES, of the United
States Army, was called to the chair, and, at the sugges-
tion of Captain ALDEN PARTRIDGE, of Vermont, General
GEORGE C. DROMOOOLE, of the House of Representatives,
and Mr. JOH-N H. WHEELER, of North Carolina, were ap-
pointed a committee to express the grateful acknowledg-
ments of the passengers to-Captain SUTTON, of the steam-
boat Pocahontas, for his gentlemanly and accommodating
conduct in her late perilous trig from Norfolk to Baltimore;
and although impeded by the ice from reaching Baltimore,
yet he left no effort untried to effect this object, and did
every thing that laid in his power to make us comfortable
at this inclement season.


A. Partridge,
Geo. C. Dromgoole, of Va.
J. H. Wheeler, of N. C.
T. Brown,
T. Freeman Spear,
Wm. Bartlett, jr. of Boston,
Harvey Shaw, of Baltimore,
D. D. Hammond, Mass.
Charles Shelton,
Charles G. Ketchum,
VTreCcic w*ntnl
D. 0. Fanning,
Bernjamin iMeec, Oto,)
William Paton, New York,
M. E. Carrere,
Jno. Fulton,
James Jordan,
S. A. Plummer,
S. C. West, of S. C.
Edward Morris,
O. M. Pelham,


IUND P. GAINES, Chairman.
Henry Gage,
Edw. Jenkins, U. S. N.
A. S. Baldwin, do
Dr. A. G. Gambrill, do
Fred. H. Dalton,
Juaquin Maury,
L. ude,
Jesse Gibbens,
W. H. H. rall, N. Y.
George Webb,
-4 Rauchein, S. C.
W. W. Haffington,
Fred. Niblo, N. Y.
Jno. M. English,
John Richardson, Va.
Benj. B. Allen, Va.
C. T. Hun, N. Y.
Edmund P. Gaines,jr.
John Test.


The Maysville (Kentucky) Monitor of the 29th
December has the following paragraph :
REPORTED STEAMBOAT DISASTER.-It was reported here
last week by boats from above, that the entire cabin of the
steamboat Mariner, on her way up, was blown off during a
gale that prevailed on Monday or Tuesday night, and that
twenty or thirty passengers had been aroused from. their
quiel slumbers tofind their death-pillows beneath the ruthless
wave! The appearance, a few days after this report, of
large pieces of wreck floating down with the ice, was cal-
culated to confirm the most melancholy intelligence.
NEW ORLEANS, DEC. 29, 1836.
We have noticed with great pleasure the acts of courte-
sy and hospitality extended by our citizens to the officers
of the FRENCH brig GAZELLE, now lying in our port.
Her arrival among'us was received with marked demon-
strations of pleasure, and the interchange of civilities which
from time to time has taken place among her office's and
the citizens cannot fail of producing the most happy re-
sults.
A sumptuous dinner was given them on Tuesday last,
at Davis's Rooms, on Orleans street, attended by a large
and respectable portion of citizens, who, mingling in the
full flow of generous feeling excited by the occasion, gave
a most cordial greeting to their respected guests. Among
the number of invited guests we recognized the French
Consul, Commandant ROUSSEAU, Gen. PLAUCHE, the Sec-
retary of State, and others. The company retired from the
table at an early hour, after drinking many patriotic toasts,
and in the course of the evening visited the different thea-
tres, French and American, which were thrown open by
their courteous and liberal proprietors.-Bulletin.
The SELECT COMMITTEE, on the resolution for an inqui-
ry whether the deposit banks have employed an agent at
the seat of the General Government to transact their busi-
ness with the Treasury Department, &c. consists of Messrs.
txaLAND, PI1KCE, ofITew IIampsihre, FrAIRFIELD, VVl,-
GILLETT, JOIfNSON, of Louisiana, HAMER, MARTIN, and
PEYTON.
A STRONG CLAIM.-At the last quarterly meeting of the
Exeter (Eng.) Humane Society a man claimed a reward
for saving the life of his wife from drowning!'
DICKINSON COLLEGE.-A paragraph is going the rounds
of the papers, stating that Dickinson College, at Carlisle,
Pa. has been reduced to ashes. This is altogether incor-
rect. The fire which occurred on the premises last week,
originated in, and was confined entirely to a detached build-
ing, occupied as a preparatory school No part of the Col-
lege proper was injured in the slightest degree, and no great
inconvenience will result from the conflagration, as immedi-
ate provision was made by the faculty for the accommoda-
tion of the grammar pupils. The building destroyed was
insured..
, The Louisville Journal mentions the death of M ED-
MUND S. ARMSTRONG, (printer) under the followg circum-
stances :
"He was in the act of throwing a hb etn ver the guards of
the steamboat 'Gen. Gaines,' wh, te shock of the current
_.A ..- ..I:-..: ... A ,. 1,.A. united, threw him off his a-


MARYLAND LEGISLATURE.

ANNAP'DLIS, AN. 1l37.
At 12 o'clock to-day, the Legislature, by joint
ballot, elected the Executive Council. All the
members of the late Council Were rereelected,
viz. GWYNN HARRIS, W .F. JOHNSON, JbOHI
MCKENNY, N. F. WiiXA4iA W ,. L. JOis. ..
The Senate to-day elected ROBERT M. TID.
BALL, Esq. of Washington county, and Jos iP
S COTTMArN', Esq. of Somerset cou y, Seni-
tora, in the place of W PaRce anid ToaA T s
KINO CAREOLL, Esqs.
The bill reported by Mr. 11sow br o taking
the sense of the Peoe of Balti~ se.county on
the propriety of separaing the county from thc-
city, was read a second time, and ordered ti be.
engrossed for a third reading.
The bills to increase the delegation from Bal-
timore city, and to require the consent of twao-
thirds of Ach branch of the Legisature "tp an-
nul a marriage contract, were severally pssed
and sent to the House,

REDERICKSE BRf, JANUARY 4.
A very destructive fire occurred in Charlestown," Kana-
wha county, (Va.) on Friday morning, the 23d :ult. Six
of the finest houses in the centre of the town, including
Wilson's extensive, tavern setablishmint, ad nearly all
their furniture, &c. were consumed, besides two other
houses blown up to arrest the, progress of the fame.. Thi:
loss is estimated at about $W2,000-onlv $1,000 of.whier
wasinsured. At one period the whole town was in rea
danger, and several other houses were repeatedly eA fegi
This is said to be the most destructive fire that lyf a vfr
occurred in Charlestown.
A Phenomenon at Fort Wayne.-The citizens of Port
Wayne (Ih.) were considerably'gratified the other day by.
the arrival of the steamer Phenomenon, from the head '
the Maumee rapids, Ohio. his is the first arrival pfl
steamboat at the above place, and the Afrst experiment al.
to the practicabiity of navigating this stream to this point.
Asit has proved successful, it is supposed a new era in the
prosperity of Fort Wayne maybe dated from this period.-
-Cincinnati Gaz.
RAILROAD ACCIDENT.-A boy by the naam of Max- /
well, says the Wilmington Delawarean, was crushed to
death by a railroad car, on Saturday last, in the lower,;
part of that city. Ele, with other boy, had acended i .
sides for the purpose of riding, when he slipped hip hold,
and was almost instantly killed by the wheels passing over
his body; This is the cause of many of the fatal ac i-
dents which take place at the stopping and starting please
on railroads. The boards at the.sides of raid earL
should, in every case, be dispensed with, and- the great
source of danger would be removed. /

NATIONAL THAT R--WASH NGTON. -
Acting and Stage Manager, Mr. WARD.
BENEFIT OF Mn. OXLEY -.'
And positively his last appearance this sea eit-O.
The Public are respectfully referred to ihe tm.a ntionwd-L'
list of characters, as this night's entertainmepl embraces tt s
entire talent of the company, and the manageprespecifully, bin
confidently, asserts that the cast of both t)gedy and farce aran.
not be excelled in any city of the Unitetates.
THIS EVENINGS JAN. 6, '
Will be presented ShakPeare's Tragedy of
HAMLET,
Prince .f Denmark.
Hamlet, Prince of ienmark, Mr. OXLEY.
Claudius, King f Denmark, Mr. Rogers.
Horia, Mr. Cline.
Laertes, Mr. Harringtow.
The Ghost of Hamlet's father, Mr. Ward..
Pelonius, Mr. Jones.
Osrick, Mr. Hautonvi. ..
First Gravedigger, Mr. Cowell.
Second Gravedigger, i r.
Player King, Mr. J. H. .
Second Player, Mr. May
Rosencrantz,. Mr. Grn.'r,
Guildenstern, Mr. Po~as
Marsellus, Mr. Bart.
Bernardo, Mr. Cadwepl '
Francisco, Mr. Howwr.
Priest, Mr. lelIy.
SPage, -. Miss Slater.
Lord, Mr. Gill
Gertrude, Queen of Denmark, Mrs. Hughes.
Ophelia Mrs. Knight.
Player Queen, Mrs. Slater.
Ladies, Mrs. Johnson, Miss Dudley, and Miss:Cross.
--i------i--a- -.it .r act''4this season) the admired
HAPPIEST DLi
Mr. Gilman, -- -F I
"- C owell.
Mr. Dudy, -
Frederick, Mr. Ca r .
Charles, Mr..Har~inh, -
Mr. Jones, Mr. HowariSi.^
John, Mr. Barry. -
Thomas, Mr. Kelly..
Gentlemen, Messrs. Newton and Caldwell.-
Mrs. Dudly, Mrs..Joese.
Sophia, Mrs. Rogers.
Mary, Mrs.-Cross.
Mrs. Grimsley, Mrs. Slater "
Miss Stokes, Miss Cross. -
Mrs. Taylor, liss Dudley.
Miss Jones, Mrs Joha.on.
The National and Patriotic Drama of the 8TH OF JANUA.-
RY, written by G. W. P: CUSTIS, Esq. author of" Pocahonta -
&c. will be produced on to-morrow evening, with new music,
scenery, and machinery.
N OTICE.-The subscribers totle'Civic and Military 'al,
.' .for the 9th inst. are informed thatthe tickets are ready
for delivery, and can be had at W. Kirkwood*s, or Barnard &


Raymond's, Washington, and at J. Thomas's Bookstore, eeorge-
town. There will be a few tickets for sale at the above places,
but as the number is limited, persons desirous of attending had
better secure their tickets. No tickets will be: issued-at thf.
door.
jI' Military officers and members of the different corps ae,
requested to appear at the ball in full uniform. Jan 2--3t
SECOND COTILLION PARTY--8 h of Jam-:
ary Victory-Celebration of the Bttle of NW
Orleans.--Mr. L. CARUSI respectfully inffirs.his frimdr, /
Members of Congress, strangers, and,.the c izens, of- tb city-:
and District, that his second Cotillion Party.-vill take plaej o,
the 9th of January, at his Grand Saloon, Ir Which 'iey are r#
spectfully invited. The Saloon and other department. arei
perly and tastefully fitted up, and every comfort aId ponven-
ence provided.
1:Nr Ladies who have not received their cards ofinvitatio p
will please send in their address to Mr. L. Carus,
Tickets of admission $1, t. be had at Mr. Fischer's, and at
the door of the Saloon.
jan 3-
BY EDWARD DYER.-Stock of rocer
I Auction.-On Friday, the. 6th, instant,at 10o i.
M., I shall sell, without reserve,, at the Grocery e' of p.
Sengstack, corner of Twelfth street and P vania Avenue,
his entire stock, consisting of
-ionar, ump, ana crowr ugars
Young Hyson, Impesiat, and Gunpowder rTea.
Coffee, Rice, Spices, Chocolate
Segars, Tobacco, coarse Shoes,.&c. &c_
Old and choice Liquors, in bottles and-on draught; as-
Champagne Brandy, Holland&Gin, Jamaica.Spirit.,
Old Rye Whiskey, Cherry Bounce
Lisbon, Port, and Teneriffe Wines
Superior Peach Brandy, nine years-ol& f :- "
Grocers and Tavernkeepers will find the sae, ,'. of at-
tention, as every article will be sold withj~w r.er'e
ALsO---- .
60 Hams, TeaCanistera. Shop Fixture.
Lamp Oil, &'c.
On the same Oil, ll be offered the very excellent and welt
finished tvwo-.aory tame House occupied by Mr. Sengstack-
one of the b't^finished dwelling-houseids-this city.
one of the b- B E%,
RDW'. DYF-/tr"
,., 4-3t Anuotioneer.
BY EDWARD DYER.--Handsome Bay Ponies,
Barouche, and Harness.--On Firiday Afternoon,
6th instant, at 4 o'clock,, I shall sell, in.front of Browans Hotel,
without reserve-
A pair of very-handsome Bay Ponibs, young and active, with
a handsome brass-mounted double Barouche and Harness.
Also, an excellent gray saddle and harness Horse,.the owner
having no use for him. He is sold for no.faultU.. .. -


I








American Life Insurance and Trust Company.
OFFICEs-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and Wall
street. New York.
AGENcY--Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite Fuller's Hotel, and
tw6 doors from the Buildings occupied by the Treasury Depart-
meinlt Washington city,
CAPITAL PAID IN $2;000,000.
PATRICK MACAULAY, President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBINSON, Vice President, New York.
M ONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
be allowed, payable semi-annually. The Company also
insures live i grants annuities, sells endowments, and executes
t rusts .
Of the rates of insurance qf $00 on a single life.
ANNUAL PREMIUM.
*g year. 7-yars.' For life. Age. 1 year. 7 years. For life.
.. 86 1 53 38 1 48 1 70 3 05
5 '7 88 1 56 39 1 57 1 76 3 11
167 84 90 1 62 40- 169 1 83 3 20
17 86 91 1 65 41 1 78 1 88 3 31
"18 89 92 1 69 42 1 85 1 89 3 40
19' 90 94 1 73 43 1 89 1 92 3 51
20- ,91 95 1 77 44 1 90 1 94 3 63
.; 9 97 1 82 45 1 91 14i 3 73
22 94 99 1 88 4 46 1 92 1 98 3 87
23 97 1 03 1 93 47 1 93 1 99 4 01
24 99 1 07 1 98 48 1 94 2 02 4 17
25 1 00 1 12 2 04 49 1 95 2 04 4 49
6 1 07 1 17 2 11 50 1 96 2 09 4 60
7 ""12 L 23 2 17 51 1 97 2 20 4 75
8. 'I 20 1i28 2 24 52 2 02 2 37 4 90
;9 1 28 35 2 '31 53 2 10 2 59 5 24
3'ti 1 3 2 2 36, 54 2-18 2 89 5 49
31: I' 32 '42 2 43 55 2 32 3 21 5 78
3' '1 3- 1 46 2 50 56 2 47 3 56 6 05
M3 1 34 1 48 2 57 57 2 70 4 20 6 27
4& 1 35 1 50 2 64 58 3 14 4 31 6 50
3C,- 1 8 1 53 2 75 59 367 4 63 6 75
36 1 39 1 57 281 60 4 35 4 91 7 00
837 1 43 1 63 2 90

Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
MACAULAY, Esq., President, .Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
BINSON, Esq., Vice President, New York; to which imme-
diate attention will be paid.
Applications may also be made personally, or by letter, post
pdid, to FRANCIS A. DICKINS, Agent for the Company in the
Ctty of WASIrNGTON. His office is on Pennvslvania Avenue,
'op diPeFuller's Hotel, anl two doors from the buildings occu-
'pi;by the~Tfeaasry Department. oct 16-26-dly
.lIjE'.AMERICAN ALMANAC and Repository
oL fyf-C eful Knowledge, for 1837, is just received
for Palo by F. TAYLOR, price one dollar.
This'work, for 1837, contains the usual amount of Commer-
i1ial, Histdrical, Political, Statistical, Astronomical, Meteorologi-
cal, Scienlific, and Miscellaneous, and useful information, which
has given the work for former years its great celebrity. Those
who are unacqualnted'with its plan and contents, which cannot
l'e detailed in an advertisement, are invited to call and examine
it, at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately east of
Ga.dsby's Hotel. The-work is upon -the same plan with the
celebrated British Almanac, issued by Lord Brougham's "So-
ciety for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge." A few complete
sets, from the commencement, and back numbers for completing
sets, can be supplied, the first number having been lately re-
printedfor-this purpose.
.The work can be sent by mail at a trifling periodical postage
to aity part of the United States. dec 14
ORPHANS' COTRT OF PRINCE GEORGE'S CoUNTY.
NovErBER 14, 1836.
CO"desL by the Court that the final account of William
DI. Bowitnd John Contee, Executors of William Bowie,
of"Waiter, decee -sd, presented to this Court for passage, be
Sand the same is here passed, unless objections to said final ac-
count, or to oine :dthefrccount passed by the said executors, be
made to this Cburt on or'4fore the second Tuesday in January
next: Provided a copy of thia order be inserted in the National
Intelligence, and another set up at the Court House door, with-
in ten days from this date.
Test, P. CHEW, Register.
nov 23-w6w
fS i ot lerset County Court-In Chancery-Bill, &c.
Gertrude Killum,
Vs.
John Pollitt and Mary Jane Pollitt, infant children Charlotte
Pollitt.
PIt1E bill filedin this cause in substance states that-Char-
lotte Pollitt, the mother of the defendants, on the eight-
eenth day' of March, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, was
seized in fee simple of certain real estate, situated in Somerset
county, Maryland, known by the following names, viz. Kil-
lum's Lot," "Wilson's Trouble," "Discovery," and "Acworth's
PFgIy, or what other names the same may be called, contain-
':ing one hundred and fifty acres of land, more or less; and on the
tiame day and year aforesaid, she, the said Charlotte, bargained
and sold thesame to the complainant for the surr of two hundred
and twenty-five dollars, which sum of money the complainant
paidthe said Charlotte as the price agreed on for the same; in
considerationn of which payment, the said Charlotte contracted
arid agreed to6 convey to the complainant, in feq simple, the
same real estate; ,that the said Charlotte hath departed this life
'without ever executing said conveyance, leaving the defendants,
her infant children and only heirs at law, which saiddeSrn .-
r&ided utoI th$ State ofMu., i .- .- "c in
parol, and that the said defeAr s, intending to defraud the
.aid: complainant ofher-',f tos'd real estate, refuse to exe-
cute said convevane; n""d that the said Charlotte departed this
'life intent a "~~f i consequence ofthe minority of the defend-
ants, and t eir fraudulent coriduct, the complainant is without re-
medy. .*cept by'the interposition of a Court of Chancery.
'me njeet of the bill filed in this cause is, that the said de-
fendantl ay be compelled by a decree of this Court to make a
specific performance of said contract, and to make and execute a
4eed to ihe'ro-''plaitiant Ifor saidreal estate.
"The Court being satisfied that John Pollitt and Mary Jane
- Pollitt reside' iot of the State of Marylan'd, and beyond its pro-
cess, it is therefore ordered by 'Somerset County Court, sitting
in Chanceiy, this 5th day of December, 1836, that the com-
plainantgive- the said John Pollittand Mary Jane Pollitt notice
to be and appear in this. Court in person, by guardian or solicitor,
aid -show cause by' the second day of May term next of this
: Court why a decree should not pass as prayed; otherwise, the
tamne wilLbe taken pro confesso as to said absent defendants;
and that this notice shall.be given by publication of a copy of this
order ornce a week for three successive weeks, insome newspa-
per published in the District of Columbia, the first insertion of
which notice shall be at least four months before the said second
djy of May term next.
BRICE J. GOLDSBOROUGH.
S True copy, test: GEO. HANDY,
: 4fc 29-liaw3w Clerk.


T\ llE PAPER.-Just received from the manufac-
i turer, 170 reamsiAmie's superior White Wove Lettef
'Paper, which will be sold a bargain at Stationers' Hall.
4ec 9 (Tel) W. FISCHER.
I ORD Blt UGHAM'S Edition of Paley's Na-
taral 'Iteolog-y, with Illustrative Notes and Disserta-
tions, by Lnrd Bitugham and Sir Charles Bell, with numerous
engravings, is justpublisled, and this day received for sale by
P. TAYLOR. dec 14
-\" '-. i '~\. -


LN%-t-ISOI BI*LES AND PRAYER BOOKS,
V- 1if 6t1 sizes-;anri varieties, richly bound.
'Ornamented apd illttrated editions of different religious
rk ,ofditffereO denominations.
SProtestant, Patholic, and other Prayer Books.
'ymn Boo~s, &c.'in elegant bindings, &c. &c.
A full supply of the above is recently opened, and for sale by
< -' -,* P. TAYLOR.
A* ew copies of an English octavo Bible, in Gothic bind-
iJi '' iech surpasses in beauty and clearness of type any thing
- er. saB Lin Washington, are just unpacked at the Waverly
Stirnelatingb'L.,ary, immediately east of Gadsby's Hotel.
"'S6PERIOR STATIONERY* -T1 subscriber has on
aL .idfroamtet.. y.p.s. ---- ason
4-00 reamscbest American and English Letter Paper
S 160' do Cap Paper
S 100 io Dlemi and Medium Paper
.40, do Folio Post
100 da. Envelope Paper
C O 000 Quills -
10 gross Inks in quart, pint, and half-pint bottles
0 t'lounds best American and English Sealing Wai
-00 "t. -tarers
360 dozen ms,
500 cards most ap Stee- .Pens
20 grossbest Lead Pen
5 00pieces India'Ink -
S24 dozen Mouth Glue
,- :'.8 Ade Out Glass Inks, for office uars
800 pounds of superior'Black Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders -
Letter Stamps, Wafer, $ounce, and Sand Boxes -
SPaper Weights, Rulers .
"" Blotting, Tracing, and Di-awing Paper
And every other article"in 'tb Stationery line, all of which
Sin be sold on better terms' than articles of similar quality can
be obtainedelsewhere. Qrders promptly executed at Station-
- 1-' Hall. ( W. FISCHER.
dec19a-3ta-4w (Tel)
rjO MEMBERS OF CONGRESS.-w FISCHER
S: would most respectfully invite the attention of members
of Cbzigrts s and strangers visitinas tha .ast nr an..........


COLLECTORS' SALE.
W ILL be exposed to public sale, to the highest bidder, on Saturday, the 11th day of February, 1837, at the
office of the Clerk of the Corporation, the following Lots and Parts of Lots hereinafter mentioned, situated,
lying, and being in Georgetown, or so many thereof as may be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of Georgetown,
D. for taxes due on them respectively for the years annexed, with costs and charges. Sale to commence at 10
o'clock A. M. Terms cash.


NAMES ASSESSED.


Daniel D. Arden's heirs





Esther Berry



Robert Craig's himr



Robert Craig's heiirs




Robert Craig's heirs




Robert Craig's heirs


Anthony Goszler's heirs




Mary D. G. Ringgold


_Mary I. G. Ringgold


Mary D. G. ftirggold


Eliza L. Ringgoldl


Fliza L. Ringgold

Rachel Steel's heirs

Cath'ine Redman's heirs




Eveline Wilsoh -






Henry M. Wilson's heirs


Benjamin Thompson -


DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY.


Lot No. 36, in Peter's square
Ditto -
Lot No. 34, in ditto -
.Ditto -
Lot Np. 35, in ditto -
Ditto -
South part qf Lot No. 34 and all of Lots Nos. 35 and 36, in same square,
90 feet on Congress street, 108 feet on Canal
Part of Lots Nos."190 and 191 in Beatty and Hawkins's addition, 20 feet
on 4th street. Improved. Balance -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on 4th street on ditto -
West part of Lot No. 54 in Beall's addition, 30 feet on Beall street. Im-
proved -
Ditto -
Ditto
Lot No. 55 in the same addition. Improved. Balance.
Ditto -
Ditto- -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Part of lots Nos. 127 and 128, in Beatty and Hawkins'saddition, 22 feet on
Highstreet. Improved -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto --
Ditto 23 feet on High street -
Part of lot No. 188, in same addition, 20 feet on 4th street. Improved
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on 4th street on ditto -
.Lot No. 70, in Threlkeld's addition. Improved
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on ditto, 123 feet 5 inches on Second street -
Ditto ditto on ditto -
Lot No. 19, in Deakins, Lea, and Casenave's addition
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 60, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 63, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto
Ditto -
Lot No. 39, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 40, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -- -
Lot, not numbered, in Holmead's addition, 120 feet Monroe street, 60 feet
Dumbarton street. Improved -
Ditto -
Part of Lot No. 14, in Holmead's addition, 30 feet on Bridge street. Im-
proved -
S. E. part ditto -
Half of lot No. 174, in Beatty and Hawkins's addition. Improved
Ditto -
Ditto
Ditto -
Ditto
Ditto
Front foot tax on ditto 35 feet on 4th street -
Part of lot No. 179, in Beall's addition, 29 feet on Bridge street, 56 feet on
Green street. Improved -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto
Part of lot No. 190, in Beatty and Hawkins's addition, 20 feet on 4th street.
Improved. Balance
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on 4th street, on ditto $7 50


Tax.



$3 37J
2 25
3 75
2 50
3 75
2 50
12 00
1 00
3 00
3 00
2 00
1 00
7 50


CITY PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR TAXES.

ON Saturday, the 11th day of February next, (1837,) will be sold by public auction, at the City
Hall, in the City of Washington, the following described -property, to satisfy the Corporation
of the said City for taxes due thereon for the years stated, unless the said taxes be previously paid
t( the subscriber, with such expenses and fees as may have accrued at the time of payment.
) R, C


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


TO WItIi ASSESSED.


Davidson, John


Handy, Edward GF.



Kerr, Alexander's heirs


Years for
which
taxes are
due.

1833
1834
1833
1834
1833
1834
1835
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833
1833
1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1834
1835

1830
1831
1832
1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833
1833
1834
1835
1833
1834
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1834
1835
1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835


Assess-
ment.


$450
450
500
500
500
500
2400
400
40D
400
400
200
400
1750
1750
1000
1800
1800
1800
1800
1250
2000
2000
2000
2000
1250
400
400
400
400
400
200
400
1500
1500
750
1500
1500
400
400
400
300
1200
1200
1200
500
1350
1350
1350
550
1200
1200
1200
400
1300
1300
1300
700
500
350

1200
400
800
800
800
800
800
300
800


2 50
1 75
6 00
2 00
4 00
4 00
6 00
6 00
4 00
1 50
13 121


4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
2000
400
400
200
400


NoTE.-The ihmes of the persons assessed are not inserted except for the year 1835; the laws previous to that date not re--
quiring it. JOHN HOLTZMAN,
a r *n 11 '- --Ve 0 5-r Far w
SIWNIAN* EAI, CWollector for the years 1833, 1834, and 1835.
If the terms of sale are not cdmplied witr by Thu ar.day, the 16th day of February, 1837, the lots and parts of lots purchased,
and not paid for, will be resold upon giving three days' notice in the Georgetown Metropolitan, at the risk and expense of the
first purchaser. JOHN HOLTZMAN, Collector as above.
nov 18-Fridays ts NINIAN BEALL, Collector as above.


ALEXANDRIA FOUNDRY and STEAM EN-
GINE MANUFACTORY.-Locomotive and Sta-
tionary Engines, heavy Iron and Brass Castings, Church Bells,
and Machinery of every kind. Gentlemen visiting Washing-
ton are invited to call and see the works.
THOMAS W. SMITH & Co.
mar 4-eoly Alexandria, March 1.


N OTICE.-The subscriber having taken out letters testa.
mentary oh the estate of Drusella Cook, late of Charles
County, deceased, hereby requests all persons indebted to said
estate to pay the same immediately, and'those having claims to
present them to him, duly authenticated, on or before the 15th
day of June next. EDWARD TURNER,
dec 12-eot Executor.

