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WASHINGTON: WEDNESDAYs DECEMBER 28, 1836.


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S. .. V-PUBLtSHE BY ..
-GALES & SEASON.
PrIC.E, FOR A YEAR, 1*N DOLLARSt) FOR SIX MXO1fTIt, SIX
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-' -^hise subscribl g for a year- who do not, either at the time of
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Sof the Editors.

OFFICIAL PAPER.

'tPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREA-
SURY ON THE STATE OF THE FINANCES.

.. TREASURY DEPARTMENT, DEC. 6, 1836.
In obdience to the directions of the "act supplementary
to the act to establish the Treasury Department," the Se-
cretary of the Teeasury respectfully submits to Congress
the following report r
I.-OP TIHEPUBIAC REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES.
It is believed that the whole amount of money in the
Treasury on the 1st of January next, applicable to public
purposes, will be about $41,723,959.
This conclusion rests in part on what has been actually
ascertained, and in part on estimates.
Thus, the .balance in the Treasury on the
1st of January, 1835, was $8,892,856 42
The receipts from all sources during that
year were -35,430,087 10
Viz.
From customs S19,391,310 59
From lands 14,757,600 75
From dividends and sales
.of bank stock 569,280 82
From incidental items 195,561 98
From Neapolitan indem-
nity 516,332 96


Those, with the above balance, make an
aggregate of $44,32,945 52
The expenditures on all objects during the
year 1835 were 17,573,141 56
Viz.
On civil list, foreign intercourse, and mis-
cellaneous objects 3,721,261 60
Neapolitan awards 508,436 93
Military service, including fortifications,
&c. 9,420,312 69
Naval service, including gradual improve-
ment 3,864,939 06
Public debt 58,191 28
For the details of the receipts and expenditures in the year
1835 reference is made to the annual account thereof,
which isthis day submitted to Congress in a separate com-
munication.
The balance left in the Treasury on the 1st
of January, 1836, was therefore $26,749,803 96
The receiptsintothe Treasury during 1836,
as ascertained and estimated, will be
about 47,691,898 00
Of these, the receipts during the first three
quarters are ascertained to have been 38,141,898 04
Viz.
From customs $17,523,151 79
From lands 20,048,929 88
Dividends and ales of U. S. Bank stock 292,676 67
Incidental items, including excess of repay-
4ents on account of public debt, as here-
- after stated 47,139 70
This does not embrace the receipts iit trust on account
of the Chickasaw Indians.
Of those receipts and their investment, besides the ex-
penditures from them, a report will forthwith be laid before
Congress, in conformity to treaties and the acts of Congress
carrying those treaties into effect.
Neither does it embrace the receipts on account of the
Post Office and Patent Office, of which, as well as the ex-
pnditures on the same accounts, separate statements are
ept, in conformity to the late laws, and will be rendered
by the proper officers.
Nor does it include what has been received in trust the
present year for the claimants under the French, Neapolitan,
and Spanish treaties.
A separate account will be exhibited in this report, of the
receipts and expenditures from those sources, in order to
avoid complexity and ambiguity in the statement of the
general receipts and expenditures in behalf of the Govern-
ment alone.
The receipts during the fourth quarter of the present
year, it is computed, will be about $9,550,000 00
These, with the balance on the 1st of Janu-
ary, 1836, form an aggregate of 74,441,702 00
The expenditures during the year 1836 are
ascertained and estimated to be 31,435,032 00
Of these, the amount during the first three
quarters is ascertained to have been 20,791,372 16
Viz.
On civil list, foreign intercourse, and mis-
cellaneous 3,850,101 55
Military service, including fortifications, &c. 13,010,061 59
Naval service, &c. 3,931,209 02
Public debt, less than the repayments by the Commis-
sioners of the Sinking Fund, as hereafter explained.
For the details of all these, and the incidental receipts
during those three quarters, reference is made to the exhi-
bit annexed, (A 1 and 2.)
The expenditures for the fourth quarter, as computed by
the proper Departments, will be $10,643,660; but which,
it is thought by me, will probably fall short of that amount.
This will leave on hand, the 1st of January, 1837, an esti-
mated balance of $43,005,669. From this, if the diminish-
ed sum of $1,080,000 for unavailable funds be deducted,
the available balance of money on the 1st of January, 1837,
would be $41,925,669.
But, beside the charges already imposed on this balance
byappropriations for public purposes still unpaid, and which
will soon be adverted to, there is, in fact, included in it
about $201,710, which was paid into the Treasury, chiefly
in former years, from ivate sources alone, and for private
or specific purposes, all which neither accrued from the
usual sources of public revenue, nor ever belonged to the
General Government, except to fulfil the particular trusts
under which it was received in behalf of others.
A schedule of those items and sums, on the 1st of De-
cember, 1836, is annexed, (B.) Deduct their amount
from the available balance of $41,925,669, and only about
$41,723,959 would remain on the 1st of January next, ap-
plicable to the general purposes of the Government.
To this deduction would be subjoined another, had not
the receipts and expenditures connected with certain sub-
jects during the present year, or portions of it, been kept
distinct, for reasons before indicated.
Thus, the receipts on account of the Post Office, which,
under the new organization, are paid into the Treasury,
and kept distinct, have, since it took effect, being the last
half year, been ascertained, and computed to be about
$1,076,872, including near $410,472 that had been collect-
ed previously; and the expenditures have been about
$562,952, leaving a balance on hand at the end of the
year of about $513,920, as will be more particularly exhi-
bited by the head of that Department.
The receipts on account of the Patent Office since its
new organization, for the present year, have also been as-
certained, and computed to be about $16,828, the expen-
ditures chargeable to them about 87,241, and the balance
about $9,587, as will be more particularly shown by the
report of the proper officer.
Besides these, the receipts into the Treasury in trust
from the treaties of indemnity with France, Naples, and
Spain, have been about $3,765,994, and the payments to
the claimants about $3,663,988, leaving a balance of about
$102,026 still uncalled for or unadjusted.
The particulars of these will more fully appear in the
general annual exhibit of all the receipts and expendi-


$41,723,959, by means of current and permanent appro-
priations, which it is expected will not be expended till
after the 1st of January next, amount to 814,636,062.
Of this sum it is computed that $3,013,389 can be ap-
plied in aid of the appropriations for the ensuing year,
without reappropriatin, and that $195,183 will be car-
ried to the surplus fund, leaving $11,427,490, which will
probably be required to accomplish the objects contemplat-
ed in the acts of Congress.
Deduct thisremainng charge of $14,440,879 from the
balance estimated to be on hand on the 1st of January,
1837, and the sum of $27,283,080 would be left to be ap-
propriated by Congress towards new or former objects.
II.-OF THE EXPENDITURES FOR THE PUBLIC
DEBT, AND ITS PRESENT CONDITION.
Before the passage of the act of Congress, at the last
session, on the subject of the public debt, the money which
had previously been deposited by the Commissioners of the
Sinking Fund in the United States Bank for the payment
of the residue of it was, under their direction, repaid into
the Treasury, amountinrg to the sum of $136,773 01.
Since that eveht~and the suspension of the duties of the
Commissioners, this Department, by virtue of the above
act, has caused all those portions of the public debt out-
standing and presented for payment to be promptly dis-
charged.
The payments made since the 1st of January last have
been as follows, viz.
On the funded debt, towards principal $46,405 72
Towards interest 3,139 09


Making, in all, the sum of


- $49,544 81


There still remains of the funded debt unclaim-
ed and undischarged-principal about $90,367 00
And interest, with dividends, about 250,416 00
A small unfunded debt of $37,440 55 also re-
mains, which may hereafter be claimed, on
which has been paid during the past year, in-
cluding 816 07 for interest on Treasury
notes, the sum of 88 57
It consists of claims registered prior to 1798, for
services and supplies during the revolutionary
war, equal to 27,835 46
Treasury notes issued during the war of 1812 5,735 00
And Mississippi stock 4,320 09
III.-OF THE ESTIMATES OF THE PUBLIC REVE-
NUE AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR 1837.
The receipts into the Treasury from all
sources, during 1837, are estimated at $24,000,000 00
Viz.
From customs, $16,500,000' 00
From lands, 5,000,00(0 00
From bank stock, '2,000,000 00
Miscellaneous, including
interest from deposit
banks, 5,000,000 00
To these add the balance of available
funds in the Treasury on the 1st of
January, 1837, estimated, as computed,
for public purposes, at 41,723,959 00


And they make an aggregate of $65,723,959 00

The expenditures for all objects, ordinary and extraordi-
nary, in 1837, including the contingent of only $1,000,000
for usual excesses in appropriations beyond the estimates,
are computed at $26,755,831, provided the unexpended ap-
propriation at the'end of this and the next year remain
about equal.
Thus, the new an'l permanent appropriations chargeable
to 1837, for specified purposes, whether ordinary or extra-
ordinary, and including what can be used without reap-
propriation, are computed at $25,755,831 00
Of these the permanent appropriations al-
ready made are estimated at 2,347,000 00
The existing appropriations, which will
not be required for the service of 1836,
and which it is proposed to apply in aid
of 1837, amount to 3,013,389 00
The new appropriations that will be need-
ed for 1837 are estimated to amount, in
all, to 20 4,442 00
The latter are divided among the different branches of
the public service, as follows, viz.
Civil, foreign intercourse, & miscellaneous, $2,925,671 00
Military service, &c. 10,758,431 00
Naval service, &c. 6,670,341 00
The details of the above estimates are exhibited in a
document from the Register's office, which this Depart-
ment has the honor to lay before the House of Represen-
tatives to-day in a separate communication.
To these have been added, for the ensuing year, on ac-
count of the usual contingent excesses of appropriations
beyond the estimates, $1,000,000, making in all, as before
mentioned, the aggregate of $26,755,831.
From these calculations, it will be seen, that if the out-
standing appropriations, unexpended at the close of 1837,
be as large as at the close of 1836, and the other expendi-
tures should agree with the above estimates, they would
exceed the computed revenue, accruing from all sources,
nearly $3,000,000, or sufficient to absorb more than half
of that part of the present surplus which is not to be de-
posited with the several States. But if these outstanding
appropriations at the close of 1837 should be much less
than those in 1836, as is probable, or, should the accruing
receipts be much less, or the appropriations made for 1837
be much larger than the estimates, a call will become ne-
cessary for a portion of the surplus deposited with the
States, though it will not probably become necessary ex-
cept in one of those events.
IV.-SOME EXPLANATIONS OF THE ESTIMATES
FOR 1837.
The unusual receipts during the last two years have
chiefly accrued from the unprecedented sales of public
lands.
It is remarkable that those sales assumed their extraor-
dinary character chiefly between July, 1835, and October,
1836, a period of little more than fourteen months.
Arising, as they have, principally from private entries,
and not from any unusual quantities of land offered for
public sale, and marked, as they have been, by sudden and
great vibrations, it has not been deemed judicious to con-
sider them as a proper basis for permanent estimates of a
public character.
Accordingly, the sum adopted for the estimates of the
sales the past year, as well as that for the ensuing year,
though larger than usual, has been grounded on general
considerations of a less fluctuating character, leavirigacci-
dental and occasional excesses or deficiencies to happen, as
they often will, without either the attempt or ability in this
Department to predict the extent of them with much cer-
tainty.
The receipts from customs the present year will be some-
what augmented by the great speculations which have cha-
racterized the business of the country generally, and the
destruction by fire of an extraordinary amount of foreign
goods near the close of the last year. This calamity, fol-
lowed by credits more liberal, and competition increased to
supply the sudden and large deficiencies in the market, led
to an excess in the importations of merchandise during the
present year, even greater than the amount destroyed, and
thus essentially contributed to swell the revenue from cus-
toms beyond the estimates. But overtrading, from what-
ever inducements it may arise, usually produces a reaction,
and it is hoped that no accident of a similar and deprecated
character will occur which may enlarge our importations
the ensuing year. The receipts from customs for 1837
have, therefore, from those and other circumstances which
it might be tedious to detail, been estimated at not more
than $16,500,000.
Only about $50,000 of the amount secured by special
bonds from the sufferers by fire last December, under the
authority of an act of Congress on that subject, has been
postponed, so as to fall due within the ensuing year, while
a relntion on account of the diminished rate of duty im-


flattering condition of things may have arisen from the
great reductions already made in the tariff and duties on
tonnage; from having cast off the burdens of the national
debt; from our increasing expenditures on works favorable
to commerce and public security; from permanent addi-
tions to the moneyed capital of the nation by the many
millions obtained abroad for foreign indemnities; from the
immense fertile tracts of land redeemed from Indian claims,
and opened to the profitable enterprise and industry ofi&r
citizens at very low prices, by the humane policy of remov-
ing the aboriginals west of the Mississippi; from the in-
precedented improvements in the facilities, the rapidity had
cheapness of communication and oftransportation by stead-
boats and railroads; from the greater safety of our foreign
commerce, and its extension to new and distant region ;
from abundant crops and high prices ; from the increasing
numbers, intelligence, and enterprise of our people gepe-
rally; or from these and various other causes combined.
But though some of these causes may have spent most of
their influence, others are acting in full vigor, and our na-
tional prosperity does not appear likely to be soon essentially
checked, except so far as the excesses before mentioned, or
Iwar, Or unavoidable physical calamities, like those of pesti-
lence and bad crops, may from time to time produce tem-
porary reactions.
The receipts from customs, therefore, though not esti-
mated so high as they proved to be during the past or pre-
ceding year, have still been computed at a larger sum than
it was formerly anticipated they would, on an average,
equal, under the existing tariff.
The imports during the year ending Sep-
tember 30, 1836, are acertained and estimated
at -$173,540,000
They show, compared with the preceding
year, an increase of 23,644,258
The imports during the three past years
have, on an average, been about 149,985,691
The exports during the past year are ascer-
tained and estimated at 121,789,000
Of these $101,105,000 were in domestic, and $20,684,000
were in foreign products.
Compared with the preceding year, they exhibit an in-
crease of $35,423, and are $5,829,150 more than the aver-
age for the last three years.
The crop of cotton grown the present year, which will
constitute the chief exports of that article for 1837, is be-
lieved to be large; but from present appearances will, pro-
bably, be less valuable than during the two past years. At
the same time, the exports of flour and grain are likely to
be smaller in both quantity and value; and those of tobac-
co and rice, which, with the articles before named, form
our principal subjects of domestic produce for exportation,
are not-believed to be materially greater, and have seldom,
during the last quarter of a century, in any series of years,
much exceeded their previous amount. However enlarged,
by our rapid increase of population, has been the demand
at home for those and other articles of our own growth and
manufacture, the most tempting and augmenting product
for exportation seems to be cotton.
During near forty years it has attracted and engrossed a
large portion of the spare capital and labor of nearly half
the territory of the Union. And by the great demand for
it abroad, independent of its increased consumption at
home, it will probably long continue to constitute, not only
our chief and most profitable product tor exportation, but
be the regulator, in some degree, of our ability to import,
and of the balance of trade between this country and Eu-
rope.
The receipts from incidental and miscellaneous sources
have been estimated on the following data. Nothing very
definite could be presented as arising from an arrangement
which,under the recent actofCongress, is contemplated with
the Bank of the United States in respect to the stock qaWa-
ed by the Government in that institution, until further pro-
gress shall be made, and the bank may indicate when it is
willing to-pay some specified amount.
It will be seen by the documents annexed, (C 1, 2, 3,)
that this Department took early steps to procure suitable
information for a settlement with the bank, and paymentin
the course of the present year of the due share of the Unit-
ed States in the nett collections from the assets existing on
the 3d of March last, as well as to obtain specific proposals
for an early adjustment of the whole concern.
It has been a cause of some surprise that the information
desired has not yet been communicated, nor any payment
been yet made. On the contrary, the president of the S4ate
corporation, to which the assets of the United States Bink
have been assigned, forwarded, in September last, a report
of a committee appointed under authority of only those two
bodies, estimating the value of the stock on the 3d of March;
but it was accompanied by no offer to pay that value, or
any other particular amount then, or at any future specified
period, though professing a willingness that the United
States should receive a just proportion out of the assets of
the bank.
Commissioners were therefore appointed, and an invita-
tion given to have them joined by others on the part of the
United States Bank, to revise the estimate of the value put
on the stock by the above committee; and, after urging
early payments as practicable towards what might in the
end be found due to the United States, if failing to obtain
any, to recommend such arrangement as might seem just
for securing and paying hereafter what they considered to
be the true worth of the share of the Government in the
capital stock. Copies of the letters, report, and instructions
before named are annexed, (D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.)
It is clearly to be inferred from the correspondence since
had by the commissioners above mentioned with a commit-
tee of the bank, that no payment whatever is intended to
be made during the present year, and that long credits are
expected and considered by the bank proper for portions of
what may be due. That correspondence, and all the steps
which have been taken under the particular instructions
given to those commissioners, will more fully appear in the
further documents which will be submitted to Congress af-
ter the commissioners make their final report. No reason-
able efforts will be spared by me to conclude some appro-
priate arrangement of this embarrassing and troublesome
subject before the adjournment of the present Congress.
Trusting that a proper sense of its obligations to the Gov-
ernment, as a large stockholder, will induce the bank to
refund at least one-fourth of our original capital, with the
profits thereon, in the course of the ensuing year, two mil-
lions of dollars have on that account been inserted in the


estimates. To this are to be added the dividends antici-
pated on the stock owned in the Louisville and Portland
canal, interest from the deposit banks, and some small re-
ceipts from other miscellaneous sources.
V.-OF THE SURPLUS IN THE TREASURY, AND DIS-
POSITION OF IT.
Various objects of a national and constitutional charac-
ter were recommended in the last annual report from this
Department, as suitable for the application, by way of ex-
traordinary appropriation, of any surplus funds for which
the General Government should happen to have no other
immediate use,
Liberal and useful appropriations were fortunately made
to many of them, which will save expense in the end, and
prove to be the soundest economy. The reasons for a con-
tinuance of the same wise policy, while our resources re-
main so ample, have lost none of their original force.
As the present surplus had chiefly arisen from an earlier
sale of large portions of the public lands than had been ex-
pected, it seemed to this Department judicious to suggest
completing with it: sooner than had been contemplated, the
projected fortifications and naval establishments of the
country; improving more rapidly the navigation and secu-
rity of its commercial bays and rivers; and, while its im-
ports and exports were prosperous beyond example, erect-
ing, where needed, appropriate custom and warehouses, as
well as suitable marine hospitals, court-houses, and post-
offices. In fine, the whole state of our finances appeared
tojustify and require that all those great works heretofore
deemed useful and constitutional, and which are intimately
connected with the duties and powers of the General Gov-
ernment, should be more hastened, with our means so much
increased and so prematurely available, than would have


The necessary expenditures of the. Government would
thus, by that time, become naturally as well as safely
lessened, so as to bear a near proportion to our diminished
receipts; while otherwise, if the expenditures for these
works are not previously increased or expedited, the proba-
bilities would seem to be that the ordinary charges for them
and other usual claims on the General Government, with
the extraordinary charges incident to war and similar ca-
lamities, from which no people can be wholly exempt, might
then so far exceed the receipts as to require new taxation
or an increased tariff.
In respect to another branch of the subject, which relates
to a reduction of the present large surplus in the Treasury,
either by an immediate diminution of the existing tariff, or
some new regulation calculated to limit and lessen the
amount ofthe sales of the public lands by confining them to ac-
tual settlers, or otherwise, this Department felt bound, in dis-
charge of its public duties, to submit to Congress,last year,
a few considerations which are still equally applicable. It is.
believed that when the balance on hand, andithe accruing
receipts, are likely for some time to come to exceed the-real
wants and just objects of the Government for expenditure,
a reduction in those receipts, and especially such as are de-
rived from taxation, is the true remedy.
Besidethe considerations relating to this reduction, which
were formerly submitted by this Department, it would now
respectfully suggest that all the duties under 20 per cent.
and which amount to near three millions annually, could,
with about half a million more on the articles paying a
higher duty, and specified in a report to the Senate at the
last session, be at once repealed by Congress, without any
encroachment on the principle of the act of 3d March,
1833. Nor has this Department any doubt that, if all the
present and anticipated receipts from customs are consider-
ed by Congress not to be wanted for any public appropria-
tion or other legitimate object, a reduction could be made
in many other duties more rapidly than is now provided
for, without any essential injury to any great interest in-
tended to be fostered by the provisions of that act. At the
same time, such a step as the last, unless foundindispensa-
ble from high public considerations, and hence generally
concurred in, does not appear to this Department consist-
ent with the expectations offnost of those who united in
the passage of that law, and has not therefore been urged.
But, if found-indispensable, the next articles which, in my
opinion, could be most appropriately selected for greater
and quicker reduction, are the raw materials of foreign
origin used in some of our important manufactures; and
though certain rival articles produced here might suffer by
such a change, yet in this way the whole manufacturing
industry of the country would probably be benefited. If
sufficient reduction cannot be obtained on that class, the
next kind of articles selected should be such as are largely
consumed in promoting the comforts and satisfying the neces-
sities of the people generally, and, at the same time, do not
materially compete with important manufactures, nor con-
flict with great agricultural interests. And the next, if
more be deemed necessary, might be such as have now a
much higher duty or protection on them than others of
greater national consequence.
Certain it is that a much more just and useful discrimi-
nation could be introduced into the whole present system,
by reducing more quickly the duties which are found to be
least beneficial by way of protection, and by reducing more
slowly those deemed most indispensable.
Equally feasible would it be, in the exercise of a proper
spirit of comity and justice, to make some legal enact-
ments which should prevent the further sale of the pub-
lic domain to any persons who do not want it for immediate
cultivation. This teems peculiarly proper at a time when
the Government neither needs the proceeds of such sales
for any public use, nor considers the money received ade-
quate to the real value of the land sold; and when the set-
tlement of the new States is retarded by permitting the pub-
lic domain to Imss in large quantities into the hands of oth-
ers than actual settlers. By a wise revision of our present
laws, the enterprising, industrious, and needy, might, for a
fair compensation, be liberally secured in the purchase and
enjoyment of a due portion of land for immediate cultiva-
tion, and, at the same time; all be effectually prevented
from seizing and securing, as a matter of speculation, in
any case, on the best tracts, without previous purchase or
any pretence of title, and from procuring, through floats or
otherwise, for wealthy persons, whether residents or non-
residents, the most valuable situations at the minimum
prices.
It must be obvious that nothing beyond a very general,
and in some degree uncertain exhibit could, at this time,
be presented of the probable amount of the surplus in the
Treasury deposited with the banks and the States during a
few subsequent years, and more especially of the various
sums connected with the different hypotheses for the future
disposition of it by appropriations for public objects, or by
a diminution of it through a large reduction in our future
revenue from either customs or lands. The uncertainty
as to these sums is greatly increased, not only by the fluc-
tuating character of our receipts from both of these sources
during the last four years, and as is anticipated for the fu-
ture, but from the doubtful amount of our annual expen-
ditures hereafter, and the absence of any determination
yet expressed by Congress, whether to retain, unexpended,
all or any portion of the present surplus, till after 1841,
with a particular view.to supply the place of the great re-
duction which is then to be made in our receipts from cus-
toms under the existing laws. Minute details, therefore,
on these points, would be only hypothetical, and might,
without further data on which to found them, mislead in-
stead of proving useful.
But it is probable that Congress may deem it expedient to
pursue one of the following general courses in relation to the
present large surplus, and any which might hereafter accrue
under our existing laws : either to appropriate more liberal-
ly to great objects of national consequence, while the Trea-
sury is so full, and in that way gradually call for and em-
ploy the surplus till those objects are accomplished, and
then to reserve only the residue, if any, in deposit with the
States, to meet future contingencies and the anticipated de-
ficiencies in the revenue after 1842; or to make a more ra-
pid reduction of the balance of public money now on hand,
by legislation, which will largely diminish our revenue
either from customs or lands, and thus require more of the
current expenditures to be paid from the present surplus,
until the whole shall be exhausted; or to permit the most
of it to remain longer in deposit with the States, and so


shape future appropriations as never to render it necessary
to call for the surplus, except to meet unexpected and ex-
traordinary wants.
In respect to this last measure, so far as already adopted
by Congress, and the operation of it upon our fiscal con-
cerns to this time and hereafter, a few further observations
may be expected.
Before the two sessions of Congress just passed, it was
considered doubtful whether that body would deem it ex-
pedient to adopt the recommendations of this Department
to expend early, on proper objects, all the nett balance in
the Treasury, after defraying existing charges; or, if un-
willing to do that, to reduce at once the revenue from cus-
toms and lands, and leave with the People the excess which
would otherwise be collected, so as gradually to absorb the
present surplus, and ere long to collect none of any consi-
derable magnitude, whether for extraordinary expenditures,
distribution, or other purposes. Consequently, a sugges-
tion was made in the annual reports of 1834 and 1835 for
the temporary investment of the surplus while either of
those operations might be going on, and, if neither of them
was adopted, then to remain safe and productive until it
should hereafter be needed for public purposes. The pro-
posed disposal of it for these periods, which it was expect-
ed would not be very protracted, was in a form which was
considered secure and profitable by the purchase of safe
stocks. Thus, easily and gradually, as well as most pru-
dently, il was supposed the inconveniences of so unexpect-
ed and embarrassing an event as a large surplus would be
obviated, and, at the same time, a provident fund created,
which would be yielding interest, and which could after-
wards be resorted to when the current expenditures might,
from any cause, either before or after 1841, exceed the cur-
rent revenue. In relation to that subject, though a topic
-1. ._ -;. _- A- ..


ney without any interest constitutes a difference from the
mode proposed by this Department, which was doubtless
designed as a benefit to the several States, and in that view
was also very properly proffered to all, if to any, of the
States, whether now in debt or not, and whether, needing
the money for any great public purpose or not. While
treated in the nature of a mere temporary deposit or ini-
vestment on the credit of each State respectively, without
interest, the profits or income of it alone to be expended,
and the principal to be ever held sacred and ready for re-
payment whenever needed, like a fund that is providently
designed to meet any future public contingencies, this kind
of deposit may not embarrass our finances, and is likely
to prove useful and convenient to the Treasury. But,
should considerable portions of it be soon wanted by the
General Government, the deposit will probably occasion
to many of the States inconvenience and difficulties, if not
losses, in the management and repayment of it, more than
equivalent to the interest received. On the contrary, if
much of it be not wanted for some years, or tillafter 1841,
the result may be otherwise to such States as either need
the money or are able to employ it-beneficially.
The experience of this Departmerithas been too brief,
under the constant and laborious preparation to carry into
effect, in due time, all the provisions in the late deposit
act, to warrant, on the present occasion, any recommenda-
tions of modifications in this particular portion of it; but
it is .respectfully suggested, that although a gradual invest-
ment of the surplus in existing State stocks would, it is
believed, have produced no pressure in the money market,
yet the embarrassments incident to the transfers of such
large sums of money as became necessary in order to di-
vide it seasonably among a greater number of banks as well
as among the different States, and the consequent tempo-
rary withdrawal of considerable portions of it from imme-
diate use, are embarrassments inseparable from the prov i
sions and faithful execution of the law in its present form.
Though they constitute only a portion of those evils which
now afflict the commercial community, and have been mi-
tigated in their operation by this Department, where prac-
ticable, they could not be wholly obviated without depart-
ing entirely from the duties imposed by the law. Imme-
diately after its passage, steps were taken, as required by
Congress, to commence d reduction of the deposits, which
had then accumulated in certain banks beyond three-
fourths the amount of their capital, and at the same time
to have some portion of the anticipated surplus taken from
States where its accumulation had been. large or inconve-
nient, and placed, before the 1st of January next, in States
where enough had not before been deposited, and where
suitable banks existed willing to receive it. These steps
will be more fully detailed in a subsequentpart of this re-
port. All the payments to the several States, for the
whole year,-are expected to be made punctually at the
times required; but it will be necessary, from the mode of
keeping public accounts, to take the current statement of
the Treasurer on the first day of January next as the guide
for the supposed amount in the Treasury required to be
apportioned among the States, and one-quarter of it to be
deposited on that day. By pursuing any other course, an
unavoidable delay of weeks, if not months, would be ne-
cessary in making the preliminary arrangements for the
first payment. But that statement seldom differs more
than a few hundred dollars from the result as ascertained
on subsequent settlement; and hence its amount, inde-
pendent of unavailable funds, and what is held for the
Post Office and Patent Office, and in various special trusts,
will be deemed the true sum intended by Congress as sub-
ject to apportionment, after deducting five millions, unless,
in the mean time, the Department shall be otherwise di-
rected by that body.
The whole sum to be deposited with the States will, on
these principles, and according to the present appearances,
range between $35,000,000 and $38,000,000, and exceed
somewhat $120,000 to each electoral vote in each of the
twenty-five States now in the Union-Michigan, from the
language of the act, not being considered as yet entitled to
an apportionment under it. Three States have already
signified their willingness to receive the money on the
terms proposed, and it is expected that several more will do
the same before the 1st of January, and probably most of
them in the course of the present winter.
Leaving further suggestions on these and various other
considerations which bear on this interesting subject, but
which need not be repeated, the Department will next pro-
ceed to an exhibit of the manner in which this surplus, as
well as the rest of the public money, has been kept during
the past year, and of the detailed preparations which have
been made for the future custody and preservation of it, in
conformity to the act of Congress to regulate the deposits
of the public money, passed June 23, 1836, and the supple-
mentary act on the same subject, passed the 4th of July,
1836.
VI.-OF THE KEEPING OF THE PUBLIC MONEY AND
STATE OF THE DEPOSIT BANKS.
The money in the Treasury has been safely kept during
the year 1836. Until July last, as during the two previous
years, it was placed in the State banks, selected according
to the discretion of this Department, on account of their
high standing and favorable position for fiscal purposes, and
regulated in a manner considered most secure to the Trea-
sury and convenient to the community, as well as useful to
all concerned.
It is a source of high gratification to be able to add that,
while so selected and employed, not a single dollar was lost
to the Government by any of them, or a single failure oc-
curred to transfer promptly and pay out satisfactorily the
public money intrusted to their custody; nor is it believed
that the domestic exchanges of the country were ever low-
er or more regular than during that period; and the large
amount of them performed by those deposit banks in ordi-
nary purchases or discounts, equalling from one hundred
and fifty to two hundred millions of dollars yearly, or near
a third more than those of the same kind by the United
States Bank while the fiscal agent of the Government,
evinced the great ability and usefulness of those banks on
this important subject.
But since the passage of the act of Congress, June 23,
1836, to regulate the deposits of public money," most of
the discretionary power before exercised by this Department
on this subject, under previous laws and long usages, has
been considered as no longer possessed, and various solici-
tations to use it, though some of them were in cases of ex-


treme hardship, could not therefore be complied with. Re-
lieved from great responsibility, and in many cases from
much delicacy in the exercise of it, by the passage of that
act, a new system, in conformity with its provisions, and in
place of the former one, was at once commenced by this Depart-
ment, and has since been pursued with all the strictness and re-
gularity which the nature of business so extensive and complicat-
ed would permit, and at the same time with every indulgence
and forbearance, in cases of embarrassment or suffering, which
were permissible without a violation of law. It was necessary
by the act to appoint anew all the former deposit banks, if they
were to be retained in the service of the Government. Accord-
ingly, the preliminary inquiries rendered proper by the new
law before any selection was authorized to be made, were im-
mediately instituted in every case of the former deposit banks,
and, having been satisfactorily answered, all of them have been
reappointed, except three, where some formalities in their pa-
pers are not yet completed. The provision of that act, which
prohibits more public money to be left in any one bank than
three-fourths the amount of its capital, rendered the selection of
numerous new banks, to receive the sums which the old ones
were not allowed to retain, indispensable in the present over-
flowing condition of the Treasury, and especially at places in
which the capitals of the old banKs were small.
The transfer of all the money in the Treasury, except five
millions, on the 1st of January next, to be deposited in the trea-
suries of the several States quarterly during 1837, in ratable
proportions, made it proper to select also a few other new banks
in some of the States, to receive those proportions, or sufficient
parts of them, when they happened to be either collected there,
or to be incidentally and easily transferable there.
Thus the trouble and embarrassment of a second and sudden
transfer in January next, and quarterly thereafter during the
year, were often saved by combining, in several appropriate
cases, the transfers ordered by Congress to be soon made from
banks having an excess, with the transfers of that excess to
other banks in the States where it was to be paid during the
nresent year on aonrooriations. or the ensuing year on the ap-