C( APSULES.-Gelatineuses au Baume de Copahu pur,
pour le traitement des Maladies secretes, par A. MOTHES.
In which the Balsam Copaib;s is so enclosed, that the unplea-
sant smell and taste, which render this medicine generally so
inconvenient, are entirely avoided.
A supl.ly ofthe'above vkalhable medicine just received and
for sale by the subscribers. Physicians are requested to call
and examine them.
Attestation de M. DESRUELLES, Ddcteur en Medecine de la Pa-
culte de Paris, Chirurgien en chef, demonstrateur a l'Hopi-
tal Militaire du Val-de-Grace, Charge de Service des Vene-
riens au dit hbplital, Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur.
Je soussigne certified avoir employee un grand nombre de fois
et toujours avec ceces, tant au Val-de-Grace qu'en ville, les
Capsules gelatineuses perfectionnees par M. A. Mothes, dans
lesquelles il renferme soit du baume de Copahu, soit du poivre
Cubebe, ou toute antre espece de medicamens, don't il imported
de dissimuler le gout et 'odeur aux maladies, et que sescapsules,
remplissent parfaitement le but de l'auteur et 1 objet du practi-
cien, sont impenetrable 'et ne laissent transsuder, aucunes
parties du medicamient, quelles que soient la divisibilite de des
molecules et la volatilite de ses parties odorantes.
J'atteste que cette erveloppe, qui est d'ailleurs tres-soluble,
ne nuit en rien a l'action du medicament, et que, perfectionnees
comnr e elles viennent de l'etre, les Capsules gelatineuses sont
prises par les malades avec une grande facility; que, pendant
leur passage a, travers le gosier et pendant leur sejour dans
l'estomac, elles ne laissent aucun gout dans la bouche et ne pro-
voquent aucun rapport desagreable.
M. A. Mothes a rendu un grand service a la science en pro-
Ourant.auX praot:.'-" lo gm)o -d 'fairn arv-irdani l3estomac
des melicamens qui par leur odeur et leur gout desagreable,
etaient bientot expulses par Ie vomissement.


Paris, ce 20 Decembre, 1834.
dec 9-3tawlw


DESRUELLES.


E. H. & C. H. JAMES.


C OLD CRI AM, &ce-Just received at Stationers' Hall,
a supply of fresh made Cold Cream, at 25 cents a bottle,
aand superior Lip Salve, neatly put up, at 181 cents per box.
dec 21 (Tel) W. FISCHER.
GREAT BARGAINS IN SHOES.--CARY &
TURNER have bought out the entire stock of Ladies'
Shoes of Messrs. Bradley & Catlett, which, th their former
stock, render their assortment the best and cheapest in the
District. The following comprise apart, viz.
1000 pairs fine Lasting Slippers, Philadelphia make, a little
defaced, at 50 cents
-3000 do Este's, Lane's, arid Follansbee's Morocco and Kid
Slippers
o0 orocco, Kid, and Seal Walking Shoe's
200 do Fur Shoes
150 do Iren d
260 do Gaiter
300 do colored Moroc oes at 75 ceni
300 do Este's black and w atin Slippers
500 do Seal, Moroo'`, and Ki pers, at $1.
i n IMIS 11 SHOP2 -*


'TOTICE.-The Trustees of the Upper Marlborough Aca-
demy wish to employ for one year, to commence on the
1st of January next, a gentleman who is qualified in all respects
to take charge of the institution as Principal; to whom they will
give a liberal salary, and the use of a dwelling-house, garden,
&c. as soon as the same can be put in a suitable state of repair.
The most unquestionable testimonials will be required as to
character and competency.
All applications on the subject to be addressed to the subscrib-
er, post paid. JNO. B. BROOKE,
President Board of Trustees, Upper Marlboro' Academy.
dec 8-wtlJ


VALUABLE POTOMAC LANDS & THREE
FISHER IES FOR SALE OR RENT.-With
a view to a further removal to Alabama, the subscribers will sell
their Deep Hole and Farm Plantations, adjacent, containing two
thousand seven hundred and twenty-eight acres, lying upon
Occoquan bay, from the junction of Occoquan river to Neabsco
creek with the Potomac, and bounded on the west by the old
mail stage road to Colchester, along which the contemplated
railroad from the South must be constructed. The farm and fishe-
ries are of easy access, by land and water, about 18 miles from
Alexandria, three from Occoquan, and one from Colchester.
These are unquestionably the most fertile lands in Prince
William county-adapted to the growth of wheat, corn, tobacco,
oats, timothy, &o. and highly susceptible of improvement by
clover and plaster. The Occoquan mills and factory are a conve-
nient market. The overseer's house, barns, quarters, wheat
machine, fencing, &c. are in corresponding condition.
The Deep Hole fishing shore is known to be among the best
upon the Potomac. The Farm Marsh (or Mud Haul) fishery has
been fished several years successfully; also the Plum Tree fish-
ery, betweenthe two. Houses are on each shore. There is
abundant sea-room for seines of the largest class.
Many hundred cords of wood might ,be cut and sold on the
land, immediately on Neabsco creek, for which there isa constant
demand; and there might still remain sufficient wood and timber
for the use of the estate.
The winter fisheries and ducking shores are also valuable.
Liberal terms are offered. The fisheries, well managed, will
more than pay the interest of cost. One-fourth cash; the bal-
ance in three equal annual instalments. Possession may be giv-
en at the ensuing Christmas.
Such an opportunity is rarely offered for judicious investment.
For terms, (if by letter, post paid,) apply to William Hindman,
Esq. Baltimore, or to the subscribers.
BEN. OGLE TAYLOE, Washington, D. C.
WM. H. TATLOE, Warsaw, Va.
aug 20-d&ctf

AT PRIVATE, SALE.--Superior Champagne
Brandy and Porto Rico Sugars.-I have just re-
ceived, on consignment from the importer-
5 quarter casks of very superior Champagne Brandy, of
-. fine flavor, and warranted genuine and pure,
10 hhds. prime Porto Rico Sugars, with orders to close the
consignment.
Dealers are requested to give their early attention to the
above. _EDW. DYER,
dec 13-d5t Auct. and Com. Merchant.

NNUALS, Illustrated Books, Souvenirs, Books of Flow-
A ers, Illustrated Albums, Scrap Books with engraved illus-
trations, Drawing Books, choice English editions of Illustrated
Works; illustrated editions of various of the most esteemed
authors, Shakspeare, Milton, Rogers, Byron, Scott, and many
others; illustrated books of Travels, various collections of Views
and Scenery in different countries, Juvenile Souvenirs, &c. &c.
all in rich bindings.
F. TAYLOR has this day-opened several cases of books of
the above class and description, making the most extensive col-
lection of the richest and most splendidly engraved works ever
brought to Washington. Purchasers and others are invited to
call and examine them. They witl be sold strictly at NewYork
and Philadelphia prices, at the Waverly Circulatihg Library,


Blake, Jaaes H.
Water tax
Davis, Gideon

Hendley, Robert


Kirk, Thorisr M.'


Parrott, Richard's
Tax for killing ul


Smith, Jartine
Simmons, Williari
Pump tax

Pumptax







Wilson, Janmd And


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9
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NEW ORLEANS, MAY, 1834.
I have had a disease in my head, which more recently be-
came very painful and alarming, m consequence of taking cold
repeatedly. A large gathering was formed in the cavity be-
tween the ears,discharging prodigiously; and from the renewed
accumulation at times, it seemed as if my head would burst,
when the running would increase at the ears, and would also
appear at the nose and eyes. I applied to the best physicians
but found no permanent relief; I also tried Swaim's Panacea,
but found it useless. By request of a friend I tried the Indian's
Panacea, which soon gave me relief; and after taking twelve
bottles, I was made as well as ever. The opinion of one so
much indebted to it may be of little weight; but the reputation
this Panacea has earned in this vicinity will give it the pre,
ferenc, over any other remedy for abscesses, sores, &c.
JOHN McMULLEN.
The proprietors of this article have received many proofs of
its'value on plantations. The negro who is subject to any dis-
eases peculiar to him, or peculiar to his exposing employment,
feels most readily its healing influence. Rheumatism, debi-
lity, swellings, loss of appetite, and the nameless evils he corn-
plains of, may all be removed by the use of a few bottles of the
Indian's Panacea. Many useful servant has been restored by
its effects; and it is confidently recommended tothe planter as
a safe and invaluable medicine.
Erysipelas is one of those severe cutaneous affections which
is removed by this Indian practicemiore effectually and speedily
than in, any other mode. There is strong evidence at hand to
show that no case can withstand its effect.
ST. AurseS'NE, (E P.) JULY, 1835.
D. G. HAVILAND & Co. Agents: am induced to write, to
inform you of the happy results I.have experienced from taking
the Indian's Panacea. For the last ten years I.have been severely
afflicted with the rheumatism in both legs, and sores covering
a large proportion of the body; and during this time I have tried
almost every thing that I heard recommended, but without re-
lief from any. In this state,, I had given up mnyselfas incurable
and made up my mind to drag out my life in excruciating pain
for .I can-safely say that I had not know a day, in that time,
during which I had been free from pain, and most of the time
I was in the greatest agorny.' I wasin this fix whenin your
city, at which time I bought a doven bottles of your Panacea.
which I took as directed in tbh, paper, and am now-happy to
state to you, and to the comiodnity, that I am a perfectly well
man. This' change I attribute to this invaluable Medicine tone,
Yoursi very respectfully,
T. H. POWERS.

CHABLESTON, JULY 12, 1881.
I was afflicted four years with an ulcer in the leg, occasion-
ally accompanied with erysipeletous inflammation and exces-
sive pai in the leg and ankle joint. Several eminent physi-
cianr exerted their skill upon it, but without permanent benefit
SIp this state, five bottles of the Indian's Panacea made perfect
cure. MARGARET A WEST
121, rting street.-
For sale by HAVILAND, HARRAL, & ALLEN,
Agents, 304, Kingstreet,;,Charleston


a,
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1832
1834
1835
1833


20 20 27
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16 16 22
17 17 22
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17 17 23
12 12 16
15 15 20
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1 161 161 562
-32- 32. 39
1 321 391 -772
27 27 36
1 *A -I A


FITHE INDIAN'S PANACEA-For the cure ofRhuo-
Smatism, Scrofula, or King's Evil, Gout, Sciatica or Hip
Gout, Incipient Cancers, Salt Rheum, Syphilitic and Mercurial
diseases, particularly Ulcers and painful affection of the bones,
ulcerated throat and nostrils; Ulcers of very description,
Fever Sores, and Internal Abscesses; Fist'dlas, Scald Head,
Scurvy, Biles, Chronic Sore Eyes, Erysipelas, Blotches, and
every variety of Cutaneous Affection; Chronic Catarrh, Head-
ache from particular causes ; pain in the Stomach and Dyspep-
sia, proceeding from vitiation; Affections of the Liver, Chronic
Inflammation of the Kidneys, and general debility, caused by a
torpid action of the vessels of the skin. It is singularly efficacious
in renovating those constitutions which have been broken down
by injudicious treatments:or juvenile irregularities. In general
terms, it is recommended in all those diseases which arise from
impurities in the blood, or vitiation of the humors, of whatever
name or kind.
Some of the above complaints may require some trifling assist-
ant applications, which the circumstances of the case will dic-
tate; but, for a general remedy or purificator, to remove tho
cause, the Indian's Panacea will generally be found sufficient.
TO THE PUBLIC.
How true it is that modern physicians, in their ambition to
excel in their profession, explore the vast fields of science by
the aid of Chemistry, and seek out new remedial agents to ar-
rive at perfection in their practice by means of art alone, and
entirely overlook and neglect, as beneath their notice, the rich
and bounteous stores of medicine which the Almighty has caused
to spring out of the earth in every clime. Andhow much more
true it is that whilst the American physician looks to foreign
countries for many of his most common and necessary articles,
perpetually changing, as they are, at the dictate of fashion and
folly, he is surrounded in his own country with an endless pro-
fusion of medical plants sufficient to answer any indication in
disease, and yet he is ignorant of their virtues, and they are suf-
fered to waste their healing on the desert air."
The effects of vegetable medicines upon the system are tem
porary-those of minerals lasting. The former exert their ef-
fects and pass off-the latter, mercury in particular, act chemi-
cally upon the solids, decomposing the bones, and undermining
the constitution by a slow and sure destruction.
The greater congeniality, efficiency, and safety of vegetable
tremedies, compared with mineral, may be estimated by con-
trasting the ancient practice with the modern; or, to bring it
more immediately under our own observation, the Indian prac-
tice with that of the white man. Who, in America, has not
known or heard of repeated instances wherein some decrepit,
unpretending female Indian, by means of her simple remedies
alone, has effected the most rapid and astonishing cures, after
the whole Materia Medica of the common practice, directed in
the most skilful manner, has failed ? And who has not been
surprised at beholding the comparative ease and facility with
which the Indian frees himself from any disease, and at the al-
/most total absence of chronic diseases among them'? Who has
ever heard of an Indian with a constitution broken and ruined
by ill treatment And can a doubt exist that this happy exemp-
tion of the savage from most of the ills which the flesh of civil-
ized man is heir to is chiefly owing to the more genial and safe
remedies which he employs? This astonishing difference in
success is a fair exemplification of the infinite superiority of the
simple and safe means of cure which God has created for the
benefit of his children over those which the pride and the art of
man have invented.
From a long residence among a portion of the aboriginal in-
habitants of his country, and intimate acquaintance with the me-
thods of cure of some of their most successful practitioners, the
proprietor of The Indian's Panacea" acquired a knowledge of
some of their most powerful and favorite remedies. From.these
he selected such as were most efficacious and appropriate, and,
after various experiments to test their principles and strength,
he has combined them in the form here presented, as the most
perfect and beneficial for the purpose for which it is recom-
mended.
The proprietor offers this preparation to the Public with the
consciousness that.he is placing within its reach a remedy capa-
ble of relieving many of his afflicted fellow-beings who are suf-
fering under the various chronic and obstinate complaints to
which it is applicable. To such it will prove of incalculable
value, as the means, and, in many cases, the only means of re-
lieving their sufferings, and restoring them once more to health
and-happiness. This is not offered as a common remedy that
may, perchance, be equally good with many others now in use,
but as one which is capable of saving life in many extreme cases
when all the usual remedies fail. This it has done repeatedly
and this is the reputation it has obtained wherever it has been
introduced.
It is only a few years since this preparation wasofrstpresent-
ed to the Public, but in that time soq- thousands of persons
might be found.who would solemnily declare that they believed
their lives were saved- byt, and in many cases after they had
tried most d perhaps all the common remedies in vain.
Whlicvper it is known, it is rapidly coming into use, and this af-
fords the most substantial and convincing proof of its merits.
The value of this Panacea is most conspicuous in those long
standing and obstinate syphilitic and scrofulous affections which
have defied all other remedies, and particularly in those cases
-where mercury has been so lavishly used as to cause distressing
pains in the bones, nodes, mercurial ulcers, derangement of the
digestive organs, &c. These it completely removes, and in all
cases it entirely eradicates the disease and the effects of mer-
cury, renovates the constitution, and leaves the patient sound
and well. In rheumatisms and ulcerated sore throat, its happy
effects are not less apparent, giving almost immediate relief.
This medicine has been found highly useful in many ambigu-
ous diseases not here specified, and it has been used with wo
derful success as a spring and fall purifier, by those who are
subject to various complaints, and whose constitutions require in-
vigorating. Such persons will do well to use two or three bot-
tles in small doses. Whenever a diet drink is considered nes
cessary, this Panacea, taken in small doses, will answer all its
purposes, in much less time, at less expense, and in a far more
agreeable manner, than the common diet drink.
The following certificates, out of hundreds similar which
might be procured, are given to show the effects of the Indian's
Panacea, in the various complaints therein mentioned; and also
to exhibit, in the most satisfactory manner, its superiority over
the. syrups in common use :
BOSTON, APRIL, 1834.
SIa: When I was a young man, I followed the fishing trade,
and, from the peculiar exposure at that time, I have had pains
about me at intervals, which have since increased to a regular
and severe rheumatism. You know, I saw you in Charleston
very bad off, and told you I had heard of the 'surprising quali-
lies of the Indian's Panacea, when you told me where to get
it. Well, I got six bottles, which have oured me for seven or
eight months, and from being free from pain so long, although
exposed, I believe my case a cured one, and write this to say
so. AARON GILBERT.


i


- -


1 01
1 67
1 49
3 10
8 10
6 71
6 71
6 71
6 71
8 10
6 71
6 71
6 59
3 10
310
D 24
S 71
S 71
71
71
S55
S83




Daily national intelligencer
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073214/00005
 Material Information
Title: Daily national intelligencer
Alternate title: National intelligencer
Sunday national intelligencer
Physical Description: v. : ; 50-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Gales & Seaton
Place of Publication: Washington City D.C.
Creation Date: January 6, 1837
Publication Date: 1813-
Frequency: daily (except sunday)[feb. 6, 1865-]
daily[ former 1813-feb. 5, 1865]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Brigham, C.S. Amer. newspapers
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microform from Readex Microprint Corp., and on microfilm from the Library of Congress.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1813)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1869.
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended Aug. 24-30, 1814.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02260099
lccn - sn 83026172
System ID: UF00073214:00005
 Related Items
Related Items: Weekly national intelligencer (Washington, D.C.)
Related Items: National intelligencer (Washington, D.C. : 1810)
Related Items: Universal gazette (Philadelphia, Pa. : Nov. 1797)
Succeeded by: Washington express
Succeeded by: Daily national intelligencer and Washington express

Full Text








AX $i1A42 i


!&iLt


VOL. XXV.



PUBLISHED BY
GALES & SEASON.
ICE, FOIR A YEAR, TEN DOLLARS ; FOR SIX MONTHS, SIX
DOLLARS. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
e subscribing for a year, who do not, either at the time of
tering the paper, or subsequently, give notice of their wish
have the paper discontinued at the expiration of their year,
11 ho presumed as desiring its continuance until counter-
mnded, and it will be continued accordingly, at the option
the Editors.

RAILROAD ARRANGEMENT.
Until further notice the cars will depart as
follows:
1From Washington for Baltimtore,
AT HALF PAST NINE O'CLOCK A.M.
AND
AT HALF PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
Frnom Baltimore for Washington,
AT NINE O'CLOCK A. M.
AND
AT A QUARTER PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
ec 28-d6t&w6t [Alex. Gaz. & Met.]
RICHMOND AND FREDER-
ICKSBURG RAILROAD NEAR-
LY COMPLETED.-Winter Ar-
rangement.-The Railroad is now in use
from Richmond to within one mile of Frede-
ksburg. The following will 'Be" the arrangement during the
iter: "
'.t Washington, when the navigation of the Potomac is open,
3sengers will rest at night on board the steamboat, which will
ye at an early hour in the morning. When the navigation of
SPotomac is closed, stages will depart from Washington. As
in as practicable, after the arrival of the mail and passengers
Fredericksbuitg, the cars will leave the termination of the
Iroad, and arrive in.Richmond the same evening. This be-
r the main Southern mail line, is regularly connected by stages
Petersburg, where passengers can proceed on the railway to
akely, and thence continue in stages to the South, by way of
ideigh, Fayetteville, &c.
From Richmond, the cars with the mail and passengers going
orth, will continue to depart at 4 in the morning, until it shall
ascertained that the passengers can leave at a later hour
while the navigation is open, and reach Washington in time for
e afternoon train of cars to Baltimore..
Besides the regular mail line, there will be, in:addition, a tri-
eekly line between Richmond and Fredericksburg, leaving
ichmond on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 9 A. M. and
'aching Fredericksburg to dinner; and leaving Fredericks-
arg on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, so soon as the cars
arrive with the mall from Richmond, which will be about a quar-
;r before 9 A. M.
With a view of making this tri-weekly line a pleasant one,
ie trade in wood and other heavy articles between Richmond
nd Chickahominy will be separated from it, and this descrip-
ion of trade will be accommodated by running cars for it at
uch hours as may suit the Company, and not interfere with the
ravel. -
Charge for transportation from Richmond to Fredericksburg,
14 per passenger. The Railroad Company and the Stage and
steamboat Company receive the fare for each other to and from
lichmond and W0 h.C.i-:.n City.. Pare from Richmond to
A'-ih 'In-., -hen the navigation of the Potinmac is practicable
:., c i.-.i. (including the transportation by omnibus in
Washington) '.-, ,. c. -rc.-e'. Pare from R;.:,.:-.r. t Wash-
ington, when '..IK .- -- .steamboats ..n tl, P...:.'-..,': is
impracticable, $10 per passengs.-. -
dec 30-3taw4dw. "-,-tI.FOLK i. .'.
NOTICE'TO 1 EbL TEl r NT" RN A, E CiE AE C
All oat :. k.r,, i, t.:t- i .: nest .-.-
'' J.,': Hotelhave a preference over
1.41 .,h ..-c isengers to WheelingorPitts-
-." 'f-t-- :. a ttt..g. \All passengers from the West,
:-- l ;.rs ,- ss in the mail coach from
F-,,.r.r k .. %",".;..r., ..1I h ve the preference over all
others going South. JAMES FOSSETT,.
dec 20-1m .Agent.
aa P_ FALL ARRANGEIIMENT FOR NOR-
__-_, FOLK.-T .,- iSiu. r *COIUMBI1, James
M ar h, I, Mr .i.r, ;II, ir.., tb.: r no-.-, i sr .:.f t h. ;.: ..n, s uaki
but one trip a --. Th... ...I..,r.b,, 'I I..-,re V ihus .:,.n ou
Wednesday, the 191h inst., at 10 o'clock in the morning, and
will continued doso theremainder of the season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at half past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of wood and provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15-dtf
S HORT HANiD.-The Self-taught Stenographer, or Ste-
snographic Guide, explaining the principles and rules of the
art of Short Hand Writing. Just received for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, price 25 cents, with numerous engravings.
CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S .PRESENTS.
W. FISCHER has this day received from New York, by
railroad line, four cases of Goods, containing new articles, ex-
pressly for Christmas and New Year's presents; which, being
too numerous for-an advertisement, he would respectfully invite
ladies and gentlemen to an inspection of them at Stationers'
Hall, where the most extensive assortment of the best Fancy
Goods are kept for sale on the most reasonable terms.
N OTICE.-The subscriber having taken, in addition to his
- old establishment on 41 street, the large and commodious
coach manufactory, on Missouri Avenue, formerly kept by Isaac
Bartlett, between 4j and 6th streets, and nearly opposite Gads-
by's hotel, is now ready to execute all orders in the coach mak-
ing line in the best and neatest manner. He also has on hand
a large assortment of excellent Coaches, Barouches, Buggies,
and vehicles of every description, &c. &c.
dec 21-eo2m MICHAEL McDERMOTT.
HE -WAVERLY CIRCULATING LIBRARY,
immediately east of Gadsby's Hotel, is regularly supplied
with a number of copies of every new work immediately upon
publication.
Additions to the Library during the last week.
Delphine, by Madame De Stael, a novel, in 3 vols.
Harry O'Reardon, by Mrs. S. C. Hall.
Astoria, by Irving.
Giafar, a tale of the Court of Haroun-Al-Rasohid.
Plebeians and Patricians, 2 vols.
Desultory Man, by James.
Mellichampe, by the author of the Partisan.
East and West, a novel.
Priors of Prague, 2'vols.
Andrew, the Savoyard, by Paul de Rock.
Memoirs of Lucien Bonaparte, by himself.
Second part of Cooper's Sketches of Switzerland.
The late volumes of Harper's Family Library.
The last numbers of the North American, the American Quar-
terly, the "Museum," and many other Periodicals andReviews,
both American and English.
Terms-Five dollars per annum, or one dollar for a single
month; two dollars for three months. dec 9
I N. CARY, Professional Hair-Cutter and Sha-
a ver, respectfully informs the Public that he can always
be found at his old stand, on 6th street, opposite the National
Hotel.
He feels confident, from his long experience und universally
acknowledged skill in the above branches, (and his desire to
please,) that he cannot fail to give satisfaction to all who may be
pleased to favor him with a call.
Cary has a brunch of his shop in that celebrated establish-
ment, Brown's Hotel, which is conducted by his brother, whose
skill as Hair-Cutter and Shaver is unsurpassed.
SRazors honed at the shortest notice, and warranted to
shave well.
dec 24-3taw2w [Globe and Tel.]
( HILDREN'S BOOKS.-Several hundred different
kinds, selected from the most approved and popular wri-
ters, for youth; and several thousand Toy Books, of all kinds
and prices.
Paint Boxes, Dissected Maps, Drawing Books,
Juvenile Souvenirs, Chess, gold and silver Pencil Cases,
Penknives, Port Folios, Battledores, Backgammon,
Dominoes, Graces, small sets Ninepins, Accordions,
Pocket Books, Card Cases, Writing Desks, Purses,
And a great variety of goods suitable to the season, for sale
at low prices; together with a large supply of Ornamental Edi-
tions of Books in every department of literature.
F. TAYLOR,
At the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
dec 24 east of Gadsby's Hotel.
C ASH FOR 400 NEGROES,includingbothsexes,
from twelve to twenty-five years of age. Persons having
servants to dispose of will find it to their interest to give me a
call, as I will give higher prices, in cash, than any other pur-
chaser who is now in this market.
I can at all times be found atthe MECHANICS' HALL, now
kept by B. O. Sheekle, an l formerly kert by Isaac Beers, on
Seventhl street, a few doors below Lloyd's Tavern, opposite the
Centre market. All comnmunicationspromptly attended to.
JAMES HII. BIRCH,
nov 7- dtf Washington Csty.


WASHINGTON: FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1837,


B EAUTIFUL BOOKS.-Now opening at Stationers'
S Hall the following beautiful Booksi suitable for Christmas
and new year's presents:
The Souvenir Keepsake for 1837
The Religious Souvenir do
The Pearl do
The Violet do
The Christmas Box do -
The Gift do
The Forget Me Not do
Friendship's Offering do
With a variety of Toy Books for children, and Almanacs for-
1837, at 61 cents. W. FISCHER.-
dec 23 [Tel] .
NTEW" NOVELS.-Harry O'Reardon, or, Illustrations of
Irish Pride, by Mrs. Hall ; price 75 cents.
Plebeians and Patricians, in 2 vols. ; price 81 25.
Delphine, by Madame de Stacl; author ofCorrinne.
Giafar al Barmeki, a Tale of te of tCourt of Haroun al Raschid,
in 2 vols.
The above are this day published, and for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, or (together with many others) for circulation among the
subscribers to the Waverly Circulating Library, inimediately
east of Gadsby's Hotel. dec 7
%TEW ARRIVALS.-Six Cases of English Sta-
.-l tionery and Fancy Goods, now landing at Baltimore
from the-. ship Potomac, from Liverpool, will be unpacked at
Stationers' Hall, on Friday next. Persons wishing to obtain
something new and- handsome, are respectfully invited to exa-.
mine the extensive assortment, and low p.-:.: ...f articles con-
stantly for sale at-Stationers' Hall, where u :, ..' uniformity of
dealing is observed. W. FISCHER.
dec 28 (Tel.) '
OOT AND SHOE MANUFACTORY, opposite
Sthe Seven Buildinags.-ANDREW HOOVER begs
leave respectfully to-inform his friends, and the Public gener-
ally, that he has made arrangements for carVying on the above
business in all its various branches, and in the most extensive
manner. He is now ready to supply his customers with Boots
.-.l 1-,....: .f every description, and of the very best quality, on
the most reasonable terms. ,
]Lk Wanted, immediately, fifty apprentices, from fourteen to
sixteen years of age, to learn the above business. Boys from
the country would be preferred.
dec 22-2aw8w (Met)
NTEW BOOKS.-Mrs. Sigourney's Letters addressed to
J.i Young Ladies, 1 vol.
The Great Teacher, by the Rev. John Harris, with Introdue-
tory Essay, by President Humphrey, of Amherst College.
The German Tourist, a splendid Annual for 1837.
The Character and Religion of George Washington.
The Fairy Book, .:.-.-. ;, -. : .. :,..":.- .:.f i.. -;' Fairy Tales,
w ith several hundr-.f r, ,. i n : ill -.II t[ d' 0 Rv.
A Plain Manual -.1 L'. ., t-, I-, l .t L',,-.:, t,.d Rev. Geo.

Ih I Fl -i:.,,n': Progress, a new and beautiful edition, with 50
engravings. P. TAYLOR.
dec 30
U U-WITARS AND ACCORDIANS.-Just opened at
i X Stationers' Hall, a choice selection of fine-toned Spanish
Guitars, with Patent Screws, and hdnidsome Adcordians, with
suitable instructions, at very low prices.
dec 7 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.
KINCHY, Confectioner, thankful for past favors,
informs the ladies and gentlemen of Washington thatbhe
continues at his old stand, where he has just received a large
assortment of French Bon Bons, and other confectionery.
Paper-shelled, Soft-shelled, and Shelled Almonds
Bunchl Muscatel Raisins, in whole, half, and quarter boxes
=- Bordeaux Prunes, in fancy and .,-i-c l..:.,
Sui| 11-t 1 r.-- r.. (..; u ,.n-i:, i,?
FORE!h..s. rRil|[, IN SIRUP.
Cm'-:.-. >(,..-nr, C't-:..v ti-... ., P.-n ,r.ppl, Prunes, Limes,
Apricots, Chinios, &c.. Pue '
DRIED FRUITS.
Ap-..:. .1 -..1...Pr. -.- -iinios,Canton Ginger, Guava,
C ull', jr. .i in u .r .:. J l .- '
Brandy Fruits, assorted
CORDIALS. .
Mareschino do Zara, Cnrracoa, Absinthe, &c.
LONDON SAUCES.
Cavice, Reading, Anchovy, John Bull Sauce, &c.
French Chocolate, French Mustard, Sweet Oil
English, French, and Domestic Pickles
Rose and Orange Flower Water
SIRUPS.
Lemon; Capilaire, Pineapple, Raspberry, &c.
ALSO.
A handsome assortment of French Sugar Ornaments, Fan-
cy Boxes, Toys, Dolls, &c.
Italian Vermicelli, Maccaroni, Olanges, Lemons, Citron,
Dates, Cranberries, Nuts, and other articles, in his line
of business.
Ice-Cream, Jellies', Blanc Mange, Fromage Bavorous,
Charlotte Russe, Pyramids, &c., made to order.
All orders for Balls, Dinner Parties, &c. will be thankfully
received and punctually attended to, at the shortest notice.
dec 20-3taw2w
S ~4RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of a deed of trust
from Benjamin Homans, dated January 5, 1832, and duly
recorded in the office of the Clerk. of the Circuit Court of the
District of Columbia for the county of Washington, -1 will offer
at public sale, for cash, at 12 o'clock M., on Saturday, the 21st
of January next, at the printing office of said'Homans, in the
city of Washington, several printing presses, a standing press,
and a quantity of type and type cases, as particularly described
in said deed. The terms of sale to be complied with before the
Removal of the property; and, if not complied with in three
days, the property will be resold at auction for cash, after three
days' advertisement, at the risk and cost of the former purcr.has-
er I. STULL,
dec 21-ts Trustee.
RS. TYTE, from London, begs to acquaint the vi-"
Jsiters and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with an elegant assortment of the newest and most FASH-
IONABLE MILLINERY, consisting of Bonnets, Head Dress-
es, Caps, Flowers, Feathers, &c., which are opened for sale,
on Pennsylvania Avenue,between First and Second streets, and
near the railroad office.
,S." Straws and Leghorns cleaned and altered to the newest
fashions. dec 20-eotf
-VASHIONABLE MILLINERY AND FANCY
GOODS.-Miss MORLEY,.from New York, grateful-
ly acknowledges the liberality of the ladies of Washington last
season, and wishes to inform them that she has arrived again
with a good assortment of Millinery and Fancy Goods, consist-
ing of- '
Bonnets, Hats, Caps, Flowers, Ostrich Featiers
Birds of Paradise, of very superior quality
Silk, Satins, Ribands, Blonde Gauze, for eveningdresses
Fur Capes, Boa Muffs, &c.
Which will be open this day, fir sale, on Pennsylvania Avyd-
nue, between 9th and 10th streets..
dec 26-eolm
Cl OUGE'S HISTORY OF PAPER MONEY
% AND BANKING IN THE U. STATES, to-
gether with the Provincial and Continental, with an Inquiry
into the Principles and Effects of theSystem, the whole intend-
ed as an exposition of the way in which paper money and mo-
ney corporations affect the interest of different portions of the
community. An additional supply of the above (second stereo-
type edition) is just received in a cheap pamphlet form, and for
sale by F. TAYLOR, who has also for sale, at the lowestprices,
a large collection of the most esteemed works on Banking,
Currency, Commerce, Statistics, Taxes, &c. &c. and all other
branches of Political Economy. by Bentham, Say, McCulloch,
Adam Smith, Cooper, Phillips, Malthus, Raymond, Simpsons,
Chalmers, Seybert, Marshall, Taylor, Oddy, Pitkin, &e. &c.
and many others, at the.Waverly Circulating Librarjr, immedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel. dec 28
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, pub'
listed by the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, is devo-
ted to the objects of Pharmaceutic research, viz. Chemistry,
(general aend pharmaceutic,) Materia Medica, Zoology, Botany,
Mineralogy, &c. Intended for the benefit of the apothecary, it
merits Iis patronage and support.
F. TAYLOR will receive subscriptions to the above work,
which will be forwarded to any part of the United States, if ap-
plication be made at the Waverly Circulating Library, immedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel.
It is published in four quarterly numbers; subscription price
$2 50 per annumn Druggists, Phiysicians, and others, fond of
the study of natural science, are invited to call and examine it.
CASH FOR FOUR HUNDRED NEGROES.-
Thie highest cash price will be given by the subscriber for
Negroes of birth sexes, from the age of 12 to 28. Those who
wish to sell will do well to give me a call, at my' place on 7th
street, yellow rough-cast house; the first on the right hand go-
ing from the market house to the steamboat whtarf or at A.
Lee's Lottery office, five doors east of Gadsby's Hotel. 'I'hose
who wish to board their servants can be accommodated on mo-
derate teims. WM. H. WILLIAMS.
Nov 7-d


OTICE'.-The PATENT OFFICE is removed to the
west wing of the City Hall, where fire-proof rooms are
obtained for the Records andl Models.
HENRY L. ELLSWORTH,
dec 30-dlw Commissioner.
PATENT OFFICE, DEC. 27, 1836.
P ERSONS who have entered CAVEATS are notified that
the same were destroyed by fire on the 15th instant, and
they are requested to transmit duplicates as soon as possible.
HENRY L. ELLSWORTH,
dec 30-dIlwc2 Commissioner.
N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all persons hold-
ing Certificates of Stock of the Corporation of Washing-
ton, that the interest on the same, due for the quarter ending on
the 31st instant, will be paid to the stockholders, on or after the
10th day of January, on application at the Bank of Washington.
Given under my hand this 27th December, 1836.
WM. HEWITT,
dec 28-tJan0 Register.
.WEDES IRON.-Just received, per Swedish brig
Kc George, from Stockholm, and now landing, 220 tons of
Swedish Bar Iron, Plough Plates, and Landsides, which, with
120 tons of Swedish and English Iron in store, makes my as-
sortment very good. For sale on liberal terms. J
PHINEAS JANNEY,
dec 30-eo7t Alexandria.
V A MOS4)IQe,U1E, or, American -Musical Annutl.
L-A Just received at Stationers' Hall, a few of the above beau-
tiful Books. The Music they contain embraces pieces ,o vari-
ous styles, by 'the most popular masters of the age4 and it is be-
lieved that the engraving and printing are at least -....1 i.:. ih.
finest specimens of these arts. W. FI',. HCER.
dec 30 (Tel)
'tRESH FRUITS, CIGARS, &C.-Just received by
&F the subscriber, immediately east of the Bank of the Me-
tropolis, on P street, a small invoice of fresh -,, P- Figs and
Prunes in fancy boxes; Raisins, in whole, Ilai, r,.i quarter
boxes; together with a fine stock of Principia and other Cigars,
of the most approved brands. Also, fresh Pickles, Sauies,
Catsups, and a general assortment of family Groceries, Wines,
and Liquors, of the best quality, all of which will be sold at a
small advance for cash, or to punctual customers, by
dec. 30-dlw. G.W. STEVENSON.:
ROSSBURG FOR RENT.-ThlisTavern and
Farm, situated 81- miles from' W--hin -t.o, on sthe
Washington and Baltimore turnpil;.: .. l, .il.- r.-
ed to a good tenant on accommodating tern,, Ti,.: r -.., ,r.I
farm will be rented together, or the tavern alone, if the tenant
shouldpreferit. The house isalrea..1, .r-,;:l.:.j. :. ...l ......
will be givenon the 1st of January r.- '
GEORGE CALVERT,
dec2-dtf Near Bladensburg.
VALUABLE FARMS AT PRIVATE SALE.-
The subscriber will sell at private sale all or any portion
of the real estate left by Thomas Cramphin, deceased, remain-
ing unsold at this time, consisting of the late residence of said
Cramphin, and other lands adjoining, together with two or
three very.valtable Farms on Rock creek.
Trhe Dwellngt-house Fqrm'is situated about eleven miles
.-.. WV .:,;.. on the Washington and Rockville turnpike
road, and contains 3754 acres of land, a large portion of which
is in wood. Th.: "-.,v:"~,: n": consist of a brick dwelling-
house nearly ne. ,, ,'i 11 b....cessary out-buildings.
Tlhe Rock creek Farm, situated six miles from Georgetown
immediately on the Georgetown and Rockville turnpike road,
is one of the uiost valuable and desirable farms in the county,
being composed of a large portion of the finest timber and mea-
dow land. The improvements consist of a commodious frame
dwelling-house, and all the necessary out-houses.
These lands have been recently surveyed, and laid off into
farms of from 200 to 400 acres; but should it be found advanta-
-geous for the disposal of them, they will be subdivided to suit
purchasers. Any communications addressed to the subscriber,
-at Bladensburg, or left at the National Hotel, Washitgton, will
-be promptly attended to. GEORGE CAL VERT,
dec 21-dtf Trustee.
BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Chrlst-
IS mas and New Year's Presents, consisting, in
part, of i......1 't. -.I3, Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
-nd Iys: LJ,..,, ... -i. Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
-.:l-. ji-T n-T-. .:J richly inlaid with pearl and ivory,
from $1 to $30 each; splendid Card and Neeodle Boxes, of
pearl, ivory, and shell, beautifully inlaidt, from p2 to-isl earch ;
Gold and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
50 cents to $12 each; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps ;
Arabesque (new) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
variety of new Games; Dissected Monuments, &c. neatly put
up; Writing and Travelling Desks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Dressing Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands;
splendid Cliina Figures for centre tables ; Toilet Boxes; China
and Bronze Inkstands; Ladies' and Gentlemen's Pocket
Books; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets ; Silk and Bead Purses;
Bouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets ; Sil-
ver Instruments; Pearl and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
folders; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes; Chessmen;
Backgammon Boards; Battledores ; Damask, Tidted, and Em-
bossed Note Paper; Perfumery of every description ; Ladies'
and Gentlemen's Penknives and Scissors ; with many other
Fancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at fair prices at Stationers' Hall.
dec 24 W. FISCHER.
T HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
A lhath obtained from the Orphans' Court ofPrince George's
County, in the State of Maryland, Letter4 of Administra.-
tion on the personal estate ofthelate Henry W. Yost, deceased,
of said county and State. All persons haviiig claims against
the said deceased are hereby warned to exhibit the same,
with the vouchers thereof, to the subscriber, on -or before the
1st day of March next; they may otherwise, by law, be
excluded from all benefit of said deceased's estate. Given
under my hand, this 8th day of December, 1836.
dec 13-w3w RACHEL YOST.
AGENCY AT WASHINGTON.-JAMESH.CAUS.
TEN, (late ofBaltimore,) having made thiscityl is perma-
nentresidence,and located his dwellindand office directlyopposite
to thie Department of State, will underage, with his accustomed
zeal and dihgence, the settlement o" claims generally; and
more particularly claims before Cougrs.s, against the United
States, or the several Departments thereof, and before any board
of commissioners that may be raised for the adjustment of spo-
liation or other claims. IHe has nov in darge hits entire class
arising out of French spoliations prior to the year 1800 ;
with reference to which, inaddition to a t.ass of documents and
proofs in his possession, he has access to tlose in the archives
-of thie Government.
Claimants and pensioners on the Navy fund, &c. bounty
lands, return duties, &c. &c. and those requiring life insurance,
can have their business ,romptly attended to by letter, (post
paid,) and thus relieve themselves from an expensive andincon-
venient personal attendance.
Having obtained a commission of-Notary Public, he is prepar-
ed to furnish legalized copies of any required public documents
or other papers. He has been so long engaged in the duties of
Z agent, thatit. can only be necessary now to say that economy
and prompn*t attention shall be extended to all business confided
to his care; and tiUat," enable him to render his services and
facilities more efficacious, h-e has become mamniar wnn ail tme
forms of office. Ieb 26-ly
AARON BURR.-Life of Aaron Burr, by MATTHEW L.
DAyVs, from his own papers and correspondence, is this
day received for sale by
dee 14 P. TAYLOR
RADLEY & CATLETT will have clothes made up
at the shortest notice, by experienced tailors, and in the
best manner, at a low price. Their stock of Cloths and Cassi-
meres at this times very large and complete.
dee 13-3aw3w (Gl. & Tel.) BRADLEY & CATLETT.
C HEAP SOUVENIRS.-F. TAYLOR has just re-
ceived a few copies of Proof Impressions of some of the
most beautiful English Souvenirs for 1836, which have beenim-
ported at the same time with the same works for 1837. They
are offered for sale at prices little exceeding one-half the rales
at which inferior impressions were sold a few months ago.
The German Tourist, for 1837, and several other splendid
Annuals for the new year, are also this day opened, and for sale
below thie usual price, at the Waverly Circulating Library, im-
mediately east of Gadsby's Hotel. jan 2
FRESH FRUIT, WINE, ,c.--
50 kegs Malaga Grapes 10 boxes Olives
20 boxes Lisbon do 5 do Capers
100 do Raisrins 5 do Anchovies
30 kegs do 10 do Pickles
75 boxes Prunes 5 do French Mustardc.
10 bags Palm Nuts 3 do Mnccaroni Pasteh
5 do Filberts 20 do Lemons
15 boxes Citron 15 barrels Shellbarks
50 hampers Elephlant, Star, Sun, andl Rilly Mouss Cham-
10 boxes Port Wine [pagne
10 do Muscat do
Just received and for sale by
dec 24-co6t S. G. KNELLER & CO.
ULWER'S NEWV DRAMA.-The Dutchess of La
Valliere, in five acts, by E. L. Bulwer, author of Rienzi,
&c. is this day received for sale by P. TAYLOR. dec 19


Bank of the Metropolis,
January 2, 1837.
V"T HE Board of Directors of this Bank have declared a
dividend of five per cent.- on the capital stock, for the
half year ending the 31stDecember last.
jan 3-d2w GEO. THOMAS, Cashier.
"W ILLIAM BUIST, Florist, lately from Phila-
delphia, begs leave to inform the Citizens of Wash-
ington, and the Public in general, that he has for sale at his
Green-house, corner of 12th and H streets, one hundred sorts
of the choicest Roses, including the Monthly Cabbage Rose.
One hundred sorts of the finest Geraniums, some ofthemn very
splendid.
Seventy sorts of Camilla Japonica, of the most beautiful colors,
several of which are now in flower.
Hyacinths, and other bulbous roots; with an extra assortment
of Plants for the garden, green-house, and parlor windows.
All orders promptly attended to, and packages put up withcare
for any part of the United States .
N. B. Plants and Bouquets for parties &c furnished on the-
shortest notice.
jane 3-3.t (Globe)
Ft HE HOTELL, known as Strother's," situate
on Pennsylvania Avenue, (adjoining the General Post Of-
fice, opposite the Treasury Department, and i,1r,...i,-. I1 con-.
I.-...u : to the President's House,) is now t..: ,.il fti.-.I up,.
., i1. .11 be hereafter known as the Columbian." :
The subscriber (late proprietor of the American Hotel) takes
pleasure in announcing to his friends his ability to entertain vis-
iters in the best manner, either transiently or permanently ;and
hopes by his assiduity to continue to receive that patronage
which has ever been so liberally extended towards him.
A. FULLER.
N. B. Attached- to this establishment are several handsorime
parlors, appropriated to families. A. F.
jan 3-d3w (Glo&Tel)
The editors of the Patriot, at Baltimore; Poulson's Daily Ad-
vertiser, Philadelphia; Courier and Enquirer, New York; and
Richmond Whig, at Richmond, Va., will please insert the above
advertiseetent every other day for three weeks, and send their
bills at above.
WtDEIRA, SHERRY, AND CHAMPAGNE
a uINES.-The subscriber has in store a choice selec-
tion of superior old Madeira and Sherry Wines, of his own im-
pomtaton, and in order for immediate use, viz.'
OldL. P. Madeira, March" brand, in pipes, half pipes, and
quarter casks.
OldL. P. Madeira, of various ages, in boxes of one and two
dozen bottles each.
Burgundy and Tinta Madeira, do do.
Gold, Brown, and Pale Sherry, in boxes of one and two doz-
ens etach, very old and superior; "Romano" and "Yriarte"
brands.
Sparkling Champagne, the mostntpproved and favoritebrands.
SRed Hermitage, very old and fine flavored.
dec 7-3taw4w v WALTER SMITH.
B EAFNESS.-A York paper sayeth, that a remedy for
the restoration of hearing is to be had of Doctor Green,
Reading and Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Enquiry has frequently been made as to the principles of
'cure, and the nature of the cases in which hearing has been re-
stored.
It proves effectual when the affliction is caused by nervous
weakness, as the remedy gives health and strength to the whole
nervous system.
Ont the other hand, when the affliction is owing to other causes
-other means of help must be sought for-but-and it may be
repetated-that, in cases where deafness is caused by nervous
weakness, the remedy will restore hearing, as hath been expe-'
rienced in the editor's own family-as well as in the families of
many of his neighbors also.

Now-according to the Doctor's practice and principles, that
MUCH OF THE ART
SOF PHYSic
S CONsIsTs
SIN TKNOWING,WHEN
L NOT TO GVE IT. J
The restoration of hearing is brought about without giving any
physic I-without giving any medicine-as hath been ascertain-
ed in numbers and numbers of instances. Therefore, and in
part return for such great benefits received, we make the above
known for the good of our fellow-citizens in similar distress.
Assistance is sent-free of postage, fior as many as are ahlict--
ed in ;t family, including the relatives of such family also, for a
fee of five dollars.
For a fee of ten dollars assistance is sent-free of postage al-
so-for 3 or 4 persons more-in addition-as at times neighbors
may be in want of some.
And in case other sickness besides deafness and loss of eye-
sight happening, help is sent for such sickness without any
charge.
The fee pays for all and every help sent to families from time
to time. ,
This is considered a praiseworthy plan. And in conclusion,
it will, no doubt, be very satisfactory for people to know that the
assistance is not to be applied to the ears-nor the eyes.
NOT AT ALL.
Consequently no danger whatever can happen to them-no-
none whatever.
And during the time that people are using his assistance at
home, and learning how to help themselves to restore and re-
cover their hearing, their eye-sight and their health again
They can follow their customary business ;
Thev can live as usual ;
And'they can also eat and drink what tastes best.

The following is an extract of a letter from Mr. Baker, to the
printer:
My friend-The method of using Dr. Green's remedy is in-
nocent, is easy, and performs the cure by strengthening the
nerves. My neighbor Jones's wife thought she would try it
too, being a long time troubled with weak and sore eyes, a long
lime troubled with dimness and failing of sight, and over one
eye a film (a skin) was beginning to grow and spread itself.
This affllliction, together with her deafness, caused by nervous
weakness, very much alarmed the family, insomuch that help
was sent for, and which arrived per mail free of postage ; and
which help in little more than a week made them as good and
as strong as ever, doing needlework now without spectacles,
and now is restored to her eyesight as well as to her hearing.
C.. BAKER.

N. B.-With the remedy the patient receives an instructive
and easy way how to preserve health in general, throughout
the whole year. This is of great value to families, (botl to pa-
rents and children,) and 'tis sent without any charge whatever.
It always accompanies .the remedy for deafitess and eyesight.
Until quite lately people had to go to the doctor to get help.
This was to them great trouble.
Absence from home, and business neglected.
Danger of travelling.
Running the risk of getting sick from home, which often hap-
peted.
Being obliged to stay with the doctor at times, from one to
three weeks, and sometimes longer.
Generally cost from 20 up to 30, 40, 50 dollars, sometimes
Now, by this tilW plan of sending help to people, at their
homes, all this is saved, and costs so little that 'tis not worth
mentioning. C. F. BAKER.
State of Pennsylvania, Sept. 10, 1835.

All printers who publish the above will receive the remedy
gratuitously, and free of postage also. It will be placed at their
optional disposal, as at times their neighbors may be in want of
some. nov 15-wly
TO JOURNEYMEN CABINETMAKERS.-
Wanted immediately, 6 or 8 journeymen cabinetmakers
to go to the western part of South Carolina-to a very healthy
place-where the best wages and constant employment will be
given, and money sure. Nonte need apply but good workmen.
For fiurrtlher particulars apply by letter, addressed to A. B. and
left at the ollice of the National Intelligencer.
dec 24-eo2w (Alex. Gaz.)
O THE AFFLICTED.-Anti-dyspeptic Aperient
Pills, No. 53, approved by the Medical Faculty. Prepar-
ed and sold only by BARNARD & RAYMOND,
No. 2 Varnum's Row, Pennsylvania Avenue.
dec 21-2aw3w
N EW STEEL PENS.-W. FISCHER has just re-
c-' eived a largelotofNewSteel Pens (superior to allothers
in use) made by the original and incomparable Manufacturers,
James Perry & Co., London, being the fillh Platent they have
obtained for their improvement in the Metallic Pens.
THE UNDER SPRING PEN allows of an opening across the
back, which gives additional freedom anttd elasticity, rendering
it a most pleasant and useful instsnment for the general purposes
of writing.
THE SIn SPRnING PEN. The improved flexibility of this Pen
is derived from a side cut above the shoulder, passing the centre
of the back ; the increased elasticity thus obtained is natural
and easy, gradually extending from the point upwards. Also,
United States Government Five Slit Pens, andl the Van Buron
Pens. Tobe had only at Stationers' Hall.
dec 26 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.


T~O PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.-The sub-
. scriber respectfully informs the Public that he will open,
on the Ist day of October next, a French and English Board-
ing School for Young Ladies, at Bordentown, N. J.
The advantages of Bordentown as a place fitted for the esta-
blishment of schools, if equalled, are certainly not surpassed by
any in the whole country. Situated on the Delaware, and eigh-
ty feet above its level, proverbial for health, at the head of
steamboat navigation, accessible from Philadelphia and from
New York twice in every day, and at all seasons of the year,
furnished with excellent boarding-houses forthe accommodation
of parents and visitors, this beautiful village offers, indeed, all
that can be desired for the purpose.
The buildings occupied by this institution were recently
erected by the Count de Survilliers; they stand on a hill,
immediately opposite his mansion, and are, in fact, a portion ot
his splendid estate. In preparing them for the reception of
young ladies, nothing was omitted that could contribute to their
health and comfort. There is on this property a chalybeate
spring, whose water was analyzed, and found to be equal, in
every respect, to that ofSchoolcy's Mountain.
The distinctive features of this institution will consist in its
being essentially a French School. It is generally admitted
that the- French language has now become-an important, not to
say indispensable, branch of a polite education. Yet it is a truth
no less indisputable, that the attention it usually receives in
schools is comparatively small, and attended with little or no
success. Ten years' experience, and much reflection upon
the subject, have led us to act according to the following propo-
sitions :
1st. The knowledge of a language is two-fold: it embraces
theory and practice.
2d. Theory may be learnt in less than orte-fourth of the time
needed to acquire practice.
If this be true, we may draw from them the following con-
clusions : .
In studying the English, thle American youth have only theo-
ry to learn. In studying the French, both theory and practice

are to be acquired: from which it necessarily follows that the
attention given to the foreign idiom should be at least four times
as great as that given to the vernacular. We therefore use the
French language in our intercourse with our pupils, and, as far
as is practicable, French text books of Hti'...-, geography ,
Mathematics, &c. are made'"use of in t.-- s',--.o of these
branches.
Bordentown, N. J. August, 1836.
A. N. GIRAULT
REFERENCES.
Bordentozon-Joseph Bonaparte, Comte de Survilliers; R ev.
Edwin S. Arnold, A.M.; Rev. John C. Harrison; E. Dubarry,
M.D.; ,William Cook, Esq.; Lucien Murat, Esq.; John L.
McKnight, Esq.; Nath. Dayton, Esq.
Burlington-Right Rev. George W. Doane, D.D.; Rev.
Samuel Aaron; Samuel R. Gummere, Esq. ; Hon. Garret D.
WalL; Capt. John T. Newton, U. S. N.
Bristol, Pa.-Rev. Charles Williams, D.D.
Philadelphia-Hon. Joseph Hopkinson; Peter S.-Dupon-
ceau, LLD.; Hon. John Sergeant; Ch rlo-. Pi.-o. :q.m
Charles J. Ingersoll, Esq. ; William Fry, Esq..; ':;- .,--,-. M,- I.:-I
lan, M.D.; Professor Walter R. Johnson; -J..:ept P. E.s-s. ,
Esq.; Samuel M. Stewart, Esq.-
Cincinnati, Ohio-J. Reese Fry, Esq.
New Orleans-Achille Murat, Esq.
Charleston, S. C.-William Lance, Esq.
Natchez, Miss.-Hon. Robert J. Walker.
Galena, Il/.--Major Legate, U. S. A.
N. B.-A Prospectus of this Institution may be had at the
stores of Henry Perins, Chestnut street, and E. Durand,
corner of Sixth and Chestnut streets. 4 nov 15-10t
T RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of a decree of Saint
Mary's County Court, sitting as a Court of Equity, the un-
dersigned as trustee will expose at public sale at Leonardtown,
on Tuesday, the 31st day of January next, between the hours
of one and live o'clock P. M. if fair, if not, the next fair day
thereafter, all that tract or parcel of land called "Part of Broad
Neck and Nun's Oak," containing one hundred and nine acres,
more or less, being part ofthle land of which the late Sympho
Rosa Millard died seized and possessed. This tract of land
is situated in Medley's Neck, immediately on the Potomac river,
and is one of the finest little farms ., i M .,' -.:.:...i l ..-
highly improved, and capable of ".. .. '.. .-:... I
immense quantity of sea ore that i -.1 .i- ..'r. i- I ....., and,
independently of that, has the benefit of every convenience and
luxury which the river affords. The improvements are in tole-
rable repair. A further de'rcrirtidon i ldeomel unneceo-3rs, .
ir ; e p.oe rm od. those .', ]-..,:, .1 h:. pil ,:l ,.,ll I. ** '.- T" "T -".-'-
previous to the day of sale. Terms of sale are, that one-fourth
ofthe purchase money shall be paid on the day of sale, or on the
ratification thereof, and the residue in two equal annual instal-
ments, with interest from the day of sale, exclusive of that part
which shall fall to the share of the two infant representatives,
which shall be paid them on their arriving at age, or on the day
of marriage, the interest to be paid'to their guardians annually;
the whole to be secured by bond with security, to be approved
by the trustee ; and, on the payment of the whole purchase
money, and not before, the trustee is authorized toconvey to the
purchaser and his, her, or their heirs, the property to them sold,
free, clear, and discharged from all claim of the complainantsor
of the defendants, or of those claiming by, from, or under them,
or either of them.
dec 24-w5w JOSEPH FORD, Trustee..
rTHE SCHOOL FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS
heretofore connected with the Georgetown College, Ky.
will henceforth be connected with the institution lately estab-
lished atthe same place and denominated BACON COLLEGE,
Georgetown, Kentucky.
FACULTY.
Walter Scott, President, and Professor of Hebrew Literature.
Dr. Knight, Professor ofMoral and Intellectual Philosophy.
S. G. Mullins, do Anciett Languages.
C. R. Presrimenski, do Modern Languages.
Dr. S. Hatch, do Chemistry.
M. Sawseski, do Drawing and Painting.
T. F. Johnson, do Maths. and Civil Engineering.
J. Crenshaw, Principal of the Preparatory Department.
The Sessions commence May Ist and November 1st..
T. F. JOHNSON,
nov 26-St Prof. Civil Eng. Georgetown, Ky
Tr14HIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that the subscriber
hath obtained from the Orphans' Court of Charles county,
Maryland, letters of administration on the personal estate of
Benjamin A. Lancaster, sen., late of Charles county, deceased.
All persons having claims against said deceased are hereby
warned to exhibit,the same, with the vouchers thereof, to the
subscriber, on or before the first day of July next ; they may
otherwise by lawbe excluded from all benefit of the said estate.
Given under my hand the 23d day ofNovember, 1836.
ELIZABETH H. LANCASTER,
jan 3-w6w Administratrix.
INERALS.-The undersigned has just opened a large
11. collection of brilliant and rare Minerals, chiefly from
foreign countries. Among the specimens are that very scarce
mineral Elastic Bitumen, from Castleton, .England, the only
locality known; several magnificent samples ofthe crystallized
and iridescent Iron of Elba ; Fluates of Lime, from England ;
the Lavas and Volcanic Sulphur, from Italy; Ycnite, from El-
ba ; splendid specimens of Stelbite, from Scotland ; also, Car-
bonate of Strontian, &c. Together within extensive variety of
American Minerals.
Cabinets complete, price $10, carefully put up, and forward-
ed to order. JAMES RIORDAN,
Antique Bookstore, Penn. Avenue.
SHELLS.-A few rare Shells from the sunny isles of lie In-
dian Ocean. dec 23
MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, in one volume,
price 75 cents, isjust received, for Fale by P. TAYLOR,
by S. W. WILLIAMS, M. D. Professor of Medical Jurisprun
dance, being principally a compendium of the opinions of the
best writers on the subject, with an essay on the importance of
the study of Forensic Medicine. Designed for physicians, law-
yers, jurymen, coroners, &c.
Also, Chitty's Medical Jurisprudence, Beck's Medical Juris-
prudence, together with a large collection of the latest editions
of the best law books, most of which have been purchased at the
lowest prices, at thle recent Northern trade sales, and will be
sold invariably at the lowest prices at which they can be pro-
cured either in New York or Philadelphia.
Purchasers are invited to call and examine for themselves ot
this point, before sending their orders to the North, at the Wa-
verly Circulating Library, inmediately east of Gadsby's Ho-
tel. nec 26
ASHINGTON COFFEE HOUSE.-The Pro-
prietor of the above establishment begs leave to make
known to the travelling Public that he has several vacant rooms
which hlie will let with or without board ; Ihe addresses those
particularly whlo have business in thie Capitol during the ses-
sion. The advantage derived by taking rooms with thle under-
signred is that, during thie inclement season, they could dine at
hiis Refectory in the Capitol, where a great variety of articles
may be had at the shortest possible notice.
It is not generally known that there is a Refectory kept in the
Capitol for the accommodation of the Public ; it is in the base-
ment story under the Senate, to the left of the west entrance.
Citizens of Alexandria, Georgetown, amd vicinity, may be
supplied with refreshments at the above Refectory.
N. B. Families supplied with oysters by the quart, gallon, or
otherwise, at either of tIe above estaldishments.
dec 17-3awlm JOHN PETTIBONE.