No. O74
J p"


Syet taken effect; many more aret still to be 1 rbi et andi th
Whole amount necessary to accomplish both objected will be lees
.and their operation easier, than if a different coarse ~td beet
pursued, and the two apportionments between the habhs and
the States had not been united, in casesL whFre practica-
ble and convenient, and where large accumjqghtioa exists
oi thteone hand to be reduced, and deicienc em, j i obter b t'
be supplied. Their union, in such cases, is seppossia 1o 6av*
been especially contemplated by Congress, ie e l gained in tla
second and supplementary deposit act, passed In July, and.m
seemed just to the several States which had frot b ftre njoye4
much, if any, benefit from the deposit and use oftbl public mo
ney withintheir limits. Hence, while many transfers hive bea&
forborne, when feasible under the law,'abd desired firm public
considerations connected with the great pressure idith money
market, and which pressure- they would, though authorized
by the acts, have severely aggravated, yet great -eare has been
employed not to make a single transfer, except id the la.inage
of the first deposit act, "to facilitate the public dishbrsement,
and to comply with the provisions of the act;" or,-aslescribl
more fully in the second act, either "to prevent large apd in-
convenient accumulations in particular places, or in ordeir~epr -
duce a due equality and just proportion according to th -rovi-.
sions of said act." All the transfers orderedd have likewl-e been
so modified in respect te time,place, ant bhusinesa, aatO poaidwo
the least inconvenience -and expense possible to to e banks or
the community, consistent with faitlful endeavo wto extente the
law on both subjects seasonably and efficiently. They have
been so conducted as also to relieve the Treauurffrom any ex-
pense whatever in a financial operation so large ad unusual;
but, in carrying out so large a moneyed operation asethe new
law demanded, and one neither comporting with outr s al fis-
cal proceedings, nor following theordinary channels of trade, it
has required great caution not to create more embarrassment.
than has really occurred from this source, and a greater derange-
ment in exchanges than actually exists.
In complying with the depomite act, it hasalready'beeh found
necessary to appoint forty-eight more banks~Imaking, on the let
instant, with the former ones, without their branches, the whole
number of e;ghty-one. 'TThe Department has edeavored, in
these selections, to conform to the spirit of the act of Congress,
as regards their convenient location for accommodating either
the collections or the disbursements of the public money. It
has in all cases required the preliminary information made ne-
cessary by the act. It has, as enjoined, chosen, at least one
bank in every State which bad banking institutions, and whick
included all except Missouri and Arkansas. It ha'obtained
from each bank a written agreement to comply with the duties
prescribed by law, and in every case except fodr or five not
deemed suitable, frotp peculiar circumstances, has received col-
tlateral security for the faithful fulfilment of these agreements,
anid has endeavored from time to time to make such requests on
the subject of specie and other topics connected with their cen-
dition, and with their mode of transacting business as. seemed
conducive to safety and public corrvenience. The names of each
deposit bank, with the amount of.public money in each, nd its
detailed condition in all respects, near the. lst of November,
1836, are exhibited in the document annexed (E l and 2.)
In another document (F) is presented more fully and'ricently
the condition of those bank with this Departmentt as mit;hows.
by their last retwaw to the Treasurer on the let infMait, the
amount of public mency then on hand, the outstandibg:drafts
then against them, and the existing transfers to and from each
bank. A number of the States now have deposits sufficient,
with the accruing revenue, to meet all the probable demands
within their limits the next year. But it is otherwise wjituseve-
ral of them ; and where money has not yerbeen placed n each
State sufficient to meet the probable amount of deposited requir-
ed there during the firstquarter of the next year, for expendi-
ture as well as apportionment, it has been, or will be, put under
orders of transfer, so as to reach there seasonably,-'
Numerous difficult and embarrassing questions have arisen in
the execution of the new deposit act, in consequence if the
novelty of many of its provisions, ar4 the unequal operation of
others on some of the depositories.
But, where great doubts existed as to the true intention f the
law, the opinion of the Attorney General has been taken. When
that opinion has been unfavorable to the views entertained un-
der the law as it now stands the parties have been left, as they
mustalways.b. in..su.h cases of supposed in-equtliy r--d L -a
Ship, to resort to ongre Tor appropriate relief. It-i, there-
-ore, respectfully suggested that relief for the past-may be pro-
per in several cases, whichit is anticipated the parties interested
will present to the consideration of Congress.. For the conve-
nience of this Department, it is desirable that a provision be
made for the future, that any agency furnishing anmle security
be regarded, under the law, as having the same separate capital
where established as the bank to which it belongs.
It is further recommended that authority be 'given to discon-
tinue such of the newly-selected banks as may, from time to
time, be no longer needed for fiscal or other purposes. Large
portion of themrafter the contemplated deposited are made with
the several States, will probably become entirely useless to the
Treasury, while their returns and correspondence will continue
to be burdensome to all concerned.
Immediately after the passage of the law it became the duty
of this Department, among other things, to select a sufficient
number of banks to hold the public money, without exceeding
three-fourths of the amount of their capitals, and oine, at least,
in each State having banks.
As it seemed impossible to carry these provisions into Iexecu-
tion in several of the States, unless banks should be selected
which might possibly have issued or paid oUit some nitralbills
after the 4th of July, and before they had completed the agree-
ment, and assumed the duties imposed by the act, it was thought
that a natural construction, given to the limitation in that re-
spect, would make it applicable only to such banks as were se-
lected and subject to the law previous to that date, and that the
others must not, on a like principle, make bny such issues after
their selection. This would impart a reasonable and practical
effect to the clause, and, at the same time, not tend entirely to
defeat the operation of other provisions in the act. According-
ly, minute inquiries were not instituted, whether the banks ap-
plying to be selected had, previous to their application, issued
such bills or not ; but all were required, at the time 'oftheir se-
lection, to enter into an express written agreement to coairm to
all the provisions of the act, and, consequently, not to iasne any
while they were public depositories. On more mature reflei-
tion, doubts having arisen whether this was going= far enough,
and whether any banks which may have issued small bills be-
tween the 4th of July and their selection could in strict. law-be
retained, or could have been legally appointed, it was deemed
proper to take the opinion of the Attorney General on that point.
He confirmed these doubts; but recommended the submission
of the subject to Congress, before discontinuing any of the banks,
which, upon investigation, might appear to have made such is-
sues before entering into the agreement. Th. Department
would, therefore, respectfully ecommend that an act be pass-
ed, sanctioning the selection and continuance of deposit banks
whicli'may be so situated, provided seiiehank have not issued
or paid out sma. bilts .after their appointment as public depo4si
stories -' -


~i.-OF THE MINT AND THE CjURRENCYG
On the subject of the mint and the new coinage, time Depart-
ment is gratified to state that, by means of additional appropria-
tions, of improvements in machinery, and of an ample supply of
metal for coining, through the fortunate remittances to this coun-
try of the French, Spanish, and Neapolitan inlemnities in gold,
more money has been and will be coined during the present
than in any previous year since the foundation ol the Govern-
ment. The whole amount from the 1st of January, 1836, to the
1st of November, 1836, has been, in gold, 83,619,441l; in silver,
$2,877,000; and in copper, $22,634. The sums transferred to
the Mint in aid of the coinage, under a clause in the late depo-
site act, have amounted to 8700,000. When the -annual repet
of the Director is made, on the 1st of January next, a moreaii-
nute account of all his operations, with his view ti~tes d trans-
fers. will be presented, accompanied with such suggestions for
further legislation on tite subject as his experience maylead him
to consider useful. The Mint and its branches would, -ig my
opinion, be more efficiently assisted by means of appropaitions,
rather than mere transfers, to supply fully and promptly the ad-
ditional coinage which the additional wants of the community
may from time to time require. The Department is still con-
vinced, for reasons formerly urged on the consideration ofCon-
gress, that a gold coin of one dollar in value might be very con-
venient and useful to the Public in many of the ordinary trans-
actions of society. The branch mints are -al in progress, and
will probably be completed by June next, and their machinery
at a still earlier day. The coinage in them can commence im-
mediately after heir completion, if the proper appropriations
are in the mean time made, and the proper officers appointed.
The greatly increased quantity of gold now existing in the coun-
try amounts, probably, to upwards of $15,000,000. For this we
are chiefly indebted to thenew valuation of our coin, though some
influence must be ascribed to the efforts made by the Gereral Go-
vernment and mostof the States to suppress the circulation ofsmall
bills, as well as to the favorable condition of our foreign exchanges
since 1834, and the policy of ordering home the foreign indemni-
ties in gold, and encouraging public payments to be in part made
with this kind of coin. At this time, the abundance of goldhere
S ,.... nro.nedo inrer ned facilitv in distant anacie


"CI~L~. L-L_ ~P~3~C~L ~~ll*IY- C BC-mT- IL1~ ;C~- I


-^- i-









DEBATE IN THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SPEECH OF GEN. RIPLEY, (or LOUISIANA,)
IN REPLY TO MR. PEYTON, (of Tennessee,)
Upon the Resolttion of Mr, Wise, proposing a se-
lect committee of investigation, and Mr. Pearce's
motion to amend the same.-December 15.

Mr. SPEAKER: Had this been a proposition to inquire
into the condition of the Department of State, of the
Treasury, of the Navy and War Departments, and the
General Post Office, with a view to investigate abuses, if
they exist, no person would be more willing to join in the
inquiry than myself. No individual would be more anx-
t.oua to enforce the responsibility of subordinate officers.
There are none who will go farther to ferret out any mal-
prac~ticesS and, if they really exist, to punish them with
the high constitutional power of this House. Had the
resolution for inquiry had these objects solely and honest-
ly in view, I should have been the last to oppose it. But,
sir,:- tee P.evideat is constitutionally responsible for the
w4oele bfthe Executive Department; the various radii of
~s ypwers concentrate as well its responsibilities as its
honors upon him; and when I take these circumstances
into view, and consider also the spirit in which this debate
has been conducted, the position of the President cannot
be observed without exciting our share of sympathy. Shall
we, at a moment when his connexion with the People of
the United States is about to terminate forever, and all
the aspirations of ambition are to be dissolved by age, in-
firmities, and sickness; when the consciousness of his
high and devoted services, which we all know he must
possess, aid. the enthusiastic affection of the American
People were about to cheer the evening of his life, and to
gild his expiring lamp, is it right or proper for the repre-
sentatives of the People whom he has succored aniosaved,
to cut off this departing solace, and to embitter his last
dys)by adopting a resolution, which, if adopted, will sanc-
tion an opinion-of this House, that corruption and Andrew
Jackson have been coupled together ? Will they do this
without some specific charge--without some definite allega-
tion, sustained at least by theeedorsement of one indivi-
dual in the House who will be willing to give his name
,to posterity as the author of the allegation ? In the speech
of the honorable member from Tennessee, marked with so
much wit and pungency of satire, the allegations are
mlade'kgainst Andrew Jackson as the object who is to be
convicted of'the corruption which is so broadly insinuated
in the resolution to exist in the Executive Department. I
am not willing to exercise the high constitutional powers
S-of-thims- f oouse in the least degree in sanctioning such an
allegation. '
'General Jackson, after a life spent in the service of his
country, is about retiring from the elevated position he
holds as presiding Executive officer of these States, at an
Advanced age, and worn down by the labors spent in that
service. Heais noW, sir, on the bed of sickness, which
may prove his 'bed of death. God grant that it may not,
'bdt that he.may live many, many years amongst that peo-
Spie whose rights he has so bravely and honestly defended,
and whose prosperity under his successful administration
has excited the astonishment of the whole civilized world.
What, sir, is the relation that Andrew Jackson bears to
the representatives of the People of the United States ?
From the period of your Revolutionary war to the present
moment he has been the lofty, indefatigable defender of his
'country. In war and in peace, on the battle field and in
youricouncils, his exertions, his toils, and unceasing ener-
gy and integrity, have done as much as any other man, not
ecepting your Washington in the field and your Jefferson
and _Madison in the cabinet, to elevate'he character of this
Republixe to advance its prosperity, and to preserve its
peace. is name has been a tower of strength, and un-
der his administration the character of an American citizen,
Sas was that formerly of aRoman citizen, a passport through-
out the: world. Ay, sir, in foreign lands, wherever your
: star-spangled banner displays from the high and giddy
mast, the chatcitaer of our Republic, under the regis of the
lofty virtues of the President, has that wall of strength
that feels ever conscious of the 'protection of a great and
-powerfil nation. And would you, sir, would this House,
after a life thus spent, and which impartial History is about
Stotake charge of for the benefit of his, country; would
they at the eve of ls,-long life, so worthily spent in all that
is patriotic and virtuouslin.thepublic service ; would they
pursmae:.inm with insinuations that corruption, with its:
blighting mildew;had found d entrance into the bosom of
Jackson s more than Roman virtue ? If this House insti-
iutes the inquiry, it-sainctions the charge; and will they,
tithoat any speeitic allegations,justat'thc close of General
Jackson's career, hold the fatal chalice to'his lips, which
should poison and embitter with the stings of ingratitude
the evening 6f his life We :have had no precedent to
justify such a measure. Party spilit~as raged and misrep--
resented all your Presidents during their term of office, but
they have passed and are passing off -the stage, all-with the
-award of official and personal integrity. Some have not
been re-elected by the People, but against them no charge
:of corruption is found embodied-in-the annals of the country.
Nor does any American citizen, at even this lapse of
:time, Impeach their integrity: no one charges them with
wilful or wanton corruption, while administering the af-
.ttirs of against: them, as thy gquit:the scene of their labors, of their
glories and their services, were, that a distinguished mem-
,ber, formerly from Virginia, accused Mr. Jefferson of re-
"iring with a political falsehood in his mouth; and an equal-
ly distinguished member from Massachusetts moved his so-
.ktary-vote-to impeach Mr. Madison. I have no doubt, sir,
after the excitement of party was over, both of these gen-
tlemen regretted these allegations. The charges never
- -have, and never will affect the great patriarch of liberty,
'the author of the Declaration 'ot :Independence, or his
equally illustrious friend, the founder and champion of our
Constitution. The one unfurled to the world the princi-
ples of popular government; the other, more than any man,
connected liberty with law-secured an equality of politi-
cal rights, by securing to society the fruits oflabor. Wher-
ever oppressed man rises to resist the oppressor, the Decla-
ration drawn up by Thomas.Jefferson is invoked. Wher-


,eer constitutional law is appealed to, to secure those
Rights, the political writings of James Madison form the
pure fountains of living water,-which diffuse liberty and
tranquillity amongst the nations. Together, locked hand
- in hand, they are working their silent way, and they have
planted that school iof p6Hticalliberty,,of which this Re-
public may arrogate to itself, through their exertions, the
being the founder.
Republics have been accused of being ungrateful. Aris-
tides was ostracised for being called the Just, and Themis-
tocles banished, after saving his country from'desolation.
The authors of these acts have not transmitted their names
to posterity. How keen would be the reproaches of the his-
tory of the last two thousand years,howwithering their infa-
'By,,If tey had notescaped by this silence of history. Gun.
Jackson has beon doomed to meet the same ingratitude, af-
-:ter preventing the 'dismemberment of our Republic, after
rescuing the tfir and fertile fields of theState which I have
the honor to represent. There, sir, helpless age and ten-
der youth, and all the charms of refinement and beauty,
Swre protected by his hand. There, sir, was effected one
Sof those signal deliverances of a people which has already
caused the plains of New Orleans to rank with Marathon
sad Platea, reflecting all its bright lustre upon the army of
liberty that fought under him, and sending all its glowing-
'light througholthe. world to elevate the character of this
SRepuitic. Sir, almost at the moment this was effecting,
and while painting, history, poetry, music, and sculpture
were giving greenness to his immortality, the Senate of the
United. States were denoujveing him in the Semiinole war.
Siakemnig with the same feelings.that were pained at hear-
Sing Auiatidw called -the Just,the .detractors of Andrew
Jackson loathed the beau ideal of his character. Again,
during the panic, that same body have impeached and con-
Sdemned him without a trial for an alleged violation of the
Cornftution of the United States. How, sir, have the
People met these charges ? They have almost by accla-
matron elected him President on each occasion. They
have allied to defend him. Where, sir, are his accuser -
I ask again, where are they.? And, sir, permit me to pre-
dict that if the present resolution passes, it will only reflect
disgrace upon the present House of Representatives. The
People wif4 come to the rescue, and expunge the resolu-
tion from this House, as I trust they are about expunging
a former one from theSeiiate. The whole future history
of the country will hold up in proud relief their old chief
sans peur and sans reproche, and the ingratitude of this-
House in pursuing himi with the odious -aiarge of corrup-
tion, even upon the bed ofsickness and of deaih w hn T int


its character. Intelligent, chivalric, patriotic and virtuous,
they will be theTast portion of the People of the United
States to sanction.allegations, either personal or as the con-
stitutional head of the Government, against their veteran
chief. Those brave men who followed his banner through
the Creek nation and on the plains of New Orleans, with
the citizen soldiers of Kentucky, Mississippi, and Louisi-
ana, are not to prove so recreant to Andrew Jackson, and
so unfaithful to themselves, as to embitter the remnant of
his days with so unjust an accusation. And what are all
the allegations that the honorable member adduces to jus-
tify the exercise of the high constitutional power of this
House ? That the President, in a conversation with a
friend, had remarked that Mr. BELLr, another member from
Tennessee, had stated lies about him, and that Peyton
could tell twenty lies to Bell's one." Now, sir, what were
the facts in the case ? The honorable members from Ten-
nessee at the last session had indulged'in pretty severe cen-
sures upon the President's administration. In conversa-
tion with his neighbors, according to this statement, in na-
turally vindicating himself, he had pretty warmly recrimi-
nated. I think the language that he made use of, as is
usual on such occasions, must have undergone, in the
course of its gossip, some version before it reached the
ears of the honorable member; for it is not the language of
that delicate and manly bearing which all know mark the
character of Andrew Jackson. At any rate, is a mere con-
troversyin an election, where the President and the ho-
norable members from Tennessee, in the exercise of their
constitutional rights., supported different candidates, to be
the basis of an inquisitorial examination on the part of
this House into the conduct of the Executive Departments ?
Again,-the honorable member alleges that this House
refused to institute an inquiry into frauds that were perpe-
trated upon the Indians of Alabama by the citizens of that
State in the sales of their lands to individuals. When that
resolution was introduced into the House, 1 had the honor
of proposing an amendment to it, referring the subject to
the President of the United States. The motive for this
amendment was, that this House had no constitutional
power to order the investigation by their authority: and, if
it had been done, it would have been one of the most fatal
precedents to the rights of the States. It was alleged that
the Indians had been swindled out of their reserved lands,
in many cases by residents of Georgia and Alabama. Of
course, if offences had been committed, as I know of no
law of the United States providing for such cases, they
were common law or statute law offences against those
States, not cognizable by the United States tribunal. In
a case where the State of Alabama secures a speedy trial
by jury, and a cross-examination of witnesses, would any
person arrogate to this House the power to send its commit-
tee to make an ex parte investigation, to hold up its citizens
as malefactors without being heard, without the privilege
of counsel, and the cross-examining of witnesses? Sup-
pose, sir, that, in obtaining the charter of a bank in a neigh-
boring State, respectable citizens should be accused of fraud
and bribery, an offence that is punishable by the common
law of that State, does this House, sir, possess the power
to trample upon State rights, and send its committee of in-
quisition into the halls of the State Legislature, to hunt up
ex parte testimony as its basis, and to hunt down all that is
respectable and venerable in the character of its citizens, to
condemn them unheard without grand juries or petit juries,
and draw up a withering report that would blast them as
far as our language extended before they had an opportuni-
ty of defending themselves ? If this power had been exer-
cised by the original resolutions of last session, like the
Council of Ten at Venice, or the Holy Inquisition of Spain,
it would have sung the requiem of public liberty, and bro-
ken down the whole penal jurisdiction of the independent
States. And I feel peculiar personal consolation in being
the means of arresting the progress of a measure so fraught
with disastrous consequences. The subject was referred
to the President, who was directed to investigate into the
cases of fraud. From the character of the agent employed
by the President, (General Hogan,) I feel confident, from
my knowledge of the man, that the duty has been faithful-
ly attended to; and if, as the honorable member suggests,
he has received the collectorship of Mobile, it cannot have
been conferred upon a more deserving or more intelligent
citizen, or one who has more gallantly defended his coun-
try during the gloomiest period of the late war.*
The honorable member has also referred to the Secreta-
ry of the Treasury as being embraced in the general alle-
gation of corruption. Sir, the lofty character of Levi
Woodbury is too well known to this House and to this na-
tion, to require any comment from me. Born, reared, and
educated amidst the granite mountains of my native State,
his stern and sterling virtues had already carried him to the
highest honors of New Hampshire, when, in the midst of
the panic battle, he was called to the arduous duties of the
Treasury of the United States. New England may justly
feel proud of the high character which he has reflected
back upon his native land. And let me ask, what induce-
ment to corruption can there be on the part-of Levi Wood-
bury ? There has been no specific charge against him; not
a whisper of prejudice that he has done any thing tof-orfeit
his exalted character. He is affluent in his-personal situa-
tion, with every thing to make him happy in domestic life;
and, above all, principles of the most stern and unbending
integrity are interwoven with his nature. The only allega-
tion insinuated against him is, that, in the exercise of his
duty imposed by a law passed by this House, he is com-
pelled to transact official business with-the agent of the de-
posite banks. That agent is no officer of this Government;
we have no constitutional power over him. He has been
assailed by the severest epithets of party. He has been
employed by the deposit banks, many of them in opposi-
tion to the Administration, to attend to their business with
the Treasury. For my own part, I do not learn any spe-
cific charges with which he is accused. And I have no
doubt that the President, when he gave him the character
which the honorable member states that he did at Jones-
borough, came to:the honest and conscientious conviction
I that such a torrent of anathemas from the opposition in this
House, assailing the character of this man for more than
four years, would have annihilated him had not his repu-
tation been founded upon the rock of integrity. High-
sounding epithets and bold denunciations cannot,thank God,
blast the character-of any American citizen, unless they
are accompanied with specific allegations and specific proofs.
On the contrary, they raise in the generous minds of the
American People that spirit of sympathy for unmerited
persecution which is sure to protect its intended victim, and


roll back the current upon the author.
I feel, sir,'that I should have but unworthily discharged
my duty as a representative of Louisiana, had I not raised
my voice in opposition to this resolution. Whatever may
be the personal or political predilections of my constituents,
gratitude to Andrew Jackson for the inestimable benefits
he has conferred upon the citizens of our State is an almost
pervading sentiment. It is, like the vestal flame, guarded
with intense care, and faithfully transmitted from one gen-
eration to another. As the 8th of January revolves its
annual rounds, so often does the hoary veteran who shared
in the memorable campaign repair-to the grass-grown hil-
lock which marks the battle field, and recite the eventful
story to his children. Often are time and space annihi-
lated, and the years of his pilgrimage recalled to the despe-
rate conflict; and in those rural fetes, which none knows
better how to grace with refinement and beauty:than the
gallant Frank of our sunny clime, the revered name of
Andrew Jackson is never forgotten, and the choicest of
Heaven's blessings are invoked upon the patriot's head.

General HOGAN served with great distinction in the staffat
Chippewa, Bridgewater, and Fort Erie.

r O the admirers of Ornamental Heads of Hair.-
Mr. CQUIRK, of New York, deems it only necessary
to announce to the fashionable world, that he has just-arrived
at the Metropolis of the Nation, and, as formerly, is now pre-
pared, and most respectfully tenders his professional services,
with a splendid assortment of ORNAMENTA-L HAIR
WORK, of every description, and in great variety. His location'
is at Mrs. Tolson's Boarding House, on the south side of Penn-
sylvania Avenue, between 9th and 10th streets, and diagonally
across from Dr. Gunton's store.
Mrs. QUIRK will attend to'the call of the Ladies.
dec24-6ftif
ANNUALS OR CHRISTMAS.-The. German
STourist, edited by Professor O. L. B. Wolff and Dr. H.
Doering, illustrated with seven splendid engravings, from
Drawings.
The Fairy Book, illustrated with eighty-one oats, by Adams.
The Wreath of Friendship, a literary album.
The Juvenile Scrap Book, by Bernard Barton, with 17 splen-
did engravings.
The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, with 12 embeHlidhments.
The Gift, with 10-engravings.
The Pearl, with 7 engravings. -
The Violet, with 5 engravings.
The Christmas Box, with engravings.
The Pilgrim's Progress, with a Life of John Banyan, by


TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

IN SENATE.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1836.
Mr. WALL presented the petition of Maria Scudder,
Martha A. Lloyd, and Elizabeth Johnston, the children
and heirs of Colonel Philip Johnston, for compensation for
'his Revolutionary services.
Mr. W. remarked: On presenting this petition T feel
that I should not discharge the duty which I have under-
taken for the respectable petitioners, nor do justice to the
State which I have the honor in part to represent, if I did
not avail myself of the occasion to make known to you the
merits and services of one of her most gallant and patriotic
sons. Colonel Philip Johnston, the father of the petition-
ers, was among the first of her sons which the devoted.
patriotism of New Jersey offered on the altar of American
Independence. Never, sir, was there a more pure and no-
ble sacrifice made on that altar.
At the Declaration of Independence Philip Johnston was
a lieutenant colonel in the New Jersey militia: he had been
appointed to that rank by an ordinance of the Provincial
Congress of New Jersey, passed on the 14th of June, 1776,
providing to raise, by voluntary enlistment, 3,300 militia,
to reinforce the army at New York. This ordinance was
passed in pursuance of the resolution of the Continental
Congress of the 3d of the same month. On the 1st of Au-
gust following he was promoted to the colonelcy of his re-
giment in the brigade under General Heard, destined to
form part of the flying camp, then assembling, for the de-
fence of New York. It was then well known that the.
enemy, with a powerful fleet, and a well-disciplined and
appointed army, was menacing New York. This was,
indeed, "the time that tried men's souls." The timid
sought safety in retirement, and the wavering were dis-
mayed.
At this moment, the earnest and soul-stirring appeals of'
the Father of his Country to the patriotism and bravery of
Americans, roused the patriotic spirit of the sons of New
Jersey :
And from the sods of grove and glen,
Rose ranks of iron-hearted men,
To battle to the death."
The reputation of Colonel Johnston for patriotism, bra-
very, and talents, enabled him speedily to enlist his regi-
ment,-and at its head he marched to defend his bleeding
and enfeebled country." He was then in the vigor of man-
hood, in the possession of a moderate competency, and the
prospects of the future bright before him. These, and all
the endearments of the domestic circle, a young and belov-
ed wife, and three daughters of tender years, he left at the
call of his country.
The morning of the 27th of August, 1776, found Colo-
nel Johnston at the head of his gallant regiment, on the
battle ground of Long Island, resolved, in the language of
his illustrious commander-in-chief, to conquer or to die."
He fought near the side, and under the eye, of his immedi-
ate commander, General Sullivan. It was a post of danger
as well as of honor, and demanded both courage and con-
duct. Never did any officer more gallantly fulfil the ex-
pectations of his country, or more gloriously earn a title to
the blessings and praises of his countrymen. He fell at
the head of his regiment by a wound in his breast, and
bravely struggling to turn the fortunes of that disastrous
day. He died for his country, and under its banner, fight-
ing for the general defence, and to secure the blessings of
freedomfor his whole country.
Yes, sir, he died in the cause and service of America, for
the liberty and rights of all, and left to his countrymen an
inestimable legacy, the example of his pure patriotism, his
devoted courage, his chivalrous gallantry, and his glorious
death. Who can calculate the extent, the influence, and
the value of that example upon the fortunes of ofr country
at that gloomy and trying period, when even hope was
sinking in dismay ?" Well, sir, may New Jersey glory in
the example of such a son. It marshalled the way to those
"heroic deeds" which have immortalized our revolutionary
sires.
"'Tis to the virtues of such men man owes
His portion in the good that Heaven bestows;
And when recording History displays
Feats of renown, though wrought in ancient days,
Tells ofa few stout hearts who fought and died,
Where duty placed them, by their country's side ;
The man that is not moved by what he reads,
That takes not fire at their heroic deeds,
Unworthy of the blessings of the brave,
Is base in kind, and born to be a slave."
Sir, no monument has been erected, by the gratitude of
his country, to the memory of Colonel Johnston; no record-
ed honors thicken around his tomb; no history displays his
" feats of renown ;" for, unfortunately for his memory, the
revolutionary history of New Jersey is yet to be written.
His fame rests in the memory of his few surviving gallant
companions in arms, or happily may be faintly recorded
among the memorials of frail and decaying memory in the
Pension office. One memorial of the heroic deeds" of
Colonel Johnston, gathered from the only Whig newspa-
per of the day, that circulated in New Jersey, blotted with
the tears of his widowed wife and fatherless daughters, has
been treasured up by their affection, and is annexed to their
petition. With your permission, Mr. President, I will
read it:
"We hear that in the late action on Long Islandl, Colonel.
Philip Johnston, of New Jersey, behaved with remarkable in-
trepidity and fortitude.. By the well-directed fire from his bat-
talion, the enemy was several times repulsed, and lanes were
made through them, until he received a ball in his breast, which
put an end to the life of as brave an officer as ever commanded.
a battalion. General Sullivan, who was close to him when he
fell, says that no man could behave with more firmness during
the whole action. As he sacrificed his life in defence of the in-
vaded rights of his country, his memory must be dear to every
American who is not insensible to the sufferings of his injured
country, and as long as the same uncorrupted spirit of liberty
which led him to the field shall continue to actuate the sons of
freemen in America."
Mr. President, the tree of American liberty was nourish-