No. 7458.


~,-s9;ns~i;uP7sPrai~PI1_V-(XIU-~CPCrr*Ff- -1 Ilr.~l~-~-~ie~(l~e~zRIIY1~*as~lR~mml~


__


SCHOOL FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS, George-
town, Kentucky.-This school was opened in May,
1835i in connexion with the Georgetown College, Kentucky.
It will hereafter be connected with the Bacon College, lately es-
tablished at the same place.
The great and increasing demand for Civil Engineers through-
out the United States affords to young gentlemen who embark
in this business a more lucrative salary than any other profes-
sion in our country.
Well-instructed assistant Engineers now receive from $1,000
to $3,000 per annum, while Principal Engineers readily obtain
from $4,000 to $10,000 a ydar.
Several young gentlemdri have finished their course at this
School and immediately obtained employment at.81,000 to
$2,000 per annum.
The favorable manner in which they have been received by
the most scientific Engineers in the Union, has induced the.sub-
scriber to extend the course of studies-to increase the facilities
for acquiring a thorough and correct practical and theoretical
knowledge of the science, and to adopt many valuable and im-
portant improvements, suggested by the most. eminent Engi-
neers in the United States. '
A Student who has completed a regular course of Mathema-
tics may graduate in this school in six months at an expense of
$120 or $150. Ottfers will require at least twelve months:-all
things being favorable.
COURSE OF STUDIES AND INSTRUCtIOe.
1st. The full course of Matliematics'studied at West Point
(Davies' Mathematics,) from Arithmetic to Fluxions inclusive. ,
2d. Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Geology, and Mine-
ralogy.
3d. Drawing and the5principles of Construction.
4th. Civil Engineering, theoretical and practical.
The Text Books in Engineering are Sganzin, Long, and Ma-
han, (Professor of Engineering at West Point,) Wood on Rail-
roads, (American Edition) Inland Navigation," from. Brew-
ster's Encyclopedia, and various other standard works in the
different departments of Civ:l'Engincering, which will be used
for works of reference.
The -practical course will be attended to in the vacations,
(April and October.) During these months the subscriber will
be engaged with the class in a regular tour,-with the Theodolite,
Compass, and Level, making preliminary, definitive, and final
surveys for railroads, canals, and turnpikes-inspecting the pub-
lic works of the State, the railroads and canals, the curves, cul-
verts, bridges, embankments, excavations, inclined planes,
locis, dams, &c. to conclude with a report of the survey.
The students of this school have the privilege of attending
gratis, any other department ofthe Bacon College, which is .per-
haps the most fully organized institution in .te West. The Fa-
.r.ulty consists of a President and Professo: .:.f rHL.re.' L;ie r-
ture ; a Professor of Ancient Languages; a P,.:. .:,cr ..: 'M.:I.ltrn
Languages (a foreigner;) a Professor of M,-'..plyvs, B.ile-
Lettres, Political Economy, &c.; a Professor of Mathematics and
Civil Engineering; a Professor of T..'.. .rjpln: si r,, Arlhnsc-
tural Drawingand. Painting, and an *\:: in[t ih lj h',e IlE-
wise the free use of the Library P i;l...:.e...l ,,h: .l Chen;.:ol
Apparatus. Theyare required :... ....L.:. lt... R.i- and .,u--
lations ofthe College. Each stu.J.,,t .i 1 ....:.:.',it:.H i t; I .:*:I ..I se
will be furnished with a certlficiew, c. on .i.-,..au.Lan, made ,Mut
on parchment.
ExPENSES.-Tuition for the first session will- be $850 in ad-
vance, which will include the regular college fee of $20, the
fee for the-practical tours, drawing, drawing instruments, mate-.
rial:, r, n.. c. Tuition for every subsequent session will
be i" j.J i,...., including the above items, and every ex-
pense incident to the school *.:. r.* 1.. t- ....k .
Board can be had in p: -, I '....h.: 'it '... 40 ) .1 r, j.'.-lhrs
a session. Fuel, lights, ..a..- .f.i-... a .c. ,at ,.:h-rge. Text-
books about $5 per session.
A student may enter at any time.
T. P. JOHNSON,
Professor of Civil Engineering, Bacon. College, Ky,

The following extracts of letters from two of the most scienti-
fie men in our country will show the utility ofti i,:h.:...I :
FRANKFORT, Ji.. 1 ', i"''6.
DEAR SIR: The four young ,:-. .. i-, o ..., i: Gen. .Jt.7wn
Mathematical School, who arte ', ,. -. Ji:: ; i r, tt, e
neercorps ofthe State, have '" -.j lt0..u: a:-r.d .,m .
in a very satisfactory manner. Among. the young-gentlement
of my acquaintance who have embraced the profession, of civil
engineering, those who have been educated at mathematical
schools have generally succeeded better than the graduates of
our common.colleaes.
------.-.---I---.--- .L- r .1 chemistry :.Jf ar. -t adr n-
tage to the engineer; and it is -aoslue-..----. L.
should be acquainted with architectural or l:in .Itr ,.o. TIT.
student should be taught the principles of construction .at the
same time he is taught to make his drawing. *
Very respectfully, your ob'tserv't,
SYLVESTER WELCH,
Engineer in Chief for the State of Kentucky.
To T. F. JOHNSON, Esq.
Professor of Civil Engineering, Georgetown, Ky.
LOUISVILLE, JULY 29, 1836.
Sm : It affords me pleasure to testify to the very correct and
satisfactory manner in which the two young gentlemen from
your school have conducted themselves during the time they
have been in the service ; and the ability manifested by the
prompt and skilful discharge oftheir several duties is alike cre-
ditable to them and the character of the institution in which they
were instructed.
The books comprised in your course of studies are appropri-
ate and well selected. I am pleased to hear topographical and
architectural drawing is to form a part of your future course.
This is an elegant accomplishment to an engineer, and in the
early part ofhis career will frequently bring him into notice,
and hasten his promotion to more responsible stations, where
his talents may be fully developed.
Appreciating as I do your efforts to elevate the profession, I
trust they will be crowned with success, and I assure you it will
afford me very great please e to render any aid in my power to
second your views.
Your most obedient, THOS. P. PURCELL,
Engineer in Chief Lexington and Ohio Railroad.
To T. F. JoHNsoN, Esq.
Professor of Civil Engineering, Georgetown, Ky.
From a Graduate of the last session.
INDIANAPOLIS, OCT. 1836.
DEAR SIR : We are about to commence tle loca-
tion of a canal 34 miles in length, to meet the Central canal,
which will take us till late in the fall. I am perfectly satisfied
with my situation, and shall never regret the money spent in
ottainingit. I consider the factof my having attended your school
one session to have saved me at least three years' hard labor,
for it would have required that time (had I not joined your class)
to qualify me for the discharge of the duties I now have on hand.
I believe this is the opinion of each member of the class which
graduated last session.
Respectfully, yours, &c.

From a correspondent qf one of the students.
GENEVA, N. Y. OCT. 29, 1836.
Your intention of going to Georgetown, Kentucky, is, I think,
an admirable one, and you would be very much to blame not to
go through with it; for, from all accounts, the school in George-
town is better adapted for preparing engineers than any other in
the United States. I have spoken to several engineers on the
subject.anduthey allt.g-oo in .rmnmending it very strongly.
dec 8--St
FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS A~EW4RD.-
Ran away from the subscriber, living near Baruesvtille,
Montgomery county, Maryland, on the 17th instant, two bright
mulatto servants, RYNALDO and LORENZO. Rynaldo is
about 5 feet 10 inches high, a well-made fellow, about 22 years
ofage, has a number of freckles on his cheeks near his nose,
and rather a down look when spoken to. Lorenzo is about 5 feet
6 inches high, an active lad of about 18 years old, pleasant coun-
tenance, and a very bright mulatto. They are. brothers, and
will no doubt keep together. Their working clothes are home-
made diab cloth pantaloons, new, their coats made last fall.
Rynaldo has a green close coat and fur itat. Lorenzo has a
brown frock coat and an old fur cap. The other clothing not
recollected. The above reward will be given, and all reason-
able charges paid if taken out of the State, and one hundred
dollars each if taken in the State, or lodged in any jail, so that I
get them again. NATHAN S. WHITE,
dec 29-wl2w Barnesville, Montgomery county, Md.
N tEW GUITAR MUSIC.-
While this heart its joy revealing, from the opera of Som-
nambnla.
Oh Love for me thy power, do do do
Still so gently o'er me stealing, do do do
The Gipseys' Wild Chant.
The Bride (a popular song.)
Auld Robin Gray.
The fair Puritan.
The Bohltemian Hunter's Return. '
Farewell, by the Forsaken.
Grand Waltz and Marseilles Hymn, composed and arranges
by Signor Perez, Professor of Music.
Just received, and for sale at FISCHER'S Music Store.
dec 30 [Tel]
ATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS.-An as
sortment of Mathematical Instruments, from 83 30 to $11
per set, iust received and for sale by
S GARRET ANDERSON,
Ilee 23 Penn. Avenue, between 11lth and 12th sl.




re- ~"-'-- -n _Ci- -


a-




TIONAL INTLLiGENCE

STATE OF OHI.

seems to be due'to the lonad meroi-
elvicgs of General ACE in the Ntinal
cils, that ivwe should spread befoe our ead-
nd his late associates followingepi-
of his feelings and his opinions on takin
hafr bl' GoVernor o which he has be
by the voice ofhis fclow-cizns of i
,oral Addres-qof Joseph fieGrenr o
io, delivered before the G iral.ssr,
member 1836.
EMIEN or THSE -
ND OFc rHC Horuse .- Rrnre rrc
ippearing bel'oto you to lakle th or office, m
*'de it necesar3n "thaI I sou tc t iam n
course ol'polic in thdiclta e of theSlrcu dt
cd to my care by the Conitio and Lasfour

our C'ont;iiulion, the duieif the E uie ,-
set ibith. FortunatelyC n tar t h itc rarqu
people, his.power is condon, U hiri arr,
5 no patronage to dv nr.: a,.nd -, n d -Chun-
pectants, mini-termnng toi hi;s an:,,an Ludi i,
ism. The C'ramrs c-four he
d a aialrI n.:, t an-j tic:e r, ihc las h-d ti-
r: hsnels.icol enf-cens aC ,ji' mci.. her e c
cc-ipare 'at pta-nc il- r ir.ni t-i i C-iU--
aim the h i)i l- ci n tia r ciliatsi a --lu-arci-T nscr r
h'a-a reasa lu b-i -- haan iIclr.:.u.J .:,
bhe Stoap rin i'nc'Lru -ern :-rrIch,: int lc Ni
irh all thi- prol-eu' cinJdSalouriri'r-ctcni 5Cic i
iirannnr ii h .a t cii, I rirrv. lfnll ,ltcLcreiair'mn- -
artul r F i, ihibii. i --- au -) i-m tl- T ,-i.nr
eribi C a nd w la i-.uI.,, -Is10 ar]It,-iiir,. -I
r-.urie anlJ a ilhe dre:i':i -i-r s c'
ry hod.ht o-f C -rr,:in.il p .- i- [hti pa I.
I.-.ak anI W, h r. c '-i .im tic i -te, r fau I-lj-II
ISn--a, I)- ,),a-wh iak.'e ;k .S-c- i ro c tn I1 halt1 li--6
.rIe and e- n b" ta it.iit -niu-.l am-it h
lC- c ica-t. h t iri r de i rn. r r Ci 1, .,. I-.le ,nE
i v -'C p er,:, c and iI.. f i? pea.:. i,: c i r-r .--d L -
lI," an-i -nlE-rrne iP' i-vr.-rur E.cc ar f. an i i
i, lthal the penal 'iei C tl-' ihe n i r ir -- d--- I_-
Lo eixe-utiorn. I It [ al.-ae i
.11i ll, c o cuns ;.:i :.n 1 cl man, h r -
arid rr t :r.j.:rn- ; cilhi ll ir.
ti.a 'v-wai rio Id -c.,' rn -ardI it,-
,ievia Ih,.e- reilroainr acn.' t-i
tlons ri c -apic eri c in hu:, O pl, r vizi -ad l a
I p lunich-iir ent 'ita b.. t of crL rd u-. r ip-i; mlc
t with lbie ,opinans l r' r z li i -rT!r- u un i cl ur
-n- :nI siadiuad o i i n fllir laiy 1lurfs,
f uit -=e ,fi:
ulfficieriat i -rme In3 y-, i.h t.:
and lhat thezi,;n ,mm i lult ct.:. i'iCu a
decp-ian.cremt in ios-Iz lliliul e .a a. I -Il ial ,
ih al iithe rill ..i.:,ri[ I liarc a beia -he o i. a
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-a ,,a I anoid. -
ii general .,ourie .'.1" :.Cac -rui-i.n, ICl I i
aeY predeeri--zur.. All tmall IF u 0
eni ilihe iffe.rn:e im n--a:--rr-,' r r-
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lVe, iv.:. i.- lcrs, bh i- ci- 1ht Irh t e ncai.:.n d
-rd o1" law ..W'-ikii v 3, o\ i,r atiu l n
1". c Civ -il p-cu -mm a', Sricmg ci i- ian- altjT
ltu.ii l *.ir i:ii-r i lel m terrrn,:r, e c
tlruirhlha i rnr i ar.e t ec.rn leir .i a

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las cian' i. ra-r, :apr. e, il55 : erci -, via u, -
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tphyncaal C, irefi r t a I
pt11ris e aJn Ic .. .r i ii nr.- r n I r-i. ii I- -
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Ad phF larii -,:.-pi-i :, i.]h al lh- v
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n :r.:.ned >.,- b e.i-1alli- U i a t
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i.jidiciary spokenef in terms t
llit; jil c r iB i, E r E "
I'eit~,irerritciic i]n taili]
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m Ihron jlhijc ei-riii- -'e cJiu -
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as, ru.:i,_riid,-ure ia cit Imia
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ilsi anvpcrra'anf ,.t lhes cr c I
isn, [hsre ha 'rt-: rthir sauiuie ty
your cra]isd 6cirn:
law -:,l'F <,Io r-ag 3, ibet pitliac
Inr t'-liorisn ua Ohuc i- ab-
nariace pl-,iaa.b bare l ai, pre;p nn
n pl I' g ,i l U ch f p mvu apri o f -


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N ain pee 1ti tsat apiaifj.aL.a Sb"ll I( ..c t
4 wilhoutl palpabl in.uj -tc heirownm da
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r l.as of 6ur:,et ; bat, F u -atC p t.
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r. S:-tra ,-i and L-: rl,--6rial; i n -d sr- na i
fashion; dee 20- otf

PEW IN ST..JOHiN'SC RC, AND NA
lizard Bridge Stock. & r.-Ia e aicrid
1. i&, f ii rl-c c-ar, a P -c i ii Si ,hi t- rc N-.i1 r l
cnro-jnd lir.. i -
"A I:.i-, ,i shrr of Navy Yard Bid c :fih
N-,d-J;aioLi,.aa Oold.Mine Compas.,an --a -iL- iat
Tt'atrl- .EDWABJ)YER, -
jan 4-3StIaf ..... A ret. cn i r.
A SEASON THIATRB TICKET oied-for
sale at .two dollarcs'bdlcv lt-cp- tpr.
jan 4'-t-3" -: -- I l O ,'B k ller.


HOU()SE--OF, REPRESENTATIVE.

REMARKS OF Mr REYNOLDSrbur-i
Oni'is triescntlation i/i'theprea le and o n
_on tie subject i/" tht ora Road.D c. .

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Dil tic Si.cl.,[,: t--.: -- -rn i-n':" -' : i
rtic- I'-.ll1,:, *.L: S;3 i n"- -i r1 nh.l ia -
l i s,,., ,,nl ,:h ,- i-i_, .icca,,i r,-ir,' .i

rIh,- .r -c. t p die tit I La..ania-'
r -h i- l: eI-i,' i-cl.lu I ic c u i i
S i,,; [ c r t-I b v I I['I..- I. l I -c


Ih Ti- U ici v-i1 slari, l rpi ti:-c :rii -

_-.e i'.l ek VrA.- '
T atiit-.,i lt i.j, i.,n 1 io-.hi tai. r ,

.n[.'a -In M 'at liii- -c-cbs :"-ancn sc-r
cI'i -C V'1"r i jlci c rcj l ilIi, -
"- cE t -.t- :,- ,-- s-i r -i a -,, ic, ,rT c


ThAlit-. : j,(ll *e* j a- r-i' -ni.- i -- l
ci i:. M. c- i rli-r .I,: A_ L I ,t- aT c i l
irbL" lI- ,:*1.'-,,: ; ,...[i|L Pr.:,:id'-n
aci ,-.ri.:: s-.i t.. .:-i'u: t t Le 7,i lhd ct -




fic d.ccc' i- i-i th tt; ~ c-r-i' ca-I i 1.-
ic, -',:,- ict: citi] aii' in i' c iA I i
i J .i ii] .. irrI c,. li i.'Ilt c'i s-I rl'. Ii r-.a
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7",' S1'll|.l l-d,, l' ; alnd [ 1.. ,l,

Sir. f[-. a.k-n, I .. lln--j IT--ccb5lt1 i:



ItL- itse -u l fan 1 il Il- : ti-cs-nI .h -r41i-, -.fI aZcI ec
cii. fib iuiua, t, ua hu tCn h u c--adi
Mr:. L i- i, It. scc-i i in ci tru cl l ii, c- I ail a 'i.
b-..iJ i _' .d irin, u--c-i L .-i Il-i-c ,0',c-- 1 t-r
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It l\':ir, ll r-i- ,i:-n .i t 1. r .il
Ir. f.,. .rr j1a r,,:, r) bl


Ih arnI-a rot hi-nao.-I nIaI.:,..- -.t.1,,in aI p i rc I ar
-a' n- -i 'ill'. : caid Oh n, r .: i- 1, -la cu- cUr u,


i'-c iit i.., MTt j lt..rnill nI..[rI". I ,A,, t.: l-
k, cv~L~l I-,:,.,C'jr,,.rtIT, ,n.Hd
jitra^ ,-' :,,iu


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fr-. n-i-and Nit-ii-uTreti aui-ol, iu Can t iaT/c ii1 lt'
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lli h i ,'Oi cLri I--i. T.r iasJ- -nl|6i &-i Ld icira m -




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,--:r, (hn Tl .-: It : ir i tla. ?al ir n,.nil i.rr ,
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a rt abhr-rin%.'
[i i s piui cup: lie.,r da',:al .; mi i *' rh. h





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Ithe AIt-nCuzp -i Ti%.- Tat ,l-i-Ta,, Sn i S c -i-a fIC' lbs
r )s,- tI- chn l.ui 't n I thi Tr- Sal, l -a i- Ca- i. ib- ai .-1,





ith cIa aleIt iiat I-)-thlec punt'il
lulI n l3i'rop ll' ,.T],I. ,ri Ft-- uir, -u iciie iJra
E'i- ut t1i -ltI. U 0urs' C ., ii -r .ii, i Nl
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r, ~ cii rIa-c.,,I ;I1tr T-l--iulr- in Ir.-nat- Iit-iiAltl. u; ai I iirid T .-
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lh ie ,'.' 1iooryI i fn 1 :l Ldc-i:,uthat of" atI

h c il prc iar-iple b',i Iu.iric TrI, hI I i.L.- r. %%at






f-u-s-I-n-C,' u~a-ilu stu f--~f- ru d t-- '-It na I .Ciu-,i-r .:;u
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ca l-n: i i,I al cr |i,:,ard, l.i rj;I. I s ae-i-c.asI-
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rt.:,-ai : hr1:-3 g' n-a ii ,- a I la. l ,a t[II- i n r at r :a-r r ,-
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'ba T .;,c lt ii. ii" h a l t, s ..iile iAII l
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i. rirng l :. thN SiaL ol" c i. i --i, urC
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>n-I' 'limii;ai Alt vi cci-- n-au r:ituit;ci
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Ali.:.,-i i"' .:.ir-i .:.t" [lhn- ir:.: []..ur
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NitS1iau[nis cim Iat IrIs ->-d ,ar it nc-.ICrtcl-c Ica i
,'.iu.-.i- .,-I. i r, lair a)l ti -
l.. L .: nc r. n.ris.s r l ir i n fi at c f .i .:
r I t C i:cr, -,lr, i[ i -; ului,:st -rl>::- m i"

Hl0Aiuu it llIa-;: l ,iF, mui'l i N i ci-
l'',ribj r >-..: I l h I 11n'1 1 1'[irfJ i 7*i,


.d i l U d,, :. nl I_ l.-I I r1 h e" h i l ,lI. l l,-| l
Ali,.rn fia.rc-i u ,:-hI.ti,-i J.fl- J '-r n I i, rti in a lc il
.ui r- I I, l I.. i iI. *, ci ,ja-rJ a St l .- i l ,l-'-Cvhe
in crp
I ht ; la, e-lu,:,ic.,, ,I, c orth ie nt ofth Sta tr a te
N l:: ,i,, l-n rI i'm- at p it irely out--F ti -
I nJiali ,i- nn b JCl-NCrot CTI '- lh--
cl--'-], -i--i -, ,iu- l ii n, at' i c l i- hal- I ca
H,.- : On .il:h :,-:. ai i-:all'h:r I 1'i,.a
^ *lh n ,: :,:,,h ,e ,*jt p,,.,li,:1, -:, ,''
eaim,: ar- rd ledthIAii te ,,]rL-udf-d al t Bu
Ifr,:a- lar.j,- -t -t!ia i. J.:-rTar? in a cI'i ia t in
i,-: ni r till tl, ini-i C1 ,c ,Ilu.. i, r -r-'and'lilh te
S n .n[" i fi.: C ltie in rt l .i li,-,a II: .i- I a conscio s
r...-ii .d in i" tic ,u riir i ,n l I ur- a v ofcons-
t]'] i],.,- ."'
I-. au I'.-pursue this course at this,'_etsoit.of
C .i.irir, I i :,', i I. p Iino ofh eneral.Assem-
1-'-1O "h i .-I- --a'l l :i : :-i th ePepleexpresed in
a meeting I .i t Te proceedings of this meet-,
lair i.:ci- ptII,,ei ai.1 laid or hi iofeach
I H .ciiir. tifiu -l' O, e.nrimarks f,.-, re ti o u I I-r -
fCi i t' Ili -t,,"i"irr,' c ,
TR IiTEE'_S %.LE.-B, aiiiyl Pr
1f .-i- ';,-'--' tI C.:uoIt I i r, ,- : i l a L'tn
c-r ,' i ii pt'3 i..-..,l..: ;,,jt:i;,:,r,5 l.:,i
aiC P ,:.:iaic ir, ,:cn ["ruJag, lh -- c
r,',,:,a.n, *,l'le.l_61-:!e_."SphE.
".ll..:lji [ie sic Jcldlc-i .h- aun t a
=. Terms of sale : Cash, on the
*Ih.ereofbythe court',, when ade w
ih'." r:gl,i .rd e'i,.:..fu'ti,. *?lirh:
.im under him. Nit."E T
cIn t:--,:,' T --
.ELL. IT DON'T SIGIFY
can to it,L for he has do
2394 4
c r-li, Ic in the Graid ConsoltJaui-
C. / apital.Pncz ,
~ i' -ci, niu'] c vii'al a i fhJ t i-i t
'tan ,I:, ii- i" au-iI i- ii a
Cc.\ND Ci)ONSOLIfiATE ET
:I

.And th" \[Ri|IN \ or, itrdJrA p
"drl m,:lcrl Onit' $7 a irkI.
I ,* cr11i :[I the prize. Oh, d
. al_,, c hI-: tUn;as H,:,,rl, C,-.:,
-L^OR RENT.-The Two-sto
.U. IT-ui, near Gadsby's Hote
by Mr. Jeremiah Sullianat
Apply to JH
janu6-3t .
C- OPARTNERSHIP.--The Su
../ ated themselves under
have taken the store lately oc


they will keep constantly on hand a enera assortment of Dry
Goods, Boots and Shoes. THOMAS CARY,
- jan.5-3t ,..BRADLY & CATLTT.
:flICIH JEWELRY &FANCYARTICLE.-
.tlLn KOBT. KEYWORTH'S Stock of Gold WathesRich
Jewelry, and Fancy Articles, isry extnd and coty,
;n carie' n i- ,an'.t iir.e-t lisment in is D bi -
ir,. The- r ,adu i an-i -entlem rcn si epctulis ae
SLO ex3mine bel, r-e purchactg ea hte.
jan;5-eo3t


POLITICS O THE DAY.

: ON THE FUTURE RPLS

FROM Tc coi' i en.; I-N "n'. 24
AMr.JoNxr': I perceii thatanyfeStates,
ana Georgia among the restrtst against any
Idrtunh,:r aC,.:liiiu]atli)Inid d i i n fthesu a d
plu. reiernue ot'f lth- Gr neal iin ent. If
lh~~~~~t Aiuttti-rTlist the taxc zuvht..h ft tntGo-
[hi. ; tcl'lnicr reift; tO t
tl-- lieiilt lha az ap a r /hlit Il t p t, it is u a d
prOc:per: b-it ;i' the piroced f the pb:clan,
ate inrciueid,, the StatOa- ,ldiiarbh
which, is tit jutdie"d an c i f
rpropriet 01 ioui [d p, lic,,Ibel- Itt p,
ltot1 itoit Iillichiil to estla i, t the p-.-e
of the public lanitis tilut t tilat t st cte i
nIorih\eit -If the (ihlit ii r, id l eStato
cal' ir rniIa in ilte ear l' l r, tt ra pti
ofihe -Federal Corietittin ,t ti-Sae
hIeld together" li.y the articslfcrirnit I
belunhr t. the s,.ce/' Sa a tid t i their

iAdfi/al clhiac-ier. I le urthrthath
Genct'al (Go,,ernticn, t i a I i- li thislu d r
thIe beniefit o i," ah e r. Sat ,ati if'tt%% r
cianl t5aCcrtcrrof Equjuui, It cc-,id be irate Pilcr!..y r[.tci
dis .! ihe pnr m""t-n.. mt uii titWt une; in hand, d.. vd,- s -iIn-r
thej salch In i, at Iurr :t.t'r, Eq uta 'Cr all .- -
ndi l,,i n the pr i h.-, F Itunt t u .n, T cii in
hc i- i, i5 i ih i lba tsr-tor.c-ut,,i at,

Icn..:. i nti- Iull e-ul ,-icii: ia f.-i: nhi5 i i ll
p it n n-i '. -. I [ I -f:illl- 1 l" l,],
t 1 l i % : v. z < lI e < r i -_ i,. A J) a

11:,- thic r' -aI buLiI- I. p. iri r lt-I th c
tuai nl hi,- ii ulltt
I.'. I tamint lh [triicl is .:,.roi
Cih I J i', if .tuli '-, IT';' 'rnJ a
c .: a t 4n Eici ) t at-L 4-,il, l uirt t s a-
in a rr- tin-,,l if ..l t.:e [l .nn] ilethi ;
i.c-ml- r- rc.'IhI. -,-.m tinili- t .:.th' i -a in tt 0
af',r.if- ] jl A aiu all c- ic at "l r
I b.... t, [ I_ ,t iii rl Lua hr.ucui rU c-.J t cs n dr .ii, r -
ruer.l icii:.iti, an-a sillui, :,i t c
grie'r, a nc -i A:cli, Isd-ll l, J ad- -Ii-rI
: i". i ru hi,: i shdi', I b- ar"'."l'rI- I i n
F -'..i n ti lic I Sie. -l e :... l iI" d -tl h ,ccbN'I i ii -i
tv i urlr -Jr'..d, Car iry p r[,i-r'a.hlar a I Ad
inR-' irr.i utn.ci I I hr,'r, nch4 1hirilu n-eat- -
irn-; t,' 5iiJi-, hlud ', ti-Unite ,-J ;n arc -
.,iid ;hall, ironi timl:- t: time 1 ci I dap i.u i eta e
for pF.,yin- that ipr ip:.flron dfn .h beI d n- ed l -
auiltr- t'aliild dilrectiti: t oi'th- Lthe
-a'tj' ,%idi t h ltrnn the ani-i I, a t nitedra i
:n" r-!,- -_ a .' lcI,,I i I e a ir si-." -up.r
',; -t. t,:, ,bh :,vr that, uit.-r tj art ,i
t I I-cr in ut itheIlicr tn-li'idhu-l cc it%, oreif 'S i tt
F_,n, lh jI 'i t ii,.ii i n-i th IIthicI .- tltr rc.r in
FieJLi l .-:r-II2- 1i1ihjl .- un fIu -i-tj i hu t
ira ).hll' :,i Lta lipe sr,,-. ,J h a ih- d
fl.tl I) \ ,'Vil' [hr ra.',. ,vi' i .
., cu. aaSite
I vr ct- M ir-.'it, It hI. i:,' i 'hi S ai:t- C: t u .:-ria -rut
p-rl, a:,i, t i- It rig- c -C rh. i-r itedSia' ef I.
ll,?[e",.u'i:.jirrif~d:rl
i ile' )arte-arC-l aTi.-wa -an the-th c
Il- The .StateI-l Vircini-i athaz L Iin
-;,iri:r ivshi-, h i -,.i Ju- n ,. urn e
c.,ri-w i c r- t ra t'r, U'titirn, riiri-
t.te in :oin-riri._'m a-, FOR THE ENFIT
"F -SAID STATES, VIRGINIA-INLiVE
riohit, lile, anrid Claim, a, titll -ot iaC ti
'beh iih thl- eiiT trll 1,,, lic iull Ii.ur I-c
ouet'cuultt i ithi ihe limit; ,: til i r h-it a
Iirns, :n.l ha'uti ht t, c tb ,s;t tier nil ,tiidl
tir the U.SES S iid [,par.i,.r,'i eaithe
ailiJ re-cd at
N ,.:., --2,1 On,: of'lhe T',c; and' 1ic t f-
uieLj Act Ist in ihi .kllcining ivon ,S -Thtaltthi n
nilih th, tc-rrtoritc '. ccdedl tothe iiet i a r,-
lt i:nt r i.e, d Ic,, or appioirii.: ar .a the b Cr i
i,,ne.pi purpriacii, ,-, d i-r ,J j..i in tt.Jthe
aid ;l]J -i. Li E ,tl'ic o A- [lite Aitn.i A -n hailIIIJ i
a C: ..[i,,i:,N Fni_, i thc U E rv E 1 u a
,iar o 01' ri: a- r-, ',i: l. c---'na, .,,c
Wc utthc1 1.1r~~y5tn~i i .i uc5ra5c Che a-d
?lit-: -, I-.l-;"l (4-r'l LCi.' IL -fI I a, d i IFn ,

nil,, cli..-ii r USEer PtURPOSE I'haSt.c.,-n-
,,z :'.', ",/ Is,. Q','-",:,''yl ,i,,,d b.ajn
f,'t-i,,.,. r ,'J. ;.., r,':, r.',l, r
C' n wvord.s i ea L i cde i xpilit t Isaid t nct l
ert,ment s, aT- ,;Ta;..- c.,C- r the Statcn. i-Innat.-- the- gal
"3 ii m 'i :, 1h:l T". i', LL th ur []
aoud t: nri l it thatandr- ha ain 3 tn-ph-hut
.:r,:-.elI a i ,.' I .I-rait ti, th itd S at- il C- re-
a-ifteruLe-J I'ur thei- i : and 'i, tI--CrCad S ,le : it
rluilJ.J, I l; sail 'Vircrinti-iN. Nic d a t
lit I u i n It V r ccvi ft uli-atr.I luarart- T, it vre c-il
-arrc n'- cf:,at tneic d -thIuItI SIAc'," and I-I ~
i,,- r,:,J a."sc.: in uiTr c c el ;I-ut len in a
tu c.;u -iit- tai pi. pt, irilu- her- fr pa ai thi l r -
t ik>..- th,: [,.jin-: pepi:ll:i'l], to i
Jy sp-;tri the iiit a n', d intara
at ,0| Iac1t t.) arfri e- :it her t n o dsi iut te' i -
inll, Iodiid,' a huiice all hi-er uei' rcang hr itrStaL
eie it'r II it-t a rath runc-d, an alti.-cY i; ed -that ea.-h
ai-pc..' ll3, u" iw ti, "titr -C ir-ni rI. iera he
l*t[ie il.t% i,, t'~lui bnlihr ,]L);
ch.a,,) e aril r ,pcn -_' r'ti l (.aeni ic h
lh,.n FedJ-r.t l 'iuc.:rruenther cc asri
la 'iu ,r n:. -) this Xrth.i'lrt n- cr is, b ti
llt e i' ,g fp r ,,. I .lel ., ;t- l i rit, uc t It v t h-t u P
phed br tli? c 1.,t.s',t .St',',a, it a t idly li ul
th.' ni tli:r m thl,, Cun --inl in that r ct
But thl-re i- E,; a VI'et \ c l ii- qutt n hu-i i rrr y
rrc.:.nclu-i-, ISupr.pu the tat- ; tdI a id er the
ait.-eA c ,1-' Ca'ri r- inattion, an.- ad sc cupt r -
sent Fe-- c a.rl ("oai tuitii, s I'ha d sebl i e
pi,'-'-.;J.-, ,t'tlj, [rulhl: IlauJ-:
i'uhid -liC tlz (f'uiclaw Ii, ai I l- d, di irc-i azW hat
univOtUI-c-I-h WCdI ('utr -.shalag li,-poluCIE[itateI,,.raise rsctliuc -
and n-i.I ri -ht .- ic, e o 1r h tltl ev rtilI-CI
pr i.-J- e in tihe iahanc .r heir au th.,hae ne it it
the [ulcrinI. ?-ir'-zing aron lhc.: a-l H o Idi har
cide, th', un-.'i uis ,:al cl in the co tra tma ith
',i".inia, to '-il : Ithe Iand; th sCededel l i-
e.I [,: a c rini,'.n Cund, 1'.r the i a n rc- ch c he
U iiJ i I St 't[ c a- have become, or shall become, members
I the ie ci edrc- Itirn or federal a lie ofth ad Stal,
Virginia ir.v c.'r, according atoth-in l tua
.', i.t.n:r ul'th g .ntc iral c- and rp ca.'nd hall e
j 'd'u./d'u ; nd ,i:.-ajii." 'r.i' C -nthatP Pc i a:ndC
no other u., or c- irpi '-hatsoescr i-' Doea n e l
perceive thM Ih FuIb c ilrju ,rn, ntvald
c.:.TpeliJ i actc C'ith il, t I c oe :the tara
their respective shares oftheoceedsof the lands as they
were. disposed of for. the use andbenefitof said States
Virginia tinclu-Aic :" It is no id objtion to say the
Stl_ tsCuuld hase- had to pit akto theFederal Go
crniitient; Ith.t ialit url t not have been the cas
;hcr oight hae Ceenulthenas threisnow. The
Federal Go-qvernnrr ni a ; rindted smof Iirindtedtmof
States, and that, at hu.,t1 had
supplies from the cediterSti ab
land procee sufuldbe touched
iti-cr driiian-, 11 was the ":te
c-iJ to be complied with.
Thi a .ica l'ul-he cuiLiIs.-t i t e ce
iu tihe ri'm a ,C of GaC tui tnir tri ni
ti-an ,,hl', Federal Gunitittliat n
.n'-nl L-.:,'ernia.:rnt a lIlie to
p:ut ariourt to the oure al-ot s th a
I'-:o, l.t it be huhou r, It aii
to pr--duct hit grant. Let
ni,,,.'ii the rfhi has5 p ise ate
himcil. \\'We mi.-hit talv',
"the i mot.r-orn j.ii-rtce tha
revokes the articles of cessi
under which the States rightful
show lhat they hi, e been ex
rest, for in- the Constitution
nearly si\ yc.acr- :,fl,:r ith Vir
theGovc-n'roo ,rir, ,-r rather ,i a
federation, tib-, x[,prrc.l-v fi t
witr- 'All hI Jebt eorlrn,.'i ru:ul,
before thl.; ado'fta:.n ,lC tlile C ti s
against the United States, under
the Oonfederation."--6th Art
it isideclared "that Congress
of and make all needful rule
the territory or other prop
States; and not/hi.ng in this
strued as to prejudice any cleaio
any particular State." .Not
show that this is not a strain


ments from which it is attemptd to deduce the right ofhe
States- to the public land. nr.thcat the river Ohioet
us see what Presiden: Jack-crasaid in his of M
Clay's Land bill, one amongthe few of-his tate papers
thai he has not recalled or explained away, one that's
the singular merit of being uncontradicted by any other.
His remarks were made in reference totat provision in the
bill which designed to give 12 per cento of the nett
proceeds to the new States, andarea follows: hat
more need be said to demonstrate its objectionable har
ter, than that it is an indirect and undisguised violation of
f


the plei.J,: gicr 1.,y C n ress the Stts, befor asing
--cari n-a marid: that'it .hrai the conditions upon
r-. h .li -.'mC .-t'lhi Sits.--o i n,lIbe ion.: iatit
zet.-at riau ,ht iii. W C. 2 -, pra-i tp-nthrC
E-.-.rY ial undl utli] r which tilr.rtir th
piual.: i. uj :iid i V b l, I., t. i eal tA a i,
1,11 aT -i ntd .11JJir.Y to i e d't:ie lde t, th
ti..n i >t"h iL, niti .di dri e-ate t ia r. Stli-: s the
painio tr Iv abi.:gate th-iEr a:the cr-v a. t
d i.-'iia r.n i th t r ,t ring.in. in ,t iI 'r:- C
;,, : i l l I-" U'"- Casd Sat, .
it 't tuall', rp,.- i'J-- that rh,.is all r u n-
.:u-ihli:Jd 1', the- g t;lcl e hl c make
all' neeidful'rules'andreg;.-,l orrru i himinto
c tf_',,:1. ~." *
Now however, things are c,- ri-r, -c-auih antto
r-.Juc thei- :urpltu; re enut hrce. n -ndii hie rrs-
t 'e, t, o iJliihn.tith p e .r the : ii pul a a d to die-
p-<-er l'thrm ,:n.ril. to actual ,t tr. Th i l ba frud
ip:onri the a StaItr-'l and ought t bei ,as ell a-
t.nmpt- to a y .fi' an; p.:.rtii-n o d ir
our alid al-are ihcir rilitluiartas -i- c new
Eil -'. C':nrTi al a ; 1.lI:,, h,.J : ir ; c-im-
p-rt L thc 'az:t c--c:.-. E; u -rid, %a Ir, u i pap--t ad
t:. thi..'n r Staii.:, a i- Ell3 as a a t,-n t:th lare
i, i r u- u ',f ric r i t lari-ir r,, thir le A n inr d ite tp f
l'i:.uld Vre pu-Lit t,: 'ieh /'- i p -I'r that'-
rin,,n I',nd," o enierui. r rrtd I-V rira r te
I ; a.h. a- h.L ii th~ orhr i r at I can-
du.ll;- admit that the r:, uld a, oclaisae-
rthi.r I in-3j', th ir pr: ,:eho.r dr d frio h
ale rai3tirLv.Iet of the Lhiu t r V, ait h ra ier
stat,'-, arid ,partulilY. i Gcu ia, ha ade iilarC
-,rnti ai'd alrin.--t i i a r't er cra. e .r made
i',_:qucru i It tO the ,Jopliu e, ti Fe al ititttn FI
think t it ti.',r I',' r.a. th.r is iY uat ill., rVa-
S ri-, J it', ho 'ri,:, cr, iw cI c, %l xI I,t u I Ior. -u5,
it dill be ru-,i.-t[ I-h ;: r c1aitl IJr.1 h: r ri uu'ts1
,i-.,ii: h-, .: 5c. ru.: I I;:.r the atrtlI' V t i,-t e Icad-
.,,n l ih,,tr FJe ral in. l uit utn in t ,the( ric ri t
h-,d arrpl p-w..-. r to raire Lric, ia ri sup -rnipe e t
vi t landh I i] rlun,, ,ill great lesen tequam c n-
'-.-rieoe r.h,-b'h s-ume 'cer to tai n ypr tc
tl'b- curplios recvnue, ari.i pre that such another d e
niuiat nrt bei r.,-t clri-:-i them. Su that timeire
,:ai he no i-e:.,'ue ethrI t .:i e r withu t lad rie-
riL-l: 0i- .,in iiF w-tt- F at, I b-ihr ac,. o
uLticdtucJ Our inn b, m,in;rill, and Alum- i the
diri-l',it n n-.n awa.,o o ro LUe mpart it that dC,
rin t ri-htiullr b, :l, n. l. l hi. : t b Cau it It-
tir.,ii olthr ,:uIrea-3 thn than ot an ct hr-r
ti..,u.z -,h -liri-l, ,n ui'cihi t -e a ta..ejta ll ro
-alec i.r the gr.uji'ty, it it be r- on-ider r ntimE Cir.
Lit ui c:,rn- t, a l'itir settlln -tard e maya d t to
rr'uird -.; i i sec rr ii rectiic and -e aird s
5i the _ror.:dueL o'the public land, udr the i c n -
p-, ,t )fa the Sritr of Virginia. Thi-i uri t. n h
rbi.:tr ii riao dc radati-',n, rsii dpen enc n ha o-
%errTeni, r t aidJ, paui-iin' ourr' -n our u righ we
Eh-d.uid cxacitr thi;r t rane
A. S. (CLAYTCN.
%ANV-CHAMBERED PITOL TOLEN
tat_ -..NI M r. i-',:,r'- r i- -E
l.:.l.e.l 'r.-..a b,; lXi,,,trJ -j G 3j.Ji.,
mi lini. I ha i-i. tic ken' rc a n ci, .- B. Al n,
-- ic.'h ,i- u -i ii'i' -:- -",: J..tralia und
.--f.tc--, L,.- rui-.n r-.rc i- rt, ny
Ii ,i ir,,+ ..:,lu y P-:r,--l i:,t" t -.-:i;-' a
[1liri, I.,II.il-[,- Lh-,,' l ',il! ihu,
Fir, .],li. v 1rn-d m t- i -c t ru C1:4thu i-t'tA-:Ean of tba-
lha[- i l rc:a rr :,A' f.t-:e p;tri ., :, ,r,<
3".d rn:. iu,?:
IAppl ... r. C Ci.v'a I, Ial ( -r;. r T -a:P.
1-ri.. : -,,', ra--r,- E r c:, i r--
.lin
P. MAll.iUrO ,. ON.-BtCia-
JS .-',.31, M,di.,.:ii, M,.ii,.ll~r,,:,
Oa Sar ar-,y er rirL. ith ir lt, al t- au -i
B ,,:.,,rr,'-_" vie,_,.' e tb,3 ,I I ,a
lt. f il" T ,:.ri. ,r ill pirl Sre r ri a-,
inuie.r,:,ii I -c l mir- tEi arid i
Tti- "L.I k *. l]< ;un p, doE hidj%
T b -.d .* lll i ,uI :, ;,i ^ -," *:' ,,1e-
ie ,nh- : .- i.- ,p -. 1 i1ri- U ri I aid
-va-Ii-~P. RUIfti0 &acSON.
-: i ",,,l,--j ]

J OHIWSTON' .'CRAPS, No., FOR
S Plir:r-.'rI--',v E-m irt di an i, ir ucd upwar
A,,na3ra ed cri-,tiure, wit, vaccr-,mp-rui rrrcc trd ,
s;. i | ,da. i r i.:-.e d, and tr' by F.TAYL ,pie
St'
'.t T --' i p.:i nr..,y nri-al ..-n a fa p ki of F -I 'h
wL-- ill t,':-.-'I r. IT t iar,, -r Ithe i.ttd
aT 'l '. a
UWENR-Y CLA 11' INE.-50iu ic
ie- E-.-,-h) ,aI.:dl rid tr aupn rr er C la' i-
r I ai', uuarn, ia-int- l t bereiai.o h a P--
b- \MNI. POWL & SON, A.ana.
I-an 6
ENGINEER'S PRACTICAL ELEMENTS
a-A l l a il- Iui-ija l -'arj ptl 'C the 0t,-:-e a th, ra-arr,, n
-r-=rje-id nd i;:.r zal.: I.TA LOy .
.an 6 --
P PROFESSOR HOLLAND'SLIFEOF AN
LBUHREN, in IL r,.,l. uti p-rr dtic uply
.i h: ii t ij.i-c,. ; j., ar-d ju: a c -pI-a F.T-1L B.
I ..-., i:' A r.[i.: i J 'k .-'ari nn al i ,P ,e'. i
<^'L'. 6i-. l..,,n, p "r lr lu I
e '. r.: ."-. p r LI i ic HII-I rc.r., e I
I --En.J;r:..-:.r'- n ,it--v.. r I w -1 -ri.:. c r iri.d
Cr Cr-i ns-i-i- c : .-v. r~u-td Ispi-;.zeed p5-nrc-it ofVan Burnn
price-1l ex5 . .
Ar.pl'" ai Ii- e Wa-irly CircuLtiin-L ra1ime-id t ea
,:-' 7.dc b.'- H Ia:.lil.
"ARE EDITIONS OF CLSICS-onued.
,t-. Aii: I -:.p irn ic -,' eJo, r v ,iir i i -Ar --
i .J,, i 'p Tra. Blic iei Te i E itit r. c I. -. A re-
l, 7 -. ,-, Mb, f 1. h
t, i- Ti,: ti en te[r i- P i f itir i-rn LV -
tIiitt cEdm ptutr o iii-,uaiit a i ; i Arntacntr us i-
,,_n,:ii E.J L i p, r B ,lii-)ayu) Va, lcc-ur.Fravi- un,, MDCIiI.
i I. c:.l. ,i 1.1e I ,:t. i '
On aic5l ii a ,ii.l,.J Bi,. reP ev lcniaA' .
jnn 6 JAS. RIORDAN.
N ElI' BOOK'i.-Ihe Ctin.:Ase.A-trdcr-i n
,, l Chifrn a, Ji iL irihaU.il ta al eri.im ap
2 A .-a.. Pr -it 21.
En--uri:-nar in Car,, J ria;ici, & .-v -rrsJr-
Mrr,-u ic C Leizerra t Ycuvi.Ladia ,c t y
i-arf-- .
Pilgruru', Pruicrrs', new nd n dtn.
For -t%,1. tGAETNEOy N,
P.:-nos Iaria iueriJ?', Lus
;an
QTOCI( E: I-FRANCIS DUGEN,:iucklriui- ,
['i,,,_,-n B ilh i.:- I:,l r,,:r,,, h:c i l..
W a Jin.rigi ,ri i l.] h, hI a ,. iri- h -i li,, hie n-i
ofFall. and Winter Stock-,, :,a ilith-,e ii m t p-- dpa-
'terns, and taken lodging' a Mr. Beuj. A. Th P-n-
sylvania Avenue, nearly ,,p,'i.t.Ga-ch-Ht l tie
:may be found until 12 o ct.:l.k in ci.- i[,said 3
in the afternoon of each day in theweekuntil Saturday ex,
when be will return to Baltimoreand will not be-heraagain
until next Fall.
Mr. U. hias on hand, besides the r
good assortment of Silk Sacks and
Pocket Handkerchiefs. .
Mr. I). will sell- stocks, warren
of the latest fashion, wholesale o
they can ba had for any where in t
t-a,.lur ta ju
Circuit Court of the Diias'
ttni Coouty.-Nore
Edward S. Bird, -
"* c' .^,'ic C r' er, al.: ri d
fl ENR Y NAh V LOR, In'-te", Ittinc
l- ai, .--ri, int t,, thi. der -rti i
cause, he halh sold all that part a v d
tune Enhrljed," whicic c ,i d~i'sr a
c.:.:- ;rngir 1 had in aa-i ,i-u'e, and m
thepurchaser thcri.,i, I-.r rh-. :un-i
dollars and uinta, cenL, and tih
complied with the ter-r .t ,I," -, re
Court: jt is by this C-'-rt, It C-t c h-
year eighteen hnodrci viai thirrl t
so made and rfuii-,, ,v tie -ani i tc r i
firnmed, unlec ,iuiC t-:, ic- r-nit h t
'o- before lhi: inrt- N-ds, te r' r
of this order t.tf- ml,'- -adl l he Nci
twice'a week t.:-r' hr5'i ,t tC u. r ,t l i
Monday in r-ub a
By order ofiflo Court. Tet


jan 6L5-0-317


Ws. a, ia,
Clerk.


FWSf1 I-" TO GIVE NOTICE ha uarr
S has obtained from tli.. Ophin'Cla .j'ITA iia
-- 11u-, r3 i ii-, rS-d- Sn :i, of ,C iv imi:-r- s n r o
ht f;-c. I -i 4At, c ANainf Alnte M.chin n
county, Dist. 'of Cblumbia,.decras ru e r ug lca
against the said deceased ure hi nudii.eau tthe

:i- ]h JI s, .:.,r J nusr, nr.'tl; tc i i- ther i bi la b
t. .l.iltij ra't. l v- ll t. en'i .l
ir.3 er n l ii. l,m.1 tIl-, i. lh i. ia J n a x-,'1 27.
EIiNARD INGLE,
jan .6-ny~a Administratar.
S I E% (. RtP 'ORLEANS SVtGR.-5lia.
-4 nt.' u 1, .,sih:c Vhi & DODG ,
Sjan 2-1,.St'Or, nJ t,.,
jan .-at. '" "


__















COMMUNICATIONS.

TO THE EDITORS.

Messrs. GALES & SEATON: In your paper of
is morning you express a wish that the truth
ay be ascertained, of an intimation; to which
seems a Boston paper has-given countenance,
,at the Hon. CHARLES J. HOLMES, one of the
fassachusetts Electors, held an office under
ie United States, at the time of giving l.is
>te, as Elector, for President and Vice Presi-
mnt of the United States. Mr. HOLMES is a
sntleman of great intelligence and respectabi-
'y, and nobody who knows him would sup-
ase for a moment that he could be guilty of so
-oss an incorrectness. Will you now please
state that; in point of fact, Mr. HOLMES, who
id held the office of postmaster for' the town
7 Rochester, in the county of Plymouth, on
ming nominated as an Elector, immediately re-
gned his office of postmaster; that another
-rson was appointed postmaster in his place
a the l1th day of October; that Mr. HOLMES
as chosen an Elector on the 13th day of No-
tmber, and gave his vote for President and
ice President on the first Monday in Decem-
tr, according to the provision of the Consfi-
ition.
MASSACHUSETTS.

ON AFFAIRS IN FLORIDA.
TALLAHASSEE, SEPT. 18, 1836.
Messrs. GALES & SEATON: Gentlemen: In your paper.
"the 27th of August you did' me the favor to publish a
>mmunication in relation to the state of the war in Flo--
da. The reason which formed one of the considerations"
ith you for the admission of that article, viz. the na-
iral sensibility felt by the writer for the honor of his
Ilow-citizens of Florida, which he deems to have been
,sailed," operates more cogently now with him to offer one
lore piece for publication in your paper.
In the Intelligencer of the 31st of August there appeared
well-written piece by a writer signing himself "Aris-
des," which, besides reiterating the old charge against the
'lorida volunteers for misconduct at the battle of the
Vythlacoochee, introduces a new matter- of accusation
against the Territory, because of the failure of the contem-
lated summer campaign. The sole design of this writer
,ems to be to thror discredit and disgrace upon the popu-.
>tion of Florida. No other motive is discernible. It ap-
ears not to be designed to justify or vindicate any man or
arty of men, except very remotely and by reaction, and so
Lr as the failure of a mere contemplated campaign can
irnish ex post facto" justification for the failure of a
)rmer one actually undertaken.
But, let me ask, in the first place, who are the citizens of
'lorida thus denouncedwas recreant and degenerate from the
characteristic valor of their countrymen.1 Very few of
iem are native to the soil of Florida. In Middle Florida,
rhich contains more than half the population of the whole
territory there exists not on venative citizen old enough to
ear arms.- Whence are they derived! From the States
f Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and the Carolinas, prin-
ipally. Tsh., ,.' emigrants from these and other States,
ho, frm a spirit of adventure, have encountered the hard-
hips and-perils of a new country; and strange, indeed,
vould it be, and-against all experience, if such men -pos-
ssed less enterprise anri courage than the other citizens of
ieir native States. In point ofifa tt.the citizens of Flo-
'da are men of the-same physical, intelltct-,st.and moral
qualities with those of the States whose soil nurtufrea-their
odies, and gave them their temperaments, -and whose in-
titutions fashioned and formed their minds. They claim
o greater share of patriotism or valor than belongs to their
llow-citizens of the other States, and they will not tamely
ubmit to the imputation of possessing less. This general
consideration alone should, with reflecting men, vindicate
em from the imputations which have been so unjustly
ast upon them; but I will proceed to give a more specific
answer to the charges of this writer.
It is not my purpose to di,-usii the axprdieri ev ot'a Eum-
aer campaign now that the summer 'e:ioni s h asi..l ay,
,nd as' I have in my former piece stated some reasons in its
-vor. But is it a fair subject of censure and ridicule, that the
governor of Florida, when the lives of his fellow-citizens
ere daily exposed by the cruel inroads of the savages,
should have sought, at the earliest possible period, to rally
force for their defence ? But, whatever may have been
e merits or demerits of the scheme, its failure is not to be.
scribed to the citizens of Florida, nor to their Executive.
he extract from the proclamation of the Governor of
lorida, furnished by "Aristides," shows that its citizens
.ere merely invited to act as auxiliary to a large volunteer
rce expected from Tennessee. The summer passed with-
ut the appearance of any such force. The Tennessee
volunteers, for reasons which reflect no discredit upon them,
re only now (20th September) near Tallahassee.
But this writer charges that, in answer to the proclama-
on of their Governor, but one single man in Middle Florida
volunteered for the summer campaign" Now, the point
f this charge turns upon the artifice or error, of this writer,
I confounding the term for which the citizens of Florida
ere, in the proclamation of the 18th June, called on to
volunteer, with that of the summer campaign." And yet
ie services were very different. By the proclamation, the
tizens of Florida were invited to volunteer, not for a
mmer campaign," but for the term of twelve months, un-
er a law of Congress authorizing the levying of 10,000
en for the defence of the Western frontier. This was a
ery different engagement from that of a summer cam-
aign." But why is it a charge against the citizens of
lorida that they have not enrolled themselves under this
w 1 Have the citizens of other States, who have been
Iso appealed to, been more eager for this service So far
s we are yet informed, there is not one corps, one compa-
y, one man, that has volunteered for twelve months; and
'there was "one single man in Middle Florida" who did
volunteer for that term, he stood alone in the United States,
nd Florida may claim the honor of the exception. The
nearing quotations, then, of this writer, and of his corres-
ondent, from Governor Gall's proclamation, and the
changes rung, or the ordinary terms of incitement used in
uch a paper, and on their failure to produce the desired ef-
ct, become mere verbiage and declamation, without mean-
g, but for the malice or levity they indicate in their au-
It is not true, however, that but a single man in all
middle Florida volunteered for the summer campaign."
since May, when the danger of the country became appa-
ent, there have been constantly in the field hundreds
f volunteers from Middle, as well as from East and West
. lorida, ready for any service. They have "sallied forth
rom their comfortable domicils," (to use the sportive term
f this very jocose writer,) with the fixed purpose "of
seekingg their enemy," though.the delay of assistance from
other quarters did prevent them from seeking him "in his
'tronghold." And there is not the least doubt that, if the
expectedd auxiliary force had arrived "in the dog days," even
under their malign influence, there would have been other
volunteers to the full extent of the ability of the country to
urnish them.
Can it be known to the writers who so cruelly and un-
ustly abuse this people that more than one-third of all the
people capable of bearing arms in Middle Florida have
aeen constantly carrying on a summer campaign, traver-
in hammocks, swamps, and labyrinths," more intricate
n impenetrable in themselves than those of the dreaded
Vythlaeoochee. That, besides the services of these men
engaged for a term of from four to six months, other por-
ions have been, during the whole period, called out on emer-
vencies, from 10, 15 or 20 days, to defend "their comfort-
. ble domicils" against the Creeks, as well as against the
'emninoles Comfortable domicile," indeed Vhen not
a man, from Tallahassee to the furthest East, could lay his

ead on his pillow, without the fear of being roused by the
ellss of the savage, of the Seminoles from the South and'
Sast, or of the equally savage Creeks from the North and
West! When men were shot down in their fields, and
he planters had to hire men to guard their people at their
vork! When every man's rifle was wedded to his side,
nd he dare not visit his nearest neighbor without watch-


ng for a lurking savage in every bush! Such, to this day,
*las been the condition of Middle Florida, while in East
SIlorida scarcely a man can claim a domicil" of any sort
I)eyond the lines of St. Augustine and Jacksonville. In
hat district, throughout this whole summer, there has been
virtually, and of necessity, a levy en masse ;" for the in-
habitants, being driven by the foe from their homes, have
been obliged to collect together, with arms in their hands,
for self-preservation.