ed by the blood of such heroes.
But, Mr. President, when the husband and the father,
at the call of his country, steps from the circle of domestic
endearments, a patriot and a hero, it is the safety and pro-
tection of his wife and children that nerves his arm and
animates his exertions in the hour of battle; and if he falls,
his last prayer is for his country, and his last earthly con-
solation is, that his death commits them to its gratitude
and protection.
This obligation, which springs from the grave of heroism,
is sanctioned by the purest and noblest feelings of our na-
ture, and the highest dictates of policy, and creates a debt
which descends upon all who inherit the blessings thus ac-
quired.
If, sir, the claim of the petitioners had no other founda-
tion than this, it would, in my humble judgment, be irre-
sistible. But it does not rest on this alone ; it is supported
by the plighted, and, I am sorry to say, the unredeemed
faith of their country.
To say nothing, sir, at present of the pledge fairly to be
implied from the addresses of General Washington calling
the militia to arms, and animating them to battle, that the
country would provide for their wives and children, this
.pledge was distinctly made to Colonel Johnston and his
companions in arms. On the 3d of June, 1776, Congiess
resolved that 13,800 militia should be employed to reinforce
,the army at New York, and that New Jersey be requested
:to furnish 3,300 of their militia to complete that number, to
be engaged until the 1st of December, unless sooner dis-
charged by order of Congress. This was to form the fly-
ing camp destined for the defence of New York. On the
5th of June, 1776, Congress resolved that the flying camp
be placed under the command of such continental general
officer as the commander-in-chief should direct. That the
militia, when in service, be regularly paid and victualled,
in the same manner as the continental troops. General
Mercer was appointed to the command of the flying camp,
thus formed, on the 20th July, 1776. The Convention of
-New Jersey was requested by Congress to raise for the fly-
ing camp, under General Mercer, three battalions of mili-
tia, in addition to the five formerly desired by Congress,
and send the same with all possible despatch to the flying
camp; and that they should be officered, paid, and provid-
ed as directed by the former resolutions for forming the
flying camp.
Thus, sir, it is pl.in that the detachment of New Jersey
militia required to former the flying camp for the defence of
New York, was called out by the Continental Congress,
and for the general defenceof the country; and was placed
-in the service of the United States under the command of
continental officers, and on the same footing in all respects


amble recites: The Convention, viewing with serious
concern the present alarming situation of this and her
'sistet States-that on a prudent use of the present means
' depend their lives, their liberty, and happiness, think it
St.eir indispensable duty to put their militia on such a foot-
'ing that the whole force may be most advantageously ex-
'erted." For that purpose, the whole militia were classed
in two divisions, and one-half was immediately detached
to join the flying camp at New York.
After the appropriate details, that ordinance concludes in
a strain of patriotic eloquence unknown to the rolls of stat-
utes, and which I cannot deny myself the pleasure of re-
calling to the recollection of our country. It breathes the
pure spirit of Seventy-six."
And whereas the principles of equity and humanity require
that a proper compensation and provision should be made for tihe
famiilie- of all such as may be killed or wounded in the service,
the Convention pledge the faith of this State that an adequate
provision for the purpose aforesaid shall be made.
S"In this interesting situation, viewing on the one hand an ac-
tive, inveterate, and implacable enemy, increasing fast in
strength, receiving large reinforcements, and industriously pre-
paring to strike some decisive blow; on the other, a considera-
ble part of the inhabitants supinely slumbering on the brink of
ruin, moved with affecting apprehension, the Convention think
it incumbent upon them to warn their constituents of their im-
pending danger. On you, our friends and brethren, it depends
this day to determine whether your wives, your children, and
millions of your descendants, yet unborn, shall wear the galling,
ignominious yoke of slavery, or nobly inherit the generous, the
inestimable blessings of freedom. The alternative is before you.
Can you hesitate in your choice? Can you doubt which to
prefer? Say, will you be slaves? Will you toil, and labor,
and glean together a little property, merely that it may be at
the disposal of a relentless and rapacious conqueror ? Will you,
of choice, become hewers of wood and drawers of water? Im-
possible. You cannot be so amazingly degenerate as to lick the
hand that is raised to shed your blood. Nature and Nature's
iGod have made you free. Liberty is the birthright of Ameri-
cans-the gift of Heaven ; and the instant it is forced from you,
you take leave of every thing valuable on earth; your happi-
ness or misery, virtuous independence, or disgraceful servitude,
hang trembling in the balance. Happily we know that we can
anticipate your virtuous choice.
With confident satisfaction we are assured that not a mo-
ment will delay your important decision; that you cannot feel
hesitation whether you will tamely and degenerately bend your
necks to the irretrievable wretchedness of slavery, or, by your
instant and animr.ated exertions, enjoy the fair inheritance of
heaven-born freedom, and transmit it unimpaired to posterity."
It was under this animated and eloquent appeal to his
patriotism, and solemn pledge that a proper compensation
and provision should be made for his family, that Colonel
Johnston marched to the field of his death and renown.
That pledge, sir, was never redeemed by the State of
New Jersey; and that pledge devolved upon the United
States, and was solemnly assumed by them when they as-
sumed the revolutionary debt and obligations of the several
States. It rests upon the equity and humanity of those
who are now enjoying the fair inheritance of freedom
which Colonel Johnston died to obtain. In addition to all
this, the claim of the petitioners is also sustained by the
equity, if not the express letter, of various resolutions of
Congress. I refer particularly to those of the 15th May
and 26th September, 1778; the 24th August, 1780, and the
26th May, 1781. It is likewise sanctioned by several laws
of Congress, making compensation for revolutionary ser-
vices in analogous cases, which I forbear to detain you by
enumerating.
Strong as the claim of the petitioners is upon its own
merits, there is another consideration which, sir, I feel
bound to press on your attention. It appears that one of
the petitioners is the wife of Joseph Scudder, Esq. His
youth was devoted to the service of his country, in one of
the bureaus established by the Revolution. He is the sur-
viving son of Colonel Nathaniel Scudder, one of that illus-
trious band of revolutionary patriots and heroes who de-
voted himself to the service of his country, both in the cab-
inet and in the field, and was alike distinguished for his
wisdom as a statesman, and bravery as a soldier. Among
the first in his native State to espouse the cause of Amer-
ican independence, he was, from its declaration until his
death, honored with a seat either in the councils of his na-
tive State, or in Congress. But he did not avail himself of
the exemption which his civil employment conferred to re-
lieve him from military duty.
At an early period of the revolutionary war, Colonel
Scudder was honored with the command of a regiment of
militia of his native county, then peculiarly exposed to the
invasion of the enemy. In the hour of danger he was al-
ways to be found at its head, bravely defending his native
soil. But it-Was not his fate there to fall in all -" the pride,
pomp, and circumstance of glorious war." He was killed
on the 16th October, 1781, near Black Point, in the coun-
ty of Moamouth, while bravely leading such of his fellow-
soldiers as could be collected on a sudden alarm, to repel a
predatory excursion of the enemy. The honors of war
were the only public tribute paid to his memory; and to
this day his children have neither asked nor received any
thing from the bounty of their country, as a compensation
for their irretrievable loss.
Thus, sir, by a happy coincidence, this petition presents
before you the daughter of the first militia colonel of New
Jersey, and the son of the last who fell in achieving our
glorious independence. Never did death confer greater
honor upon children. If it cannot disarm poverty of its
miseries, it ennobles it.
The children of Col. Johnston, now aged, infirm, and, it
gives me pain to add, poor, are compelled to ask of their
country the redemption of that pledge, solemnly made to
their father, to relieve them from the severe pressure of
misfortunes which have resulted from neither crime nor
vice. Their father died on the first battle field, where the
star-spangled banner was unfurled in defence of American
independence; that glorious prize for which he fought and
died, which animated his exertions and nerved his arm
when that banner waved fitfully over the field of his death
and his country's misfortunes, has been obtained by his
country. The star-spangled banner now waves in triumph
over the land of the free and the home of the brave;" the
pride and protection of a great, prosperous, and happy na-
tion.
The petitioners now submit their case to the equity, the
humanity, and plighted faith of their country.
Mr. W. concluded by moving that the petition be read,
and referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims;
which motion was agreed to.


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27.
A message was received from the President of the Unit-
ed States, through A. JACKSON, jr. his Private Secretary,
on the subject of the admission of Michigan into the Union,
with documents, stating that Michigan, by Convention,
had, at a late day, complied with the regulations of the con-
ditional act of admission.
Mr. GRUNDY moved that the message and documents
be printed, and referred to: the Committee on the Judi-
ciary.
:Mr. BENTON remarked that, as the President had giv-
en his opinion that Michigan had complied with the requi-
site terms of admission, and as he had said that he should
have issued his proclamation accordingly, had the informa-
tion arrived during the recess of Congress, he (Mr. B.) re-
garded the proposed reference as a mere matter of form, and
would prefer that a joint resolution of admission should
forthwith be passed by both Houses.
Mr, GRUNDY said he would still prefer the course
which he had suggested, and, on this account-that the
"first'Conhvention had not assented to the terms of admis-
siorn: but another Convention had decided to accede to the
proposition made by the Congress of the United States.
The great inquiry now was, are the proceedings in accord-
ance with the act of admission? The decision of which
question depends on information which ought to be ascer-
tained before the actual admission, though the President
had said that, in his opinion, all Was right, and, if the in-
formation had come during the recess, he would have act-
ed accordingly. Mr. G. had no design to produce any de-
lay by a reference to a committee. He should not with-
draw his motion, and he hoped the Senator would with-
draw his opposition.
Mr. BENTON said that, as the committee might draw,
up a joint resolution for admission to-day, he should not
oppose-the reference.
The message was also accompanied with a report from
the Secretary of the Treasury, in compliance with the Sen-
ate resolution of the 19th instant, in relation to the unex-
pended balances remaining in the Treasury on the 1st of
January, 1836.
The CHAIR presented a communication from the Sec-
retary of the Treasury, in compliance with a Senate reso-
lution, offered by Mr. WEBSTER, relating to the transfers,
&c. of the public money, since the 21st of June last. Re-
ferred, and ordered to be printed.
Mr. TOMLINSON presented the petition of a large
I -L:.% A 'Nr '_ -. -


The following bills were severally introduced, on leave,
read twice, and referred :
By Mr. PRENTISS: A bill for the relief of Elisha
Town.
By Mr. SOUTHARD :
A bill for the relief of the heirs of the late Henry Eck-
ford.
A bill:to establish a naval asylum.
A bill for the relief of Commodore Isaac Hull.
A bill to establish and regulate navy rations, and for
other purposes.
A bill to regulate the pay of the officers of the marine
corps.
A bill for the erection of a dry dock at Pensacola.
A bill to re-organize the Navy of the United States.
A bill to defray the expenses of a rendezvous and naval
depot at the southern extremity of Florida.
By Mr. DAVIS: A bill to remunerate the captors of
.the privateer Lydia.
By Mr. BUCHANAN: A bill to extend "to a longer
period the several acts for the relief of certain insolvent
debtors of the United States.
By Mr. ROBINSON: A bill for the relief of Daniel
Bush.
By Mr. MOORE: A bill authorizing the Secretary of
the Treasury to invest the two per cent. fund set apart for
the construction of a road or roads, to the State of Ala-
bama.
By Mr. TIPTON: A bill to authorize J. D. Bencraft
to locate certain lands in Indiana.
By Mr. HENDRICKS: A bill for the completion of
certain internal improvements in Florida.
Mr. DAVIS gave notice that he should to-morrow ask
leave to introduce a bill in addition to the act for the relief
of sick and disabled seamen.
THE TREASURY CIRCULAR.
The Senate now proceeded to the special order, the far-
ther consideration of the joint resolution introduced by Mr.
EWING. of Ohio, on this subject, the question being on the
amendment or substitute offered by Mr. RIVEs to that reso-
lution, which substitute proposes to refuse to receive for the
public dues the I.ills of such banks as issued after certain
specified periods bills under certain specified denominations;
the substitute also leaving in the power of the deposit
banks to refuse such funds as they may think proper.
Mr. HUBBARD addressed the Senate at large on the
subject of the resolution and the amendment.
Mr. HUBBARD having concluded his remarks,
Mr. EW~ING, of Ohio, inquired whether he was to un-
derstand Mr. H. as including in his argument of justifica-
tion the discrimination made in the order between citizens
of different States of the Union, requiring of one class to
pay gold and silver, and permitting the other to pay in the
ordinary currency ?
Mr. HUBBARD replied that he had not turned his at-
tention to that point, considering it as having been suffi-
ciently met in the able speech of the Senator from Mis-
souri, (Mr. BENTON.)
Mr. MORRIS obtained the floor for to-morrow; and
then
The Senate, at a little past three, went into executive
business; after which, the Senate adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

V TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27.
Petitions and memorials were called for in the order of
States and Territories, and were presented by Messrs.
EVANS and HALL, of Maine; Mr. D. J. PEARCE,
of Rhode Island; Messrs. HARD, WARDWELL,
HAZELTINE, McKEON, REYNOLDS, and RUS-
SELL, of New York; Mr. GALBRAITH, of Penn-
sylvania; Mr. WASHINGTON, of Maryland; Mr.
LUCAS, of Virginia; Mr. W. B. SHEPARD, of North
Carolina; Messrs. BOYD and HARLAN, of Kentucky;
Messrs. SLOANE and KENNON, of Ohio; Mr. CA-
SEY, of Illinois; and Mr. WHITE, of Florida.
Mr. JARVIS, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, re-
ported against the petition of Abigail Morgan; which re-
port was laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Abigail Fuller; which Was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Elihu Noyes ; which was
laid on the table. '
Also, against the petition of Eli Darling; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of James Ware, Anthony
Mendes, and James M. Blye; which was laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of John Tupman; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Catharine Read ; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of the heirs of Lydia Crans-
ton, deceased ; which was laid on the table.
Mr. RUSSELL made an unfavorable report upon the
petition of Marinus W. Gilbert; which report was laid
on the table.
Mr. PARKER made an unfavorable report upon the pe-
tition of Lot Davis; which report was laid on the table.
Mr. RICE GARLAND made a report upon the peti-
tion of Polly Lemon, accompanied by a bill for her relief;
which, was read twice, and committed to a Committee of
the Whole House.
Mr. CAMBRELENG, from the Committee of Ways
and Means, reported a bill making appropriations for the
civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year
1837; which bill was read twice, and committed to the
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
Mr. BEALE, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions,
reported against the petition of Alexander Phelps.
Mr. LINCOLN, from the Committee on Public Lands,
reported a bill to grant the Atchafalaya Railroad and
Banking Company a right of way through the public lands ;
which bill was read twice, and committed to a Committee
of the Whole House.
Mr. LAWLER, from the Committee on Private Land
Claims, reported a bill for the relief of James Moor and
William Moor, which bill was read twice; and on the
question Shall the bill be engrossed ?" it was decided in
the negative, and the said bill was subsequently rejected
by the House.
MICHIGAN.


A message was received from the President of the Unit-
ed States, transmitting proceedings of a late Convention
held in Michigan, for accepting the conditions of the
act of Congress for admitting the State of Michigan into
the Union; of which message we have not been able to
obtain a copy in time for this day's paper.
The message was read; and,
On motion of Mr. CRAIG, the message and accompa-
nying documents were referred to the Committee on the
Judiciary, and ordered to be printed.
On motion of Mr. E.WHITTLESEY, the House recon-
sidered the vote by which the bill for the relief of James
Moor and William Moor -had been rejected; and on mo-
tion of Mr. LAWLER, the bill was committed to a Com-
mittee of the Whole House.
On motion of Mr. BRIGGS,
Resolved, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be
instructed to inquire into the expediency of continuing to
the widows and children of the officers and soldiers of the
late war with Great Britain, the pensions to which their
husbands and fathers were entitled.
The.following resolution was offered by Mr. JARVIS:
Resolved, That a committee be appointed whose duty it
shall be to consider all matters touching the public build-
ings and public grounds within the City of Washington,
with leave toreport by bill or otherwise.
Mr. J. said (on offering the resolution) it had been cus-
tomary to appoint such a committee annually, and he was
aware it was usual to place the mover at the head of the
committee. In the present instance, however, he must beg
to be excused on account of ill health. The resolution was
adopted.
On motion of Mr. CUSHMAN,
Resolved, That the Committee on Naval Affairs be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of reviving the
act granting pensions to the widows and orphan children of
persons who were employed on board of private armed ves-
sels of the United States, who died in such employment
during the late war.
On motion of Mr. SMITH,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of extending the
provisions of the act entitled An act for the relief of cer-
tain insolvent debtors of the United States," passed March
2, 1831, to such persons who were indebted to the United
States in the manner provided for by said act on thelst
day of January last past.
On motion of Mr. HALL, of Maine,
Resolved, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be
instructed to inquire into the expediency of placing the


On motion of Mr. LAWRENCE,
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be instruct-
ed to inquire into the expediency of appointing a surveyor
of the customs at Brunswick, in the State of Georgia.
On motion of Mr. BEAN,
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be instruct-
ed to inquire into the expediency of granting an additional
appropriation for removing the obstructions in the Cocheco
branch of the Piscataqua river, near the harbor of Dover,
in the State of New Hampshire.
On motion of Mr. EVERETT,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Library be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of publishing a ste-
reotype edition of the laws of the United States.
On motion of Mr. BORDEN,
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of changing the
name of the revenue district, Dighton, in -he State of Mas-
sachusetts, to that of Fall River; also, into the expedien-
cy of allowing vessels arriving from the Cape of Good
Hope, and places beyond, to enter in said district.
On motion of Mr. HALL, of Maine,
Resolved, That the Committee on Revolutionary Pen-
sions be instructed to inquire into the expediency of al-
lowing to Elijah Barden the arrears of pay as a revolution-
ary soldier from the 25th day of September, 1820, when he
was stricken from the pension roll, until the 19th day of
January, 1832, when his name was restored to the roll.
On motion of Mr. JARVIS,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Post Office and
Post Roads be instructed to inquire into the expediency of
establishing a post route from Danville, through Walden
and Lamoile village, to Wolcott, in the State of Vermont;
and that the papers now on file in relation to the same be
referred to- the same committee.
On motion of Mr. PEARCE, of Rhode Island,
Resolved, That the President of the United States be
requested to communicate to this House, if, in his opinion,
not incompatible with the public interest, what steps, if
any, have recently been taken to recoverofthe Kingdom of
Denmark the claim of the United States for three prize
ships, viz. the Betsey, the Union, and Charming Polly, va-
lued by Dr. Benjamin Franklin at ;50,000 sterling, cap-
tured by the squadron under the command of John Paul
Jones, during the war of the Revolution, and carried into
the port of Bergen, Norway, apart ofthe Danish dominions,
seized by the officers of His Danish Majesty the King of
Denmark, in October, 1779, and unlawfully delivered to
the British authorities. If no steps have been so taken to
recover said claim. to communicate to this House whether
it has ever been waived or given up; and if the same has
been waived or given up, when; and if upon any, what,
consideration.
PROTECTION OF SEAMEN.
Mr. CAMBRELENG offered thefoollowing resolution :
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be instruct-
ed to inquire into the expediency of repealing all laws au-
thorizing protections to be issued to American seamen.
Mr. C. briefly explained the object ofthisresolution. He
said it was matter of surprise that these laws had not been
repealed before this time. In the early stages of our Gov-
ernment, in the infancy of our dangers, such laws were ne-
cessary. But now, the time had arrived when the flag of our
country was in itself a sufficient protection. The Ameri-
can seamen were taxed heavily for the payment of these
protections; and no necessity, he thought, existed for their
continuance.
Mr. PARKER was understood to oppose the object of
the resolution on the ground that there were many cases
in which such protections were indispensable; such, for
instance, as shipwreck.
Mr. McKEON hoped that the gentleman from New
Jersey would yield his objections. It was merely for in-
quiry, and he trusted that the House would not oppose a
proposition which made an inquiry into the propriety of
relieving a highly deserving class of our citizens from anr
onerous tax.
Mr. PARKER said he would not oppose the adoption
of the resolution.
Mr. D. J. PEARCE said that he should, at a proper
time, object to any alteration in the law referred to. It
had been adopted with a view to increase the number of
American seamen. The resolution, like many others sub-
mitted to this House, looked to an existing evil, and took
the present year as a standard for years to come. The
law, as it now stood, served to increase the number of our
seamen; the resolution, to his mind, looked to a decrease.
Mr. CAMBRELENG could not understand how the
removal of an actual existing tax upon seamen was to de-
Screase their number. In his opinion, the tax ought-tocsbe
abolished. If the Committee -on Commerce should spe
any reason why it should he continued, he would yield hs&
own opinion to that committee. He wished to refer it
them simply as a matter of inquiry. So far as he ha'"
himself examined the subject, and from the information
he had collected from sources where the subject ought to
be best understood, he. was decidedly of opinion that the
law ought to be abolished.
Mr. GILLETT hoped the resolution would pass; but
suggested to Mr. CAMBRELEIiG so to enlarge the resolu-
tion as to instruct the committee to inquire into the expe-
diency of abolishing the fees.
Mr. CAMBREL'ENG accepted the modification..
Mr. ADAMS said he was very glad the proposition had
been made; that he hoped the subject would be referred to
the Committee on Commerce, and that they would consi-
der it in all its aspects, and present a report on which the
House might act with deliberation. It was a great andrim-
portant change which was proposed to be made in the con-
dition of the seamen of the United States. He had said it
was a great and important change; great and important in
the present state of things, and which might become much
more important from day to day by a change, not in our
own condition, but in that of other nations. He had his
doubts, therefore, whether this resolution was not too ex-
tensive. If, however, a report was made by the Committee
on Commerce, they would present their views, fully on the
subject. He had his doubts whether it was expedient to-
repeal all the laws for the protection of American seamen..
He doubted very much whether, even in a state of peace,
American seamen ought not to be furnished with some


document or paper, constituting their national character,
which should protect them over the surface of-the globe.
He did not know but that, in the present condition of the
world, American seamen might cross over the ocean with-
out any serious danger from wanting such a document;
but inasmuch as they had been possessed of such- a docu-
ment for more than forty years, he had some hesitation ii"
abolishing it altogether, lest thereby that very useful and
important class of men should lose the protection which
was afforded them by that document, when distant from
their country.
The world, or, at least, the United States, had been at
peace for upwards of twenty years; and there might be
gentlemen in that House who did not know what was the
origin of the protection which it was now proposed to take
away. It originated in the practice of impressment by the
British Government in time of war; the practice of taking
out of all vessels every seaman whom the officers of the
British armed ships might thin proper to consider -as a
British subject. The United tes had.endured this na-
tional indignity,, and our seamen had endured this heavy
affliction, for a period of five and twenty years, during all
the wars of the French Revolution: and all these lawshad
been founded upon the practice of the, British Government,
by which, from the moment it entered upon.or projected a
war, the King, by an order of council, authorized his offi--
cers on the sea to take British seamen wherever they were
to be found, without regard to their condition, without re-
gard to their rights, and without regard to the engagements
by which they might be bound. This order of the British
council was not legal, even in England, in time of peace;
but the King, by his prerogative, had the power of making
war; and whenever he projected any thing like hostilities
against another nation, from that moment an order o coun-
cil was issued to take British.seamen wherever they were
to be found, from all American vessels.. By this order for
twenty-five years, every seaman whom the officer-sent to
search or examine our vessels choseto coinsler as a British
subject was taken, and the only check or counteracting influ-
ence ever enjoyed by the U.Stateswas this very same protec-
tion which it was now proposed to take away. It was in-
troduced as an expedient for saving native American citi-.
zens, or naturalized American citizens from being taken
away in this manner, and impressed on board the Britsh
ships 6f war to senre the King of England for an indefi-
nite length of time; to expose their lives in. his wars, and
tobe entirely deprived of that protection which their coun-
try owed ..them. Now, he hoped that, if -the: resolution
passed, -and .was considered by the committee, they wvuld
consider 'it with very serious reference to -this state
of things; ;nd that, if alf the laws of protection were to









not his design to take away any protection from seamen;
he wished only to relieve them from a grievous tax, if it
: could be done without impairing any important principle.
Mr. ADAMS, in continuation, said it had not been his
intention when he rose to oppose the resolution, nor did
he mean now to oppose it; but'he did mean to remind the
House that a proposition thus made was a proposition in-
volving a question of peace and war; and it was a ques-
tion of peace and war with no less a Power than Great
Britain; and he hoped that the committee would view the
subject with reference to that role d'eqaipage which the
.gentleman from New York declared to be a sufficient pro-
tection. Did not that gentleman know that there was not
an officer in the British service who would look upon it as
any more than a piece of waste paper ? If the order of
council, authorizing this impressment of seamen, were is-
sued to-morrow, and it infallibly would be issued in case
SGreat Britain was arrayed against aany maritime Power-
against France, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, or any other
Power-I ask the gentleman what good his role d'equipage
would do to protect an American citizen, native or other-
wise, against that order? It would be no protection at all.
SBut the British officers would ransack every vessel of the
ocean, and would take out every able-bodied man whom
they chose to say was a British subject. And what would
we do ? We would remonstrate; we would instruct our
minister in England to remonstrate; and we would cavil
and quarrel as we did twenty-five years ago; and, finally,
we would come to a war. That was the cause of the war;
there never would have been a war but for that cause; it
was a war as righteous as was ever waged on the face of
the earth; and much as he abhorred war upon earth, he
hoped it would come in less than twenty-five weeks, if a
seaman should ever again be taken out of an American
vessel. That was the cause of the war.
Twenty-two years had now elapsed, during which, in
time of peace, the United States had been constantly en-
deavoring to settle this matter with Great Britain, and had
never been able to do so. The United States had made
war, and had been obliged to make peace, without remedy-
ing the evil. Would they, then, now take away this pro-
tection from an American seaman, not perhaps very ne-
cessary, yet it might be very proper in time of peace ? This
was a proper subject for inquiry by a committee. But he
wished especially to caution the House against the aboli-
tion of that particular protection, without something were
substituted which would secure the seaman on the ocean.
As to the fees vhich the seaman paid for the protection, he
(Mr. A.) would vote for their abolition at this time; but,
under the color of relieving the sailor from that trifle, he
was not willing to take from him that which was a talis-
man to carry him safe through the world, against the prac-
tice of the British Government, (and he did not wish to
bandy words or to qualify the truth,) of seizing seamen up-
on every occasion to serve the British King; and, under
the pretence that he spoke the same language, taking it for
granted that every stout able-bodied American seaman was
a British subject. He wished to say no more, nor did he
wish to oppose the resolution.
Mr. C USHING said he did not rise forthe particular pur-
pose of opposing the adoption of the resolution before the
House. Indeed, he thought some inquiry, upon a point
closely connected with the present, not undesirable. He
referred to the provision of the law requiring the employ-
ment in the merchantt service of a certain proportion of
American, as distinguished trom foreign, mariners. Owing
to causes not immediate only, as implied in the remarks of
the gentleman from Rhode Island, (Mr. PEARCE,) not tem-
porary only, but permanent in their operation, there is a de-
ficiency of seamen for the supply of our mercantile as well
as our military marine. Not only does the difficulty exist,
but it operates unequally in the different parts of the Unit-
ed States. At some custom-houses, as he (Mr. C.) had
had occasion to know in his own business, there is more of
rigor in the administration of the law in this respect, in
others less; which gives a sensible advantage to the com-
merce of those ports where the most liberality is manifested.
It might deserve consideration whether some relaxation of
the existing laws in that particular may not be proper and
expedient. There certainly could be no serious objection
to having the subject examined by a committee.
But (Mr. C. said) he wished to object most distinctly
and emphatically to the reasons with which the gentleman
from New York (Mr. CAMBRELENG) advocated the passage
of the resolution. He entertained views the very opposite
of those which that gentleman had expressed.
The gentleman from New York says a protection is not
necessary to the seaman, because the role d'equipage will
indicate his citizenship. But is not the role a secondary
,f ifAe ofevidence only, made up from the protections them-
./ Jelves ? And what foreign officer, then, would receive the
S'r6le as conclusive proof of the citizenship of any individual
Whose name happened to be borne upon it Beside which,
'the individual needs a document which may accompany
uis person. But the role d'Squipage belongs o the ship.
he individual seaman may be discharged. His contract
of service-may expire in a foreign port. The ship may be
j wrecked. And what, then, becomes of his protection ? Is
it not self-evident that he should have a separate document
to prove his citizenship to accompany himself wherever he
navigates the sea? .
But Mr. C. had a still graver difference with the gentle-
man from New York. He (Mr. CAMBRELENG) seems to
think there is something discreditable, either to the coun-
try or the individual, in the fact of the latter bearing a pro-
tection. Is not this a most mistaken view of the subject' ? I
heartily rejoice, (said Mr. CUSHING,) in common with the
gentleman from New York, that a series of brilliant naval
victories, during the last war, has vindicated the honor of
our flag in this matter; and I trust we shall never cease to
maintain the same controversy with equal decision and
triumph. But is it dishonorable to carry a protection ? By
no means. How stands the fact ? If an American citi-
zen desires to travel in foreign countries, he sends to the
Department of State, and, upon proof of his citizenship,
obtains a passport; if a seaman desires to pass on the ocean,
he repairs to an officer of the customs, and on similar proof
obtains a protection. The things differ in name: in sub-
stance they are one. Each of them is a certificate, signed
by some officer of the Government authorized by law, at-
testing the citizenship of the individual named and describ-
ed in the document. Is it any disgrace to the United States


to give, or the citizen to receive, such a document'? Sure-
ly not. The protection is to the mariner at sea what the
passport is to the landsman on shore. Am I (said Mr. C.)
dishonored by bearing such a document in foreign lands or
distant seas ? On the contrary, is it not matter of pride, as
well as convenience, that, armed only with a paper bearing
the seal of the United States, I may travel the earth over,
secure, in every place, of the protection of the ministers of
my country, of the good-will of the functionaries of other
countries allied with us, and, if need be, of the guns and
whole public force of the Republic to vindicate any injury
done to my person ? That I may go unharmed throughout
the world, under the magic influence of the broad seal of
Sthe United States 1
Besides, it is not material to remember, as suggested by
my honorable colleague, (Mr. ADAMS,) the origin of the
particular usefulness of protections. We speak the lan-
guage, inherit the blood, and wear the features of the inha-
bitants of the British Islands, from whom most of-us are
descended. Shall we hastily abandon the use of a docu-
ment which certifies the citizenship of the seaman, and re-
claims for him, as its name denotes, the protection of his
nation ? Which affords him the convenient proof of his
nationality, which his person and language do not fur-
nishi? And to maintain which the United States should
stand ready now, as they had heretofore done, to recur, if
necessary, to the ultimate remedy of war ?
One thing, in this connexion, (Mr. C. said) deserved the
interposition of this House. The landsman, though proba-
bly better able than themariner to pay for his passport, ob-
tained it from the Department of State free of cost. The
seaman ought to have his free of cost. The fee paid by
him to the customs for his protection ought to be imme-
diately abolished, and then the situation of all citizens, in
this particular, would be equal. And he should insist, if
the resolution was to be adopted, on amending it to this
effect.
1 Mr. CAMBRELENG expressed his astonishment at
what had fallen from the honorable gentleman (Mr. CuSH-
ING;) this was the first time he (Mr. C.) had even heard
that protections were given to our seamen with a view to
their convenience when on their travels in foreign countries.
He must express his astonishment at the pertinacity with
which some members still persisted in holding allegiance to
the British fag. The protection referred to had nothing
to do with travelling in foreign countries. Every captain
of a vessel was bound by the law to pay three months'
wages to a seaman if he left him in a foreign port; if in an
island where there was no consul of ours residing, yet a cap-
tain dare not leave any of his hands, because the owners


spected. But as to whether these protections could operate
in warding off the calamity of war, Mr. C. ridiculed the-
idea. He (Mr. C.) must beg the honorable gentleman's
pardon, (Mr. J. Q. ADAMS,) but really he must say that he
(Mr. A.) appeared to him ever on the alert to watch each
little speck upon the horizon and make it out as if it were
a cloud portending war; he (Mr. A.) could see nothing
before him on that horizon but war and blood. These
laws, (Mr. C., said,) he had thought for years past were
unnecessary and ought to be repealed; he hoped, there-
fore, they would be totally abolished.
The question was then taken on agreeing to the resolu-
tion as modified, and determined in the affirmative.
ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Mr. WisE's resolution for the appointment of a select
committee to inquire into the conduct of the different De-
partments, together with Mr. PEARCE'S proposed amend-
ment to the same resolution, being the first thing in the
Orders of the Day-
The resolution having been read, Mr. CAMB RELENG
moved that its consideration be postponed till Thursday
next, in order to take up several bills which he deemed of
great importance.
Mr. CAMBRELENG repelled the charge of postpon-
ing this resolution in order to evade the question of inqui-
ry. Not only in this, but in the last session, he had voted
affirmatively on every question involving an inquiry into
the affairs of Government; the only object he now had in
view was the public benefit, as'several bills relating to ap-
propriations of immediate necessity were waiting to be pass-
ed. If, however, the House should seem to desire it, he
(Mr. C.) would withdraw his motion to postpone.
The House was proceeding to the debate upon this re-
solution, when
Mr.PICKENS observed that, as he did not see the
honorable mover of this resolution (Mr. WISE) in his seat,
and as that gentleman, no doubt, would be anxious to
watch the progress of the debate, and perhaps might wish
to make a reply to what had been opposed to his resolution,
perhaps it would be according to Parliamentary use, and
respectful to the mover, to postpone the subject until his
return. He therefore moved that it be made the special
order of the day for Thursday next.
At the suggestion of Mr. HARPER, Tuesday next was
substituted, it being doubtful whether'Mr. WISE would be
in his seat on Thursday.
Mr. BOON hoped the consideration of this important
subject would not be postponed another hour; foi if it were
much further postponed, it would be too late in the session
to obtain the information to be called for.
The question of postponement was then put; and a di-
vision being called for, there appeared 98 for the postpone-
ment, and 51 against it. So the further consideration of
the subject was postponed, and made the special order of
the day for Tuesday next.
The engrossed bill to regulate the disposition, in certain
cases, of the proceeds of lands belonging to the Indian
tribes, was read a third time, passed, and sent to the Sen-
ate for concurrence.
THE MINT AND COINAGE.
The House then again resolved itself into a Committee
of the Whole on the biil concerning the Mint (to consoli-
date all existing and some other regulations concerning the
Mint and Coinage.)
The question being upon the motion of Mr. HARPER to
strike out 140 grains (the proposed weight for the new
cent) and insert in lieu of it 168 grains, the weight of the
present cent.
The debate on this proposition was resumed, in which
the motion was opposed by Mr. CAMBRELENG and
Mr. McKIM, and supported by Mr. HARPER, and at
more length and with great earnestness by Mr. ADAMS.
The motion of Mr. HARPER was finally agreed to with-
out a division; and Mr. ADAMS then, as the section had
been amended, withdrew his motion to strike out the sec-
tion respecting copper coin.
Mr. HARPER then moved further to amend the bill so
to reduce the minimum amount of gold and silver bullion re-
ceivable at the Mint for coinage from two hundred to one
hundred dollars; in support of which he made some co-
gent observations.
Mr. CAMBRELENG made no opposition to this mo-
tion.
The motion was agreed to, nem. con.
Mr. ADAMS then moved to amend the bill so as to
raise the proposed weight of" the dime, or tenth part-of a
dollar," from 40 to 411 grains, so as to make it correspond
in weight with the weight of the new dollar (4121 grains.)
Unless this amendment was made, Mr. A. said, the bill
would include the absurdity of declaring that the tenth part
of 412J was 40! Mr, A. protested, besides, against this
debasement of the dime, one of the most useful of our coins,
because it was entirely at war with the decimal system, as
well as tending in practice to introduce confusion into the
currency.
Mr. CAMBRELENG inclined to agree in the proprie-
ty of this amendment, being as much opposed as the gen-
tleman from Massachusetts to depreciating the coin. The
reduced weight had been introduced into the bill at the
suggestion of the Director of the Mint, from a desire that
these coins should be kept in circulation by being made
less liable to be exported or melted up, and also because
the coinage of small coins was more expensive to the Mint
than of the large.
The amendment moved by Mr. ADAMS was agreed to
without a division.
The Mint Bill was then laid aside; and
The bill (before the same committee) for making further
appropriations for the suppression of Indian hostilities, was
taken up and read through, no objection being made to it.
Both the bills were then reported to the House; and the
amendments to the Mint Bill were immediately taken up
for consideration.
The question being on concurring in the amendment
which strikes out the provision makingcents and half cents
a legal tender for all sums less than a dime, it was opposed
by Mr. GILLETT, who maintained that if the coin was
made, it ought to be a legal tender to some amount, if for
no more, at least for half a dime ; and he made a motion so
to amend the bill.
Mr. ADAMS, suggesting that this amendment had been


introduced on the motion of a gentleman now absent, pro-
posed on that ground to postpone the further consideration
of the bill, unless gentlemen would consentto let the bill
pass as amended.
Mr. GILLZTT'S opposition, however, was overruled by the
House; and the amendment made in Committee of the
Whole was concurred in by the House: yeas 86.
Mr. GILL ET T then moved to strike out the 12th section
(being all that part of the bill which establishes the weight
and value of the copper coin.) The motion was negatived,
without a count; and
The bill, as amended, was then ordered to be engrossed
for a third reading.
The Indian Hostilities Appropriation bill, as well as the
bill making appropriations for payment of the Revolutionary
pensioners, were then also ordered to be engrossed for a
third reading, and
The House adjourned.

The following petitions, among others pre-
sented, were specially brought to the notice of
our Reporter :
By Mr. RUSSELL: The petition of Melancthon
Wheeler, John H. Boyd, and others, inhabitants of the
county of Washington, in the State of New York, praying
an appropriation to improve the harbor at White Hall, in
said State; which, on motion of Mr. R. was referred to
the Committee on Commerce.
Also, tlfe petition of Lewis Hatch, praying for pension
for revolutionary services; which, on motion of Mr. R.
was referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions.
Also, the petition of Samuel Weeks, of the county of
Washington, in the State of New York, a soldier of the
Revolution, praying for an increase of his pension for re-
volutionary services; which, on motion of Mr. R. was re-
ferred to the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions.

FINE DUELLING AND POCKET PISTOLS.
At private sale, a pair of each of the above articles; they
are of very excellent quality, and may be bought cheap.
EDW. DYER,
dec 28-3t Auct. and Coin. Merchant.
I EW-YEAR'S PRESENTS.-Splendid Silver
Ware.-A valuable Tea and Coffee Set, of solid silver,
richly embossed and beautifully chased-valued at nine hun-
dred dollars.
Likewise, sundry valuable articles of gold and silver, worthy
the attention of the ladies and gentlemen of Washington, to
which their attention is respectfully invited, are to be seen at
EMACK'S Office, sign of the Flag of Scarlet and Gold, three
r,, ....o ,iTt ,f Ronwn'e s tel pf 928--3tif


. ---*,- ---*-. a*,.A^.rt-- --->@ s ^ --- ..---- .-__^-L.^-

WVASHiN GTON.
l" Liberty and Unioni, now and forever, one and
inlseparable.91

W WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1836.

In the case of RICHARD H. WHITE, indicted
and tried in our Circuit Court on a charge of
burning the Treasury building, in the year 1833,
the Jury came into Court yesterday, about two
o'clock, being still unable to agree upon a ver-
dict, and, by consent of counsel, a juror was
withdrawn, leaving the case to be tried over
again. In this state of the case, we forbear
any remark upon either the trial or its result.
The jury was confined upon this case upwards
of seventy hours!

THE MINT AND THE COINAGE.-The import-
ant bill consolidating into one, with slight altera-
tions, all the existing laws and regulations re-
specting the Mint and Coinage, was yesterday
ordered to be engrossed for a third reading in
the House of Representatives, Mr. ADAMS having
waived his objections to parts of the bill, after
having maturely examined it, and other objec--
tions being obviated by amendments. As the
bill now stands, the Gold Coin remains as now;
the Silver Dollar is to be hereafter of the weight
of 4121 grains instead of 416, its present weight,
(the'quantity of pure silver in it, however, re-
maining the same,) and the parts of a dollar of
proportionate weight; and the copper coin re-
mains, instead of being reduced as proposed, at
its present weight of 168 grains to the cent, and
84 grains to the half-cent.

Amongst the visitors at present at the seat of
Government we observe Brigadier General AT-
KINSON, of the Army.

The London Times of November 8, founding
his reasoning on the opinions of his American
correspondent, under the signature of a "Gen-
esee Traveller," says:
We see in the late proceedings of the Government and
People of the United States a confirmation of the suspicion
long entertained in the best informed diplomatic circles that
the annexation of Texas to their already unwieldy territory
is a favorite project. Texas would be the stepping-stone to
the acquisition-of Mexico. Will such a result, probably not a
very distant one, be most injurious to Spain or to the Amer-
ican Union ? Meantime, will Europe be content to be a
quiet observer of the progress of events ?"
From the turn of the subjoined paragraphs, which we
copy from a journal formerly favored with the correspon-
dence of Major Jack Downing, one might suppose that that
defunct worthy had come to life again. Perhaps, however,
he has left some son behind him who inherits his father's
humor.
FROM THE PORTLAND COURIER, DEC. 22.
rjr Apology.-We have to apologize to our readers for the
non-appearance of the Courier yesterday. It must be a pretty
good vessel that could keep under sail in such a storm as we
had yesterday, and not be obliged to furl all sails snug and lay
to, or scud under bare poles. Our little ship can generally stand
most any kind of a storm ; but she had not been under way half
an houryesterday morning, before the Captain had to call all hands
to take in the light sails, and close reef fore and aft. And be-
fore noon, he had to furl every rag of canvass, and drive the
crew into the forecastle to keep them from being washed over-
board. The rest of the day she lay rolling in the trough of the'-
sea. However she moves again this morning like a bird, and
we believe she has sustained no damage.
P. S. Lest our land readers may not perfectly understand
all this, we must add that the violence of the storm was so great
that it drove all the smoke and fire from the stove and funnel
into the office, and all the workmen out of it; and we could
not make it go any other way all day, no how we could fix it.
If there should be a reddish appearance about our eyes to-day,
we beg leave to assure our readers that we don't drink.

We have not yet heard of any serious damage by the storm
yesterday, though we fear we shall. There was a rumor about
town that the roof of Park street Church had started, and that it
took all the neighbors around there to hold it on. We are in-'
clined to think, however, that the rumor had not so good a foun-.
dation as the building has.

FROM THE CONNECTICUT COURANT.
It appears, by the annual report of the Secretary of War,
that there have been mustered into the service of the Unit-
ed States, during the past year, no less than twenty-four
thousand five hundred militia and volunteers. We believe
the troops under the command of General WASHIrnTON,
during the Revolutionary war, frequently fell short of this
number. And yet they have not been found sufficient, un-
der this warlike Administration, to put an end to hostilities
with a handful of Indians. The Seminoles, a mere rem-
nant of a tribe, and being able to bring into the field only
a few hundred warriors, have stood out against all the force
that has been sent against them, and at the end of a year
and a half; or thereabouts, the war appears as likely to last
as it did a twelvemonth ago. In the mean time, a large


proportion of the officers of the regular army have resigned
their commissions, and quit the service in disgust. Among
these are many individuals of high reputation for experi-
ence and conduct, whose places cannot easily and readily
be supplied. That the War Department, in all its branch-
es, requires a thorough overhauling, we do not doubt. An
extensive.and minute examination into all its business, pe-
cuniary as well as military, should be made, and measures
adopted to place it upon a more safe and profitable footing.
That a multitude of abuses will be discovered upon such an
investigation, we do not question; and among them, if we
are not greatly mistaken, one important ground of dissatis-
faction will be traced to a system of favoritism, by which
the rights of many meritorious officers have been disregard-
ed or sacrificed, and many unjust instances of promotion or
preference have occurred, in which higherclaims have been
overlooked and trifled with.
LOUISVILLE, DEC. 19.
COAL.-We have seen specimens of coal taken from the
mine of Mr. F. W. Hunt, about 120 miles below Louis-
ville. In this mine there are two strata, one of which is
the real Kennel coal, so celebrated in England. The other
resembles the Pittsburg coal. A part of the stratum of
Kennel coal has been analyzed by a distinguished chemist
of Boston, and found to contain 48-100 of bitumen. The
Kennel coal is superior to any other for generating ggs. It
is also preferable to any other kind, wherever a lively blaze
is required, as in locomotive engines, steamboats, &c. The
steamboat Harry Hill now lies at the wharf with a load of
Mr. Hunt's coal.-Journal.
BRINGING uP.-Children, in the cities of Europe, are
brought up better than ours are. The nurses do not keep
them in their chambers, fondling over them all day. The
children are made to exercise in the open air. There they
stay all of the day that the time from school or from meals
will permit. The consequence is, that they grow up with
health, and with a ruddy ph'ysiognomy.-Dewey.
MURDER.-A most horrid murder was committed in Hopkins
county, Kentucky, a few days since. A man by the name of
Brown had been out during the day on which the murder hap-
pened, hunting hogs; in the evening he called at a house where
he observed several men, whom he believed his enemies, and two
or three whom he thought his friends; he requested some of
the latter to go home wiih him, alleging his tears for his per-
sonal safety; but before they started, a door was opened, and the
unhappy man (Brown) received eighteen buckshot and a ball in
his body, which instantly killed him. It is to be hoped that the
wi.kped asnmsin will hp ferr-eted nut, and madenl to answer tn the


FROM FLORIDA.-OFFICIAL.-

Extract from a letter from General Jesup.
HEAD QUARTERS, ARMY OP THE S:;UTH,
Volusia, Florida, Dec. 9, 1836.
The command of the forces in Florida was transferred
to me yesterday. I would greatly have preferred that Go-
vernor CALL had been permitted to close the campaign.
:He has had difficulties to encounter of which no man can
form an adequate idea, who has notbeen here. I have ex-
amined carefully the state of the service, and have looked
into every matter connected with the recent operations;
and I am sure that no man could have done more under
the circumstances. He established this post, and took eve-
ry preliminary step to supply it. Supplies and means of
transportation are rapidly arriving; and had he retained
the command, he would soon have struck an important
blow.
.*' The term of service of the Tennessee volunteers will
expire in a few days. To avail myself of their services in
the attack I propose to make, I shall move sooner than, 'in
my own judgment, I ought to move, and may have to fall
back; but I am so arranging my depots, that, ifcompelled
to relinquish one object, I shall readily strike another. If
I should not succeed in dislodging Powell, I can, on re-
turning to this place, strike Micanopy, Philip, and Cooper,
who are about a day's march from each other, each with
from one hundred and twenty to two hundred Indian and
negro warriors; the latter perhaps the more numerous.
,My object will be to strike them in succession, and prevent
them from concentrating."

Extract from a letter from General Jesup.
HEAD Q~UARTEItS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,
SVolusia, Florida, Dec. 12, 1836. )
"A sufficient supply of subsistence having been receiv-
eJ yesterday to enable me to move with twenty days' ra-
tions, the army will march to-day. The advance is now
moving. At the Ocklawaha I shall have the choice of two
objects-Micanopy, who is about thirty miles south of the
point where I shall cross that river, and Powell, who is
fifty miles southwest of it.
I propose, after placing the train safely across the Ock-
lawaha, to leave a sufficient force to protect it, and with
the remainder make a forced march, and strike either Mica-
nopy or Powell, and, if successful with the first, immedi-
ately attack the other.
My movements are not in accordance with my own
judgment; they are controlled by the necessity of availing
myself ofthe few days that yet remain of the term of service
of the Tennessee brigade, and I am, therefore, compelled
to march on their route to the mouth of the Wythlacoochee,
where they expect to embark for New Orleans, on their
way home. This movement will enable me to strike at the
two chiefs mentioned above, and to cover the frontier ; but
had I the control of my measures, I could employ the force
to much more advantage, in a succession of attacks along
the Ocklawaha, and thence down the Wythlacoochee."

COMMERCE OF CHICAGO, (ILLINOIS.)

The rapid growth of CHICAGO is a subject of remark and
wonder throughout the Union. The growth of the town,
however, bears no comparison with that of its commerce,
as win be seen in the following statements: In 1833, there
were, as we are informed, but four arrivals from the lower
lakes, viz. two brigs and two schooners, say 700 tons. In
1835, there were about 250 arrivals, nearly all of which
were schooners, averaging about 90 tons burden each, or
22,500 tons in all. In 1836, the first arrival was on the
18th day of April. From that time to the first day of De-
cember, 226 days, 456 vessels (49 steamboats, 10 ships and
barques, 26 brigs, 363 schooners, and 8 sloops) arrived,
averaging 57,550 tons, as follows: 85 ships, steamboats,
barques, and brigs, at 250 tons each, 21,250 tons; 363
schooners at 100 tons each, (many of them carry 150 to 200
tons,) 36,300 tons: or 57,550 tons in all, without including
the sloops. To give a more concise view of the increase of
our commerce, for the years above named, we place it in the
following order:
Year. Number of arrivals. Average tonnage.
1833 4 700
1835 250 22,500
1836 456 57,550
As there are several vessels now on the way, which will
arrive here this season, we may safely state the tonnage at
60,000! being an increase of 59,300 tons in three years!
Is there any other town within the borders of our Union
which can boast of as large an increase in its commerce as
this ? We challenge !-Chicago American.

CHRISTMAS IN PHILADELPHIA.

FROM THE PENNSYLVANIA SENTINEL OF DEC. 26.
CHRISTMAS.-We never saw a festival more generally
celebrated or more heartily enjoyed than Christmas has
been this season. "Christmas comes but once a year."
Alack! that it should be so! If we had our will, we
would have at least a score of domestic and holiday festi-
vals, scattered pleasantly through the year. Your fourths
of July are a rough and unchristian enjoyment; they deal
wholly in masculine pleasures, and are accordingly forced
to put up with drunkenness without exhilaration, and noise
without pleasure. St. Nicholas, on the contrary, gathers
all round his shrine-the venerable grandsire, the manly
father, his smiling partner, the ardent youth, blushing
maid, and, noisier than all, shouting master and romping
miss are all there, and are all happy. Religion and do-
mestic affection throw their influence over the day. It is
the festival of hearts-the festival of home. Commend us
ever to Christmas--ancient, merry-hearted Christmas, with
all its old observances, its sacred recollections, and home-
bred joys!
The scene presented'by the streets of our city on Christ-
mnas eve was one of the most peculiar and joyous we ever
witnessed. The evening was clear and pleasant; and the
streets were crowded with children. The toy and confec-
tionary shops were filled with a happy concourse of the
little folk. Each littJe fellow was Ihappy as a prince.
Drums, trumpets, whistles, were all in requisition--and
such a concert has not been heard since the days of Babel.


Several hundred little boys collected, and made a military
procession-a more joyous one was never witnessed. The
music was peculiar, and, if somewhat inharmonious, was
certainly enlivening.
Yesterday the city was all alive. Every heart was glad,
every face was smiling. Ten thousand turkeys smoked
upon the altar of St. Nicholas-a hundred thousand re-
joicing disciples gathered around it. May our goodly city
enjoy many such days; and may we be there to see !"
NEW HUMAN BEINGs.-Hotels and public houses have a
phraseology of- heir own. On an inquest held some years
since on the body of a gentleman who died suddenly at a Lon-
don hotel, one of the witnesses, Mr. Boots, deposed that the
chambermaid desired him to run for a doctor, as "Number four
was in a fit." And at one of the suburban tea gardens, a waiter
loaded with a tray containing tea and riuflius for twelve, who
observed a bolt before the bill was paid, roared out to a brother
attendant, Run, run, Bob, there's two teas and a glass of bran-
dy and water escaping over the paling; catch 'em."


N OTICE.-A meeting of the citizens of the First Ward is
requested at the room over the West Market, this even-
ing, (Wednesday, 28th instant.) The object of the meeting is
the organization of a Fire Company, and to take some steps to
obtain from Congress a charter for a Fireman's Insurance Com-
pany. dec 28
A CARD.-Dr. PLANTOU invites the patrons and friends
of Internal Improvement to see his Models of a railroad
car and of a canal steamboat, now in the Rotundo of the Capi-
tol. -He at the same time offers his services as a Surgeon Den-
tist to the Public. Dr. P. may be found at Mrs. Turner's, oppo-
site Brown's Hotel. dec 28-eo3t
W ILLIAM B. TODD, six doors west of Brown's
Hotel, has lately received a fresh supply of--
Gentlemen's Beaver and Silk Hats, Otter, Fur, Seal,
Muskrat, Sealette and Cloth Caps
Ladies' Beaver and Silk Plush Bonnets
Medicated Russia Hare Skins
Ladies' Fur Cloak Linings, Capes
Lynx Boas and Muffs, Swansdown Trimming
Splendid white Cashmere Boas
Carriage Mats, Buffalo Robes
Leather Hat Cases. dec 23-7tif
F HOWARD'S Improved Chemical Chloride
Soap.-This deservedly celebrated Soap may at all
times be had, wholesale and retail, of the subscriber, inventor
and sole proprietor. For sale, also, at most of the Drug and
Fancy stores in Washington, Georgetown, and Alexandria.
N. B.-The genuine will have the signature of the proprie-


DANGERS OF THE SEAS.

Loss of the brig Gambia, of New York.-The brig Gam-
bia. which sailed from New York for Lisbon on the 16th
ultimo, was capsized on the night of the 19th, while lying
too in a gale of wind, in the Gulf. The captain, first mate,
md a passeng-r werein the cabirjat the time, and were
drowned. The survivors, seven in number, clustered
around the forecastle, the only part out of the water, and
'lashed themselves to the bitts. Here, for three days and
nights, they were exposed totte, peltings-of thestorm, with
nothing to eat but a few raw potatoes; and no water. At
this period, two of the crew died, and the cabin boy died
raving mad; and, to satisfy the cravings of hunger, the
boy was cut up for food! On the night of the 22d the re-
mainder of the crew, who.had succeeded' in reaching the
main-top, saw a vessel-to leeward, which proved to be the
ship New England, on board of which they were taken,
and landed in Boston.
The names of the'survivors are Joseph Couilland, se-
cond mate, Samuel Presson, Andrew Smith, and A. Smith.
Those drowned were Captain French, M. Jordan,-mate,
and John Dean, passenger; Jacobs, the cook, Andrew
Paterson, seaman, and a Portuguese boy,- named Alexan-
der, died from fatigue and hunger.

By the arrival of the ship Brandt at New Bedford, (Mass.)
news has been received of the loss in the"Mozambique Chan-
nel, in the months of June or July last..of Captain Edw'd
Howland, of Dartmouth, master of the ship Lalla Rhook,
of this port, and G. Howland, (son of Stephen Howland,)
3d mate, and a boat's crew belonging to said ship.
The particulars which have come to hand are as fol-
lows: The mate, William C. Swain, and second :mate,
were absent, chasing whales, for several hours, and, on
returning on board the ship, learnt from the ship-keeper
that whales came up near the ship soon after their leaving.
Capt. Howland lowered his boat, and fastened to a sperm
whale, which was the last that was seen either of the un-
fortunate captain or boat's crew. We have been unable
to learn the names of the seamen who composed the boat's
crew.
A letter dated York, Me. Dec. 20, gives the following
particulars of another shipwreck :
I hasten to inform you that three dead bodies were
brought into this harbor last evening, taken from a wreck
partly under water, on York ledge, where she was disco-
vered on Monday morning. She is a vessel of about 100
tons; Lean (probably Leander) is discovered on her stern,
but where from is not yet discovered. Two bodies, two
men and a boy, were found lashed to the taffrail and lar-
board quarter. The vessel is a schooner,, two white stars
on her stern, white streak around her; trimmings green.
The main swifter shrouds new, new flying jib and boom,
remnant of colors fastened at fore rigging, decks ripped up,
and not known whether she is light or loaded; probably an
eastern built. One of the men about 30, one probably 50,
and the boy about 16."

RAILROAD ARRANGEMENT.
Until further notice the cars will depart as
follows:
From Washington for Baltimore,
AT HALF PAST NINE O'CLOCK A. M.
AND
.AT HALF PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
From Baltimore for Washington,
AT NINE O'CLOCK A. M.
AND
AT A QUARTER PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
dec 28-d6t&w6t [Alex. Gaz. & Met.]


FRESH ARRIVALS-No. I.
As a passenger in the steamboat from the city of Brotherly
Love, I was much amused at the sight of, and to hear the obser-
vations and jokes of some very learned and-scientific men, by
their remarks on the persons who arrived here this morning in
the railroad cars from Baltimore. One, whom I supposed to be
perfectly acquainted with the structure of the human eye, very
rudely asked Dr. WILLIAMS, the Oculist, if the one nearest to
him was a Lion or T2iger ? No, sir, replied Dr. Williams, it
is one of the Lambs- and those who insult them are the Lions
and the Tigers." I afterwards learned, in thecars this morning
from Baltimore,from the patients themselves, the following in-
teresting facts: That one of the "Lions and Tigers" had
been totally dark from her birth, but who now sees A second
said she had been nearly blind fifteen or sixteen years, but
could now see to read large print. A third said she had been
blind eight years, or nearly so, but that she is now, at the
age of twenty-four years, learning to read. A .fourth said
that she was blind three or four years, and totally dark seven
weeks, yet now sees every object distinctly A.fJfh, a little
girl, about ten years of age, said she had disease in the eyes
and eyelids tbr many years, nearly amounting to blindness,
which was very distressing! "No one in the profession at Phi-
ladelphia (said the young woman who had been blind eight
years) could relieve her in the least degree 'they said as she
grew up to womanhood she would grow out of it, as it was ow-
ing to the impurities of her blood. 1Her eyes now appeared to
me no worse than mine, after so long journey. All the above-
mentioned persons appear to regard the Oculist as their greatest
benefactor, and declared, all of them, if they had not been aban-
doned by Mr. Williams, by his quitting the city of Philadelphia
and Baltimore,that their cures would have perhaps been perfect,
as all the women declared that they had not lost any of the
benefit they had derived!!
Excuse this scrawl, as I am just arrived from New York.
AN OBSERVER.
P. S. I had for gotten to add that all of the ladies (except one
who resides in Baltimore) declared that they had been attend-
ed to by all the very first physicians and oculists in Philadelphia
for years, and abandoned by them all as incurable.
Friday, December 23, 1836.
FRESH ARRIVALS-No. 2.
TO THE EDITORS OF THE CITY PAPERS.
Gentlemen: I was so pleased the whole of the past night
at having yesterday done my duty, that I wasinduced, this morn-
ing, to find out the females who were brought herein the Steam
Packet and Railroad cars from Philadelphia and Baltimore, by
the English Oculist, Dr. WILLIAMS.
1 will begin with the lady from the last named city. Mrs.
Foley, in answer to my questions, said she was aged forty years,
lives with her children and grand-children in Liberty street,
Baltimore. Said she had been sometimes totally blind, at others
nearly so, during the whole period of fifteen, or sixteen years.
Said she never applied to any physician or oculist, from herap-
prehensions of being made worse, but that, on Dr. Williams's ar-
rival in Baltimore, she, with upwards of a hundred other per-
sons, of all ages, attended upon him every day, at the Baptist
Church, until his departure.
I asked if she had received benefit? In answer, said she
could now see to read large letters, and she well knew another
poor woman, named Margaret Vanderford, who had been blind
nine years, but who was also restored to sight by Dr. Williams
within fourteen days. On my asking her why Margaret was
not also with Dr. Williams, said that the Doctor went up to the
almnshouse yesterday morning, and requested Mr. Holten, the
keeper, to allow her to go down with him to General Smith, the
Mayor of Baltimore, in order that he might obtain a certificate
of her being in a measure restored to sight, promising the keep-
er that he would send her back again to the almshouse in a
close carriage; but, I understand that that honorable gentle-
man (Mr. Holten) insulted Mr. Williams by positively refusing
him his demand, slating that he would not lend his assistance to
such an abominable imposition. Then, sir, you refuse to let
the poor woman, that I have restored to sight, go with me to the
Mayor." Yes, sir, I do refuse." Dr. Williams then told me
that he put on his hat and came away. Is it possible, thought
I, that there can be such a man in the United States.
Mrs. Foley also informed me that she knew a gentleman,
aged forty-three years, who was born totally dark on one eye,
and almost so on the other, who was so far restored to sight as
perfectly to see the light, and also to distinguish many objects
without knowing what they were.
Another gentleman, she said, she knew had been blind up-
wards often years, by what is called a gutta screna, who is also
so much benefited in his eyes (though Ire enjoys very bad
health) as to be able to walk without a guide.
Another gentleman, who wan formerly a- master of a vessel,
and who had lost the sight ofone eye, now sees with both.
Another, a colored man, who said he had been blind in both
eyes ten years, but now sees with both.
Another, ae colored young woman, aged fourteen years, whom
I heard tell General Smith that she was born with the sight of
one eye only, but now she sees with both.
I am sure, also, of many children having been brought to the
Church, totally blind in both eyes, whom some of them their
mothers declared had been blind from their birth, but that they
now see every object.
I will only mention another, which is the daughter of an inti-
mate friend of my own, whose case is noticed by the Mayor of
Baltimore, namely, a little girl aged eight years, whom I know
to have been afflicted with blindness ever since she was an in-
fant. Sometimes she could see, and sometimes erhe was blind,
until Dr. Williams came to Baltimore, at which time she was
totally blind, but within one hour she was so far restored to
sight, in presence of several clergymen, as to be able to see
every object distinctly; which benefit continues to this day.
All theladies knew (they said) a great many other cases which
they would intorm me of at anytime. I1 therefore must post-


NATIONAL T1HEATRE-W-ASIIINGTON.

Second night of Mss' CLIFTON, the highly celebrated Native
Actress, wlo is engagedd for a fewnights only.
By particular desire, wilb be performed the ROSE OF KER-
RY, being positively the last night it can be performed this
season.
THIS EVENING, DEC. 2
Will be performed Sheridan Knowles' play of the
HUNCHBACK.
Julia, -: Miss CLH.TQN.
STo conclude with (by particular desire) "
THE ROSE OP KERRY".-
Or, fMu order Will T ..*-
Miss CLIFrTOWS third appearance on Thursday ~i alg.
In preparation a new comedy called Snakes in the Grass,
with a strong cast of characters, which will be produced o~i
Thursday evenin-, '
C IVIC AIND MILITAtY BALL.--At a large nd
respectable meting, held at the Masonic Hal on the vwe
ning of the 22d inst. for the purpose of celebratingthe anniver-'
sary of the Battle of ew Orleans, by a Civic and Military Ball,
to be held at the Masonic Hall on the evening ofthe 9th of Jan-
uary, 1837, the following gentlemen were unanimously elected
Managers :


Col. Peter Force,
Capt. J. H. Bradley,
Capt. J. A. Blake,
Capt. J. Bronaugh,
Lieut. T, Lloyd,
Lieut. J. Y. Young,
Lieut W. WH. .Mauro,
-Lieut. J. Ragan,
Lieut, C. Calvert,
Mr. W. Kirkwood,
Mr. G. Hill,
Mr. S. Cunningham,
Mr. N. Callan, Jr.,
dec 28


Capt. ; Manotr*
Capt. J. H. Douglity,
Lieut. R. France.
Lieut. Gk Naylor,
/ Lieut. S.. Mid'dlefo,.
Lieut J. Mills,
Lieut; N. P Ckusin,
Mr. C. F. Lowrey,
MrL. E. Raymond,-
Mr. J. W. Ma.ury-,
Mr. Samuel Mr 1Khteo
. MrW.,W. Berry,
Mri. G. W. Phillipg.