In what miserable taste, then, are all these sneering,
ironical epithets of" brave Floridians," &c. &c., as applied
to these men! and how unbecoming the tone of levity which
pervades this piece,-and "id genus omnne "
And what is the provocation we have given to this wri-
ter, and to the army to which he manifestly belongs? None
whatever. The service of the Army in Florida has not
been a "thankless service," as this writer states" for here
they are respected and admired, and their valuable service's
are acknowledged with gratitude by all. As to the epithet
of rascally regulars," which Aristides uses as a quotation.
no man with whom I have conversed ever before heard of-
it. If ever used in Florida, it was the inconsiderate re-
mark of some light-minded vulgar man. Aristides himself
disparages the Army by supposing it obnoxious to such
low abuse, and in deeming them worthy of notice. I aver
that, since the first battle of the Wythlacoochee, I have
not conversed with a single individual who has not spoken
in tie highest terms of praise of the Army generally, ex-
cepting only a few of its highest officers, against whom
they do urge well-grounded cause of complaint. And every
"affair" in which detachments of the regular Army have
since been engaged, (afid in each of which they have been
successful,) they have exhibited even more than their cha-
racteristic valor, and have increased those favorable senti-
ments.
It only remains that I attempt to answer the charge last
in order, but the primal eldest" one in date, made by
Aristides" against the citizens of Florida-their conduct
at the battle of the Wythlacoochee, in December, 1835.
After referring to the statement in General Clinch's offi-
cial report, that only three officers and twenty-seven men
of the volunteers joined the "regulars" in combat with the
Indians, this writer adds, "but he (Gen. Clinch) does not
'explain why the residueof the Florida volunteers remained,
as it would seem, mere spectators of the fight." Not ha'
ving the means of referring to Gen. Clinch's report, I do
not undertake, from recollection, to say how he explains a
matter so simple and susceptible of explanation, or whe-'
ther he attempts to explain it at all. But I do undertake
to say, thatno part of that report gives the least color to
the imputation'conveyed in the last clause of the above ci-
tation from "Aristides," that "the volunteers were mere
spectators of the fight." This is the language of "Aris-
tides," and not of Gen. Clinch.
Not having been with that expedition to the 'Wythlacoo-
chee, it maybe rash in the writer of this piece to attempt
to answer the questions which Aristides" propounds, but
he has heard the affair so often described by unexception-
able eye-witnesses,(thathe deems a satisfactory answer most
easy. .
The questions put by thm;. n writer are : "Why did any of
the volunteers ,ri.sr 1r, .r i' opposite bank of the river
out of the action ." and r, hy did the main body, which
is said to have crossed over, not advance to engage the ene-
my 1" A simple and summary answer to these questions
would be in the following terms, and would be justified by
the facts of the case:
The volunteers were on the opposite side of the river
when the action began, and they did not there remain one
moment after it was possible to cross, and after they re-
ceived orders or permission to cross; and
The main body which is said to have'crossed," (and
which did cross over,) did advance to engage the enemy so
soon as they had crossed.
These assertions can be proved beyond doubt, and I
venture to assert, that no one who witnessed the affair will
gainsay them, and they contain a full vindication of the
Florida volunteers. But a more detailed explanation of
this affair is proper, as much for the justification of the of-
ficers in command, as of the men.
When this army marched to the Wythlacoochee, the In-
dians had afforded to their troops no demonstration of a de-
termination to fight a battle. At that time, the fatal affair
of the lamented Dade was unknown, and the universal im-
pression was, that the- resistance of the Indians would be
merely passive. No'man expected an attack,from them;
or even a pitched battle. This explanation is wanted to
account for the want of caution in the subsequent advahce..
On-arriving at the river, a deep and rapid stream, the onlyh
means of transportation was a canoe, capable of conveying
eight men at a freight. The regulars (infantry) were'pass-
ed over, and they, without waiting for the mounted volun-
teers to make g g.x,3 h. ir passage, marched in advance from
300 to 400 yard:, pil.:. their arms, and reposed themselves
on the ground. In this state of fancied security they re-
mained until the attack- was made.
In the mean time, the volunteers, most of them entirely
inexperienced in this species of service, had to swim' their
horses over, or wait until a bridge could be built. The
day was cold, and it was found exceedingly difficult to
make the horses take to the water, and impossible for their
riders to swim them over without wetting their arms and
ammunition. Trees were being cut and floated to form a
foot bridge by which the men could take their arms over,
leading their horses ; and the boat soon after the regulars
crossed was employed in towing the logs to their position.
In this state of things, after a few of the men had with
great difficulty and peril swam their horses over, but were
separated from their arms and clothes, while others were
engaged in constructing the bridge, and only the gallant
27," who had the good fortune to have the use of the boat
after the regulars, and before it was directed to the con-
struction of the bridge, were in condition to join in the
fight, the attack was made.
And let it be borne in mind that the attack was simul-
taneously made, on the volunteers on this side, and on the
regulars on the opposite side of the river. The first, it is
true, was a feint, but it served the purpose of embarrassing
and delaying the passage of the river. The fight continued
just one hour, and in that time" the main body of the vol-
unteers" repelled the attack on them, built the bridge, cross-
ed over at imminent peril, and joined the regulars at the
close of the fight. It is undeniable that the main body of
the volunteers were eager to cross, and did cross, as soon
as they possibly could, and would readily have advanced to
another fight, had the commanding General deemed it ad-
visable to order it.
This is believed to be a strictly true account of the first
affair of the Wythlacoochee, and it must serve to retrieve
the Florida volunteers, as a body; from any imputation of
misconduct or want of courage. It is not my purpose to
give any detail of this fight, when it is admitted that the
twenty-seven volunteers and the three olfficers-fought brave-
ly. But it may be proper to remark that Colonel Warren,
and not Colonel Warner, is the officer meant by "Aristi-
des," anid that, besides the officers named, Colonel Park-
hill, MaM r (now General) Read, and Majors Gamble and,
Wellford, were also present; and that some of these last
attracted the special commendation of the regulars them-,
selves on this occasion.
I shall now, Messrs. Editors, take leave of this subject,
to which I should have been invited by an abstract love of
truth, even if I had not felt impelled to do justice to a
much abused and suffering People.
DECEMBER 17, 1836.
The foregoing remarks were written at the time they
bear dtle, but,owing to engagements which called the wri-
ter suddenly from his home, they could not be transmitted
before this for publication. Permit him to indulge the
hope that you will not deem them yet out of season ; that
at this time, most especially when the claims of his much
injured and suffering fellow-citizens to pecuniary redress
from their Government for their unmerited losses have been
so forcibly urged upon Congress by the Chief Magistrate
of the nation, an attempt to disabuse the Publicin relation
to the moral wrongs they have endured, may meet with
countenance and support. And, as illustrating and con--
firming the views he has advanced, he is now enabled to
refer to the events of the Jast-eanipaign, to place the char-
acter of the Florida militia upon the same elevated ground
with those of their brave auxiliaries. He can appeal with con-
fidence to every officer and man of every corps engaged in
the late affairs of Florida, to bear witness that where all
behaved well, no troops in the Army exhibited more cour-
age, or endured with more patience the sufferings of the
service, than did the volunteers and militia of this Territo-
ry. The same recent events afford' a striking practical
commentary on the disputed question of a summer cam-
paign.
A force of about 1,200 volunteers march through the
country about the middle of Septeminber, the most sickly
and oppressive season of the year, and, except from the
measles, which accompanied them from their homes, they
suffer but little from disease. In fact, they enjoy a greater
degree of health than any similar army have ever experi-
enced in any country. Their advance at once relieves a
rich, extensive, ad most ev exposed' country from the pre-
sence and pressure of the savage foe, whose previous de-
vastations were spreading ruin and dismay throughout the
land. The whole army engaged in active operations'suf-
fered less from disease that did' one of the small detach-
ments of regular troops cooped'up in a frontier post. Not
an individual of the Florida troops in this armn.v but felt


that his labors and fatigues were lessened, the dangerto his
health and life diminished, and the safety of his home and
family were secured every step he advanced towards the
enemy. These results alone, if no serious injury and loss
had been inflicted on the enemy, would alone fully justify
this hasty advance into the Indian nation.
But these remarks have already been too far extended,
and will now be closed, with many acknowledgments for
your former indulgence.
A Citizen of Middle Florida.


--in
TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1S37.

IN SENATE. -
The CHAIR presented the letter of resignation of Hon.
ALEXANDER PORTER, Senator from Louisiana; which was
read.
Mr. SEVIER presented two memorials from the Legis-
lature of Arkansas; one of which asked an extension of
the national road to that Territory. Referred.
Mr. FULTON presented from the Legislature of Ar-
kansas instructions to her Senators in Congress to vote for
Mr. BaNToN's expunging resolution. Read, laid on the
table, and ordered to be printed.
Mr. PRENTISS presented the petition of Cephas Car-
penter, praying for a pension ; which was referred to the
Committee on Pensions.
Other petitions and memorials were presented by Messrs.
KENT, ROBINSON, LINN, TALLMADGE, SOU-
THARD, and HUBBARD, and referred.
On motion of Mr. PRENTISS, the Committee on Pen-
sions was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of William Davis, for arrearages of pension.
On motion of Mr. WRIGHT, the Committee on Fi-
nance was discharged from the further consideration of the
petition of sundry umbrella makers in Philadelphia; and
the petition was laid on the table.
Mr. DAVIS, from the Committee on Commerce, report-
ed a bill for the relief of Thomas H. Perkins and others;
which was read, ordered to a second reading, and the do-
cuments were ordered to be printed.
Mr. KING, of Alabama, from.the Committee on Com-
merce, reported a bill making appropriations for custom-
houses at Philadelphia and-New Orleans. Read, and or-
dered to a second reading.
The following resolution, were offered, and, by rule, lie
over one day :
By Mr. RUGGLES:
Resolved, That the Secretary of War be requested to
communicate to the Senate copies of the surveys, estimates,
and maps of Owlshead harbor and Cabscook bay, taken
pursuant to a resolution of the Senate at its last session.
By Mr. HENDRICKS:
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be in-:
structed to inquire into the expediency of establishing a
port of entry or delivery at Fort Wayne.
By Mr. RIVES:
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of biicreasing the
salary of the District Judge for the eastern district of Vir-
ginia.
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of making addi-
tional provision by law fdor the compensation of the clerks
of the Federal Courts held at Richmond and Norfolk, in
the State of Virginia.
The following were offered and adopted by unanimous
consent;
By Mr. NICHOLAS: .
Resolved, That the Commiittee on Private Land Claims
be instructed to inquire into the propriety of confirming
the report of the Register and Receiver of the Land Office
at St. Stephen's, in the State of Alabaiia, acting as com-
missioners under the authority of the third section of an
act of Congress, passed the 2d of March, 1829, recom-
mending for confirmation the title of Andrew Demetry to
lands on the bay of St. Louis, which report was made on
the 16th of February, 1834;
By Mr. KING, of Alabama:
Resolved, That the Cominittee oni Finance be instruct-
ed to inquire into the propriety of authorizing the Secretary
of the Treasury to pay equitable commissions to the attor-
neys of persons the sums awarded to whom, utinder the
treaty with France, were taken by debts due by them to
the 'United States.
The CHAIR presented a comniunidation from the Navy
Department, with statements in relation to clerks employ-
ed in that ])epartnuent.
Also, a communication from the same Department, with
a copy of a letter from the Navy Commissioners, relating
to an examination of the waters of Narragansett Bay, in
accordance with a resolution of the Senate at the last ses-
sion.
MICHIGAN.
The engrossed bill to admit Michigan into the Union
having been read a third time, and the question pending
being upon its passage,
Mr. CALHOUN spoke in opposition to the bill, charac-
terizing it as eminently irregular in its principles, and revo-
lutionary in its tendency.
Mr, STRANGE replied, chiefly in vindication of his
own opinions hn relation to this bill, and of the Baltimore
Convention. - _. = -- '
Messrs. BUCHANAN, DAVIS, and KING, of Geo.
also spoke on the subject of the bill..
The bill passed by yeas and nays, as follows:
YEAS-Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Dana,
Fulton, Grundy, Hendricks, Hubbard, King, of Alabama,
'King, of Georgia, Linn, Nicholas, Niles, Page, Parker,
Rives, Robinson, Sevier, Strange, Tallmadge, Tipton,
Walker,. Wall, White, ~Wright-25.
NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Calhoun, Clay, Crittenden,
Davis, Kent, Moore, Prentiss, Southard, Swift.-10.
The Senate then- adjourned,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
Mr. WHITTLESEY, from the Committee of Claims,
made an unfavorable report upon the petition of John S.
HIorner and Elisha Ives.
Mr. HARPER, from the select committee on the Patent
Office, made an unfavorable report upon the petition of
Daniel Pease, jr.
Mr. HOAR, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions,
made unfavorable reports upon the petitions of Joseph M.
Rhea, James Bean, and Samuel Crapon.
Mr. HARRISON, of Pennsylvania, from the same
committee, made unfavorable reports upon the petitions of
James Allen and Moses Smith.
Mr. ANDERSON made an unfavorable report upon
the petition of the heirs of Reuben Chapman.
Which several reports were ordered to lie upon the table.
Mr. S. WILLIAMS, from the Committee on Invalid
Pensions, made a reiprt upon-the petition of Freling Pratt,
accompanied by a bilIfor his benefit; which said bill was
committed to a Committee of the Whole.
The SPEAKER laid before the House a letter from the
Secretary of the Treasury, containing a statement of the
causes which have prevented the execution of the ninth ar-
ticle of the treaty of 1819, with Spain, and the two acts of
Congress passed in relation thereto, furnished in com-
pliance with the order of this House of the 26th of De-
cember; which letter was referred to the Committee on
Foreign Affairs.
The SPEAKER laid before the House a letter from the
Secretary of the Navy, transmitting a list of the names of
the persons employed as clerks in the Navy Department
during the year 1836, with the compensation of each. Laid
on the table.
Mr. HALL, of Maine, moved that the Committee on
Enrolled Bills be now appointed. Agreed to.
Mr. A. MANN gave notice that he would to-morrow
move to take up the report of the select committee of the
last session on the rules and orders of the House.
Mr. TOUC)EY gave notice that when the House next
resolved itselmltnto Committee of the Whole on the state of
the Union, he would ask leaveto take up the bill No. 297,ex-
tending the provisions of the law adopted in the case of the
State of Massachusetts, for adjusting her militia claims
during the last war, to similar claims of the State of Con-
necticut.
S THE PUBLIC LANDS.
The House resumed the consideration of the following
resolution, offered on yesterday by Mr. CHLT/oN ALLAN :
Beit resolved, That a select committee of one member from
" each-State be appointed, whose duty it shallbe to inquire into the
justice and expediency of making to each of the thirteen origi-
nal American States, together with each of the States of Ver-
mont, Maine, Kentucky, and Tennessee, such grants of thie pub-
lic lands, for the purposes of education, as will correspond in a
just proportion with those heretofore made in favor of the first-
iamed' States and Territories, and that said committee have leave
to report by bill or othermvise. But, to avold the objoc'ion of
one State holding land in another, the committee is directed to
insert a clause in time bill whicb, they may report, providing
that the grants to be made thereby shall be subject to sale un-
der the laws of the General Government now in force, and that
the proceeds arising therefrom shall be paid over to the States
entitled to the same.
To which the following amendments were pending:
By Mr. VINTON:


Resolved, That the said inquiry extend to all the States, and
that the said committee be further instructed to inquire into the
expediency of inserting a clause in "said bill to pay said new
. Statos-the" value of tlhe improvements made by them on the pub-
lioelands, or tr pay to .them the amount the public lands would.
have been assessed fir taxes, if they had been private property
By Mr. JOHNSON, of La. to amend the resolution,
by extending its provisions to all the States of the Union.


By Mr. CLAIBORNE, of Mississippi, to amend, the
amendment by adding thereto the following:
And provided that no such grant shall interfere worth1 or be
located on the claim or improvement of any actual settler on, the
public lands.
Mr. HARRISON, of Mo., addressed' the House at
length in opposition to the resolution, and with a view to
show that the preamble was entirely erroneous in the as-
* sumption which it contained, that the grants to the new
States were gratuities for which no consideration had been
received. He denied the position; and maintained that
the.States accepted the land, not as a gratuity, but under
a compact entered into under the ordinance of 1787, by
which compact the new States, in consideration of the
grants, had surrendered one of the greatest attributes of
sovereignty-the right to tax the public domain within
their limits.
Mr. HANNEGAN was of opinion no practical good
was to le obtained by the continuance of the discussion,
and moved to lay the whole subject on the table.
Mr. C. ALLAN called for the yeas and nays on that
motion, which were ordered; and, being taken, were-
Yeas 95, nays 99. So the motion to lay tie subject on the
table was rejected.
On motion of Mr. GARLAND, of Virginia, the House
proceeds to the Orders of the Day.
EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATION.
The House resumed the consideration of the resolution
heretofore offered by Mr. WISE, together with the pending
amendment of Mr. D. J. PEARCE, providing for the appoint-
ment of a select committee to inquire into the administra-
tion of the Executive Departments.
Mr. ROBERTSON concluded his remarks, and the
House was addressed by Messrs. HANNEGAN and HA-
MER.
Mr. H. had not concluded, when he gave way to a mo-
tion for adjournment; and, on motion of Mr. ANTHO-
NY, the House adjourned.

WASHINGTON.
Liberty and Union, now. and forever, one and
inseparable.9"
FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1837.

PROPOSED HOSPITAL AT WASHINGTON.

The measure proposed in the subjoined bill is
one which must commend itself as well to the
judgment as to the feelings of the gentlemen who
compose the two Houses of Congress. Sole Le-
gislator for this District, Congress is the only
authority competent to accomplish a purpose,
the necessity of which must be admitted by all
who have examined, even ever so little, into the
subject. But the claim of Humanity is still
stronger upon Congress, in its federative cha-
racter as Governor of the whole country, than in
its local capacity. From every quarter of the
country; from the remotest bounds of civiliza-
tion, and from all the intermediate circles of so-
ciety of which Washington is the centre, indi-
viduals are drawn to this city, in pursuit of rights,
real or supposed, whose worldly means are too
often exhausted before they arrive here or before
they get away, and' who become objects of cha-
rity, or victims tio want and suffering, which,
through ignorance of'it, and the want of such an
Institution as a public Hospital, charity itself is
not able to relieve. The relief of such objects,
besides, it needs no argument to show, ought
not to continue to depend on individual benevo-
lence. The Government, which attracts such a
population to this city, ought to protect the
poor, the needy, and the unfortunate, as well
as reward the bold, the ingenious, the perse-
vering-ay, and the obtrusive applicants for
its favor. The worn-down projector, who finds,
after a travel of a thousand miles, that his che-

ago as before he was born; the hapless mo-
ther or widow who seeks in, vain. from Gov-
ernment a support which her son or husband, in
the public service, once afforded her; the revo-
lutionary veteran, whose living evidences of
youthful service have descended to the grave be-
fore him; the less unhappy subject of some
mental delusion which impels him to seek fame
or fortune through strange eccentric paths-
these, and all the varieties of distress with which
a resident of the metropolis, in course of time,
becomes acquainted, are entitled to the regards
of Congress, and not the less so because it is
impossible that, either as a class or as individuals,
they can ever plead their own cause before that
tribunal. We rejoice that there have been found
those who are willing and able to do it for them.
We rejoice that there has been found a commit-
tee of Congress, with one of the most experienc-
ed and faithful members at its head, that has
listened to the plea in behalf of the unfortunate,
and has sustained it, as far as it can, by report-
ing the bill to which we have now the pleasure
of directing the attention of our readers,

IN SENATE, JANUARY 4, 1837 .
MR. KENT, from the Committee for the District
of Columbia, reported the following bill ;
which was read, and passed to a second read-
ing:
A BILL to authorize the erection of an hospital in the.
city of Washington, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted, 4-c. That the Commissioner of the Public
Buildings be, and he is hereby, authorized and required,
under the direction of the Preuidnt of tho-jnited-State,
and upon a plan and site to be by him approved, to erect a
building in the city of Washington, suitable for an hospi-
tal, for the reception and accommodation of the insane of
the District of Columbia, and of such sick, disabled, and
infirm seamen, soldiers, and others, as may, by competent
authority, to be hereafter prescribed, be deemed proper to
be received therein.
SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That, on the comple-
tiori of the said building, the President be authorized to
appoint three respectable persons, residents of the city of
Washington, to be a board of inspectors of the said insti-
tution, who shall hold their offices two years from the date
of their appointment; and whose duty it shall be to have
a general supervision of the concerns of the said hospital;
to appoint the necessary subordinate officers thereof; to
prescribe rules for the admission and due regulation of pa-
tients therein, and' to make an annual report to Congress of
their proceedings, and of the condition of the said institu-
tion.
SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That there be, and


there is hereby,, appropriated the sum of-- dollars for
the erection of the said building, to bo paid out of any mo-
ney not otherwise appropriated.
Sentence of death was pronounced on the 27th ult. by
Judge CawronRD, upon PHILANDER R. BRO-AD, who was d.
short time since- convicted before the United States Circuit
Court, sitting at Mobile, of an attack upon the mail stage,
in the Creek nation, last spring. He is to be hung on the
first Friday in:March next.


At this moment, when a surplus of money has *
been declared to be in the Treasury, to an amount.
singularly contrasting with the predictions of
the opponents of the Distribution Bill, and far
exceeding the most sanguine anticipations of its
friends, the Letter of Judge CL&AYTON, of Geor-
gia, which we have copied into the preceding
page, will be found to be of considerable inter-
est. He is not only not opposed to further dis-
tribution, if there be further accumulation of
revenue beyond the amount required for the
necessary purpose's of Government, but lie is of
opinion that the States have a legal title to all
the proceeds of the sale of public lands in the
territory Northwest of the Ohio, and could re-
cover them from the United States if there were
any Court in which such a case could be impar-
tially tried.

It is a subject of regret that, at this interest-
ing period of the session,. Mr. Senator EwING,
of Ohio, should be obliged to absent himself (for
a week or two, at least,) from his seat in the
Senate. Afflictive intelligence from home hav-
ing reached him', he immediately left this city,
for his residence ii.n Ohio, on Wednesday
evening.

T EE MAILS.-No newspaper has been received in
this city from the.city of New York of a letter date than
Sunday last, except only the New York Courier and En-
quirer of Monday'morning. Where all, the rest of the
papers of Monday, and where all the papers of Tues-
"day, due at this office yesterday morning, are,. we cannot
pretend to say. The Philadelphia papers are' all up to time.

The Little Rock (Ark.)-Advocate. of the 16th
ult. states that Col. Wi. WHrTsoN was killed on
the 5th in an affray,. which took place in Craw-
ford county.
The same paper states that the U. S. troops
at Camp Sabine have been ordered by Gen. AR-
BUCKiE to abandon that station and return to
our Western frontier.

Wgeg We copy the following from the Balti-
more papers, as well in justice to Captain SUT-
TON, who has earned such testimony to his good
conduct, as because it establishes the where-
abouts of a number of distinguished and respect-
ed citizens of different parts of our common
country :
Meeting of the passengers on board of the steam..
boat Pocahontas, Jan. 3, 1837.
On motion, General EDMUND P. GAINES, of the United
States Army,.was called to the chair, and, at the sugges-'
tion of Captain ALDEN PARTRIDGE, of Vermont, General
GEORGE C. DROMGOOLE, of the House of Representatives,
and Mr. Jon-N H. WHEELER, of North Carolina, were ap-
pointed a committee to express the grateful acknowledg-
ments of the passengers to-Captain SUTTON, of the steam-
boat Pocahontas, for his gentlemanly and accommodating
conduct in her late perilous trial from Norfolk to Baltimore;
and although impeded by the ice from reaching Baltimore,
yet he left no effort untried to effect this object, and did
every thing that laid in his power to make us comfortable
at this inclement season.
EDMUND P. GAINES, Chairman.
A. Partridge, Henry Gage,
Geo. C. Dromgoole, of Va. Edw. Jenkins, U.S. N.
J. H. Wheeler, of N. C. A. S. Baldwin, do
T. Brown, Dr. A. G. Gambrill, do
T. Freeman Spear, Fred. H. Dalton,
Wm. Bartlett, jr. of Boston, Juaquin Maury,
Harvey Shaw, of Baltimore, L. Eude,
D. D. Hammond, Mass. : Jesse Gibbens,
Charles Shelton, W. H. H. Prall, N. Y.
CharlesG. Ketchum, George Webb,
reuer --- auhein, S. C.
D. 0. Fanning, -- .-y11,._;L_-
BcrtnaMn Mges, -Ohio, W. W. Haffngton,
William Paton, New York, Fred. Niblo, N. Y.
M. E. Carrere, Jno. M. English,
Jno. Fulton, John Richardson, Va.
James Jordan, Benj. B. Allen, Va.
S. A. Plummer, C. T. Hun, N. Y.
S. C. West, of S. C., 'Edmund P. Gaines, jr.
Edward Morris, John Test.
0. M. Pelham,

The Maysville (Kentucky) Monitor of the 29th
December has the following paragraph-:.
REPORTED STEAMBOAT DIsASTER.-It was reported here
last week by boats from above, that the entire cabin of the
steamboat Mariner, on her way up, was blown off during a
gale that prevailed on Monday or Tuesday night, and that
twenty or thirty passengers had been aroused from- their
quiet slumbers to find their death-pillows beneath the ruthless
wave! 'he appearance, a few days after this report, of
large pieces of wreck floating down with the ice, was cal-
culated to confirm the most melancholy intelligence.
NEW ORLEANs, DEC. 29, 1836.
We have noticed with great pleasure the acts of courte-
sy and hospitality extended by our citizens to the officers
of the FRENCH brig GAZELLE, now lying in our port.
Her arrival among'us was received with marked demon-
strations of pleasure, and the interchange of ivilities which
from time to time has taken place among her officers and
the citizens cannot fail of producing the most happy re-
sults.
A sumptuous dinner was given them on Tuesday last,
at Davis's Rooms, on Orleans street, attended by a large
and respectable portion of citizens, who, mingling in the
full flow of generous feeling excited by the occasion, gave
a most cordial greeting to their respected guests. Among
the number of invited guests we recognized the French
Consul, Commandant RoussEAu, Gen. PLAoCHE, the Sec-
retary of State, and others. The company retired from the
table at an early hour, after drinking many patriotic toasts,
and in the course of the evening visited the different thea-
tres, French and American, which were thrown open by
their courteous and liberal proprietors.-Bulletin.
The SELECT COMMITTEE, on the resolution for an inqui-
ry whether the deposit banks have employed an agent at
the seat of the General Government to transact their busi-
ness with the Treasury Department, &c. consists of Messrs.
QxrcC.AND, F.ERUE, or UTew Iampsanlire, FAIRFIEID,- Vr1S,-
GILLETT, Joitfeson, of Louisiana, HAMER, MARTIN, and
PEYTON.
A STRONG CLhAM.-At the last quarterly meeting of the
Exeter (Eng.) Humane Society a man claimed a reward
for saving the life of his wife from drowning!'
DiciuNSoN COLLEGE.-A paragraph is going the rounds
of the papers, stating that Dickinson College, at Carlisle,
Pa. has been reduced to ashes. This is altogether incor-
rect. The fire which occurred on the premises last week,
originated in, and was confined entirely to a detached build-
ing, occupied as a preparatory school. No part of the Col-
lege proper was injured in the slightestdegree, and no great
incofivenience will result from the conflagration, as immedi-
ate provision was made by the faculty for the accommoda-
tion of the grammar pupils. The building destroyed was
insured.
.- The Louisville Journal mentions the death of :. ED-
MUNn S. ARMsTnoNo, (printer) under the folo' circum-
stances:
He was in the act of throwing a b,.o"t over tle guards of
the steamboat' Gen. Gaines,' wh". te tshocko toff curraet
and the slipperiness of the d".' united, there' hm off hr ele- ba
lance, and he was immed-..e prelpitated a tinto th watery ole-
mni. All eforts toa ialihm proved unavailing. Mri. Ain-
s onEwasaP,,lyvsnteR by birth, and had resided ii this


city for tleJat year."
7 Waslhington Light Intflintry-Attention I-A
meeting ofthe company will be held this evening, at Baker's,
Franklin lnn,corner of 8th and D streets.
Punctual attendance is requested, as business of importance
is expected to be brought before the company.
By order: A. B. CLAXTON,
jan 6 Secretary.