CARUSI'S SALOON.
TrEW YEAR'S COTILLION PARTY.-M. L
I CARUSI respectfully informs his friends, members of
Congress, strangers, and the citizens of the city and- Ditrict,
that his first COTILLION PARTY will take place onMonn
day, the second day of January next, at his Grand Saloon, to
which they are respectfully invited. The saloon and other de-
partments are properly and tastefully ftted up, and every com.-
fort and convenience provided.
j Ladies who have not received their ef:ds invitation,
will please send in their adIdrel it Mr. L.t arus'i
IT Tickets of admission one dollar; to be had at the fancy
store of Mr. Fischer,.and at the door of the Saloon.,.
dec 24-iftd
SOIREE DE DANSE.--Mr. F. C. LABSEfesptoc-
fully informs the ladies and gentlemenn ofWashington,
Capitol Hill, and Navy Yard, that his second Soiree Da ansa
will take place on Capitol Hill, on Friday, -6th. Fo6 tickets
apply at his dwelling,-or on Capitol Hill. "
Ladies having received invitations for the first Soiree, are-
considereed to e invited for all the season t both paces, and
those wishing to attend will please to give M. '.L. information,
and they shall be attended to. .
N. B. Mr. F. C. L.'s second quarter of insti:iction in,dancing
and waltzing will commence on Monday, the 2Jdof January, on
Capitol Hill, and en Tuesday, the 3d, at his dw61lling.
dec 27-3t
FURNITURE SALE.-By Edward Dyer.-On
Thursday, 29th inst. at 11 o'clock A. M. if fair, I shlil .elH
in front o the auction store, a variety of Household Furniture,
such as
Sideboards, Mahogany dining and breakfast ables
Handsome Card Tables, Breaus, B'edsteads,Feather Beds
Handsome Rush seat and Windsor Chairs
Spring seat Sofa, very superior'
Handsome maple French post Bedstead
1 new Carpet
Maple Workstand, Washstand,. Clothes Pressen:
Crockery, China, and Glassware '
With many other articles
Rotary, Cooking, arid other Stoves, Grates, & ;c.
dec 28-2t EDW. DYER, Auctioneer.
Tr 0 GROCER S-Peremptory Sale.-On Friday,
30th instant, at 12 o'clock M. 1 shall sell, at the ware-
house, corner of C and 10th streets, without reserve-
9 hhds of prime Porto Rico Sugars, 10 bbis do
5 bbls and 1 cask Lamp Oil, Pepper, Teas'
5 qr casks of very pure and superior Champagne Brandy
1 half-pipe superior Teneriffe, & 2 qr casks Sherry Wines
10 qr casks dry Malaga and Marseilles Madeira do
2 parts of pipes old Holland Gin,.'eicellent'
6 boxes St. Julien and Lafitte Claret, basketaChamp. geod
10 baskets best Olive Oil, boxes buteh Rabi nma
50 drums superior fresh Smyrna Figs, &e. &c.
Terms will be very liberal, and every inducement- offered to
purchasers, as the sales of the ahboe must bef-thwith-,Alosed.
dec 28-3t ,I). DY'ER,, Anetbineep,.
MEDICAL BOOKS.--
Dublin Dissector, or Manual'f Anatomy, 1 vol. $2.
Dupuntrcn's Lectures on Clinical Surgery, 1.vol. 33.
Loui s sPathological Researches on Phthisis, I ol$ 2.
SECtOND-HAND BOOKS.
Constantly on sale an increasing stock of Secotid-hand Books,
in the various languages-many rare and valuable. Tlhey will-
be sold low, forcash,or exchanged for others, with a view to
furnish an interesting variety.
School Classics always on hand, at about h'af-jirice-
JAS. RIORDAN,,
Antique Book Store, Penn. Avenue.
ji Wanted, a copy of Cleveland's Mineralogy.
dec 28
W7 OOD.-1,000 or 1,500 cords of Wood for sale, eut or
standing, on the lands of Mr. REDIN, about two-miles'
from the city and town, between the race-ground and Pierce's
mill. Offers can be addressed to him at Georgetown, or made
to the subscriber, his agent, on the land.
RICH'D SOUTHERN.
Wood-cutters and haulers wanted. -Wood fori sale on the
land. r- de. 28-3t
NOTICE IS THEREBY GIVEN to all person hold-
I- ing Certificates of Stock of the Corporation of Waihing-
ton, that the interest on the same, due for the. quarter ending on
the 31st instant, will be paid to the stockholders, on or after the
10th day of January, on application at the Bank of Washington.
Given under my hand this 27th December, 1836.
WM. H EWITT,
dec 28-tJan10 Register.,
TOUGE'S HISTORY OF PAPER MONEY
G AND BANKING IN THE U. STATES, to-
gether with the Provincial and Continental, with an Inquiry
into the Principles and Effects of the System, the whole intend-
ed as an exposition of the way in which paper money and mo-
ney corporations affect the interest of different portions of the
community. An additional supply of the above (second stereo-
type edition) is just received in a cheap pamphlet fomt and for
sale by F. TAYLOR, who has also for sale, at the lowest prices,
a large collection of the most esteemed works' on Banking,
Currency, Commerce, Statistics, Taxes, &e. &c. and' all other
branches of Political Economy. by Bertham, Say,- McCulloch,
Adam Smith, Cooper, Phillips, Malthus, Raymond, Simpson,
Chalmers, Seybert, Marshall, Taylor, Oddy, Pitkin, &c. Eo.
and many others, at the Waverly Circulating Libraryiinimedi-
ately east of Gadsby's Hotel. de -28
UB7iRUIT, ORNAMENTAL TREES, & SHRUBS,
S For sale at Clairmont Nurseries, near Balti-
more.--The subscriber hereby notifies his.friends and custom-
ers in the City of Washington, and others :that he has a large
stock of the above articles, covering alout twenty acres, of fine
thrifty plants of proper size for transplanting, carefully raised,
and the fruit trees correctly grafted under his immediate super-
intendence, consisting of the.new and most valuable varieties of
'apple, pear, plum, cherry, peach, nectarine, apricot, grape,
quince, gooseberry, currant, raspberry, strawberry, figs, filberts,
;and English walnut; European and'American Linden, Chinese
i Lilanthus, English, Scotch, ancdDutch elm, abeal ar 8i!ver-leaved
'oplar, horse chestnut, catalpa, yellow locust, European and
; knerican larch, Weymouth pine, balsam fir, balim of gifted, or
Silver fir, garden and East India roses, a very extensive assort-
ment, of best shade and colors, and the same as to double lahh-
as. My stock of other shrubs, vines, creepers, and sTeculent
'oots is full, and good sized plants; all whicb will be sksod 0'
ery moderate terms. For- very many articles and prices, see
printed catalogues, to be had gratis of his agents, G. S. -FAR-
'UHAR, Druggist, City of Washington, and G. FAwiYrAR, Alex-
andria. ROBT. SINCLAIR.
P. S. One hundred thousand trees now ready to dig, of mo-
'us multicaulis and white Italian mulberry, and cuttings tf
'the former, which are from two to six feet higbhrwill be soa at
moderate prices by the 100 or 1,000. R S.
oct 27--l1awwif -


INES.-Splendid Madeira, Sherry, aiad Pprt.
The subscribers beg leave to notify members of Con-
gress and others, that they have 'on hand, remaining fr rm the-
sale on the instant, a few of the splendid wines'then offered,
and have since received, of same importations, an additional lot
of other sorts, which they were then unable to supply thede-
mand for; all of which will be disposed of at very low prices.
Among them are splendid old East India Maderias: Sherrys, and
Ports, which they hesitate not, to say cannot be surpassed in
quality. -












to,. -. .... .ontinuedfrom thf first pge.)
jilitirty-one previous years which had elapsed after the Mint went
2:nut operation. The amount coined during the past twelve
itnintlis alo'ie' itl atertthan that during the whole of the first
AixteaI i~t er its establishment.
aL portant and gratifying consequence, which has re-
suitea principally from the present policy and system as to the
cearrenl y, has been, that of all tke gold coltd before August,
1S34, amw i-,ti to about $12,00t000, prob'bly9 not $1,000,000
h(in.Eemained:in the country, andof that sitall amount only a
wvery iimiantire portion was in active circulation. Indeed, be-
fore 1834, our coinage of gold was of little 'benefit except to
'purify and prepare the bullion Sfr exportation, a'nd for the use
f foreign mints. Bat the great mass o~fnear $10,000,000,
since coined, undoubtedlyarwmains in the country, and an in-
*creased mndi4nreasingsportion of it is in act 'e and convenient
-ciraculion. so promote this desirable end,-alarger proportion
.than usual Of quarter eagles has been recently struck; and the
whole number of .gold pieces, of every kind, .made since the
beginning of the present year, is about $1,000,000, and almost
equals the tire numberecoined during the whole forty years
previous totihe new coinage. The change in the amount of
Sspecie 'of'all kinds, in the country, during the last three years,
is'highly gratifying as an earnest of a more solid basis to a pa
per circulation, already'too large in proportion, and as a securi-
ty, not only to those classes who are most safe in the employ-
ment of a metallic currency for all common purposes, but to the
-baBnckm.institutions'themselves in periods of panic and unfavo-
rablo balances in foreign trade.
The whole specie in the country in October, 1833, when the
public deposits were removed from the United- States Ba'k,
dlidnot probably exceed thirty millions, and the portions of this
in. banks is'not supposed to have exceeded twenty-six millions ;
S:'While 'now the whole specie in the country probably exceeds
seventy-three ihillions, and of that the portion in banks is be-
lieved to be over forty-five millions, leaving twenty-eight mil-
"iJRns in active circulation.
The p er circulation within the above period has also beefi
greatly and unfortunately enlarged.
Prom about eighty millions, which was then the supposed
aggregate, after deducting the large amount of twenty millions
for potes held in different banks, it has probably risen, and
chiefly within eighteen months past, to about one hundred and
twenty millions. But this increase, though great, it will be
isen, is not halfpo great a relative increase as has taken place
in the whole specie in the country, nor quite as great as has
happened in the specie of the hanks alone.
Computing that the paper in active circulation in the United
States has generally averaged about two to one of specie on hand
Sin the banks, and was, in October, 1833, about three to one, or
near fifty per cent. over the usual proportion, the comparative
amounts of specie at the several returns from 1833 to 1836 pre-
seated a very favorable change; had become greater than the
usual proportion, and even now, in all the banks, taken as a
whole, are somewhat improved since 1833. But they have
imch deteriorated the last year and a half. Again, while the
"whole amount, as well as proportion of specie in the country, is
"inuch greater than it was two years ago, and the proportion is
ample for the paper circulation in several ofthe banks and States,
yet it is manifest that many institutions in other States have oft
late departed more widely from the proper and safe proportions'
than their peculiar location or advantages for business, however
Sfavorable, light warrant on sound banking principles.
As some illustration of the general changes on those points
since 1833, the following brief exhibit, in round numbers, and in
a' tabular form, prepared partly from actual returns and partly
from estimates, may be useful .

Ditt. Paper in act- Specie in act- Specie in
ive circulation. ive circulation. banks.

Near Oct. 1833 $80,000,000 $4,000,000 $25,000,000
an. 1, 1834 76,000,000 12,000,000 27,000,000
Jan. 1, 1835 82,000,000 18,000,000 43,000,000
Janm.1, 1836 108,000,000 23,000,000 40,000,000
'WDe. 1, 1836 120,000,000 28,000,000 45,000,000

"At 'il these periods, except the 1st :of January last, twenty
millioae -of paper have been computed as issued, but not in ac-
tive circulation among the People, being held by other banks,
and eso-far considered as equivalent to a deduction of a like,
Amount from'their own'circulation, liableto be redeemed in spe-
cie. On the 1st of January last the amount so held was about
thirty-two millions, and in July last the active paper circulation
was also probably some millions larger than it now is. This ex-
h-ibit makes-the whole active circulation, of both paper and spe-
cie, about $6 50 per head of our whole estimated population in
October, 1833; about $6 50 in January, 1834; about $7 in Ja-
nuary, 1835; about $8 50 in January, 1836; and near $10 at
he present time.- "Though this is a less proportion of the circu-
lating 'medium than is now usual in the countries of Europe
which are most commercial, and where spen'ieis more used
than bills, yet it is a larger ratio than has ever been supposed to
be necessary in the United States, considering the character
of two or three millions of our Southern population.
The-average here has usually been about $6 per head; nor
:Ai the am unt 'eer, before 1811, been supposed much to ex-
ceed $5; ai at no time since, has exceeded about $7 per head,
except under the excessive paper issues towards the close of
the late war, by which, m 1816, it was estimated to have reach-
ed.$11 per head.
: Whilb our country hasi of late years, become more commer-
irial and wealthy, and has a larger portion of specie in use,
'which circumstances would somewhat increase the necessary
and proper atnount of circulation per head, it has, as counteract-
ing causes to these, greatly increased in the .ease and quickness
'fefdmmaunication,' whether by mailer otherwise, and in the use
of bills of. exchange, and drafts instead of money 'for distant'
Operations.
Hence our circulaition',during the past twelve months, at$8 50
a.nd $10 per head, is deemed excessive, and, as in 1816, one
great cause of Ihe exorbitant prices which have prevailed in re-
.' lationi to almost every article, as well as of the extraordinary
p: ropensity to overtrading and speculation which has pervaded
a,,.almost, 'every section of the country. It is true that, during a
few months past, the paper'proportion of our circulation has, as
before suggested, been considerably reduced; but till that, with
'our present large amount of specie in circulation added, falls as
a low as -abdut 87-perfhead; dr the bank notes to about $80,000,000,
4 instead of $120,000,000, the currency may be considered as too
redundant, and in an unnatural and inflated condition.
The credit system has not only undergone an unnsaal ex-
pari'inn among individuals and States, but it has, by means of
these inordinate paper-issues, penetrated more deeply than is
sa fe into the' whole currency of the country, and rendered that
which, as money, is and should be deemed the substitute or an-
tagonist of credit, dependent too much on credit itself, and sub-
ject to many of the dangers and fluctuations in value insepara-
ble from 'mere credit, rather than possessing the intrinsic and


uniform value attached to specie.
.This condition is believed to have been produced chiefly by
numerous incorporations of new banks, without suitable legal:
restrictions, in many States, on either the amount of discounts
or the paper issued, in proportion to the specie on hand, and by
lhe excessive demands 4r money thus tempted and stimulated
to aid an unusual number of extravagant adventurers in lands,
stocks, andtrade.
These, acting together, and in some degree influencing and
-exciting each other, have induced many banks to hazard un-
reasonable and indiscreet issues, as well as loans, to supply the
wants of such ant extraordinary crisis, and which there is good
reason to believe howeverr large a proportion of specie fortu-
-ately exists in the country, and which may tend sooner to avert
o'e usual evil consequences from the above state of things) will
i.prvdiee. much distress, embarrassment, and ruin, before this
S ispie can be duly equalized, the excesses of paper sufficiently
curtailed, and the exorbitant discounts gradually lessened to
-4heir safe and-proper limits.
'This increase of about forty millions, or one-third of the pa-
per circulation, in a yet'and a half, is a sudden and great fluctu-
tion, which 'ever could occur in a currency entirely metallic,
and whichwowild probablyduriing the past year, as in 1811, have
been much greater, had not the larger proportion of specie now
in the country, and the increasing disuse of small bills, operated
Strongly as prevehtive checks.
B ut even now, the excess has been sufficient to constitute the
chief cause for the artificial augmentation in prices-an unnatu-jt
ral stimulus to speculation, and-a rapid vacillation in the regular
modes of doing business, which cannot, under sound views of
Spolitical-etonomy, be too greatly deprecated, or their recurrence
toA carefully guarded against.
These sudden and great vibrations in the value of property,
labor, and debts, howeverpr6duced, or however flattering to
Many it first, are in the enddangerous to all classes, as well as
Suinous to commerce ande every species of regular industry.
But should paper issues, according to anticipation, continue to
e reduced, as during the four months past, by the natural and
:iaservative reaction ofcommer~iidlcauses, athome and abroad,
*id by the general wise and increasing discontinuance of the
.use small bank notes, through State legislation, and provisions
.of a similar character and tendeune by Congress, as at the last
session, In the general appropriation act, and in the deposit law,
and by the diminished receipt of all bank notes, the last few
months, atthe different land offices for the sales of the public
domain, a sounder-and a less artificial trtte of things will ere
-' long return.
the prospect on thesltAject of the currency is, therefore, on
ire whole, becoming more satisfactory, even without further
legislation. But if all the States would unite in repressing en-,
tirely the circulation ofBimallnotes, and in rigidly restricting all
paper issues, so as not in any case to exceed three to one of spe-
ie on hand, which would be about two of paper in active circu-
lation to eae :of specie on hand, and would add a few judicious


and it is believed that the interest now paid by borrowers
would, by these changes, become, at an early day, sensibly re-
duced, But, without the most careful and rigid restrictions,
such a tritasure in this country, whatever may have been its
operations elsewhere, would, under our different institutions
and habits, probably increase rather than diminish any existing
evils in the currency,
It is conceded that these disproportionate issues by banking
institutions are in fact much more frequent in regions where the
number of banks is small than where it is large, provided their
dharters be similar in omitting prudent limitations because, in
the former case, there is less vigilance, caution, and correction,
produced by thq jealousies and interests of rival institutions, to
prevent excessive issues, and irregular and dangerous discounts.
But the tendency to excessive trading, excessive credits and
rash enterprises is so strong, and sometimes ungovernable in
individuals, and in some respects equally or more so in corpora-
tions, as to endanger the stability of both banks and business, un-
less the power to manufacture paper is carefully restricted and
wisely regiiated, The,present amount of bank capital, as well
as its increase for some years past, is another kindred topic of
some interest.
But space does not exist on this occasion for its full exposition,
and at the same time it is not very alarming, except where it
has been authnriled without proper limitation on paper issues,
and without other prtident bank restrictions.
The whole bank capital in active operation is computed to
have been over $200,000,000 in 1833-4; $231,000,000 in 1834-5;
$250,000)000 in 1835-6; and near $50)000,000 more has been au-
thorized, m ost of which is supposed not yet to be in full opera-
tion.
More facts Will be exhibited on these points, and particularly
on the amount of bank capital in each State, in a special report
soon tp be presented from the Department It Congress, concern-
ing the detailed condition of the State banks near the 1st of
'January) 1836-
Had it not been for the large sales of American stocks abroad,
and the very high prices given there for our principal staples, a
demand for specie, for export, would doubtless have arisen ere
this from our evertrading, and have greatly enhanced the pre-
sent difficulties which some of the banks now experience, chief-
ly from the great excess of paper in circulation. The compa-
rative value of specie being reduced by such excesses, the evil
would have been still more aggravated if those excesses had
not become somewhat diminished, and specie had not become
in greater demand here, in consequence of the circular as to
the kind of money receivable for the public lands, issued, by di-
rection of the President, in July last. This demand has con-
tributed to retain and diffuse it wider, and to make its great
and early export less probable than it otherwise would have
been. The other objects of that circular were gradually to
Spring back the practice in those payments, to what was deemed
to be the true spirit as well as letter four existing laws, and to
what the safety of the public money in the deposit banks and
the desirable improvement"bfour currency seemed at that time
to unite in rendering judicious. The reasons more in detail for
themeasure are contained in the document itself, of which a
copy is annexed, (G.) Our moneyed operations have also been
somewhat affected by a few difficulties abroad in the nation,
with which our commercial intercourse is greatest, and whose
monetary system of late years, often beating with a pulse like
Sour own, is underinfluences nearly corresponding.
Since 1833, the paper circulation in England is s-appos d to
have increased over sixteen millions of dollars, while the specie
possessed by the banks has diminished over twventy-three mil-
lions. The whole circulation of private banks, joint-stock banks,
and the Bank of England, is now probably about one hundred
and fifty-two millions of paper to less than twenty-six millions
of specie on hand; whereas, in 1833, it was only about one hun-
dred and thirty-seven millions to fifty millions of specie, or now
from five and six to one, but then only two and three to one:
consequently, an alarm and pressure have arisen there, which
are operating unfavorably here, though they have arisen not so
much from an excessive amount of both the paper and specie
currency united, as 'from the greatly increased disproportion,
being quite dodit, between the amount of paper issues to the
specie on hand by all the banks.
What port-ion of their paper was or is now held by each other,
Sis not known'; but, as the bills of the Bank of England are a
tender byall the private and joint-stock banks, the amount is
probably large.
Their banking system as a whole, with every supposed bene-
fit to be derived from a national bank, is believed to be under
much more defective regulations as to excessive issues, exces-
sive discounts, and secrecy of condition and proceedings, than
is our own in most of the States of the Union. Indeed, so un-
satisfactory has been its operations, that they have recently be-
come tho subject of parliamentary inquiry, which it is proposed
to resume and push much further at a subsequent session.
VIII.--LAND OFFICE.
Immediately after the passage'of the law at the last session,
reorganizing the General Land Office,som doubts arose whether
it still remained attached to the Treasury Department, and the
opinion of the Attorney General was taken on the question. In
consequence of his opinion, that the supervision over its con-
cerns remained here, and of the direction of the President of
the United Stdtes, under whose control that law now places all
the affairs of'the General Land Office, steps were taken by me
to carry it into immediate effect. The result thus far has been
a sensible diminution in the pressure of the business of that of-
fice, a better system of supervision and despatch for most of it,
and much less delay in completing titles to the public domain.
Should the sales not continue very large during a few ensuing
years, it is believed that the whole arrearages of business can
be disposed of, and the promptitude in all its future operations
secured; which is so immediately important to the great West-
ern and Southwestern sections of the country, and more or less
beneficial to all, as well as creditable to the administration of the
Government.
The report 'of the Commissioner will speedily be laid before
Congress in av'eparate communication, and contains many sug-
gestions which seem to deserve careful attention.
IX.--MISCELLA NEOUS.
Great iicotiveniences have been sustained in many parts of the
country by-an omission to repeal or modify the provisoes in the
tariff act of 1832. A detailed report on this subject has once
been submitted by this Department; and the interests of the
community connected with the articles of hardware affected by
these provisoes, and convenience in the execution of the reve-
nue laws, appear to require the earliest attention of Congress to
the subject.
The revision of the presentsystem of compensation to custom-
house officers, with'the various changes in our collection laws
heretofore recommended in connexion with that revision, is
deemed very important to'the meirciintile community as well as
;to the Treasury:; and, at the same time, to the just and ratable
compensation for arduous and responsible duties to many collec-
tors and other officers Who are now inadequately paid, while
some receive an amount disproportioned to 'their situation and
labors.
In connexion with'this subject, and in addition to former re-
commendations to Congress, as well'as the valuable report on
the safety ofsteam-boilers, submitted by me at the last session
from the Franklin'Institute, it seems proper to urge earnestly


for consideration the necessity for some provision for the more
careful management of steamboats navigated under papers from
the custom-houss--subjecting their commanders, and, in suita-
ble cases, their owners, to the forfeiture of their papers, and
other severe penalties, in cases of carelessness or neglect, de-
structive to property or life.
The security of the public money would be promoted in many
cases by requirthg bonds from district attorneys, through the
hands of some of whom large sums pass ih collections, without
any collateral obligation being given for the indemnity of the
United States, as required in most analogous cases of public
officers.
The act in respect to insolvent debtors, the execution of which
is placed in the charge of this hepartmerit, expires in June next,
and the propriety of the further continuance of its provisions is
suggested to Congress.
The first four instalments due uhder'the French treaty have
been paid in Paris since my last annual report. The sum claim-
ed by our agent, and by this Department, exceeds that paid by
the French Government in the amount of more than a million of
francs: and the difference is now the subject of correspondence
and negotiation.
What was actually paid has been remitted-to this country in
gold, and divided among the claimants. From the rates of ex-
change and pti0e of gold, it was deemed most advantageous to
the claimants to have it sent home in that form, though a direc-
tion was subsequently given to substitute bills of exchange or:
other modes of remittance, if more profitable, but whi'h the
agent did not find it expedientor beneficial todo.
The third installment of the Neapolitan treaty, and the first
payments due on the inscriptions, under the treaty of indem-
nity with Spain, have als; been since discharged with punctu-'
a'ity, and remitted here in a similar manner, under similar in-
structions.
Various other topics suggested in the last two annual reports
to the consideration of Congress, and not yet finally legislated
on, the Department would earnestly, but respectfully, present:
again to its attrition. Among them may be more particularly
mentioned'thb reorganization of this Department, and the change
in the commer.cement of the fiscal year and of the annual appro-
priations.
Several diher subjects 'have received proper attention, which
are connected with the official duties of the Treasury, or have
been specially devolved on its charge, such as the repairs of the
bridge across the Potomac; the survey of the coast; and thee
maanfacture of weights and measures, not only foa the differ-
ent custom-houses, but for each State in the Union; the appro-
priate sites for new marine hospitals'; the practices pursued in
other countries s sto the tratmsportation of their pbor'citizens hi-
ther, who have been burdensome for their maintenance:; a di-
get of the rdtubrns and condition of State banks, near Janaary, 1


O TaOTICE.-WaahingtMi Branch
L.' Railroad.-On and after Monday
next, the 17th instant, the cars for Baltimore
will leave the Depot in this City, until fur-
ther noticed at the following hours, viz. 9J
A. M. and 5 P. M. oct 12
NOTICE TO WESTERN TRAVELLERS.
All seats taken at the office next door
--g_ L to Gadsby's Hotel have a preference over
Pa all other passengers to Wheeling or Pitts-
MI sfbtburg. All passengers from the West,
W coming across in the mail coach from
Frederick to Washington, will have the preference over all
others going South. JAMES FOSSETT,
dec 20-1m Agent.
MA FALLARRANGEMENT FOR NOR-
SFOLK.-The Steamer COLUMBIA, James
Mitchell, Master, will, for the remainder of the season, make
but one trip a week. The Columbia will leave Washington on
Wednesday, the 19th inst., at 10 o'clock in the morning, and
will continue to do so the remainder of the season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at half past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of wood and provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15-dtf
MAIL ARRANGEMENT.-Washington City.
The Eastern Express Mail is closed at 10 minutes
before 6 P. M. and arrives at 5 P. M.
The Southern Express Mail is closed at 2, and arrives at
half-past 2 P. M.
The Eastern, Southern, and Western Ordinary Mails
are closed at 9 P. M. and arrive in the night. The letters w,:' *
be ready for delivery at 8 in the morning.
The Annapolis Mail is closed on Sunday, Tuesrday, and
Thursday, at 9 P. M. and arrives on Tuesday, Th',rsday, and
Saturday at 3 P. M.
The Warrenton and Winchester Way Mfrils are closed on
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 9 P. M. and arrive on
Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday at 4 P,.Il.
The Winchester Mail is sent and received daily; via Balti-
more.
The Leesburg Mail is closed on Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday at 9 P. M. and arrives on Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, in the night.
The Port Tobacco l ail is closed on Sunday and Wednesday
at 9 P. M. and arrive's on Wednesday and Saturday at 6 P. M.
The Brookeville Mail is closed on Thursday at 9 P. M. and
arrives on Sunay at 6 P. M.
dec 17-d;iw WM. JONES, P. M.
R OP#GER'S CUTLERY.-The Subscriber has re-
ceived, per ship Alexandria, and direct from the manu-
factory of the celebrated cutlers, J. Rodgers & Sons, Ivory, Stag,
Buck, and Cocoa handled Knives and Forks, in sets of 51 and
55 pieces. Also,
Buck and Ivory Knives and Forks by the dozen
Razors, Plated Forks
Britannia Tea and Table Spoons
With a few sets of Dixon & Son s Britannia Ware, of the lat-
est and most fashionable patterns.
Which are offered at a small advance by
EDW. S. WRIGHT,
dec 19-lw High st. Georgetown.
NEW BACON, HOG'S LARD, SUGAR, &c.-I
have received, and am receiving from the Western
country and the Eastern States, large supplies of the following
articles, viz.
10,000 pounds of New Bacon, Hog round
100 kegs new (family) Lard, No. 1. '
The bacon and lard are the handsomest articles in the
provision order ever offered for sale in this market.
20,000 pounds of Havana Sugars, in bags containing from 50
to 75 lbs. at 8 -0 per 100lbs. Families will now be
able to lay in their sugars lower than they have for
several years.
60 bags Coffee at low price
Come, oh come, do come to the cheap shop, No. 110 Water
street, Georgetown, D. C. and apply to
J. N. FEARSON.
P. S. Jackson City House for rent, in Georgetown, at $100
per annunf. Apply to J. N. F.
dec 19-6t
SOLLECTOR'S SALE.-Will be sold at public auc-
tion on Saturday, the 31st day of December next, the
following articles of furniture :
5 Feather Beds, 1 Bolster, and 1 Pillow
5 Mattresses
3 Bedsteads
2 Sideboards
1 Sofa, and 1 eight-day Clock.
Levied on as the property of A.Fuller,and willbe sold to satisfy
taxes due the Corporation of Washington. Sale to take place
in front of Edward Dyer's auction rooms, on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, at 12 o'clock M. W. W. BILLING,
dec 21-dts Collector 1st and 2d Waf'e.
T OTICE.-The books and accounts of the late firm o
L, DESAUQUE & HUBER having been left in my charge,
with authority to collect all balances, all persons indebted tothe
said firm, spon open accounts or otherwise, are requested to call
at my office and adjust and settle them.
dec 17-dlw JOS. H. BRADLEY, Attorney.
CASH FOR 400 NEGROES, including bothsexes,
from twelve to twenty-five years of age. Persons having
servants to dispose of will find it to their interest to give me a
call, as I will give higher prices, in cash, than any other pur-
chaser who is now in this market.
I can at all times be found atthe MECHANICS' HALL, Bow
kept by B. O. Sheckle, anV formerly kept by Isaac Beers on
Seventh street, a few doors below Lloyd's Tavern, opposite the
Centre market. All communications promptly attended to.
JAMES H. BIRCH,
nov 7- dtf Washington City.
^ ROSSBURG FOR RENT.-ThisTavern and
Farm, situated 8 miles from Washington, on the
.LIrH Washington and Baltimore turnpike road, will be rent-
ed to a good tenant on accommodating terms. The tavern and
farm will be rerqted together, or the tavern alone, if the tenant
should prefer it. The house is already furnished, and possession
will be given on the 1st of January next.
GEORGE CALVERT,
dec 2-dtf Near Bladensburg.
VALUABLE FARMS AT PRIVATE SALE.--
S The subscriber will sell at private sale all or any portion
of the real estate left by Thomas Cramphin, deceased, remain-
ing unsold at this time, consisting of the late residence of said
Cramphin, and other lands adjoining, together with two or
three very valuable Farms on Rock creek.