MARYLAND LEGISLATURE.

ANNAPOLIS, JAN. 3, 1837.
At 12 o'clock to-day, the Legislature, by joint
ballot, elected the Executive Council. All the
members of the late Council were re-elected,
viz. GWYNN HARRIS, WM. F. JOHNSON, JOHN
MCKENNY, N. F. WILLIAMS, WM. L. JONES.
The Senate to-day elected ROBERT M. TID-
BALL, Esq. of Washington county, and JOSEPH
S. COTTMAN, Esq. of Somerset county, Sena-
tors, in the place of WM. PRICE and THOMAS
KING CARROLL, Esqs.
The bill reported by Mr. BROWN for taking
the sense of the People of Baltimore county on
the propriety of separating the county from the
city, was read a second time, and ordered to be
engrossed for a third reading.
The bills to increase the delegation from Bal-
timore city, and to require the consent of two-
thirds of Atch branch of the Legislature to an-
nul a marriage contract, were severally passed
and sent to the House,
FREDERICKSBURG, JANUARY 4.
A very destructive fire occurred in Charlestown, Kana-
wha county, (Va.) on Friday morning, the 23d ult. Six
of the finest houses in the centre of the town, including
Wilson's extensive tavern establishment,, and nearly all
their furniture, &c. were consumed, besides two other
houses blown up to arrest the progress of the flames. The
loss is estimated at about $22,000-only $1,000 of which'
was.insured. At one period the whole town was in great
danger, and several other houses were repeatedly on fire.
This is said to be the most destructive fire' that has ever
occurred in Charlestown. *
A Phenomenon at Fort Wayne.-The citizens of Fort
Wayne (Ia.) were considerably gratified the other day by
the arrival of the steamer Phenomenon, from the head of
the Maumee rapids, Ohio. This is the first arrival of a
steamboat at the above place, and the first experiment ah
to the practicability of navigating this stream to this point.
As it has proved successful, it is supposed a new era in the
prosperity of Fort Wayne may be dated from this period.,
-Cincinnati Gaz.
RAtILROAD ACCTDE.T.-A boy by the name of Miar-
well, says the Wilmington Delawarean, was crushed to
death by a railroad car, on Saturday last, in the lower
part of that city. He, with other boys, had ascended its
sides for the purpose of riding, when he slipped his hold,
and was almost instantly killed by the wheels passing over
his body; This is the cause of many of the fatal acci-
dents which take place at the stopping and starting places
on railroads. The boards at the.sides of railroad cars
should, in every case, be dispensed with, and- the great
source of danger would be removed.

NATIONAL ,THEATRE-WASHEtNGTON.
Acting and Stage-Manager, Mr. W A. [,[. -
BENEFIT OF MR. OXLEY,.
And positively his last appearanoemthis season.
The Public are respectfully refereed' to the unmJanrntron-edsT
list of characters, as this night's entertainment embraces the
entire talent of the company, and tFe managp'respeetfully, but.
confidently, asserts that the cast of both tr-gedy and farce can,-
not be excelled in any city of the United States.
THIS EVENINGs JAN. 6,
Wilt be presented Shaklpeare's Tragedy of
HAMLET, -
Prince qf Denmar'k.
Hamlet, Prince ('." rd, Mr. OXLEY.
Claudius, Kingol1 '--i k, Mr. Rogers.
Horatio, Mr. Cline.
Laertes, Mr, Harrington.
The Ghost of Hamlet s father, Mr. Ward.
Polonies, Mr. Jones.
Osriek, Mr. Hautonville.
First Gravedigger, Mr. Cowell.
Second Gravedigger, Mr. Knight.
Player King, Mr. J. H. Hall.
Second Player, Mr. May. -
Rosencrantz, Mr. Garner.
Guildenstern, _Mr. Newin.'
Marsellus, Mr. Bary.
Bernardo, Mr. Caiddwell.
Francisco, Mr. Howard.
Priest, Mr. Kelly..
Page, '- -. Miss Slater.
Lord, Mr. Gill.
Gertrude, Queen of Denmark, Mrs. Hughes,.
Ophelia, Mrs. Knight.
Player Queen, Mrs. Slater.
Ladies, Mrs. Johnson, Miss Dudley, and Miss Cross..
....---- -.t.t.si h.'-f-a -tha-'.slt-nthis season) the admired
HAPPIEST DAY -IFE.
Mr. Gilma r.Cowell..
Mr. Dudly, ..arne.r
Frederick, Mr. C1ink.
Charles, Mr..Harrings.
Mr. Jones, Mr. Howard..
John, Mr. Barry..
Thomas, Mr. Kelly..
Gentlemen, Messrs. Newton and Caldwell..
Mrs. Dudly, Mrs..Jones,.
Sophia, Mrs. Rogers.
Mary, Mrs. .Cross.
Mrs. Grimsley, Mrs. Slater.
Miss Stokes, Miss Cross.
Mrs. Taylor, Miss Dudley.
Miss Jones, Mrs. Johnson..
The National and Patriotic Drama of the 8TH OF JANUA-
RY, written by G, W. P. CUSTIs, Esq. author of" Pocahontas,"
&c. will be produced on to-morrow evening, with new music,
scenery, and machinery.
NT'OTICE.--The subscribers tothe'Civic and Military Ball,
.L' for the 9th inst. are informed that-dhe tickets are ready
for delivery, and can be had at W. Kirkwood's, or Barnard &
Raymond's, Washington, and at J. Thomas's Bookstore, George-
town. There will be a few tickets for sale at the above places,
but as the number is limited, persons desirous-of attending had
better secure their.tickets. No tickets will be issued at the.
door.
gj" Military officers and members of the different corps are
requested to appear at the ball in full uniform, jan 2--3t
SECOND COTILLION PARTY--Sth of Jame-
b. ary Victory-Celebration of the Bottle of N4W
Orleans.-Mr. L. CARUSI respectfully iufrms-his fi crmds, /
Members of Congress, strangers, and.the cdizens of. th city/.
and District, that his second Cotillion Party.vill take place ot
thie 9th of January, at his Grand Saloon,. trwhich they are ri'
spectfully invited. The Saloon and otherleparfments are ro-.
perly and tastefully fitted up, and every comfort and conveni-
ence provided. .
:nj Ladies who have not received their cards of invitation
will please send in their address to Mr. L. Carusnl.
'rickets of admission $1, t_ be had at Mr. Fischer's, and at
the door of the Saloon.
jan 3- .
AtBY EDWARD DYER.StochK of Groceries-it
SS Aucttono.-On Friday, the 6th. instant, at 10 'e cl A.
M., I shall sell, without reserve, at the Grocery 'ne of C P.
Sengstack, corner of Twelfth .street and pirrieylvania.A.veaue,
his entire stock, consisting of
L'oar, Lump, anaisrowir'gars .
Young Hyson, Imperial, sand Gunpowder Teas.
Coffee, Rice, Spices, Chocolate
Segars, Tobacco, coarse Sboes,-&c. &e.
Old and choice Liquors, ina bottles and-on draught, as-
Champagne Brandy, Holland-Gin, Jamaica.Spirits.
Old Rye Whiskey,..Cherry Bounce
Lisbon, Port, cad '"Peneriffe Wines
Superior Peach. Brandy, nine yearseol&: .-
Grocers and Tavern.keepers will find the sale ..rthy of at-
tention, as every article will be sold with *"" ..erve..
60 Hams, TeaCanisters. picture
Lamp Oil, &c. excelenand well
On the same do ill be offered the very xeent andaek-
fimmished two-O'Y th'ame House occupied by Mr. Sengstalk-
ofinetoimhe t tloiised dweling-houaes.in this city.n
nEDW. DYER,
.- 4-_3t A'uotioneer.
Y EDWARD DYER.-Handsome Bay Ponies,
_S Baroucelt, and Harness.-Oil Friday Afternoon,
6th instant, at 4 o'clock,, I shall sell, in.frontof Browns Hotel,
without reserve--
A pair of vert'hadsome Bay Ponies, young and active, with
a handsome brass-mounted double Barouche and Harness.
Also, an excellent gray saddle and harness Horse,. the owner
having no usefor hiim. He issold for nofaulti
n' 5-2t ED, DYER, Aut.
Will be added to the above,.a very good. second-hand Car-


riage, suitable for a Back. .
i'OTICE.-lIn the course of next week all those indebted.
. to me will be called on for the amount of their bills. All
bills not paid during the week, will, on the f6llowmg week, bo
placed in the hands ofan officer for collection.
jan 6-dStif EDWARD DYBi.
()ARDING.-Genteel and comfortable board oan be
obtained by applying at the house on 10th sheet, lately
occupied by the Mayor. jan 5-3;


J~BL~i~hPI~ ~EljC






pt~ .


American Life Insurance and Trust Company.
OFFICEs-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and Wall
reet,New York.
AGENCY-Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite Fuller's Hotel, and
;o doors from the Buildings occupied by the Treasury Depart-
entr Washington city,
CAPITAL PAID IN 82,000,000.
PATRICK MACAULAY, 'President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBINSON, Vice President, New York.
ITONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
V O be allowed, payable semi-annually. The Company also
sures lives, grants annuities, sells ehbowments, and executes
-usts
Of the rates of insurance qf $100 on a single life.
ANNUAL PREMIUM.
g 1 year. 7years..For life. Age. 1 year. 7 years. For life.
?72 86 1 53 38 1 48 1 70 3 05
5 '77 88 1 56 39 1 57 1 76 3 11
5, 84 90 1 62 40 1*69 1 83 3 20
7 86 91 1 65 41 1 78 1 88 3 31
3 89 92 1 69 42 1 85. 1 89 3 40
9 90 94 t 73 43 1 89 1 92 3 51
0- 91 95 1 77 44 1 90 1 94 3 63
1 92 97 1 82 45 1 91 1 45 3 73
2 94 99 1 88 46 1 92 1 98 3 87
3 97 1 03 1 93 47 1 93 1 99 4 01
4 99 1 07 1 98 48 1 94 2 02 4 17
5 1 00 1 12 2 04 49 1 95 2 04 4 49
6 .1 07 1 17 2 11 50 1 96 2 09 4 60
7 '"'12 1 23 2 17 51 1 97 2 20 4 75
S"1'20 1 28 2 24 52 2 02 2 37 4 90
3 1 28 -1 35 2 81 53 2 10 2 59 5 24
3 1 ;1 ]" 38 2 36, 54 2-18 2 89 5 49
1 1 32 '142 2 43 55 2 32 3 21 5 78
2 1 33 1 46 2 50 56 2 47 3 56 6 05
3 1 34 1 48 2 57 57 2 70 4 20 6 27
4 1 35 1 50 2 64 58 3 14 4 31 6 50
5 1 36 1 53 2 75 59 3 67 4 63 6 75
6 1 39 1 57 2 81 60 4 35 4 91 7 00
7 1 43 1 63 2 90

Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
1,C.'.LUL. E:.., President, Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
INstON, C7Es, i.:e President, New York; to which imme-
i.: it-.1 I *t.: paid.
r. "'i. ir:.: m:, ..iso.bo made personally, or by letter, post
'i.., ..' fR,\NCI'~ .. DICKINS, Agent for the Company in the'
Rlty of WASHINGTON. His office is on Pennvslvania Avenue,
-F.:-.i F.ul11i Hotel, anc two doors from the buildings -occu-
tid tv. ib.: Tr, sury Department. oct 16-26-dly
rt IE "AMERICAN ALMANAC and Repository
of Useyful K Rnowledge, for 1837, -is just received
3r sale by F. TAYLOR, price one dollar.
This'woik, for 1837, contains the usual amount of Commer-
ial, Hi'stdric'al;'Political, Statistical, Astronomical, Meteorologi-
al, Scientific, and Miscellaneous, and useful information, which
as given the work for former years its great celebrity Those
,ho are unacquainted'with its plan and contents, which cannot
o detailed in an advertisement, are invited to call and examine
at.-the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately east of
Sadsby's Hotel. The-work is upon. the same plan with the
elebMated British Almanac, issued by Lord Brougham's "So-
iety for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge." A few complete
sts, from the commencement, and back numbers for completing
sts, can be supplied, the first number having been lately re-
Ainted for this purpose.
.The work can be sent by mail at a trifling periodical postage
yany part of the United States. y dec 14
OHAWSaNS' CoURT OF PRINCE GEORGE's COUNTY.
":- NOVEnBER 14, 1836.
RIPED by the Court that the Court that the final account of William
D BOwie':nd John Conteei Executors of William Bowie,
f Walter, deceased, presented to this Court for passage, be
ind the same is h.r'-." r. .:d], unless objections to said final ac-
ount, or to some .11.-I ...-ailt passed by the said executors, be
lade to this Cburt on ork&efore the second Tuesday in January
ext: Provided a copy of thi, order be inserted in the National
itelligencer, and another set ui. at the Court House door, with-
a ten days from this date. .
Test, P. CHEW, Register..
nov 23-w6w

'S omerset County Court-In Chaecery-Bill, &c.
Gertrude Killum,

ohn Pollitt and Mary Jane Pollitt, infant children'of Charlotte
Pollitt.
T HE bill filed in this cause in substance states that Char-
lotte Pollitt, the mother of the defendants, on the eight-
d -5%r!' .i, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, was
d 1i .:1 i l.:: -.. .-l. *-f certain real estate, situated in Somerset
county, Maryland, known by the following names, viz. Kil-
am's Lot," "Wilson's Trouble," "Discovery,'" and "Aeworth's
"olly," or what other names the same may be called, contain-
ag one hundred and fifty acres of land, more or less; and on the
mine day and year aforesaid, she, the said Charlotte, bargained
nd sold the same to the complainant for the sumn of two hundred
nd twenty-five dollars, which sum of money the complainant
aid the said Charlotte as the price agreed on for the same; in
consideration of which payment, the said Charlotte contracted
nd agreed to convey to the complainant, in feq simple, the
ame real Otie; tlt tlh 'nl od Chirlntte hbth departed this life
',lt,. ,, r :, ,i...,h11 I;,. -. 1 '. l ,, thedefendants,
-er infant children and only heirs at law, which sai
side outof the Stat-ofMa r.l-e- ----
arol, and that the said defendants, intending to defraud the
aid complainant ofherxinCft soid real estate, refuse to exe-
ute said convey anae. ;-d that the said Charlotte departed this
-f- eintet t n(! in consequence ofthe minority of the defend-
nts,s their fraudulentcoriduct, the complainants without re-
. o ,-. hert by the interposition ofaCourtof Chancery.
Tr: ..: t. *-c ,:.f' the bill filed in this cause is, thattthe said de-
-. -,' ti, compelled by adecree of this Court to make a
specific performance of said contract, and to make and execute a
.eed to the coi'plaitiant for said real estate.
'The Court'hbirigsatisfied that John Pollitt and Mary Jane
ollitt reside out of the State of Marylan'd, and beyond its pro-
ess, it is therefore ordered by 'Somerset County Court, sitting
a Chancery, this 5th day of December, 1836, that the com-
.lainantgive the said John Pollittand Mary Jane Pollitt notice
abe and appear in this Court in person, by guardian or solicitor,
ad show cause by the second day of May term next of this
Dourt why a decree should not pass as prayed ; otherwise, the
amte will be taken pro confess as to said absent defendants ;
r-1i ih- t n.-;.i. :I-allbe given by publication of a copy of this
1.1 r ...r.e a '-.. k i--three successive weeks, in some newspa-
,er published in the District of Columbia, the first insertion of
ehich notice shall be at least four months before the said second
ay of MN., ie .i next.
BRICE J. GOLDSBOROUGH.
True copy, test: GEO. HANDY,
-dec 29-law3w Clerk.
ETTElt PAPER.-Just received from the manufac-
turer, 170 redms iAmie's superior White Wove Letter
aperr, which will be sold a bargain at Stationers' Hall.
dec 9 (Tel) W. FISCHER.
' ORD BROUGHAM'S Edition of Paley's Na-
u tutral Teology, with Illustrative Notes and Disserta-
tions, by LordBrtugham and Sir Charles Bell, with numerous
,nrrn-,in' -, is just)ublished, and this day received for sale by
P.TAVLOR dec 14
E ENGLISH BItLES AND PRAYER BOOKS,
o6-hll sizes and varieties, richly bound.
Ornamented a illustrated editions of different religious
works of differ denominations.
Protestant, ,atholic, and other Prayer Books.
Symn Books, &c.-in elegant bindings, &c. &c.
full supply of the above is recently opened, and for sale by
/ E F. TAYLOR.
..** A few copies-of an English octavo Bible, in Gothic bind-
ln" which surpasses in beauty and clearness of type any thing
yee s5i5ain Washington, are just unpacked at the Waverly
Criulatingl3-Arary, immediately east of Gadsby's Hotel.
SUPERIOR STATIONERY.-Thesubscriber has on
400 reams best American and English Letter Paper
160do Cap Paper
100 do Demi and Medium Paper
40 do Folio Post
100 do "Envelope Paper
60,000 OQuills
-10 gross Inks in quart, pint, and half-pint bottles
"oa -unds best American and English Sealing Wae
100 ae-.W-aars
360 dozen dS Tr
500 cards most app, Steel Pens
20 gross best Lead PAen't e
500 pieces India Ink
:, 24 dozen Mouth Glue ~--.
28 do Cut Glass Inks, for office use ".
800 pounds of superior Black Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders "-.
Letter Stamps, Wafer, Pounce, and Sand Boxes "
Paper Weights, Rulers .
Blotting, Tracing, and Drawing Paper
And every other article in the Stationery line, all of which
will be sold on better terms than articles of similar quality can
ie obtained elsewhere. Orders promptly executed at Station-
ire' Hall. W. FISCHER.
dec 19-Sta4w (Tel)
1O MEMBERS OF CONGRESS.-W. FISCHER
would most respectfully invite tie attention of members
if Congress and strangers visiting the seat of Government, to
ts .very extensive assortment of


-uperior Stationery, Blafik Books, Drawing Materials
- Music, Perfumery, Musical and other Work Boxes
Gold and Silver Pencil Cases, Card Cases
Pocket Books and Purses, Playing and Visiting Cards
Hair and Teeth Brushes, Shell and other Combs
Portable Desks, Port Folios
Chessmen and Backgammon Boards
Musical Instruments and Fancy Articles generally.
All of which will be sold at the lowest prices at Stationer.'
tall, where. a strict uniformity of dealing is observed.


COLLECTORS' SALE.

W ILL be exposed to public sale, to the highest bidder, on Saturday, the 11th day of February, 1837, at the
office of the Clerk of the Corporation, the following Lots and Parts of Lots hereinafter mentioned, situated,
ine and being in Georgetown, or so many thereof as may be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of Georgetown,
D. for taxes due on them respectively for the years annexed, with costs and charges.- Sale to commence at 10
o'clock A. M. Terms cash.


NAMES ASSESSED.


Daniel D. Arden's heirs





Esther Berry



Robert Craig's h-eiib



Robert Craig's heiraf




Robert CGraig's heirs




Robert Craig'sheirs


Anthony Goszler's heirs




Mary D. G. Ringgold


_Mary D. G. Ringgold


Mary D. G. Ringgold


Eliza L. Ringgoldi,


Eliza L. Ringgold

Rachel Steel's heirs

Cath'ine Redmafi's heirs




Eveline Wilson.






Henry M. Wilson's heirs


Benjamin Thompson -


DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY.



Lot No. 36, in Peter's square
Ditto
Lot No. 34, in ditto -
'Ditto
Lot Np. 35, in ditto
Ditto -
South part 9f Lot No. 34 and all of Lots Nos. 35 and 36, in same square,
90 feet on Congress street, 108 feet on Canal
Part of Lots Nos.'190 and 191 in Beatty and Hawkins's addition, 20 feet
on 4th street. Improved. Balance -
Ditto -
Ditto
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on 4th street on ditto -
West part of Lot No. 54 in Beall's addition, 30 feet on Beall street. Im-
proved -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 55 in the same addition. Improved. Balance.
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Part of lots Nos. 127 and-128, in Beatty and Hawkins'saddition, 22 feet on
Highstreet. Improved -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto ..
Ditto 23 feet on High street .
Part of lot No. 188, in same addition, 20 feet on 4th street. Improved -
Ditto
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on 4th street on ditto
.Lot No. 70, in Threlkeld's addition. Improved -
Ditto -
SDitto -
Frofit foot tax on ditto, 123 feet 5 inches on Second street -
Ditto ditto on ditto
Lot No. 19, in Deakins, Lea, and Casenave's addition
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 60, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 63, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 39, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Lot No. 40, in same addition -
Ditto -
Ditto
Ditto -
Lot, not numbered, in Holmead's addition, 120 feet Monroe street, 60 feet
Dumbarton street. Improved -
Ditto -
Part of Lot No. 14, in Holmead's addition, 30 feet on Bridge street. Im-
proved -
s S. E. part ditto -
Half of lot No. 174, in Beatty and Hawkins's addition. Improved
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Front foot tax on ditto 35 feet on 4th street -
Part of lot No. 179, in Beall's addition, 29 feet on Bridge street, 66 feet on
Green street. Improved -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Ditto -
Part of lot No. 190, in Beatty and Hawkins's addition, 20 feet on 4th street.
Improved. Balance -
Ditto

Ditto -
1'ront foot tax on 4th street, on ditto $- 7 50


Years for
which
taxes are
due.


1833
1834
1833
1834
1833
1834

1835

1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833

1833
1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1834
1835

1830
.1831
1832
1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833
1833

1833
1834
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835
1832
1833
1834
1835

1834
1835

1834
1835
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1833

1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835

1832
1834
1835
1833


Assess-
ment.


$450
450
500
500
500
500

2400

400
40D0
400
400
200
400

1750
1750
1000
1800
1800
1800
1800
1250

2000
2000
2000
2000
1250
400
400
400
400
400
200
400
1500
1500
750
1500.
1500
400
400
400
300
1200
1200
1200
500
1350
1350
1350
550
1200
1200
1200
400
1300
1300
1300
700

500
350
1800
1200
400
800
800
800
800oo
800
S300
800

4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
2000

400
400
200
400


_- -


NOTE.-The names of the persons assessed are not inserted except for the year 1835; the laws previous to that date not re-
quiring it. JOHN HOLTZMAN,
nrev iou tn5 ^i- oj ew o5e
.... NINIAN BEALt.,- Collector for the years 1833, 1834, andI 1835.
If the terms of sale are not complied with-byh-Treday l te16th day of February, 1837, the lots and parts of lots purchased,
and not paid for, will be resold upon giving three days' notice in the Georgetown Metropolitan, at the risk and expense of the
first purchaser. JOHN HOLTZMAN, Collector as above.
nov 18-Fridays ts NINIAN BEALL, Collector as above.


A LEXANDRIA FOUNDRY and STEAM EN-
GINE MANUFACTOIRY.-Locomotive and Sta-
tionary Engines, heavy Iron and Brass Castings, Church Bells,
and Machinery of every Lind. Gentlemen visiting Washing-
ton are invited to call and see the works.
THOMAS W. SMITH & Co.
mar 4-eoly Alexandria, March 1.

N OTICE.-The subscriber having taken out letters testa.
mentary onf the estate of Drusella Cook, late of Charles
County, deceased, hereby requests all persons indebted to said
estate to pay-the .. : '... 1., -l', ...1',r.. :- having claims to
present them to .-..., .J.I ...t r. ... ... I ., r before the 15th
day of June next. i'i .\ itl[ TURNER,
dec 12-eot Executor.

C: APSULES.-Gelatineuses au Baume de Copahu pur,
pour le traitement des Maladies secretes, par A. MOTHES.
In which the Balsam Copeaiba is so enclosed, that the unplea-
sant smell and taste, which render this medicine generally so
inconvenient, are entirely avoided.
A supl-y ofthe above valuable medicine just received and
for sale by the :.-...: .. ..... Physicians are requested,to call
and examine them'.
Attestation de M. DESRUELLES, Doc'teur en Modeine de la FPa-
culte de Paris, Chirurgien en chef, demonstrateur a l'Hopi-
tal Militaire du Vil-de-Gri ., ..-..L... de Service des Vene-
riens au dit hbpital, Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur.
Je soussigne certified avoir -.,,. ..: ..-. : .....1 ..-...,.r- de fois
et toujours avecitocees, tant ... \ i -.I. '--. ,. .. .. i 'ille, les
Capsules gelatineuses -.. -.. -.:u-..:.... par M. A. Mothes, dans
lesquelles il renferme soit du baume de Copahu, soit du poivre
Cubebe, on toute autre espece de medicamens, dont il imported
de dissimulerle gout et l'odeuraux maladies, et queses capsules,
remplissent parfaitement le but de l'auteur et l'objet du practi-
cien, sont inpenetrables 'et ne laissent transsuder, aucunes
parties du medicament, quelles qua soient la divisibilite de des
molecules et la volatilite de sos parties odorantes.,
J'atteste que cette eaveloppe, qui est d'ailleurs tres-soluble,
ne nuit en rien a action du medicament, et que, perfectionnees
commae elles viennent de 'etre', les Capsules gelatineuses sont
prises par lesmalades avec une grande facility ; que, pendant
leur passage a travers le gosier et pendant leur sejour dens
I'estomac, elles ne laissent aucun gout dans la bouche et ne pro-
voquent aucun rapport desagreable.
M. A'. Mothes a 'rendu un grand service a la science en pro-
-- ,rantau x p-anoti -a "inaan"xie-f "ap.ai ldans asltomac
des melicamens qui par leur odeur et leur gout desagreable,
etaient bientot expulses par Ie vomissement.
DESRUELLES.


Paris, ce 20 Decembre, 1834.

dec 9-3tawlwc


E. H. & C. H. JAMES.


OLD CREAM, &C.-,Just received at Stationers' Hallr
a supply of fresh made Cold Cream, at 25 cents a bottle,
and superior Lip Salve, neatly put up, at 181 cents per box.
dec 21 (Tel) W. FISCHER.