The Dwelling-house Farm is situated about eleven miles
from Wishington, on the Washington and Rockville turnpike
road, and contains 375J acres of land, a large portion of which
is in wood. The improvements consist of a brick dwelling-
house nearly new, with all the necessary out-buildings.
The Rock creek Farm, situated six miles from Georgetown
immediately on the Georgetown and Rockville turnpike road,
is one of the most valuable and desirable farms in the county,
being composed of a large portion of the finest timber and mea-
dow land. The improvements consist of a commodious frame
dwelling-house, and all the necessary out-houses. -
These lands have been recently surveyed, and laid off into
farms of from 200 to 400 acres; but should it be found advanta-
geous for the disposal of them, they will be subdivided to suit
purchasers. Any communications addressed to the subscriber,
at Bladcnsburg, or left at the National Hotel, Washington, will
be promptly attended to. GEORGE CALVERT,
dec 21-dtf Trustee.
LOTS AND CASSIMERES.-We are to-day
opening-
50 pieces Ladies' Cloak Cloths, very cheap
20 do figured and plain Satins
30 do heavy black and blue black Silks
100 do Irish Linens, superior and very cheap
70 do blue and black Cloths, for gentlemen's cloaks
65 do Cassimere ribbed, plaid, and plain
150 do gentlemen's Silk Handkerchiefs
BRADLEY & CATLETT.
dec 13-eo3w [Glo&Tel]
RADLEY & CATLETT will have clothes made up
at the shortest notice, by experienced tailors, and in the
best manner, at a low price. Their stock of Cloths and Cassi-
meres at this times very large and complete.
dec 13-3aw3w (G1. & Tel.) BRADLEY & CATLETT.
District of Columbia, County of Alexandria, set.
IN CHANCERY-OCTOBER TERM, 1836.
Robert I. Taylor et al. (Trustees)-Complts. "
vs.
Bank of Alexandria et al. Defendants.
O N the Complainants' motion, their bill is now taken for
S confessed, and set for decree as to the Defendants, on
whom process has been served; and the common order of pub-
lication is granted them against the other Defendants. And,-on
the motion of'the Complainants, it is here by the Court order-
ed that Master Commissioner Auld do take an amount of all
the outstanding debts due from the late Mechanics' Bank of Al-
exandria, entitled to -payment out of the trust estate conveyed
to the Complainants by the said Bank, and of the assets which
have been received, or ought to have bien received, by the
Complainants under the said conveyance in trust; and that he
report to Court the dividend the said assets will allow the cred-


P KINCHY, Confectioner, thankful for past favors
informs the ladies and gentlemen of Washington that he
continues at his old stand, where he has just received a large
assortment of French Bon Bons, and other confectionery.
Paper-shelled, Soft-shelled, and Shelled Almonds
Bunch Muscatel Raisins, in whole, half, and quarter boxes
Bordeaux Prunes, in fancy and other boxes
Malaga Grapes, in kegs and jars
Sultana Raisins, Currants, &c.
FOREIGN FRUITS IN SIRUP.
Canton Ginger, Chow Chow, Pineapple, Prunes, Limes,
Apricots, Chinios, &c.
DRIED FRUITS.
Apricots, Cherries, Prunes, Chinios, Canton Ginger, Guava,
Currant, and Quince Jellies
Brandy Fruits, assorted
CORDIALS.
Mareschino de Zara, Curracoa, Absinthe, &ce
LONDON SAUCES.
Cavice, Reading, Anchovy, John Bull Sauce, &c.
French Chocolate, French Mustard, Sweet Oil
English, French, and Domestic Pickles
Rose and Orange Flower Water
SIRUPS.
Lemon, Capilaire, Pineapple, Raspberry, &c.
ALSO;
A handsome assortment of French Sugar Ornaments, Fan-
cy Boxes, Toys, Dolls, &c.
Italian Vermicelli, Maccaroni, Oranges, Lemons, Citron,
Dates, Cranberries, Nuts, and other articles, in his line
of business.
Ice-Cream, Jellies, Blanc Mange, Fromage Bavorous,
Charlotte Russe, Pyrainids, &c., made to order.
All orders for Balls, Dinner Parties, &c. will be thankfully
received and punctually attended to, at the shortest notice.
dec 20-3taw2w
JUVENILE BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS.--The
Christmas Box, Parley's Library, Youth's Book of Seasons;
View of the World, Missionary Voyages, Premium, Carpenter's
Family, Domesticated Animals, Boy's Every-day Book, Child's
i3ook of Indians, Boy's Week-day Book, Little Child's Book,
S wiss Robinson, The Rustic, Sadoc and Miriam, Robinson Cru-
so e, Home, Stories of Gen. Warren, Mother at Home, Ornl-
th ology, Book of Common Things, Young Florist, Parley's Life
of Washington, Parley's Life of Franklin, Parley's Book of
Poe try, Juvenile Poems, Parley's Picture Book, Barbauld's
Lessons, Leading Strings, Children's Friend, Atlantic Tales,
Mamma's Lessons, Adventures of Paul Pry, The Value of Time,
The Value of Money, Sanford and Merton, Stories Worth Tell-
ing, Familiar Tales, Adelaide, Daughter of-a Genius, Nina of
Iceland, Poetry without Fi6tior, Original Poems, Juvenile Plu-
tarc;h, Elements of Moraiif3,, Trimimer's History of England,
The; Beloved Sister, The Pareift's Assistant, The Young Cadet,
Stories from Scripture, Infantifte Stories, Conversations on Mas-
sachusetts, Godfrey Hall, The Young Naturalist, First Settlers
of New England, Edgeworth's Lessons, Harrietand Lucy, Rosa-
mi and, Life of Linnaus, The Story Teller, The Officer's Widow,
E evening Hours, Lights of Education, Tales for Ellen, Nursery
F ables, Boy's Own Book, American Girl's Book, Northern Re-
g ions, Belzoni in Egypt, &c. together with the largest assort-
n ient of colored Toy Books ever offered in this city.
For sale at the School Book and Juvenile Repository, No. 5,
Varnum's Row, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 9th and 10th
s trees. I. FARNHAM.
dec 22--lw
STOCK OF THE BANK OF WASHINGTON.
SA small lot of this stock, in charge of the subsciber, for
s ale. Also, a few eligible building lots in the city of Washing-
t on. Inquire of D. A. HALL,
dec 24-3t Pennsylvania Avenue.
A CARD.-Purchasers of Stationery for the public offices,
and the citizens generally, are respectfully invited to visit
' stationers' Hall, and examine the qualities and very low prices
( ,f the extensive assortment of articles in this line, for sale there.
i samples will, on the application of heads of offices, be sent there-
t o for inspection, and purchases will be delivered without any
t rouble to the messengers. A strict uniformity of dealing is ob-
s .erved, and all orders will be promptly executed.
dec 1-d4w (Tel) W. FISCHER.
B BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Christ-
S nias and New Year's Presents, consisting, in
I art, of Annuals, Albums, Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
r Lnd keys, Ladies' Work Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
r shed and unfurnished, richly inlaid with pearl and ivory,
f rom $1 to $30 each; splendid Card and Needle Boxes, of
p .earl, ivory, and shell, beautifully inlaid, from $2 to $10 each;
4 .old and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
S0 cents to $12 each ; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps;
Pkarabesque (new) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
v variety of new Games; Dissected Monuments, &c. neatly put
u p; Writing and Travellirig Desks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Dressing Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands)
sl Alendid China Figures for centre tables ; Toilet Boxes; China
ai~d Bronte ~ Inkstands; Ladies' and Gentlemen's Pocket
B ooks; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets; Silk and Bead Purses;
B ouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets; Sil-
v er Instruments Pearl and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
fc elders ; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes; Chessmen;
B .ackgammon Boards; Battledores ; Damaskf Tinted, and Em-
b ossed Note Paper Pe'rfu'naery of every description ; Ladies'
a ad Gentlemen's Penknives and Scissors ; with many other
E 'ancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at: fair prices at Stationers' Hall;
dec 24 W. FISCHER.
A NNUALiS.-GARRET ANDERSON has on hand all
.< tU the Annuals, London and American, yet published, which
h e will sell as cheap as any person in theo city.
Persons wishing to make splencid presents, are particularly
requested to examine them before purchasing elsewhere, at
P. Thompson's old stand, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 11th
an.d 12th streets, dec 23--3t
Fr IHE SUB3SCRIBER begs leave to inform his friends
-. and the Public generally, that he has removed his store
from Washington to Georgetown, on High street, in the store
lately occupied by his brother, where he has on hand and ini-
tends keeping a coristant supply of GROCERIES of the best
quality. Also, every description of country produce, best Fami-
ly Flour, &c. He particularly invites his friends in Washing-
ton to call and see him, as they will meet with prompt atten-
tion and good bargains, All gdddo delivered in Washingt8ii dr
'Georgetown, free of charge.
dec 22--6t (Met.) GEORGE LIPSCOMB.
Ir RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of a deed of triist
from Benjamin HiIm~ts, dated January 5, 1832, and duly
recorded in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of the
IDistrict of Columbia for the county of Washington, I will offer
at public sale, fdr cash, at 12 o'clock M;, on Saturday, the 21st
of January next, at the printing dofice of said Homans, iri th'e
city of Washington, several printing presses, a standing press,
and a quantity of type arid type cases, it particularly described
in said deed. The terms of sale to be timplied with before the


removal of the property; and, if not complied with in three
days, the property will be resold at auction for cash, after three
days advertisement, at the risk and cost of the former purchas-
er. J; t. STULL,
dec 21-ts Trustee.
AGENCY AT WASHINGTON.-JAMES H;CAUS-.
TEN, (late ofBaltimore,}having made this city his perma-
nentresidence,and located his dwellingand office directlyopposite
to the Department of State, will undertake, with his accustomed
zeal and diligence, the settlement of claims generally; and
more particularly claims before Congress, against the United
States, or the several Departments thereof, and before any board
of commissioners that may be raised for the adjustment of spo-
liation or other claims. He has now in charge the entire class
arising out of French spoliations prior to the year 1800;
with reference to which, inaddition to a mass of documents and
proofs in his possession, he has access to those in the archives
of the Government.
Claimants and pensioners on the Navy fund, &c. bounty
lands, return duties, &c. &c. and those requiring life insurance,
can have their Lusiness promptly attended to by letter, (post
paid,) and thus relieve themselves from an expensive and incon-
venient personal attendance.
Having obtained a commission of Notary Public, he is prepar-
ed to furnish legalized copies of any required public documents
or other papers. He has been so long engaged in the duties of
aft agent, that it can only be necessary now to say that economy
and prompt attention shall be extended to all business confided
to his care; and that, to enable him to render his services and
facilities more efficacious, he has become familiar with all the
forms of office. teb 26--ly
C HILDRIN'S BOOKS.-Several hundred different
kinds, selected from the jnost approved and popular wri-
ters, for youth ; and several thousand Toy Books, of all kinds
and prices.
Paint Boxes, Dissected Maps, Drawing Books,
Juvenile Souvenirs, Chess, gold and silver Pencil Cases,
Penknives, Port Folios, Battledores, Backgammon,
Dominoes, Graces, small sets Ninepins, Accordions,
Pocket Books, Card Cases, Writing Desks, Purses,
And a great variety of goods suitable to the season, for sale
at low prices; together with a large supply of Ornamental Edi-
tions of Books in every department of literature.
F4 TAYLOR,
At the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
dec 24 east of Gadsby's Hotel.
M RItS. TYTIE, from London, begs to acquaint the vi-
I sitters and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with an elegant assortment of the newest and most FASH-
IONABLE MILLINERY. consisting df Bonnets. Head Dress-


NOTICE.

COMMISSARY GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Philadelphia, Dec. 1, 1836.
P ROPOSALS will be received at the office of the Commis-
sary General of Purchases, in Philadelphia, to furnish ma-
terials for making Army Clothing for the year 1837, and for
sundry articles ready made, as hereafter enumerated, viz.
Blue cloth, 6-4 wide, dyed in indigo; and in the wool.
Sky blue kersey, 6-4 wide.
Unbleached cotton shirting, 7-8 wide,
Flannel, of cotton and wool, 7-8 wide
Canton flannel, 3-4 wide.
Unbleached cotton drilling, 3-4 wide.
Do do do 7-8 wide.
Bleached do do 3-4 wide.
Uniform caps for Dragoons.
Do do Artillery and Infantry.
Pompons, white, for Infantry.
Do scarlet, for Artillery.
Hair plumes for Dragoons.
Bands and tassels for Dragoons.
Aiguillettes, (white and yellow.)
Worsted sashes, (crimson and yellow.)
Shoulder straps for Artillery.
Do do Infantry.
Brass do Dragoons.
Epaulettes for non-commissioned Staff, Inf'y and Art'y.
Forage baps for Infantry and Artillery.
Do do Dragoons.
Laced bodtees, pairs.
Leather stocks.
Woollen half stockings;
Woollen blanketsi six and a half feet long, five feet wide,
weight four pounds.
Bunting, (blue, white, and scarlets)
Spades.
Saddle blankets.
Strapping Knapsacks.
Making tents.
Plates and tulips for Drago6on aps.
Do do bugles for Infantry caps.
Plates and X cannon for Artillery caps.
Felling axes.
Hatchets.
Buttons for Artillery, Infantry, Ordnance, and Dragoons,
coat and vest.
Buttons U. S. large and small, yellow and white.
Do for shirts and'suspenders, white metal.
Worsted binding and cord of all kinds, and Prussian lace.
[The quantities and number of these articles will be deter-
mined hereafter.]
Casks and cooperage for one year from 1st of April, 1837.
The whole are to be of domestic manufactured materials.
Patterns of all the required cotton and woollen cloths and arti-
cles are deposited in the Commissary General's office in this
citj; for examination. Samples of any of the woollen and cotton
cloths will be sentto any manufacturer, on application to this office,
(by mail,) and such information in relation to the goods as may
be desired. The Bootees are to be of eight, and the Caps of
five sizes. The sizes and proportions of sizes will be stated in
the contracts. On the samples and patterns exhibited the con-
tracts will be founded and inspections made; and no article will
be received that is inferior in the material or workmanship, or
that does not correspond, in every respect, with the pattern on
which a contract is founded.
The supplies are to be delivered at the United States Arsenal,
near Philadelphia, for inspection, in equal monthly portions, and
the contracts are to be fulfilled on or before the 1st day of
July, 1837.
The proposals must be in writing, sealed and endorsed "Pro-
posals for materials and articles for Army Clothing," and must
reach the office of the Commissary General of Purchases on or
before the 31st day of December, 1836. Security will be re-
quired for the fulfilment of contracts. C. IRVINE,
dec 5-eot31stD Commissary General of Purchases.
DRAWN NUMBERS OF THE
VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For endowing Leesburg Academy, and for other purposes.
Class No. 8-drawn 17th Dec. 1836.
19 26 4 65 30 55 51 56 69 2 63 42

Virginia State Lottery,
For the benefit of the town of Wellsburg.
Class No. 8.
To be drawn on Saturday, 31st Dec.1836, at Alexandria, Va.
75 No. Lottery-13 drawn ballots.
CAPITAL PRIZES.
$30, 000-$10,000.
$6,000-$5,000--$4,000-$2,500-$2,000,
25 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10; halves 5; quarters 2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets, $120
Do do 25 half do 60
Do do 25 quarter do 30
Virginia Monongahela Lottery,
Class No. 1, for 1837,
To be drawn on Saturday, 7th Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
66 No. Lottery-10 drawn ballots.
PRIZES.
$25,000-$7,000,
$4,000-82,500-82,000-8$1,486--25 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $7-Halves $3 50-Quarters $1 75.
Certificates of packages of 22 whole tickets $80.
Do do 22 half do 40
Do do 22 quarter do 20

Virginia State Lottery,
For the benefit of the Mechanical Benevolent Society of Norfolk,
Class No. 1, for 1837.
To be drawn on Saturday, 14th Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
*75 No. Lottery-12 drawn ballots.
SPLENDID SCHEME.
$30,000-$8,000,
$4,000-$3,000-$2,500, and 100 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10, halves 5, quarters 2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do Qo 25 quarter do 32 50
Virginia State Lottery,
For endowing the Leesburg Academy, and for other purposes.
Class No. 1, for 1837.
To be drawn on Saturday, 21st Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
75 No. Lottery-12 drawn ballots.
CAPITAL PRIZES.
$30,000-$10,000,
$6,000-- 3,140--$3,000-$2,500-$2,000.
50 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10-Halves $5-Quarters $2 50.


Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do do 25 quarter do 32 50

For Tickets and Shares or Certificates of Packages in the above
splendid schemes, address
D. S. GREGORY & CO., Managers,
Washington City, D. C.
jr" Orders from a distance by mail promptly attended to,
and the drawings sent as soon as over.
dec 23-2aw2wd&c
F FASHIONABLE MILIANERY AND FANCY
GOODS.-Miss MORLEY, from New York, grateful-
ly acknowledges the liberality of the ladies of Washington last
season, and wishes to inform them that she has arrived again
with a good assortment of Millinery and Fancy Goods, consist-
ing of-
Bonnets, Hats, Caps, Flowers, Ostrich Feathers
Birds of Paradise, of very superior quality
Silk, Satins, Ribands, Blonde Gauze, for evening dresses
Fur Capes, Boa Muffs, &c.
Which will be open this day, for sale, on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, between 9th and 10th streets.
dec 26-eolm
EXTRA ORONOKO TOBACCO-
25 half boxes of this very superior pound lump Tobacco,
tidnutactured by S. S. Myers & Co. Richmond, Virginia. Just
received and for sale by J. MASON, Jr.
dec 24-3t Georgetown.
TORE FOIR EEN T.-The store on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, adjoining James Richey, is for rent. Inquire of Brad-
ley & Catlett, or A. B. WALLER,
dec 26-3t Agent.
SPLENDID JEWELRY & FANCY GOODS.
WM. A. WILLIAMS, second door from Brown's Hotel,
in addition to his former stock Of handsome Jewelry, has just
received from Messrs. Wolfe and Wriggins, of Philadelphia,
the most spleridid assdrtmeilt of Jewelry and Fancy Articles
ever exhibited in the Distritt; consisting of-
Splendid diamond Pins, Pat. diamond do
Sets aqua-marine, pearl and diamond do
Pull sets Silver
Splendid Head-bands of gold, pearl, and silver
Massive gold signet Rings
Diamond, ruby, emerald, and pearl do.
Ornaments for the head of gold, artificial flowers, &c.
Brilliant Combs, Bouquets, Plaques and Buckles of gold,
gold and enamelled, gilt, silver, and pearl
Handsome Glove-tie1
A great variety of gold Chains, Seals ard Keys
Gold pencils, miniature Settings, sleeve Buttons, &c.
t -1A4r. r -1"-+ -_- ,_4. d-


TOCKS t-FRANC1l D)UGENT, Stook Manufacturer,
from Baltimore, respectfully announces to the citizens of
Washington that he has arrived here with a splendid assortment
of Fall and Winter Stocks, of the latest and most approved pat-
terns, and taken lodgings at Mr. Benj. A. Thorn's, Penn-
sylvania Avenue, nearly opposite to Gadsby's Hotel, where he
nmay be found until 11 o clock in the forenoon, and after 3 o'clock
in the afternoon of each day in the week, Sunday excepted,
Mr. D. has on hand, besides the articles mentioned above, a
good assortment of Silk Socks and Gloves, and superior Silk
Pocket Handkerchiefs.
Mr. D. will sell Stocks, warranted of the best materials and
of the latest fashion, wholesale or retail, at prices lowdf than,
they can be had for any where in this city, or in the District of
Columbia. dec 26-3t
M MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, in one volume,
price 75 cents, isjust received, for sale by F. TAYLOR,
by S. W. WILLIAMS, M. D. Professor of Medical Jurispru-
dence, being principally a compendium of the opinions of the
best writers on the subject, with an essay on the importance of
the study of Forensic Medicine. Designed for physicians, law-
yers, jurymen, coroners, &c.
Also, Chitty's Medical Jurisprudence, Beck's Medical Juris-
prudence, together with a large collection of the latest editions
of the best law books, most of which have been purchased at the
lowest prices, at the recent Northern trade sales, and will be
sold invariably at the lowest prices at which they can be pro-
cured either in New York or Philadelphia.
Purchasers are invited to aall and examine for themselves on
this point, before sending their orders to the North, at the Wa-
verly Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's Ho-
tel. dec 2
L AND SCRIP.-For sale-
10,000 acres Land Scrip.
BANK STOCKS.
.Patriotic Bank Stocks.
Bank of Washington loc
Corporation 6 per cent.
C. S. FOWLER & CO.


EW STEEL PENS.--W. FISCHER has just re-
ceived a large lotof New Steel Pens (superior to all others
in use) made by the original and incomparable Manufacturers,
James Perry & Co., London, being the fifth Patent they have
Obtained for their improvement in the Metallic Pens.
THE UNDER SPRING PEN allows of an opening across the
back, which gives additional freedom and elasticity, rendering
it a most pleasant and useful instrument for the general purposes
of writing.
THE SIDE SPRING PEN. The improved flexibility of this Pen
is derived from a side cut above the shoulder, passing the centre
of the back; the increased elasticity thus obtained is natural
and easy, gradually extending from the point upwards. Also,
United States Government Five Slit Pens, and-the Van Buren
Pens. To be had only at Stationers' Hall.
dec 26 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.
NEW MAP OF ILLINOIS, showing the Town-
ships, &c. &c. is just published, and for sale by F. TAY-
IOR, being the latest Map extant, and connected with a Guide
to Emigrants and Settlers," giving information in regard to the
productions, face of the country, public lands, internal improve-
ments, population, geography of the State, &c. &c. Price for
the whole, put up in a portable form for the pocket, 75 cents.
dec 26
6350 BUSHELS of Richmond Grate and Smith's
2 5 Coal, daily expected, and for sale by
B. BRWNER & CO.
Lenox's wharf, near the Long Bridge.
ON HAND.
700 cords dry oak Wood
300 do pine do
40 do hickory do
S 110 tons Anthracite Coal.
dec 22-3t
SUPERIOR INGRAIN CARPETINGS.-Just
received-
1,600 yards best Carpetings, Brussels patterns.
dec 22-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
EW PLACQUES, &c.-Just received atStationers'
SHall, a choice collection of Placques, Buckles, and Berlin
Side Combs. W. FISCHER.
dec 23 [Tel]
A BAG FOUND.-Found on Sunday morning, an Penn-
A sylvania avenue, a Bag, containing several articles. The
owner will please call at Mr. Thomas Lloyd's hotel, where
he can have the same, by describing the articles and paying
for this advertisement. dec 23-3t
ATTEAU TAKEN UP.-A Batteau, or flat-bottom
boat, was taken up a few days ago, floating down tb- 'o-
tomac. It appears to be about 16 feet long, and thf owner
can get it by paying for this advertisement, and giving-l e S
scriber something for his trouble.
SPENCER DULAL Cv',
dec 23-3t_ Near Capt. Howl,
OR SALE.-A first rate Gray Mare, formerly the
perty of Mr. John Balcher, of Georgetown. She
sideredinferior to no animal in the District, either un'
saddle or in harness. She will be sold for less than hei
as I have no use for her this winter. Inquire of
RICHARD FRANCE
dec 22-3t Penn. Avenue, near 13th street
SERMAN TOYS AND BASKETS.-20 cases com)r
C prising a handsome assortment, just received per Bremen
'ship Alexander, from Bremen. For sale by
LAMBERT & McKENZIE,
dec 22-6t Alexandria.
ADEIRA, SHERRY, AND CHAMPAGNE
WINES.-The subscriber has.in store a choice selec-
tion of superior old Madeira and Sherry Wines, ofhis oWn im-
portation, and in order for immediate use, viz.
Old L. P. Madeira, March" brand, in pipes, half pipes, and
quarter casks.
Old L. P. Madeira, of various ages, in boxes of one arit two
dozef bottles each.
Burgundy and Tinta Madeira, do do.
Gold, Brown, and Pale Sherry, in boxes of one and t'wo doz-
ens each, very old and superior; "Romano" and "'Yriarte
brands.
Sparkling Champagne, the most approved and favorite brands
Red Hermitage, very old and fine flavored.
dec 7-3taw4w WALTER SMITH.
W ASHINGTON COFFEE HOUSE.-The Pro-
prietor of the above establishment begs leave to make
known to the travelling Public that he has several vacant rooms
which he will let with or without board; he addresses those
particularly who have business in the Capitol during the ses-
sion. The advantage derived by taking rooms with the under-
signed is that, during the inclement season, they could dine at
his Refectory in the Capitol, where a great variety of articles
may be had at the shortest possible notice.
It is not generally known that there is aRefectory kept in the
Capitol for the accommodation of the Public; it is in the base-
ment story under the Senate, to the left of the west entrance.
Citizens of Alexandria, Georgetown, and vicinity, may be
supplied with refreshments at the above Refectory.
N. B. Families supplied with oysters by the quart, g tkon, or
otherwise, at either of the above establishments.
dec 17-3awlm JOHN PETTIBONE.
UPERIOR STATIONERYs-The subscriber has on
hand from recent purchases-
400 reams best American and English Letter Paper
160 do Cap Paper
100 do Demi and Medium Paper
40 do Folio Post
100 do Envelope Paper
60,000 Quills
10 gross Inks in quart, pint, and half-pint bottles
200 pounds best American and English Sealing Was
100 do Wafers
360 dozen Office Tape
500 cards most approved Steel Pens
20 gross best Lead Pencils
500 pieces India Ink
24 dozen Mouth.Glue
28 do Cut Glass Inks, for office tse
800 pounds of superior Bla-ck Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders
Letter Stamps, Wafer, Pounce, and Sand Boxes
Paper Weights, Rulers
Blotting, Tracing, and Drawing Paper
And every other article in the Stationery line, aH of which
will be sold on better terms than articles of similar quality can
be obtained elsewhere. Orders promptly executed at Station-
ers' Hall. W. FISCHER.
dec 19-3ta4w (Tel) ;-
SUPERIOR PURE WINES.--Fine old Madeira
wine, in pipes, half pipes, and quarter casks, from the


house of Murdock & Co.
SSuperior rich old Port wine, from Page & CerOportoa i'i casks-.:-
and cases of one dozen bottles each.
Champagne, of the well-known Key brand, warranted of best
quality.
Sherry wine, in quarter and half quarter casks.
Chateau Looville, St. Julien, Sauterne, Malaga, Prontignac,
&c. &c. For sale by A. C, CAZENOVE & Co.
dec 12-3taw3w' Alexandria.
NI"EW AND FASHIOINABIE GOODS.-ENOCH
TUCKER, of the late firm of Tucker & Thromplon, be-
tween Gadsby's and Brown's Hotels, has lately received an ex- ,
tensive and beautiful assortment of Pall iind Winter Goods.


dec 26-d3t


[Globe]




Daily national intelligencer
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073214/00004
 Material Information
Title: Daily national intelligencer
Alternate title: National intelligencer
Sunday national intelligencer
Physical Description: v. : ; 50-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Gales & Seaton
Place of Publication: Washington City D.C.
Creation Date: December 28, 1836
Publication Date: 1813-
Frequency: daily (except sunday)[feb. 6, 1865-]
daily[ former 1813-feb. 5, 1865]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Brigham, C.S. Amer. newspapers
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microform from Readex Microprint Corp., and on microfilm from the Library of Congress.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1813)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1869.
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended Aug. 24-30, 1814.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02260099
lccn - sn 83026172
System ID: UF00073214:00004
 Related Items
Related Items: Weekly national intelligencer (Washington, D.C.)
Related Items: National intelligencer (Washington, D.C. : 1810)
Related Items: Universal gazette (Philadelphia, Pa. : Nov. 1797)
Succeeded by: Washington express
Succeeded by: Daily national intelligencer and Washington express

Full Text
























PUBLISHED BY
GALES & SEASON.
pSIGE, FOR A YEAR, TEN DOLLARS i FOR SIX MONTHS) Six
DOLLARS. ]AYABL.E ItN ADVANCE.
Those subscribi'ng for a year, who do not, either at the time of
ordering the paper, or subsequently, give notice of their wish
to have the paper discontinued at tje expiration of their year,
will be presumed as desiring its continuance until counter-
manded, and it will be continued accordingly, at the option
of the Editors.

OFFICIAL PAPER.

ItZPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREA-
SURY ON THE STATE OF THE FINANCES.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, DEC. 6, 1836.
In obedience to the directions of the "act supplementary
to the act to establish the Treasury Department," the Se-
cretary of the Treasury respectfully submits to Congress
the following report:
I.-OF THE PUBLIC REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES.
It is believed that the whole amount of money in the
Treasury on the 1st of January next, applicable to public
purposes, will be about 841,723,959.
This conclusion rests in part on what has been actually
ascertained, and in part on estimates.
Thus, the balance in the Treasury on the
1st of January, 1835, was $8,892,856 42
The receipts from all sources during that
year were 35,430,087 10
Viz.
From customs $19,391,310 59
From lands 14,757,600 75
From dividends and sales
of bank stock 569,280 82
From incidental items 195,561 98
From Neapolitan indem-
nity 516,332 96


Those, with the above balance, make an
aggregate of $44,322,945 5:
The expenditures on all objects during the
year 1835 were 17,573,141 5'
Viz.
On civil list, foreign intercourse, and mis-
cellaneous objects .- 3,721,261 6(
Neapolitan awards 508,436 92
Military service, including fortifications,
&c. 9,420,312 6S
Naval service, including gradual improve-
ment 3,864,939 06
Public debt 58,191 21
For the details of the receipts and expenditures in the yea
1835, reference is made to the annual account thereof
which is this day submitted to Congress in a separate com-
munication.
The balance left in the Treasury onthe lst
of January, 1836, was therefore $26,749,803 96
The receipts into the Treasury during 1836,
as ascertained and estimated, will be
about 47,691,898 00
Of these, the receipts during the first three
quarters are ascertained to have been 38,141,898 04
Viz.
From customs 817.5"3 151 79
From lands *2',0,4,9"!9 88
Dividends and sales of U. S. Bank stock 299,67' 67
Incidental items, including excess of repay-
ments on account of public debt, as here-
-- a-aiier stated 247.139 7'0
Thii does not embrace the receipts in-lrust on ace.:.urnt
of the Chickasaw Infdians.
Of those receipts and their investment, besides the ex-
penditures from them, a report will forthwith be laid before
Congress, in conformity to treaties and the acts of Congress
carrying those treaties into effect.
Neither does it embrace the receipts on account of the
Post Office and Patent Office, of which, as well as the ex-
penditures on the same accounts, separate statements are
kept, in conformity to the late laws, and will be rendered
by the proper officers.
Nor does it include what has been received in trust the
present year for the claimants under the French, Neapolitan,
and Spanish treaties.
A separate account will be exhibited in this report, of the
receipts and expenditures from those sources, in order to
avoid complexity and ambiguity in the statement of the
general receipts and expenditures in behalf of the Govern-
ment alone.
The receipts during the fourth quarter of the present
year, it is computed, will be about $9,550,000 00
These, with the balance on the 1st of Janu-
ary, 1836, form an aggregate of 74,441,702 00
The expenditures during the year 1836 are
ascertained and estimated to be 31,435,032 00
Of these, the amount during the first three
quarters is ascertained to have been 20,791,372 16
Viz.
On civil list, foreign intercourse, and mis-
cellaneous 3,850,101 55
Military service, including fortifications, &c. 13,010,061 59
Naval service, &c. 3,931,209 02
Public debt, less than the repayments by the Commis-
sioners of the Sinking Fund, as hereafter explained.
For the details of all these, and the incidental receipts
luring those three quarters, reference is made to the exhi-
bit annexed, (A I and 2.)
The expenditures for the fourth quarter, as computed by
he proper Departments, will be $10,643,660 ; but which,
't is thought by me, will probably fall short of that amount.
rhis will leave on hand, the 1st of January, 1837, an esti-
nated balance of $43,005,669. From this, if the diminish-
td sum of $1,080,000 for unavailable funds be deducted,
he available balance of money on the 1st ofJanuary, 1837,
vould be $41,925,669.
But, beside the charges already imposed on this balance
y appropriations for public purposes still unpaid, and which
vill soon be adverted to, there is, in fact, included in it
bout $201,710, which was paid into the Treasury, chiefly
i former years, from private sources alone, and for private
r specific purposes, ad which neither accrued from the
sual sources of public revenue, nor ever belonged to the
general Government; except to fulfil the particular trusts
under which it was received in behalf of others.
A schedule of those items and sums, on the 1st of De-
.mber, 1836, is annexed, (B.) Deduct their amount
om the available balance of $41,925,669, and only about
11,723,959 would remain on the 1st of January next, ap-
icable to the general purposes of the Government.
To this deduction would be subjoined another, had not
e receipts and expenditures connected with certain sub-
:ts during the present year, or portions of it, been kept
stinct, for reasons before indicated.
Thus, the receipts on account of the Post Office, which,
ider the new organization, are paid into the Treasury,
d kept distinct, have, since it took effect, being the last
If year, been ascertained, and computed to, be about
,076,872, including near $410,472 that had been collect-
previously; and the expenditures have been about
62,952, leaving a balance on hand at the end of the
or of about $513,920, as will be more particularly exhi-
ed by the head of that Department.
The receipts on account of the Patent Office since its
w organization, for the present year, have also been as-
tained, and computed to be about $16,828, the expen-
ures chargeable to them about $7,241, and the balance
>ut $9,587, as will be more particularly shown by the
tort of the proper officer.
Besides these, the receipts into the Treasury in trust
m the treaties of indemnity with France, Naples, and
sin, have been about $3,765,994, and the payments to
: claimants about $3,663,988, leaving a balance of about
32,026 still uncalled for or unadjusted.
rhe particulars of these will more fully appear in the
seral annual exhibit of all the receipts and expendi-
es.
Lastly, the receipts into the Treasury on account of the
ickasaw Indians, have been about $639,252, the expen-
ores by investment and otherwise about $577,675, and
balance on hand is about $91,574.
rhe detailed account of these and the other transactions
;heir behalf will be, as'remarked in a former portion of
; report, immediately presented in a separate communi-
ion to Congress.
'he charges already imposed on the general balance of


2

6

0
3

9

6
8
r


5


$41,793,959, by means of current and permanent appro-
priations, which it is expected will not be expended till
after the 1st of January next, amount to $14,636,062.
Of this sum it is computed that $3,013,389 can be ap-
plied in aid of the appropriations for the ensuing year,
without reappropriation, and that $195,183 will be car-
ried to the surplus fund, leaving $11,427,490, which will
probably be required to accomplish the objects contemplat-
ed in the acts of Congress.
Deduct this remaining charge of $14,440,879 from the
balance estimated to be on hand on the 1st of January,
1837, and the sum of $27,283,080 would be left to be ap-
propriated by Congress towards new or former objects.
II.-OF THE EXPENDITURES FOR THE PUBLIC
DEBT, AND ITS PRESENT CONDITION.
Before the passage of the act of Congress, at the last
session, on the subject of the public debt, the money which
had previously been deposited by the Commissioners of the
Sinking Fund in the United States Bank for the payment
of the residue of it was, under their direction, repaid into
the Treasury, amounting to the sum of $136,773 01.
Since that eveht,'and the suspension of the duties of the
Commissioners, this Department, by virtue of the above
act, has caused all those portions'of the public debt out-
standing and presented for payment to be promptly dis-
charged.
The payments made since the 1st of January'last have
been as follows, viz.
On the funded debt, towards principal $46,405 72
Towards interest 3,139 09

Making, in all, the sum of $49,544 81

There still remains of the funded debt unclaim-
ed and undischarged-principal about $90,367 00
And interest, with dividends, about 250,416 00
A small unfunded debt of $37,440 55 also re.-
mains, which may hereafter-be claimed, on
which has been paid during the past year, in-
eluding $16 07 for interest on Treasury
notes, the sum of 88 57
It consists of claims registered prior to 1798, for
services and supplies during the revolutionary
war, equal to 27,835 46
Treasury notes issued during (h:e war of 1812 5,735 00
And Mississippi stock 4,320 09
III.-OF THE ESTIMATES OF THE PUBLIC REVE-
NUE AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR 1837.
The receipts into the Treasury from all
sources, during 1837, are estimated at $24,000,000 00
Viz.
From customs, $16,500,000: 00
From lands, 5,000,000' 00
From bank stock, 2,000,000 00
Miscellaneous, including
interest from deposit
banks, 5,000,000 00
To these add the balance of available
funds in the Treasury on the 1st of
January, 1837, estimated, as computed,


4 tIon -a


^IWItLJ ILjencUEJE


WASHINGTON: WEDNESDAYs DECEMBER 28, 1836.


___________________________ ..---ld r ~~~ gBU '- -.enlB~~b h


flattering condition of things may have arisen from the
great reductions already made in the tariff and duties on
tonnage; from having cast off the burdens of the national
debt; from our increasing expenditures on works favorable
to commerce and public security; from permanent addi-
tions to the moneyed capital of the nation by the many
millions obtained abroad for foreign indemnities; from the
immense fertile tracts of land redeemed from Indian claims,
and opened to the profitable enterprise and industry of our
citizens at very low prices, by the humane policy of remov-
ing the aboriginals west of the Mississippi; from the un-
precedented improvements in the facilities, the rapidityand
cheapness ofcommunication and of transportation by steam-
boats and railroads; from the greater safety of our foreign
commerce, and its extension to new and distant regions;
from abundant crops and high prices ; from, the increasing
numbers, intelligence, and enterprise of our people gc-, -
rally; or from these and various other causes conitbn.Il.
But though some of these causes may have spent most of
their influence, others are acting in full vigor, and our na-
tionalprosperity does not appear likely to be soon essentially
checked, except so far as the excesses before mentioned, or
war, or unavoidable physical calamities, like those of pesti-
lence and bad crop, may from time to time produce tem-
porary reactions.
The receipts from customs, therefore, though not esti-
mated so high as they proved to be during the past or pre-
ceding year, have still been computed at a larger sum than
it was formerly anticipated they would, on an average,
equal, under the existing tariff.
The imports during the year ending Sep-
tember 30, 1836, are acertained and estimated
at $173,540,000
They show, compared with the preceding
year, an increase of 23,644,258
The imports during the three past years
have, on an average, been about 149,985,691
The exports during the past year are ascer-
tained and estimated at 121,789,000
Of these $101,105,000 were in domestic, and $20,684,000
were in foreign products.
Compared with the preceding year, they exhibit an in-
crease of $35,423, and are $5,829,150 more than the aver-
age for the last three years.
The crop of cotton grown the present year, which will
constitute the chief exports of that article for 1837, is be-
lieved to be large ; but from present appearances will, pro-
bably, be less valuable than during the two past years. At
the same time, the exports of flour and grain are likely to
be smaller in both quantity and value; and those of tobac-
co and rice, which, with the articles before named, form
our principal subjects of domestic produce for exportation,
are not believed to -be materially greater, and have seldom,
during the last quarter of a century, in any series of years,
much exceeded their previous amount. However enlarged,
by our rapid increase of population, has been the demand
at home for those and other articles of our own growth and
manufacture, the most tempting and augmenting product
for exportation seems to be cotton.
During near forty years it has attracted and engrossed a
large portion of the spare capital and labor of nearly half


for public purposes, at 41,723,959 00 e territory of the Union. nd by the great demandt ti
0 it abroad, independent of its increased consumption
And they make an aggregate of $65,723,959 00 home, it will probably long continue to constitute, not onl
I our chief and most profitable product for exportation, bi
The expenditures for all objects, ordinary and extraordi- be the regulator, in some degree, of our ability to impor
9 nary, in 1837, including the contingent of only $1,000,000 and of the balance of trade between this country and Es
i for usual excesses in appropriations beyond the estimates, rope.
7 are computed at $26,755,831, provided the uitexpended ap The receipts from incidental and miscellaneous source
propriation atthe end of this and the next year remain have been estimated on the following data. Nothing ver
about equal. definite could be presented as arising from an arrangemer
) Thu the new awl permanent appropriations chargeable which,under therecentactofCongress, is contemplated wit
1( 1 3^, .:.r specified purposes, whether ordinary or extra- .the Bank of the United States in respect to the stock owr-
ordinary, and including what can be used without reap- ed by the Government in that institution, until further pr
propriation, are computed at $25,755,831 00 gress shall be made, and the bank may indicate when it i
Of these the permanent appropriations al- willing to-pay some specified amount.
s ready made are estimated at 2,347,000 00 It will be seen by the documents annexed, (C 1, 2, 3
The existing appropriations, which will that this Department took early steps to procure suilabl
not be required for the service of 1836, information for a settlement with the bank, and paymentir
and which it is proposed to apply in aid the course of the present year of the due share of the Unil
of 1837, amount to 3,013,389 00 ed States in the nett collections from the assets existing o
The new appropriations that will be need- the 3d of March last, as well as to obtain specific proposal
ed for 1837 are estimated to amount, in for an early adjustment of the whole concern.
all, to 20,'5444200 It has been a cause of some surprise that the information
The latter are divided among the different branches of desired has not yet been communicated, nor any payment
the public service, as follows, viz. been yet made. On the contrary, the president of the S(at
Civil, foreign intercourse, & miscellaneous, $2,925,671 00 corporation, to which the assets of the United States Bin]
Military service, &c. 10,758,431 00 have been assigned, forwarded, in September last, a report
Naval service &c. 6670341 00 ofa committee appointed under authority of only those tw
The details of the above estimates are exhibited in a bodies, estimating the value of the stock on the3d of March
document from the Register's office, which this Depart- but it was accompanied by no offer to pay that value, o
ment has the honor to lay before the House of Represen- any other particular amount then, or at any future specified
tatives to-day in a separate communication. period, though professing a willingness that the Unites
To these have been added, for the ensuing year, on ac- States should receive a just proportion out of the assets o
count of the usual contingent excesses of appropriations the bank.
beyond the estimates, $1,000,000, making in all, as before Commissioners were therefore appointed, and an invita
mentioned, the aggregate of $26,755,831. tion given to have them joined by others on the part of th,
From these calculations, it will be seen, that if the out- United States Bank, to revise the estimate of the value pu
standing appropriations, unexpended at the close of 1837, on the stock by the above committee; and, after urgin
be as large as at the close of 1836, and the other expendi- early payments as practicable towards what might in thn
tures should agree with the above estimates, they would end be found due to the United States, if failing to obtain
exceed the computed revenue, accruing from all sources, any, to recommend such arrangement as might seem juse
nearly $3,000,000, or sufficient to absorb more than half for securing and paying hereafter what they considered tS
of that part of the present surplus which is not to be de- be the true worth of the share of the Government in tht
posited with the several States. But if these outstanding capital stock. Copies of the letters, report, and instructions
appropriations at the close of 1837 should be much less before named are annexed, (D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.)
than those in 1836, as is probable, or, should the accruing It is clearly to be inferred from the correspondence since
receipts be much less, or the appropriations made for 1837 had by the commissioners above mentioned with a commit-
be much larger than the estimates, a call will become ne- tee of the bank, that no payment whatever is intended to
cessary for a portion of the surplus deposited with the be made during the present year, and that long credits are
States, though it will not probably become necessary ex- expected and considered by the bank proper for portions ol
cept in one of those events, what may be due. That correspondence, and all the steps
which have been taken under the particular instructions
IV.-SOME EXPLANATIONS OF THE ESTIMATES given to those commissioners, will more fully appear iinthe
FOR 1837. further documents which will be submitted to Congress af-
The unusual receipts during the last two years have tar the commissioners make their final report. No reason-
chiefly accrued from the unprecedented sales of public able efforts will be spared by me to conclude some appro-
lands. private arrangement of this embarrassing and troublesome
It is remarkable that those sales assumed their extraor- subject before the adjournment of the present Congress.
dinary character chiefly between July, 1835, and October, Trusting that a proper sense of its obligations to the Gov-
1836, a period of little more than fourteen months. ernment, as a large stockholder, will induce the bank to
Arising, as they have, principally from private entries, refund at least one-fourth of our original capital, with tihe
and not from any unusual quantities of land offered for profits thereon, in the course of the ensuing year, two mil-
public sale, and marked, as they have been, by sudden and lions of dollars have on that account been inserted in the
great vibrations, it has not been deemed judicious to con- estimates. To this are to be added the dividends antici-
sider them as a proper basis for permanent estimates of a pated on the stock owned in the Louisville and Portland
public character. canal, interest from the deposit banks, and some small re--
Accordingly, the sum adopted for the estimates of the ceipts from other miscellaneous sources.
sales the past year, as well as that for the ensuing year, THE SURPLUS IN THE TREASUY AND D
though larger than usual, has been grounded on general THE SURPLUS IN THE TREASURY, AND DS-
considerations of a less fluctuating character, leavirig.acci- POSITION OF IT.
dental and occasional excesses or deficiencies to happen, as Varioufs objects of a national and constitutional charac-
they often will, without either the attempt or ability in this ter were recommended in the last annual report from this
Department to predict the extent of them with much cer- Department, as suitable for the application, by way of ex-
tainty. traordinary appropriation, of any surplus funds for which
The receipts from customs the present year will be some- the General Government should happen to have no other
what augmented by the great speculations which have cha- immediate use,
racterized the business of the country generally, and the Liberal and useful appropriations were fortunately made
destruction by fire of an extraordinary amount of foreign to many of them, which will save expense in the end, and
goods near the close of the last year. This calamity, fol- prove to be the soundest economy. The reasons for a con-
lowed by credits more liberal, and competition increased to tinuance of thie same wise policy, while our resources re-
supply the sudden and large deficiencies in the market, led main so ample, have lost none of their original force.
to an excess in the importations of merchandise during the As the present surplus had chiefly arisen from an earlier
present year, even greater than the amount destroyed, and sale of large portions of the public lands than had been ex-
thus essentially contributed to swell the revenue from cus- pected, it seemed to this Department judicious to suggest
toms beyond the estimates. But overtrading, from what- completing with it, sooner than had been contemplated, the
ever inducements it may arise, usually-produces a reaction, projected fortifications and naval establishments of the
and it is hoped that no accident of a similar and deprecated country ; improving more rapidly the navigation and secu-
character will occur which may enlarge our importations rity of its commercial bays and rivers; and, while its im-
the ensuing year. The receipts from customs for 1837 ports and exports were prosperous beyond example, erect-
have, therefore, from those and other circumstances which ing, where needed, appropriate custom and warehouses, as
it might be tedious to detail, been estimated at not more well as suitable marine hospitals, court-houses, and -post-
than $16,500,000. offices. In fine, the whole state of our finances appeared
Only about $50,000 of the amount secured by special tojustify and require that all those great works heretofore
bonds from the sufferers by fire last December, under the deemed useful and constitutional, and which are intimately
'authority of an act of Congress on that subject, has been connected with the duties and powers of the General Gov-
postponed, so as to fall due within the ensuing year, while ernment, should be more hastened, with our means so much
a reduction on account of the diminished rate of duty im- increased and so prematurely available, than would have
posed on wines since July last has been made in the esti- been proper or practicable, had the revenue continued at
mates for 1837, equalling quite three times that sum. Be- only the reduced amount, which was generally anticipated.
sides unusual speculations and overtrading, which are team- By pursuing such a provident course, it was supposed that
porary in their operation, the last two years have exhibited much less would remain to be accomplished, and hence,
an extraordinary degree of prosperity throughout the whole that our expenditures would be much diminished, when
country, and which, it is presumed, will continue to exer- our revenue shall become less by the reductionswhich,un-
cise a considerable direct influence on the whole amount der the existing laws, are to take effect in the customs be-
of our exports and imports; and, consequently, an indirect fore and in 1842, and which will probably happen in the
influence on our receipts from customs, Much of this receipts from public lands during that period.


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The necessary expenditures of the Government would
thus, by that time, become naturally as well as safely
lessened, so as to bear a near proportion to our diminished
receipts; while otherwise, if the expenditures for these
works are not previously increased or expedited, the proba-
bilities would seem to be that thle ordinary charges for them
and other usual claims on the General Government, with
the extraordinary charges incident to war and similar ca-
lamities, from which no people can be wholly exempt, might
then so far exceed the receipts as to require new taxation
or an increased tariff.
In respect to another branch of the subject, which relates
to a reduction of the present large surplus in the Treasury,
either by an immediate diminution of the existing tariff, or
some new regulation calculated to limit and lessen the
amount ofthesales ofthe public lands by confining them to ac-
tual settlers, or otherwise, this Department felt bound, in dis-
charge of its public duties, to submit to Congress,last year,
a few considerations which are still equally applicable. It is
believed that when the balance on hand, and the accruing
receipts, are likely for some time to come to exceed the real
wants and just objects of the Government for expenditure,
a reduction in those receipts, and especially such as are de-
rived from taxation, is the true remedy.
Beside the considerations relating to this reduction, which
were formerly submitted by this Department, it would now
respectfully suggest that all the duties under 20 per cent.
and which amount to near three millions annually, could,
with about half a million more on the articles paying a
higher duty, and specified in a report to the Senate at the
last session, be at once repealed by Congress, without any
encroachment on the principle of the act of 3d March,
1833. Nor has this Department any doubt that, if all the
present and anticipated receipts from customs are consider-
ed by Congress not to be wanted for any public appropria-
tion or other legitimate object, a reduction could be made
in many other duties more rapidly than is now provided
for, without any essential injury to any great interest in-
tended to be fostered by the provisions of that act. At the
same time, such a step as the last, unless found indispensa-
ble from high public considerations, and hence generally
concurred in, does not appear to this Department consist-
ent with the expectations of nost of those who united in
the passage of that law, and has not therefore been urged.
But, if found-indispensable, the next articles which, in my
opinion, could be most appropriately selected for greater
and quicker reductiofi, are the raw materials of foreign
origin used in some of our important manufactures; and
though certain rival articles produced here might suffer by
such a change, yet in this way the whole manufacturing
industry of the country would probably be benefited. If
sufficient reduction cannot be obtained on that class, the
next kind of articles selected should be such as are largely
consumed in promoting the comforts and satisfying the neces-
sities of the people generally, and, at the same time, do not
materially compete with important manufactures, nor con-
flict with great agricultural interests. And the next, if
more' be deemed necessary, might be such as have now a
much higher duty or protection on them than others of
greater national consequence.
Certain it is that a much more just and useful discrimi-
nation could be introduced into the whole present system,
by reducing more quickly the duties which are found to be
least beneficial by way of protection, and by reducing more
slowly those deemed most indispensable.
Equally feasible would it be, in the exercise of a proper
spirit of comity and justice, to make some legal enact-
ments which should prevent the further sale of the pub-
lic domain to any persons who do not want it for immediate
cultivation. This seems peculiarly proper at a time when
the Government neither needs the proceeds of such sales
for any public use, nor considers the money received ade-
quate to the real value of the land sold; and when the set-
tiement of the new States is retarded by permitting the pub-
lic domain to pass in large quantities into the hands of oth-
ers than actual settlers. By a wise revision of our present I
laws, the enterprising, industrious, and needy, might, for a I
fair compensation, be liberally secured in the purchase and
enjoyment of a due portion of land for immediate cultiva-
tion, and, at the same time, all be effectually prevented
from seizing and securing, as a matter of speculation, in t
any case, on the best tracts, without previous purchase or t
any pretence of title, and from procuring, through floats or
otherwise, for wealthy persons, whether residents or. non- c
residents, the most valuable situations at the minimum
prices. C
It must be obvious that nothing beyond a very general,
and in some degree uncertain exhibit could, at this time, t
be presented of the probable amount of the surplus in the b
Treasury deposited with the banks and the States during a c
few subsequent years, and more especially of the various o
sums connected with the different hypotheses for the future r
disposition of it by appropriations for public objects, or by 1
a diminution of it through a large reduction in our future
revenue from either customs or lands. The uncertainty
as to these sums is greatly increased, not only by the fluc-
tuating character of our receipts from both of these sources t
during the last four years, and as is anticipated for the fu- ,
ture, but from the doubtful amount of our annual expen- t
ditures hereafter, and the absence of any determination h
yet expressed by Congress, whether to retain, unexpended, r
all or any portion of the present surplus, till alter 1841, s
with a particular view.to supply the place of the great re- a
auction which is then to be made in our receipts from cus-
toms under the existing laws. Minute details, therefore, w
on these points, would be only hypothetical, and might, to
without further data on which to found them, mislead in- c
stead of proving useful. p
But it is probable that Congress may deem it expedient to t
pursue one of the following general courses in relation to the e
present large surplus, and any which might hereafter accrue a
under our existing laws: either to appropriate more liberal-
y to great objects of national consequence, while the Trea- a
sury is so full, and in that way gradually call for and enm- a
ploy the surplus till those objects are accomplished, and S
hen to reserve only the residue, if any, in deposit with the e,
States, to meet future contingencies and the anticipated de- t
iciencies in the revenue after 1842; or to make a more ra-
iid reduction of the balance of public money now on hand, 1s
by legislation, which will largely diminish our revenue th
either from customs or lands, and thus require more of the o
current expenditures to be paid from the present surplus, hb
until the whole shall be exhausted; or to permit the most ta
f it to remain longer in deposit with the States, and so tr
hape future appropriations as never to renderit necessary li,
o call for the surplus, except to meet unexpected atd ex- m
raordinary wants. ac
In respect to this last measure, so far as already adopted pI
by Congress, and the operation of it upon our fiscal con- i
erns to this time and hereafter, a few further observations gt
nay be expected. ed
Before the two sessions of Congress just passed, it was an
considered doubtful whether that body would deem it ex- wi
edient to adopt the recommendations of this Department by
o expend early, on proper objects, all the nett balance in .w
he Treasury, after defraying existing charges ; or, if un- int
willing to do that, to reduce at once the revenue from cus- la
ioms and lands, and leave with the People the excess which me
would otherwise be collected, so as gradually to absorb the an
resent surplus, and ere long to collect none of any consi- pe
arable magnitude, whether for extraordinary expenditures, pr
distribution, or other purposes. Consequently, a sugges- tin
on was made in the annual reports of 1834 and 1835 for nu
se temporary investment of the sueplus while either of we
sose operations might be going on, and, if neither of them fln
-as adopted, then to remain safe and productive until it wh
tould hereafter be needed for public purposes. The pro-
osed disposal of it for these periods, which it was expect- mi
d would not be very protracted, was in a form which was asu
onsidercd secure and profitable by the purchase of safe psi
ocks. Thus, easily and gradually, as well as most pru-
ently, il was supposed the inconveniences of so unexpect- or,
I and embarrassing an event as a large surplus would be
bviated, and, at the same time, a provident fund created, tra
which would be yielding interest, and which could after- ye
ards be resorted to when the current expenditures might, cas
om any cause, either before or after 1841, exceed the cur- bar
mt revenue. In relation to that subject, though a topic oth
ill intimately and deeply connected with our finances, pr
w additional remarks, at this time, seem called for, since por
congress, at the last session, by a clause in the deposit fic
w, provided for what this Department considers, and has Sun
ken all the proper preliminary steps to make, a tempora- abl
disposition of the whole money in the Treasury on the per
st of January next, except five millionsof dollars. Look- dil!
g at that as a financial measure, which is the only view min
ow under consideration, the granting the use of the mo- net


ney without any interest constitutes a difference from the
mode proposed by this Department, which was doubtless
designed as a benefit to the several States, and' in that view
was also very properly proffered to all, if to any, of the
States, whether now in debt or -not, and whether needing
the money for any great public purpose or not. While
treated in the nature of a mere temporary deposit or in-
vestment on the credit of each State respectively, without
interest, the profits or income of it alone to be expended,
and the principal to be ever held sacred and ready for re-
payment whenever needed, like a fund that is providently
designed to meet any future public contingencies, this kind
of deposit may not embarrass our finances, and is likely
to prove useful and convenient to the Treasury. But,
should considerable portions of it be soon wanted by the
General Government, the deposit will probably occasion
to many of the States inconvenience and difficulties, if not
losses, in the management and repayment of it, more than
equivalent to the interest received. On the contrary, if
much of it be not wanted for some years, or till after 1841,
the result may be otherwise to such States as either need
the money or are able to employ it-beneficially.
The experience of this Department.has been too brief,
under the constant and laborious preparation to carry into
effect, in due time, all the provisions in the late deposit
act, to warrant, on the present occasion, any recommenda-
tions of modifications in this particular portion of it; but
it is.respectfully suggested, that although a gradual invest-
ment of the surplus in existing State stocks would, it is
believed, have produced no pressure in the money market,
yet the embarrassments incident to the transfers of such
large sums of money as became necessary in order to di-
vide it seasonably among a greater number of banks as well
as among the different States, anid the consequent tempo-
rary withdrawal of considerable portions of it from imme-
diate use, are embarrassments inseparable from the provi-
sions and faithful execution of the law in its present form.
Though they constitute only a portion of those evils which
now afflict thie commercial community, and have been mi-
tigated in their operation by this Department, where prac-
ticable, they could not be wholly obviated without depart-
ing entirely from the duties imposed by the law. Imme-
diately after its passage, steps were taken, as required by
Congress, to commence a reduction of the deposits, which
had then accumulated in certain banks beyond three-
fourths thie amount of their capital, and at the same time
to have some portion of the anticipated surplus taken from
States where its accumulation had been large or inconve-
nient, and placed, before the 1st of January next, in States
where enough had not before been deposited, and where
suitable banks existed willing to receive it. These steps
will be more fully detailed in a subsequent part of this re-
port. All the payments to the several States, for the
whole year,-are expected to be made punctually at the
times required ; but it will be necessary, from the mode of
keeping public accounts, to take the current statement of
the Treasurer on the first day of January next as the guide
for the supposed amount in the Treasury required to be
apportioned among the States, and one-quarter of it to be
deposited on that day. By pursuing any other course, an
unavoidable delay of weeks, if not months, would be ne-
cessary in making the preliminary arrangements for the
first payment. But that statement seldom differs more
than a few hundred dollars from the result as ascertained
on subsequent settlement; and hence its amount, inde-
pendent of unavailable funds, and what is held for the
Post Office and Patent Office, and in various special trusts,
will be deemed the true sum intended by Congress as sub-
ject to apportionment, after deducting five millions, unless,
in the mean time, the Department shall be otherwise di-
rected by that body.
The whole sum to be deposited with the States will, on
these principles, and according to the present appearances,
range between $35,000,000 and $38,000,000, and exceed
somewhat $120,000 to each electoral vote in each of the -
twenty-five States now in the Union--Michigan, from the
language of the act, not being considered as yet entitled to
an apportionment under it. Three States have already
signified their willingness to receive the money on the
terms proposed, and it is expected that several more will do
the same before the 1st of January, and probably most of
hem in the course of the present winter.
Leaving further suggestions on these and various other
considerations which bear on this interesting subject, but
which need not be repeated, the Department will next pro-
ceed to an exhibit of the manner in which this surplus, as
well as the rest of the public money, has been kept during
he past year, and of the detailed preparations which have
been made for the future custody and preservation of it, in
conformity to the act of Congress to regulate the deposits
if the public money, passed June 23, 1836, and the supple-
mentary act on the same subject, passed the 4th of July,
.836.
VI.-OF THE KEEPING OF THE PUBLIC MONEY AND
STATE OF THE DEPOSIT BANKS.
The money in the Treasury has been safely kept during
he year 1836. Until July last, as during the two previous
years, it was placed in the State banks, selected according
o the discretion of this Department, on account of their
high standing and favorable position for fiscal purposes, and
egulated in a manner considered most secure to the Trea-
ury and convenient to the community, as well as useful to ,
ll concerned.
It is a source of high gratification to be able to add that, 1
Mile so selected and employed, not a single dollar waslost 1
o the Government by any of them, or a single failure oc-
urred to transfer promptly and pay out satisfactorily the
public money intrusted to their custody; nor is it believed
hat the domestic exchanges of the country were ever low- t
r or more regular than during that period ; and the large
mount of them performed by those deposit banks in ordi- t
ary purchases or discounts, equalling from one hundred r
nd fifty to two hundred millions of dollars yearly, or near p
third more than those of the same kind by the United F
states Bank while the fiscal agent of the Government, c
vinced the great ability and usefulness of those banks on '
his important subject. s
But since the passage of the act of Congress, June 23,
836, to regulate the deposits of public money," most of
he discretionary power before exercised by this Department
n this subject, under previous laws and long usages, has c
een considered as no longer possessed, and various solici-
ltions to use it, though some of them were in cases of ex-
reme hardship, could not therefore be complied with. Re-
eved from great responsibility, and in many cases from 0
such delicacy in the exercise of it, by the passage of that t
;t, a new system, in conformity with its provisions, and in n
ace of the former one, was at once commenced by this Depart- n
ent, and has since been pursued with all the strictness and re- .1
clarity which the nature of business so extensive and complicat-
I would permit, and at the same time with every indulgence n
ud forbearance, in cases of embarrassment or suffering, which $
ere permissible without a violation of law. It was necessary tt
y the act to appoint anew all the former deposits banks, if they si
ere to be retained in the service of the Government. Accord- o
gly, the preliminary inquiries rendered proper by the new n
,w before any selection was authorized to be made, were im- fe
ediately instituted in every case of the former deposit banks, fu
d, having been satisfactorily answered, all of them have been t
appointed, except three, where some formalities in their pa- p
rs are not yet completed. The provision of that act, whlichi
ohibits more public m-ney to be left in any one bank than di
ree-fourths the amountof its capital, rendered the selection of di
merous new banks, to receive the sums which thie old ones vi
ere not allowed to retain, indispensable iu thie present over- g
wing condition of thile Treasury' and especially at places iu ve
ich the capitals of the old bangs were small.
The transfer of all the money in thle Treasury, except five a
Ilions, on the 1st of January next, tobe deposited in the trea- i]
ries of the several States quarterly during 1837, in ratable
-portions, made it proper to select also a few oilier new banks m,
some of the States, to receive those proportions, or sufficient pr
rts of them, when they happened to be either collected there,
to be incidentally and easily transferable there. tr
Timus the trouble and embarrassment of a second and sudden ar-
nsfer in January next, and quarterly thereafter during the inl
ar, were often saved by combinitig, in several appropriate hi
es, the transfers ordered by Congress to be soon made frnoms si
iks having an excess, with thle transfers of that excess to tie
er banks min the Stales where it was to be paid during thie i
sent year on appropriations, or the ensuing year on thIe p- i
tionment, and in which last described banks and Slates a de- is
ency existed. In this way, on several occasions, the oppor- OP
ity has been improved of beginning to perfect, gradually, and f
some degree cotemporaneously, between places near, suit- ce
e, and of easy intercommunication, the great and difficult ap- e5
-tionmnent of thIe deposits of the public money among several Ot
'erent States, as well as among different banks. The whole ne
mount of transfers ordered since the 1st of July last have, of ce0
eeasity, been at times rery large; but many of them have not


Vole XXIV.