-IREAT BARGAINS IN SHOES.--CARY &
RETURNER have bought out the entire stock 6f Litdes'.
Shoes of Messrs. Bradley & Catlett, which', .fth their former
stock, renders their assortment the best and cheapest in, the
District. The following comprise apart, viz.
1000 pairs fine Lasting Slippers, Philadelphia make, a little
defaced, at 50 cents
'-3000 do Este's, Lane's, and Follanisbee's Morocco and Kid
Slippers
60 Morrocco, Kid, and Seal Walking Shoes
200 do 0. r Fur Shoe's
150 doP Frenc. do
250 do Gaiter Be.
300 do colored Moroce shoe, at 75 cenfs
300 do Este's black and w Satin Slippers
500 do Seal, Morocco, arid K papers, at$1.
MISSES' SHOE-
350 pairs Misses' Moricco and Kid Phiila"pliiia Slippers
100 do thick SealJeffersons "
200 do fine Seal and Morocco Boots
300 do Child's Boots and Ankle-ties
100, do thick-sole Lasting Jeffersons, at 50 cenits
Also-2000 pairs coarse Shoes for servants.
CARY & TURNER.
k"P Ladies can have any of the above Shoes sent to their
dwellings. A liberal discount will be made where a dozen pair
or more are taken. C. & T.
nov 30---43w


'TOTICE.-The Trustees of the Upper Marlborough Aca-
- demy wish to employ for one year, to commence on the
1st of January next, a gentleman who is qualified in all respects
to take charge ofthe institution as Principal ; to whom they will
give a liberal salary, and the use of a dwelling-house, garden,
&c. as soon as the same can be put in a suitable state of repair.
The most unquestionable testimonials will be required as to
character and competency.
All applications on the subject to be addressed to the subscrib-
er, post paid. JNO. B. BROOKE,
President Board of Trustees, Upper Marlboro' Academy.
dec 8-wtlJ I

VALUABLE POTOMAC LANDS & THREE
FISHER IES FOR SALE OR RENT.-With
a view to a further removal to Alabama, the subscribers will sell
their Deep Hole and Farm Plantations, adjacent, containing two
thousand seven hundred and twenty-eight acres, lying upon
Occoquan bay, from the junction of Occoquan river to Neabsco
creek with the Potomac, and bounded on the west by the old
mail stage road to Colchester, along which the contemplated
railroad from the South mustbe constructed. The farm and fishe-
ries are of easy access, by land and water, about 18 miles from
Alexandria, three from Occoquan, and one from Colchester.
These are unquestionably the most fertile lands in Prince
William county-adapted to the growth of wheat, corn, tobacco,
oats, timothy, &c. and highly susceptible of improvement by
clover and plaster. Tile Occoquan mills and factoryare a conve-
nient market. The overseer's house, barns, quStaters, wheat
machine, fencing, &c. are in corresponding condition.
The Deep Hole fishing shore is known to be among the best
upon the Potomac. The Farm Marsh (or Mud Haul) fishery has
been fished several years successfully ; also the Plum Tree fish-
ery, betweenlthe two. Houses are on each shore. There is
abundant sea-room for seines of the largest class.
Many hundred cords of wood might ibe cut and sold on the
land, immediately on Neabsco creek, for which there is a constant
demand ; and there mightstill remain sufficient wood and timber
for the use of the estate.
The winter fisheries and ducking shores are also valuable.
Liberal terms are offered. The fisheries, well managed, will
mort than pay the interest of cost. One-fourth cash; the bal-

ance in three equal annual instalments. Possession may be giv-
en at the ensuing Christmas.
Such an opportunity is rarely offered for judicious investment.
For terms, (if by letter, post paid,) apply to William Hindman,
Esq. Baltimore, or to the subscribers.
BEN. OGLE TAYLOE, Washington, D. C.
-W M. H. TAYLOE, WPrsaw, Va.
aug 20-d&ctf -
AT PRIVATE SALE.--Superior Champagne
Brandy and Porto Rico Sugars.-I have just re-
ceived, on consignment from the importer-
5 quarter casks of very superior Champagne Brandy, of
ine flavor, and warranted genuine and pure,
10 hhds-.primnePorto Rico Sugars, with orders to close the
consignment.
Dealers are requested to give their early attention to the
above. .EDW. DYER,
dec 13-d5t Auct. and Corn. Mrchant.

NNUATLS, Illustrated Books, Souvenirs, Books of Flow-
A ers, Illustrated Albums, Scrap Books with engraved illus-
trations, Drawing Books, choice English editions of Illustrated
Works; illustrated editions of various of the most esteemed
authors, Shakspeare, Milton, Rogers, Byron, Scott, and many
others ; illustrated books of Travels, various collections ofViews
and Scenery in differentcountries, Juvenile Souvenirs, &c. &ec.
all in rich bindings.
F. TAYLOR has this day-opened several cases of books of
the above class auddescription, making the most extensive col-
lection ofthe richest and most splendidly engraved works ever
brought to Waslington. Purchasers and others are invited to
call and examine them. They witl be sold strictly at NewYork
and Philadelphia prices, at the Waverly Circulatilg Library,
immediately east of-Gadsby's Hotel. dec 9


Sale to takii place at 10 o'clock A. M. Terms, cash.


-SPLENDID GERMAN PIANOS.-Just received W. W. BILLING, Collector 1st and 2d Wards.
six more of those splendid instrtiments, of the same quality nov 12---lats
as those I'eretofore sold. These Pianos are approved of by the
first Professors in this country. Their cases are of superior MERICAN ALMANAC FOR 1837 is this TRITING PAPER.-W. FISCHER has been re-
c-lted mahogany, with pillars and stand ofthe newest and most A day received, for sale by F. TAYLOR, containing more W cealving by the late arrivals from New York.and Phila-
adnifd patterns.. My 'price is low for instruments of such su- than the usual valuable aniount of Scidtifici Commercial, Sta- delphia, his fall supply of Writing Paper. The assortment is
.. "uali. I shall receive 'a further supply in a few days. tistical, and Historical information, price only 81. The work extensive, apart of which he had made expressly to order, of
N. .-Old Pianos receivedin part ay .- will be safely sent to any part of the country, if application be superior quality, and weighing from 12 to 16 ounces more in the
RI ICHARD DAVIS, made at the Waverly Creculating Library, immediately east of ream than any other kind of the same size.
nov l3-d3t&2aw4w I Alexandria. Gadeby's Hotl. oot 6 sep 29 (Tel.)


For sale in Washington, by TODD & Co.
In Alexandria, by WM. STABLER.
mar 28-wly
RADLEY & CATLETT have received-
50 dozen pairs heavy Kentucky knit Socks
30 do heavy ribbed Drawers
50 do do Shirts
50 pieces Flannel, warranted not to shrink from washing
50 do gentlemen's Kid' Gloves
Also, I case Sattinets, very fine.
deo S-ao8w BRADLEY & CATLETT.


P


Tax.



$3 37J
2 25
3 75
2 50
3 75
2 50

12 00

1 00
3 00
3 00
2 00
1 00
7 50

13 121
8 75
5 00
3 00
9 00
13 50
9 00
6 25

10 00
10 00
15 00
10 00,
6 258
2 00
2 00
3 00
3 00
2 00
1 00
7 50
11 25
7 50
3 75
67 88
15 43
3 00
3 00
2 00
1 50
9 00
9 00
6 00
2 50
10 12P
o10 12i
6 75
2 75
9 00
9 00
6 00
2 00
9 75
9 75
6 50
3 50

2 50
1 75

6 00
2 00
4 00
4 00
6 00
6 00
4 00
1 50
13 12j

20 00
20 00
30 00
30 00
20 00
10 00

1 50
2 00
1 00
7 50


.. -. ...- -_ -..-.... -.... --------- r'Hj E 1NDIAN'S9 PANACEA-For the cure ofRhu5.
TAXES. .- matism, Scrofula, or King's Evil, Gout, Sciatica or Hip
CITY PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR TAXES. Gout, Incipient Cancers, Salt Rheum, Syphilitic and Mercurial
diseases, particularly Ulcers and painful affection of the bones,
N Saturday the 11th day of February next, (1837,) will' be sold by public auction, at the City ulcerated throat and nostrils; Ulcers Fr description,
ON all, in th e of Washington, the following described property, to satisfy the Corporation Fever Sores, and Internal Abscesses; r..-. o, Scald Head,
Hall, in theCity of Washington, the following described property, 1 scurvy, Biles, Chronic Sore Eyes, Erysipelas, Blotches, and
of the said City for taxes due thereon for the years stated, unless the said taxes be previously paid Suevery variety of Cutaneous Affection; Chronic Catarrh, Head-
to the subscriber; with such expenses and fees as may have accrued at the time of payment ache from particular causes; pain in the Stomach and Dyspep-
Sthe subscriber expsia, proceeding from vitiation; Affections of the -Liver, Chronic
SInflammation of-the Kidneys, and general debility, caused by a
Y '3o torpidaction of the vessels of the skin. It is singularly efficacious
ERS OR WHIC TAXES ARE DUE. S in renovating those constitutions which have been broken down
u w by injudicious treatments.or juvenile irregularities. In general
TO WHIO'D ASSESSED. I t terms, it is recommended in all those diseases which arise from
1824 1825 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830 1831 183218331834 1835 2 S a impurities in the blood, or vitiation of the humors, of whatever
E- "' name or kind.
S"-- Some of the above complaints may require some trifling assist-
Square. Lot. ant applications, which the circumstances of the case will dic-
quar. Lo.John 917 3 9 9 9 12 17 17 17 17 1 07 tate; but, for a general remedy or purificator, to remove'the
Davidon Joh 917 6 6 6 8 1 11 11 11 70 cause, the Indian's Panacea will generally be found sufficient.
7 -,13 13 13 17 24 24 24 24 1 52 3 29 TO THE PUBLIC.
Handy, Edward 657 11 7 81 1 8 1 81 811 08 1 58 1 58 79 79 11 40 How true it is that modern physicians, in their ambition to
982 7 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 19 27 27 27 27 2 24 excel in their profession, explore the vast fields of science by
9 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 19 27 27 27 27 2 24 the aid of Chemistry, and seek out new remedial agents to ar-
1036 14 12 13 13 13 13 14 14 19 25 25 25 25 2 11 17 99 rive at perfection in their practice by means of art alone, and
1036 14 12 13 13 13 1 14 1 9 25 2 7 16 53 entirely overlook and neglect, as beneath their notice, the rich
Alexander's heirs 296 7 45 50 50 50 50 1 261 261 682 472 4 2472 47 16 and bounteous stores of medicine which the Almighty has caused
411 3 23 25 25 25 25 63 63 84133123123123 825 to spring out of the earth in every clime. And how much more
4 23 25 25 25 25 63 63 841 231 231 231 23 8 25 true it is that whilst the American physician looks to foreign
22 20 22 22 22 22 54 54 73 1 07 1 071 071 07 7 17 countries for many of his most common and necessary articles,
24 23 25 25 25 25 63 63 841 23 1 231 23 1 23 8 25 perpetually changing, as they are, at the dictate of fashion and
40 23 25 25 25 25 63 63 84 1 23 1 23 1 231 23 8 25 folly, he is surrounded in his own country with au endless pro-
856 6 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 18 25 25 25 25 2 08 fusion of medical plants sufficient to answer any indication in
7 '10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 22 22 1 79 disease, aid yet he is ignorant oftheir virtues, and they are suf-
8 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 22 22 1 79 feared to waste their healing on the desert air." "
9 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 21 21 1 77 The effects of vegetable medicines upon the system are tern
10 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 21 21 1 77 porary-those of minerals lasting. The former exert their ef-
10 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 2 22 22 22 1 79 fects and pass off-the latter, mercury in particular, act chemi-
11 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 22 22 1 79 cally upon the solids, decomposing the bones, and undermining
12 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 25 25 25 25 1 08 the constitution by a slow and sure destruction.
13 12 13 13 13 2 13 13 13 18 25 25 25 25 1 08 The greater congeniality, efficiency, and safety of vegetable
14 11 12 12 12 12 11 .11 '1 .. 32 2 2 2 2 1 84 tremedies, compared with mineral, may be estimated by con-
'8s all 64 71 71 71 71 70 70 '1:. I 36 1 36 1 36 1 36 11 25 tasting the ancient practice with the modern; or, to bring it
909 all 1 00 1 13 1 131 13 1 13 1 10 1 10 1 472 162 162 162 16- 17 83 more immediately under our own observation, the Indian prac-
959 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 13 13 13 13 1 16 tise with that of the white man. Who, in America, has not
8 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 13 13 13 13 1 1G known or heard of repeated instances wherein some decrepit,
9 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 9 9 11 11 96 unpretending female Indian, by means of her simple remedies
10 7 8 8 8 8 7 7 9 14 14 14 14 1 18 alone, has effected the most rapid and astonishing cures, after
11 7 8 8 8 8 7 7 9 14 14 14 14 1 18 the whole Materia Medicaeof the common practice, directed in
048 12 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 9 13 13 1" 13 1 09 109 21 the most skilful manner, has failed ? And who has not been
Oneale, illi 12 36 40 40 40 40 40 53 7 6 41 surprised at beholding the comparative ease and facility with
Oneale "Willia$ 12 2I 36 40 40 40 40 40 1 53 7 78 I 1 1 41 which the Indian frees himself from any disease, and at the al-
a28 7 74 2 82 82 82 82 11 1 2 I 1 211 21 12 43 most total absence of chronic diseases among them Who has
101 77 1 981 981 981 98 1 971 -2 643 ;' -2 902 90 29 81 ever heard of an Indian with a constitution broken and ruined
111 771 981 981 981 98 1:971.972 643 873 872 902 90 29 81 by illtreatment? Andcan a doubtexistthatthishappyexemp-
3 .74 .82 82 82 82 1 2331 231 65-2 1-2 4-21 621 62 16 21 tion of the savage from most of the ills which the flesh of civil.
..241 50 1 671 671 671 67 2 092 092 79 4 i, I 10 3 293 29 29 93 ized man is heir to is chiefly owing to the more genial and safe
252 082 322 3-22 322 32 2 322 323 124 564 563 423-42 35 08 remedies which he employs This astonishing difference in
57 1 -- / 076 075 065 06 24 26 success is a fair exemplification ofthe infinite superiority ofthe
70 20 33 37 37 37 37 36 36 48 71 71 43 43 5 29 simple and safe means of cure which God has created for the
21 49 54 54 54 54 -54 54 721 051 05 64 64 8 83 benefit of his children over those which the pride and the art of
73 1 64 72 72 72 72 7-2 72 96 1 41 1 41 93 93 10 60 man have invented.
107 3 62 71 71 71 71 92 92 1 23 1 81 1 81 1 811 81 From a long residence among a portion of the aboriginal in-
62 7 habitants of his country, and intimate acquaintance with the me-
Pamp tax --- 2 00 1577 thods of cure of some of their most successful practitioners, the
4 86 96 96 96 96 1 28 1 28 1 71 2 -5. *"2- '3 2- 52 proprietor of "The Indian's Panacea' acquired a knowledge of
Pump tax 2 00 1 05 some of their most powerful and favorite-remedies. From these
156 11 -. 79 79 79 79 3 16 lie selected such as were most efficacious and appropriate, and,
178 9 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 21 30 30 30 30 2345 after variousexperiments to test their principles and strength,
10 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 14 19 19 19 19 1 64 he has combined them in the form here presented, as the most
11 12 13 13 13 13 12 12 17 24 24 24 24 2 01- perfect and beneficial for the'purpose for which it is recom-
12 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 14 19 19 19 19 1 64 mended.
13 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 i15 2 -2 22 22 1 77 The proprietor offers this preparation to the Public with the
14 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 15 22 22 22 22 1 77 consciousness that.he is placing within its reach a remedy capa'
14 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 14 19 19 19 19 1 64 ble of relieving many of his afflicted fellow-beings who are suf-
15 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 14 19 2 19 19 19 164 fearing under the various chronic-and obstinate complaints to
16 12 13 13 13 13 12 12 17 24 24 24 24 2 01 which it is applicable. To such it will prove of incalculable
17 10 11 11 11 11 10 10 14 19 19 19 19 1 64 value, as the means, and, in many cases, the only means of re-
'18 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 21 30 30 30 30 2 45 living their sufferings, and restoring them once more to health
218 1 1 96 1 96 1 18 1 18 6 28 and happiness. This is not offered as a common remedy that
339 1 25 28 28 28 28 41 41 56 81 81 1 09 1 09 6 55 may, perchance, be equally good with many others now in use,
7 25 28 28 28 28 41 41 56 81 81 1 09 1 09 6 55 but as one which is capable of saving life in many extreme cases
8 16 18 18 18 18 27 27 38 54 54 72 72 4 32 when all the usual remedies fail. This it has done repeatedly;
9 16 18 18 18 18 27 27 38 54 54 72 72 4 32 and this is the reputation it has obtained wherever it has been
10 16 18 18 18 18 27 27 38 54 54 72 72 4 3-2 introduced.
North of 396 all 46 49 49 49 49 49 49 66 97 97 76 76 7 52 It is only a few years since this preparation was-lirstpresent-
398 1 23 25 25 25 25 P5 25 33 48 48 48 48 3 98 ed to the Public, but in that time somethousands of persons
22 25 25 25 25 25 25 33 48 48 48 48 3 98 might be found who would solemnly declare that they believed
2 5 25 5 25 25 5 33 48 48 48 4 3 their lives were saved 14- -t, and in many cases after they had
3 15 17 17 17 17 17 17 -22 32 32 32 32 2 67 tried most -d"i perhaps all the common remedies in vain,
8 15 17 17 17 17 17 17 22 32 32 32 32 2 67 Wh,-sver it is known, it is rapidly coming into use, and this af-
422 2 22 25 25 25 25 25 25 33 49 49 49 49 4 01 -fords the most substantial and convincing proof of its merits.,
3 15 17 17 17 17 17 17 22 33 33 33 33 2 71 The value of this Panacea is most. conspicuous in those long
4 15 17 17 17 17 17 17 22 33 33 33 33 2 71 standing and obstinate syphilitic and scrofulous affections which
5 23 25 25 25 25 25 25 33 50 50 49 49 4 04 have defied all other remedies, and particularly in those cases
446 8 17 19 19 19 19 38 38 51 76 76 76 76 5 24 --where mercury has been so lavishly used as ..- -.._-1: ,i'. ,:
9 23 25 25 925 25 50 50 68 99 99 99 '99 6 87 pains in the bones, nodes, mercurial ulcers, I..e ..-'.:.....,r...in..:
10 21 23 23 23 23 47 47 63 92 92 92 92 6 38 digestive organs, &c. These it completely removes, and in all
11 23 5 25 25 9 5 50 50 67 98 98 98 98 6 82 cases it entirely eradicates the disease and the effects of mer-
11 23 25 25 25 25 50 50 67 98 3 8 98 98 3 12 cury, renovates the constitution, and leaves the patient sound
510 16 24 35 35 34 34 1 62 and well. In rheumatisms and ulcerated sore throat, its happy
17 48 70 70 71 71 3 30 effects are not less apparent, giving almost immediate relief.
18 22 25 25 32 32 1 36 This medicine has been found highly useful in many ambigu-
781 1 75 1 09 1 091 641 64 6 21372 08 ous diseases not here specified, and it has been used with wonm-
TlMap s 143 3 2 20 2 46 2 46 2 46 2 46 4 70 4 70 3 39 4 83 4 83 6 04 6 04 46 57 derful success as a spring and fall purifier, by those who are
42 202 462 462 462 46 2 462 46 3 29 4 83 4 83 6 046 04 41 99 88 56 subject to various complaints, and whose constitutions require in-
Blake, James H. 256 13 1 972 21 2 21 2 21 2 21 2 93 2 93 3 93 3 93 3 9:15 76 5 76 vigorating. Such persons will do well to use two or three bot-
Water tan 1 03 --- -- 41 01 lies in small doses. Whenever a diet drink is considered ne-
DavisteGideon 207 23 12 12 12 12 12 15 23 23 23 23 1 67 cessary, this Panacea, -taken in small doses, will .-r.: -,11 : ,
24 11 11 11 11 11 14 20 20 20 20 1 49 3 16 purposes, in much less time, at less expense, and .- i' i", .r
Hendley, Robert 468 6 37 41 41 41 41 62 62 83 1 211 21 80 80 8 10 agreeable manner, than the common diet drink.
7 37 41 41 41 41 62 62 831 211 21 80 80 8 10 The following certificates, out of hundreds similar which
13 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 might be procured, are given to show the effects of the Indian's
13 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 681 001 00 67 67 6 71 Panacea, in the various complaints therein mentioned; and also
14 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 to exhibit, in the most satisfactory manner, its superiority over
15 31 34 84 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 the. syrups in common use:
18 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 681 001 00 67 67 6 71 BOSTON, APRIu, 1834.
19 37 41 41 41 41 62 62 83 1 211 21 80 80 8. 10 SIR: When I was a young man, I followed the fishing trader
29 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 001 00 67 67 6 71 and, from the peculiar exposure at that time, I have had pain
31 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 681 001 00 67 67 6 71 about me at intervals, which have since increased to a regular
469 1 30 33 33 33 33 50 50 67 99 99 66 66 6 59 and severe rheumatism. You know, I saw you in Charleston
2 37 41 41 41 41 62 62 83 1 211 21 80 80 8 10 very bad off, and told you I had heard of the .surprising quali-
3 37 41 41 41 41 62 62 83 1 211 21 80 80 8 10 ties of the Indian's Panacea, when you told me where to glt,
4 47 52 52 52 52 78 781 03 1 531 53 1 021 02 10 24 it. Well, I got six bottles, which have cured moe for seven of
31 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 eight months, and from being free from pain so long, although
32 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 exposed, I believe my case a cured one, and write this to say
32 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 681 00100 67 67 671 'so. AARON GILBERTS.
33 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 681 001 00 67 67 6 71 --
34 31 34 34 34 34 51 51 68 1 00 1 00 67 67 6 71 124 43 NEW ORLEANS, MAY, 1834.
Kirk, Thormas M.'i heirs 88 4 39 39 52 52 69 1 011 011 01 1 01 655 I have had a disease in my head, which more recently beh
89 4 .14 14 14 14 19 27 27 27 27 1 83 came very painful and alarming, in consequence of taking cold
5 29 29 29 29 38 56 56 56 56 3 78 12 16 repeatedly. A large gathering was formed in the cavity be-
Parrott, Richatld's heirs 102 18 1 802 01 2 01 01 2 01 3 213 214 30 6 31 6 31 4 734 73 tween the' ears,discharging prodigiously; and from the renewed
Tax for filling Up lot -- 56 66 - 99 30 accumulation at times, it seemed as if my head would burst
105 30 83 92 92 92 92 1 45 1 45 1 94 2 85 2 85 2 60 2 60 20 25 when the running would increase at the ears, and would also
895 12 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 19 29 29 14 14 2 09 appear at the nose and eyes. I applied to the best physicians
13 15 16 16 16 16 16 16 21 32 32 15 15 2 but found no permanent relief; I also tried Swaim's Pan~~ zes
14 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 21 32 32 15 15 2 21 but found it useless. By request of a friend I tried the I....r,
15 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 21 323 32 15 15 2 21 Panacea, which soon gave me relief; and after taking ,r -.. -.
16 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 19 19 13 13 -- 13 1 74 bottles, I was made as well as ever. The opinion of one so
606 7 35 39 39 39 39 19 19 25 37 37 37 37 4 0 much indebted to it may be of little weight; but the reputation
606 7 35 39 3 39 39 3 9 19 25 37 37 37 37 4 0 this Panacea has earned in this vicinity will give it the preo
607 9 32 35 35 39 39 35 35 46 68 68 34 34 5 00 ference over any other remedy for abscesses, sores, &c.
608 8 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 22 22 22 22 1 79 remedy f JOHN McMULLEN. .
667 9 25 28 28 28 28 20 20 27 40 40 39 39 3 63 The proprietors of this article have received many proofs of
943 1 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 9 27 27 13 13 1 96 its-value on plantations. The negro who is subject to any dis-
2 15 17 17 17 17 16 16 22 32 32 15 15 2 31 eases peculiar to him, or peculiar to his exposing employment,
6 16 18 18 18 .18 17 17 22 33 33 16 16 2 42 feels most readily its healing influence. Rheumatism, debi-
7 26 29, 29 29 29 29 29 37 56 56 27 27 4 03 lity, swellings, loss of appetite, and the nameless evils he cotit
8 16 18 18 18 18 17 17 23 33 33 16 16 2 43 plains of, may all be removed by the use of a few bottles of the
983 2 11 12 12 12 13 12 12 16 23 23 23 23 1 91 Indian's Panacea. Many.a useful servant has been restored by
3 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 20 30 30 30 30 2 44 its effects; and it is confidently recommended to the planter as,
4 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15 21 21 22 22 1 77 a safe and invaluable medicine.
1019 4 30 34 34 34 34 34 34 45 66 66 33 33 4 77 Erysipelas is one of those severe cutaneous affections which
1023 2 23 25 25 25 25 25 25 34 49 49 16 16 3 37 is removed by this Indian practice more effectually and speedily
East of 1025 8 32 35 35 35 35 35 35 48 69 69 35 35 4 98 than in any other mode. There is strong evidence at hand to
1043 27 24 29 29 29 29 26 26 35 51 51 25 25 3 79 show that no case can withstand its effect.
28 13 14 14 14 14 14 14 18 27 27 13 13 1 95 ST. AUGUSTINE, (E F.) JULY, 1835.
9 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 15. 22 22 11 11 157 D. G. HAVILAND & Co. Agents: I am induced to write, to
30 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 17 25 25 12 12 1 81 inform you of the happy results I have experienced from taking
301 i 173 17 173 173 136 16 21 3 5 2 32 15 15 2 1 the Indian'sPanacea. Forthelasttenyearslhavebeenseverely
31 19 19 19 19 1 19 25 37 37 1 18 2 66 afflicted with the rheumatism in both legs, and sores covering
32 17 19 19 19 19 19 19 25 37 37 18 18 2 66 a large proportion ofthe body; and during this time l have tried
1048 10 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 12 18 18 17 17- 1 44 almost every thing that I heard recommended, but without re-
1065 2 1 191 331 331 331 33 1 331 331 782 622 62 13 13 16 45 lief from any. In this state, I had given up myselfas incurable,
4 1 19 1 33 1 33 1 33 1 33 1 33 1 33 1 78 2 622 62 12 12 16 44 and made up my mind to drag out my life in excruciating pain
N. E; of 1065 2 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 19 29 29 14 14 2 09 for I can safely say that I had not known a day, in that time,
3 25 28 28 28 28 27 27 36 54 54 26 26 3 87 during which I had been free from pain, and most of the time
4 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 19 29 29 14 14 2 09 1 was in the greatest agony. I was in this fix when in your
1067 1 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 11 15 15 6 6 1 08 234 43 city, at which time I bought a dosen bottles of your Panacea.
Smith n J iliae 169 19 481 661 1 66 68 99 99 30 30 3 26 which I took as directed in the paper, andam now happy I

Pumptax 4 00 38 64 Yours, very'espectfully,
19 2 022 262 26 2 26 26 3 233 234 336 356 356 356 35 Y T. H. POWERS.
Pump tax 3 00 -. 50 25 -
126 251 22 1 371 -371 371 37 1 711 712 28 3 353 35 2 68 2 68 24 46 CHARLESTON, JULY 12, 183l.
26 83 93 93 93 -93 1 16 1 16 1 56 2 282 28 1 83 1 83 16 65 I was afflicted four years with an ulcer in the leg, occasion-
158 13 29 32 32 32 32 '32 -.32 39 63 63 63 63 5 12 ally accompanied with erysipeletous inflammation and exces'
172 281 181 321 321 321 32 1 321 391-772 582 582 592 59 21 21 sivo pain in the leg and ankle joint. Sever.. '-........ *,"
183 18 18 20 200 20 27 27 36 '53 53 53 53 4 00 cian exerted their skill upon it but without -. -.,.,,.
207 1 13 14 '14 14 14 14 14 18 27 27 27 27 2 23 Is this state, five bottles of the Indian's Panacea made a perfeo
2 11 12 12 12 12 11 11 15 22 2-2 22 22 1 84 cure. MARGARET A VEST,
S. E. ofl1068 1 8 9 9 9 9 8 8 10 16 16 16 16 1 34 165 74 121, letinc street.
Wilson, Janles snd Thomaf 88 16 49 47 47 47 47 62 62 31 1 1 1 21 9 21 7 For sale by HAVILAND, HARRAL, & d LLEN,
Agents, 304, King street, ChsrlestoO