4 a ,\


rYh


W -t- TM'- -1. -


No. 7450


yettaken effect; many more arn still t6 be ordered, and th,
whole amount necessary to accomplish both objects will be less
and their operation easier, than if a different course had beei
pursued, and the two apportionments between the banks anm
the States had not been united, in cases where practice
ble and convenient, and where large accumulations existe(
on the one hand to be reduced, and deficiencies on the other t
be supplied. Their union, in such cases, is supposed to have
been especially contemplated by Congress, as explained in tih
second and supplementary deposit act, passed in July, and a,
seemed just to the several States which had not before enjoyed
much, ifany, benefitfrom the deposit and use of the public me.o-
ney within their limits. Hence, while many transfers have been
forborne, when feasible under the law, and desired from public
considerations connected with the great pressure iti the money
market, and which pressure they would, though authorized
by the acts, have severely aggravated, yet great care has been
employed not to make a single transfer, except int the language
of the first deposit act, "to facilitate the public disbursements,
and to comply with the provisions of the art;" or, asdescribed
more fully in the second act, either "to prevent large and in-
convenient accumulations in particular places, or in order to pro-
duce a due equality maid just proportion according to the provi-
sions of said act." All the transfers ordered have likewise been
so modified in respect to time,-place, antd business, as to produce
the least inconvenience 'and expense possible to the banks or
the community, consistent with faithful endeavors to execute the
law on both subjects seasonably and efficiently. They have
been so conducted as also to relieve the Treasury'from any ex-
pense whatever in a financial operation so large and unusual;
but, in carrying out so large a moneyed operation as the new
law demanded, and one neither comporting with our usual fis-
cal proceedings, nor following the ordinary channels of trade, it
has required great caution not to create more embarrassment.
than has really occurred from this source, and a greater derange-
ment in exchanges than actually exists.
In complying with the deposit act, it has already been found
necessary to appoint forty-eight more banks, making, on the 1st
instant, with the former ones, without their branches, the whole
number of eghty-one. 'The Department has endeavored, in
these selections, to conform to the spirit of the act of Congress,
as regards their convenient location for accommodating either
the collections or the disbursements of the public money. It
has in all cases required the preliminary information made ne-
cessary by the act. It has, as enjoined, chosen at least one
bank in every State which had banking institutions, and which
included all except Missouri and Arkansas. It has obtained
from each bank a written agreement to comply with the duties
prescribed by law, and in every case except four or five not
deemed suitable, from peculiar circumstances, has received col-
lateral security for- the faithful fulfilment of these agreements,
and has endeavored from time to time to make such requests on
the subject of specie and other topics connected with their con-
dition, and with their mode of transacting business, as seemed
conducive to- safety and public convenience. The names of each
deposit bank, with the amount of public money in each, and its
detailed condition in all respects, near the let of November,
1836, are exhibited in the documenitannexed (E 1 and 2.)
In another document (F) is presented more fully and recently
the condition of those banks with this Department; -as it shows.
by their last returns-to the Treasurer on the 1st instant, the
amount of public money then on. hand, the outstanding drafts
then against them, and the existifig transfers to and from each
bank. A number of the States now have deposits sufficient,
with the accruing revenue, to meet all the probable demands
within their limits the next year. But it is otherwise with seve-
ral of them ; and where money has not yet been placed in each
State sufficient to meet the probable amount of deposits requir-
ed there during the first quarter of the next year, for expendi-
ture as well as apportionment, it has been, or will he, put under
orders of transfer, so as to reach there seasonably,
Numerous difficult and embarrassing questions have arisen in
the execution of the new deposit act, in consequence of the
novelty of many of its provisions, and the unequal operation of
others on some of the depositories.
But, where great doubts existed as to the true intention of the
law, the opinion of the Attorney General has been taken. When
that opinion has been unfavorable to the views entertained un-
der the law as it now stands, the parties have been left, as they
must always be in such cases of supposed inequality-and-hard-
ship, to resort to Congress for appropriate relief. It is, there-
fore, respectfully suggested that relief for the past may be pro-
per in several cases, which it is anticipated the parties interested
will present to the consideration of Congress.. For the conve-
nience of this Department, it is desirable that a provision be
made for the future, that any agency furnishing ample security
be regarded, under the law, as having the same separate capital
where established as the bank to which it belongs.
It is further recommended that authority be given to discon-
tinue such of the newly-selected banks as may, from time to
time, be no longer needed for fiscal or other purposes. A large
portion of them,-after the contemplated deposits are made with
the several States, will probably become entirely useless to the
Treasury, while their returns and correspondence will continue
to be burdensome to all concerned.
Immediately after the passage of the law it became the duty
of this Department, among other things, to select a sufficient
number of banks to hold the public money, without exceeding
three-fourths of the amount of their capitals, and one, at least,
in each State having banks.
As it seemed impossible to carry these provisions into lexecu-
tion in several of the States, unless banks should be selected
which might possibly have issued or paid out some small bills
after the 4th of July, and before they had completed the agree-
ment, and assumed the duties imposed by theact, it was thought
that a natural construction, given to the limitation in that re-
spect, would make it applicable only to such banks as were se-
lected and subject to the law previous to that date, and that the
others must not, on a like principle, make any such issues after
their selection. This would impart a reasonable and practical
effect to the clause, and, at the same time, not tend entirely to
defeat the operation of other provisions in the act. According-
ly, minute inquiries were not instituted, whether the banks ap-
plying to be selected had, previous to their application, issued
such bills or not; but all were required, at the time of their se-
lection, to enter into an express written agreement to conform to
all the provisions of the act, and, consequently, not to issue any
while they were public depositories. On more mature refle>-
tion, doubts having arisen whether this was going far enough,
aittd whether any banks which may have issued small bills be-
tween the 4th of July and their selection could in strict law be
retained, or could have been legally appointed, it was deemed
proper to take the opinion of the Attorney General on thatpoint.
He confirmed these doubts ; but recommended the submission
f the subject to Congress, before discontinuinganyofthebanks,
which, upon investigation, might appear to have made such is-
sues before entering into the agreement. The Department
would, therefore, respectfully recommend that an act be pass-
ed, sanctioning the selection and continuance of deposit banks
which'imay be so situated, provided such banks have not issued
or paid out small. bills after their appointment as public deposi-
ories. -
VIl.-OF THE MINT AND THE CURRENCY.
On the subject of the mint and the new coinage, the Depart-
ment is gratified to state that, by means of additional appropria-
ions, of improvements in machinery, and of an ample supply of
aetal for coining, through the fortunate remittances to this coun-
ry of the French, Spanish, and Neapolitan indemnities in gold,
tore money lins been and will be coined during the present
han in any previous year since the foundation of the Govern-
tent. The whole amount from the 1st of January, 1836, to the
st of November, 1836, has been, in gold, $3,619,440; in silver,
2,877,000; and in copper, $22,634. The sums transferred to
he Mint in aid ofthe coinage, under a clause in the late depo-
te act, have amounted to 8700,000. When the annual report
fthe Director is made, on the 1st of January next, a more rii-
aute account of all his operations, with his views on these trans-
ers. will be presented, accompanied with such suggestions for
irther legislation on the subject as his experience may lead him
consider useful. Thie Mint and its branches would, in my
pinion, be more effsr.icntly assisted by means of appropriations,
tier than mere transfers, to supply fully and promptly ithe ad-
tional coinage which the additional wants of the community
ay from time to time require. The Department is still con-
need, for reasons formerly urged on the consideration ofCon-
ess, that a gold coin of one dollar in value might be very con-
nient and useful to the Public in many of the ordinary trans-
tions of society. The branch mints are all in progress, and
ill probably be completed by June next, and their machinery
a still earlier day. The coinage in them can commence im-
ediately caller their completion, if the proper appropriations
e in the mean time made, and the proper officers appointed.
he greatly increased quantity of gold now existing in the coun-
i amounts, probably, to upwards of $15,000,000. For this we
e chiefly indebted to thle new valuation of our coin, though some
lueuce must be ascribed to the efforts made by the General Go-
rnmnent and mostof the States to suppress the circulation of small
Is, as well as to the favorable condition of our foreign exchanges
ce 1834, and the policy of ordering home the foreign indemni-
s in gold, and encouraging public payments to be in part made
thl this kind of coin. At thistime, the abundance ofgoldhere
such as to iave produced increased facility in distant specie
orations, anttd it is becoming more widely and beneficially dif-
sed over the different sections of the Union, to the greater ac-
mmodation of most classes of the people, particularly in tra-
lling and exchanges, and to te permanent t improvement of
r cirsculating medium. Tite amount of gold coined since the
w valuation, in 1834, has been near $10,000,000, anttd hias ex-
wded by one or two millions, the whole amount coined in tha
(Continutd on the famrth page.)


K/l';U~ ,as


,/Y











I


_________ _' -------~---' '""'"'" its character. Intelligent, chivalric, patriotic and virtuous,
D E1 AT E IN T T HE they will be the last portion of the People of the United
HOUSE OF RE R ET TI V States to sanction.allegations, either personal or as thecon-
HOUSE OF REPRESEN TATIVES. stitutional head of the Government, against their veteran
chief. Those brave men who followed his banner through
SPEECH OF GEN. RIPLEY, (or LOUISIANA,) the Creek nation and on the plains of New Orleans, with
IN REPLY TO MR. PEYTON, (of Tennessee,) the citizen soldiers of Kentucky, Mississippi, and Louisi-
IN REPLY TO M. PYTON, ofana are not to prove so recreant to Andrew Jackson, and
ULon lhe Resolution of Mr. Wise, proposing g a se- so unfaithful to themselves, as to embitter the remnant of
lect committee ofinvesti atlon, and M. Pearce's his days with so unjust an accusation. And what are all
le co ttee es athe allegatioercs that the honorable member adduces tojus-
motion to amend the same.-December 15. tify the exercise of the high constitutional power of this
House ? That the President, in a conversation with a
Mr. SPEAKER: Had this been a proposition to inquire friend, had remarked that Mr. BE[.L, another member from
Into the condition of the Department of State, ot the Tennessee, had stated lies about him, and that "Peyton
Treasury, of the Navy and War Departments, and the could tell twenty lies to Bell's one." Now, sir, what were
General Post Office, with a view to investigate abuses, if the facts in the case? The honorable members from Ten-
they exist, no person would be more willing to join in the nessee at the last session had indulged'in pretty severe cen-
inquiry than myself. No individual would be more anx- sures upon the President's administration. In conversa-
ious to enforce the responsibility of subordinate officers, tion with his neighbors, according to this statement, in na-
There are none who will go farther to ferret out any mal- turally vindicating himself, he had pretty warmly recrimi-
practices; arid, if they really exist, to punish them with nated. I think the language that he made use of, as is
the high constitutional power of this House. Had the usual on such occasions, must have undergone, in the
resolution for inquiry had these objects solely and honest- course of its gossip, some version before it reached the
ly in view, I should -have been the last to oppose it. But, ears of the honorable member; for it is not the language of
sir, the President is constitutionally responsible for the that delicate and manly hearing which all know mark the
whole of the Executive Department; the various radii of character of Andrew Jackson. At any rate, is a merecon-
'its powers concentrate as well its responsibilities as .its troversy in an election, where the President and the ho-
honors upon him ; and when I take these circumstances norable members from Tennessee, in the exercise of their
into view, and consider also the spirit in which this debate constitutional rights, supported different candidates, to be
has been conducted, the position of the President cannot the basis of an inquisitorial examination on the part of
be observed without exciting our share of sympathy. Shall this Holise into the conductor the Executive Departments ?
we, at a moment when his connexion with the People of Again,-the honorable member ..it-.::' that this House
the United States is about to terminate forever, and all refused to institute an inquiry into ,Wu.ts that were perpe-
the aspirations of ambition are to be dissolved by age, in- treated upon the Indians of Alabama by the citizens ofthat
firmities, and sickness; when the consciousness of his State in the sales of their lands to individuals. When that
high and devoted services, which we all know he must resolution was introduced into the House, I had the honor
possess, and the enthusiastic affection of the American of proposing an amendment to it, referring the subject to
People were about to cheer the evening of his life, and to the President of the United States. The motive for this
gild his expiring lamp, is it right or Iproper for the repre- amendment was, that this House had no constitutional
sentatives of the People whom he has succored and saved, power 'to order the investigation by their authority: and, if
to cut off this -departing solace, and to embitter his last it had been done, it would have been one of the most fatal
days, by adopting a resolution, which, if adopted, will sanc- precedents to the rights of the States. It was alleged that
tion an opinion. of this House, that corruption and Andrew the Indians had been swindled out of their reserved lands,
Jackson have been coupled together ? Will they do tPhis in many cases by residents of Georgia and Alabama. Of
without soie specific charge-without some definite allega- course, if offences 'had been committed, as I know of no
tion, sustained at least by the-endorsemcnt of one indivi- law of the United States providing for such cases, they
dual in the House who will be willing to give his name were common law or statute law offences against those
to posterity as the author of the allegation t In these speech States, not cognizable by the United States tribunal. In
of the honorable member from Tennessee, marked with so a case where the State of Alabama secures a speedy trial
muck wit and pungency of satire, the allegations are by jury, and a cross-examination of witnesses, would any
made 'against Andrew Jackson as the objectwhos is to be person arrogate toths Hous the tepower tosend its commit-
convieted if'the corruption which is so broadly insinuated tee to make an ex part investigation, to hold up its citizens
in the solution to exist in the Executive Deparltment. I as malefactors without being heard, .without the privilege
am not willing to exercise the tigh constitutional powers of counsel, and the cross-examining of witnesses'? Sup-
-of tis Houseinhe least degree in sactioning such an pose sir, that, in obtaining the harder of a bank in a eigh-
allegation. o" boring State, respectable citizens should be accused of fraud
mGmenral Jackson, after a life spentin the service of his and bribery, an offence that is punishable by the common
country, is about -retiring from the elevated position he- hlaw of that State, does this House, sir, possess the power
holds a presiding Executive officer of these States, at an to trample upon State rights, ad send its committee of in-
advanced age, and worn down by the labors spent in that quisition into the halls of the State Legislature, to hunt up
service. He i.s now, sir, on the bed of sickness, which ex part testimony as its basis, and to hunt down all that is
nmay prove heis 'bed of death. God grant that it may not, respectable asid venerable in the character of its citizens, to
bitt that he may live many, many years amongst that peo- condemn them unheard without grand juries or petit juries,
pie whose rights lie has so bravely and honestly defended, and draw up a withering, report that would blast them as
and whose prosperity under his successful administration far as our language extended before they had an opportuni-
has excited the astonishment of the whole civilized world. ty ofhdefendinge themselves t If this power ihad been exer-
What, sir, is the relation that Andrew Jackson bears to cised by the original resolutions of last session, like the
the representatives ofthe People of the United States ? Council of Ten at Venice, or the Holy Inquisition ofeSpain,
From theperiod of your Revolutionary war to the present it would have sung the requiem of public liberty, and bro-
moment he has been the lofty, indefatigable defender of his ken down the whole penal jurisdiction of the independent
country. In war and in peace, on the battle field and in' States. And I feel peculiar, personal consolation in being
Tour councils, his exertions, his toils, and unceasing cier- the means of arresting tie progress of a measure so fraught
gy and integrity, have done as much as any other mian, not with disastrous consequences. The subject was referred
excepting.your Washington in the field, and your Jeffersou to the President, who was directed to investigate into the
and Madison in .the cabinet, to elevate the character of this cases of fraud. From the character of the agent employed
Republic, to advance its prosperity, and to .preserve its' by the President, (General Hogan,) I feel confident, from
.peace. .His name has been a tower of strength, and un- my knowledge of the man, that the duty has been faithful-
der his administration the character of an American citizen,- ly attended to; and if, as the honorable member suggests
as was that formerly of a Roman citizen, a passport through- he has received the collectorslcp of Mobile, it cannot have
out the world. Ay, sir, in foreign lands, wherever your been conferred upon a more deserving or more intelligent
star-spangled banner displays from the high and giddy citizen, or one who has more gallantly defended his coun-
mast, the character of our Republic, under the reigis of the try during the gloomiest period of the late war *
lofty virtues of the President, has that wall of strength The honorable member has also referred to the Secreta-
that feels ever consciousof. the .protection of a great and ry of thile Treasury as being embraced in the general alle-
ptowerifu nation. Ana'would you, sir, would this House, galten of corruption. Sir, the lofty character of Levi
after a life hiu Pip, :. ntI which impartial History is about- Woodbury is too wellhknown to this House and to this na-
totake cha:g..- ,o :.,r.tii,;. benefit of his .country; would tion, to require any comment from me. Born, reared, and
they at the eve of p is- long. life, so worthily spent in all that educated amidst the granite mountains of my native State,
s patriotic and virtnouSin thepublic service ; would they 'his stern and sterling virtues had already carried him to the
pursue himr-with insinuations that corruption, with its: highest honors of New Hampshire, when, in the midst of
blighting misldew;had found entrance into theboso of the panic battle, he was called to the arduous duties of the
Jackson's more than Roman virtue If this House insti- Treasury of the United States. New England may justly
I.b'"e tihc ,iqumr.- ,-, r iti..rt: ,o,. '., '.ha.i twmil they, feel proud of the high character which he has reflected
-. :.,:... T'..'-.. .: dIl.:._,.,,:.t, *,u t, ...:i ,i ,:.r'General back uponhis'native land. Andlet me ask, what induce-
Jia.-ur c:,-r h.,ud the Ioiil e adIin': i:. hi t !ps, which ment to corruption can there b on the part-of Levi Wood-
should poison anrd embitterwith the stings of ingratitude bury b There has been no specific charge against him ; .not
the evening of his life W.i he .hnave lad no precedent to a whisper of prejudice that he has.done any thing totorfeit
justify such a measure. 'Party spIrithas raged and misrep-- his exalted character. tie is affluent in his.personal situa-
resented all your Presidents during their term of office, but tion, with every thing to make him happy in domestic life;
they have passed and are passing off the stage, all-with the and, above all, principles of the most stern and unbending
award of official and personal integrity. Soeie have not integrity are interwoven with his nature. The only allega-
beea re-elected by the People, but against them no charge tion insinuated against him is, that, in the exercise of his
of corruption is foundembodied-in'the annals ofthecountry. dutyimposed bya law passed by this House, he is cornm-
Nor does any American citizen, at even this lapse of polled to transact official business withsthe agent of the de-
time, peach their integrity: 'no one charges them with posite banks. That agent is no officerof this Government;
wilful or wanton corruption, while administering the af- we have no constitutional power over him. He has been
*fairs of .the Commonwealth,. the only allegations made assailed by the severest epithets of party. He has been
againstthem, as they.quitthe scene of their labors, of their employed by.the deposit banks, many of them in opposi-
glories 'and their services, were, that a distinguished mem- tion to the Administration, to attend to their business with
ber, formerly from Virginia, accused Mr. Jefferson of re- i the Treasury. For my own part, I do not learn any spe-
tirinng with a political falsehood in his mouth; and an equal- cifie charges witlwhicl he is accused. And I have no
ly distinguished membernfromt Massachusetts moved his so- doubt that the President, when he gave him the character
.htary-'opte..to impeach Mr. Madison. I have no doubt, sir, which the honorable member states that he did at h did at Jones-
after :the excitement of party was over, both of these gen- borough, came to:the honest and conscientious conviction
tlemen regretted these allegations. The charges never i that such a torrent of anathemas from the opposition in this
have, and never will affect tie great patriarch of liberty, House, assailing the character of this man for more than
the author of the Declaration ot :independence, or his, four years, would have annihilated him had not his repu-
equally illustrious friend, the founder and champion of our station been founded upon the rock of integrity. Hih-
onstitution. The e one unfurled to the world the princi- sounding epithetsand bold denunciations annotthankGod,
pies of popular government; the other, more than any man, blast the character of any American citizen, unless they
connected liberty with law-secured an equality of politi- are accompanied with specificallegations and specific proofs.
cal rights, by securing to society the fruits oflabor. Wher- t On the contrary, they raise in the generous minds of the
aver oppressed man. rises to resist the oppressor, the Decla- American People that spirit of sympathy for unmerited
ration drawn up by Thomas.Jefferson is invoked. Wher- persecution which is sure to protect its intended victim, and
v-er constit-utional law is appealed 'to, to secure those roll back the current upon the author.
ights,e the political writings of James .Madison form the I feel, sir,'that I should have but unworthily discharged
lure fountains of living water,-which diffuse liberty and my duty as a representative of Louisiana, had I not raised
tranquillity amongst the nations. Together, locked hand my voice in opposition to this resolution. Whatever may
n hand, they are working their silent way, and they have be the personal or political predilections of my constituents,
wantedd that school 'of plitica hiberty,,ot which this Re- gratitude to Andrew Jackson for the inestimable benefits
public may arrogate to itself, through their exertions, thehehe has conferred upon the citizens of our State is an almost
.eing the founder. e pervading sentiment. It is, like thie vestal flame, guarded
Republics have been accused of being ungrateful. Aris- with intense care, and faithfully transmitted from one gen-
des was ostracised for being called the Just, and Themnis- oration to another. As the 8th of January revolves its
ides banished, after saving his country from'desolation, annual rounds, so often does the hoary veteran who shared
he authors of these-acts have not transmitted their names in the memorable campaign rcpairto the grass-grown hil-
S posterity. How keen would be the reproaches of the his- lock which marks'the battle field, and recite the eventful
hryofthelasttwothousandywears,howwitheringtheirinfa- story to his children. Often are time and space annihi-
y, if they had not escaped by this silence of history. Gn. lated, and the years of his pilgrimage recalled to the despe-
tckson has been doomed to meet the same ingratitude, af- rate conflict; and in those rural fetes, which none knows
r preventing the dismemberment of our Republic, after better how to grace with refinement and beauty:than the
sceing.the fir .and.fertile fields ofthe.Statewhich I have gallant Frank of our sunny clime, the revered name of
e honor to represent. There, sir, helpless age and tn- Andrew Jackson is Andrew an never forgotten, and the choiest of
r youth, and all the charms of refinement andi beauty, Heavenf's blessings are invoked upon the patriot's head.
rine protected by his hand. There, sir, was effected one ____l
those signal deliverances of a people which has already General HoaGAS served with great distinction in the staffat
Used thle plains of New Orleans to rank with Marathon Chippewa, BridgORewater, and Fort Erie.
d Pltaat, reflecting all its bright lustre upon the army of
erty that fought under him, and sending all its glowing- orin the admirers of Orniamsentali Heads of Hair.-
lt throughout.the world .to elevate the character of this .i- Mr. 0ULIK, of New York, deems it oily necessary
public. Sir, almost at the moment this was effecting, to announce to the fashionabl wold, that Iha hias just .arrived
While painting, hislutory, poetry music, iand sculpture at the Metropolis of Ithe Nation, and, as formerly, is now pre-
re giving greenness to his immortality, the Senate of the pared, and most respetfiklly tenders his professional services,
ited States were denouteing him in the Semineole war. with a splendid assortment of ORNAMEN.TAL HAIR
hkening with the same feelingsthat were pained at hsear- 'ORK, of every deserption, and in great variety. His location'
SAritides called the Justthe detractors of Adre is at Mrs. Tolon's Boarding House, on the south side of Penn-
ieidn posathed th'e itthe dde is raetor d Aofd syheansi Avesue, between 9sh and 10th streets, and diagosallt
ekson loathed the beat ideal, of his character. Again, across from Dr. Guntonr's stare.

ntitution of"the United Slates. How, sir, have the NNUALS 'TTt)T CHR TMAS.--The German
)ple met these charges They have almost by acc-a Torseidh Pro e B.KIS nlff-aud Gr.an
e rallied to defend him. Where, sir, are his accusers drawing's .. n
k again, where are they And, sir, permit me to pre- Tie airy Book, illustrated with eighty-one cts, by Adams.
that if the present resolution passes, it will only reflect The Wreath of Friendship, a literary album.
raceupon thee present House of Representatives. The The Juvenile Scrap Bok, by Bernard Barton, with .17 splen-
ple will come to the rescue, anmd expunge the resolu- did engravingrins.
from this House, as I trust they are about expunginue Time Token and Atlantic Souvenir, with 12.iembetli'hments.
rmer one from the Senate. The whole future history The Gift, with io0engravings.
'ue country will hold up in proud relief their old chief The P~earl, with 7 engravings. g
peour and sans s-ep'oche, and the iugratitude of this- Tie violets Bih ewithngravings.
ise in pursuing him with the odious ch arge of corrup- Tha Pitgrim's Progress, with a Life of John innyan, by
even upon the bed of sickness and of death, when I do Robert Soutley, illustrated with 0if cuts, by Adams.
believee .there can be a member here who conacientious- Letters to Young Ladies, by Mrs. Sigourney.
hlieves that Andrew Jackson ever was, in thought Thi YoungHusad's Ihomle.
I, or deed, unfaithful or inimicaJ te the interests of this The Young Wifs's Book.
Th".0ngWfesBok


regret that the honorable h The English version of the Polyglott Bible, with marginal
regret that the honorable member from Tennessee readings and plates, bound in elegant calf.
Id have been so excited by a warm election contest as Mrs. Hemans's Poems, bound in elegant calf.
ge, upon such trivial grounds as he has alleged, so Book of Flowers, with 24 plates.
an inquiry into the corrupt conduct of the Executive The Christian Florist, with plates.
xrtments. The State of Tennessee has been reared For sale at the School and Juvenile Book Repository, No. 5,
r the fostering and paternal care of Andrew Jackson Varnum's row, Pennsylvania avenue, between 9th and 10th
as done more than any other man to elevate and form s'seets. R-. ARNHAMft
mdee 24-if6t


TWENTY-FOURTH CONGRESS.
SECOND SESSION.

IN SENATE.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1836.

Mr. WALL presented the petition of Maria Scudder,
Martha A. Lloyd, and Elizabeth Johnston, the children
and heirs of Colonel Philip Johnston, for compensation for
'his Revolutionary services.
Mr. W. remarked: On presenting this petition I feel
that I should not discharge the duty which I have under-
taken for the respectable petitioners, nor do justice to the
State which I have the honor in part to represent, if I did
not avail myself of the occasion to make known to you the
merits and services of one of her most gallant and patriotic
sons. Colonel Philip Johnston, the father of the petition-
ers, was among the first of her sons which the devoted.
patriotism of New Jersey offered on the altar of American
Independence. Never, sir, was there a more pure and no-
ble sacrifice made on that altar.
At the Declaration of Independence Philip Johnston was
a lieutenant colonel in the New Jersey militia: he had been,
appointed to that rank by an ordinance of the Provincial
Congress of New Jersey, passed on the 14th of June, 1776,
providing to raise, by voluntary enlistment, 3,300 militia,
to reinforce the army at New York. This ordinance was
passed in pursuance of the resolution of the Continental
Congress of the 3d of the same month. On the 1st of Au-
gust following he was promoted to the colonelcy of his re-
giment in the brigade under General Heard, destined to
form part of the flying camp, then assembling, for the de-
fence of New York. It was then well known that the
enemy, with a powerful fleet, and a well-disciplined and.
appointed army, was menacing New York. This was,
indeed, the time that tried men's souls." The timid
sought safety in retirement, and the wavering were dis-
mayed.
At Ihis moment, the earnest and soul-stirring appeals of
the Father of his Country to the patriotism and 1i1 ha r, ,:.r
Americans, roused the patriotic spirit of the sor. .:.l Nr..
Jersey :
And from the sodJs of grove and glen,
Rose ranks of iron-hearted men,
To battle to the death."
The reputation of Colonel Johnston for patriotism, bra-
very, and talents, enabled him speedily to enlist his regi-
ment, and at its head e marched to defend his -" bleeding
and enfeebled country." He was then in the vigor of man-
hood, in the possession of a moderate competency, and the
prospects of the future bright before him. These, and all
the endearments of the domestic circle, a young and belov-
ed wife, and three daughters of tender years, lie left at at the
call of his country.
The morning of the 27th of August, 1776, found Colo-
nel Johnston at the head of his gallant regiment, on the
battle ground of Long Island, resolved, in the language of
his illustrious coinmader-in-chief, "to conquer or to die."
He fought near the side, and under the eye, of his immedi-
ate commander, General Sullivan. It wais post of danger
as well as of honor, and demanded both courage and con-
duct. Never did any officer more gallantly fulfil the ex-
pectations of his country, or more gloriously earn a title to
the blessings and praises of his countrymen. He fell at
the head of his regiment by a wound in his breast, and
bravely struggling to turn the fortunes of that disastrous
day. He died for his country, and under its banner, fight-
ing for the general defence, and to secure the blessings of
freedom for his whole country.
Yes, sir, lie died in the cause and service ofAmerica, for
the liberty and rights of all, and left to his countrymen an
inestimable legacy, the example of his pure patriotism, his
devoted courage, his chivalrous gallantry, and his glorious
death. Who can calculate the extent, the influence, and
the value of that example upon the fortunes of otr country
at that gloomy and trying period, when even hope was
sinking in dismay V" Well, sir, may New Jersey glory ilz
the example of such a son. It marshalled the way to those
"heroic deeds" which have immortalized our revolutionary
sires.
"'Tisto to the virtues of such men man owes
His portion in the good that Heaven bestows
And when recording History displays
Feats ofrenown, though wrought in ancient days,
Tell-Is of a few stout hearts who fought and died,
Where duty placed them, by their country's side ;
The man that is not moved by what lie reads,
That takes not fire at their heroic deeds,
Unworthy of the blessings of the brave,
Is base in kind, and born to be a slave."


amble recites: The Convention, viewing with serious
concern the present alarming situation of tis and her
Ssister States-that on a prudent use of the present means
depend their lives, their liberty, and happiness, think it
t.eir indispensable duty to put their militia on such'a foot-
'ing that the whole force may be most advantageously ex-
erted." For that purpose, the whole militia were classed
in two divisions, and one-half was immediately detached
to join the flying camp at New York.
After the appropriate details, that ordinance concludes in
a strain ofpatriotic eloquence unknown to the rolls-of stat-
utes, and which I cannot deny myself the pleasure of re-
calling to the recollection of our country. It breathes the
pure spirit of Seventy-six."
And whereas the principles of equity and humanity require
that a proper compensation and provision should be made for the
families of all such as may be killed or wounded in the service,
the Convention pledge the faith of this State that an adequate
provision for the purpose aforesaid shall be made.
"In this interesting situation, viewing on the one hand an ac-
tive, inveterate, and implacable enemy, increasing fast in
strength, receiving large reinforcements, and industriously pre-
paring to strike some decisive blow; on the other, a considera-
ble part of the inhabitants supinely slumbering on the brink of
ruin, moved with affecting apprehension, the Convention think
it incumbent upon them to warn their constituents of their im-
pending danger. On you, our friends and brethren, it depends
this day to determine whether your wives, your children, and
millions of your descendants, yet unborn, shall wear the galling,
ignominious yoke of slavery, or nobly inherit the generous, the
inestimable blessings of freedom. The alternative is before you.
Can you hesitate in your choice? Can you doubt which to
prefer?7 Say, will you be slaves?. Will. you toil, and labor,
and glean together a little property, merely that it may be at
the disposal of a relentless and rapacious conqueror ? Will you,
of choice, become hewers of wood and drawers of water? Im-
possible. You cannot be so amazingly degenerate as to lick the
hand that is raised to shed your blood- Nature and Nature's
God have made you free. Liberty is the birthright of Ameri-
cans-the gift of Heaven ; and the instant it is forced from you,
you take leave of every thing valuable on earth ; your happi-
ness or misery, virtuous independence, or disgraceful servitude,
hang trembling in the balance. Happily we know that we camn
anticipate your virtuous clihoice.
With confident satisfaction we are assured that not a mo-
ment will delay your important decision ; that you cannot feel
hesitation whetheryou will tamely and degenerately bend your
neeks to the irretrievable wretchedness of slavery, or, by your
instant and animated exertions, enjoy the fair inheritance of
heaven-born freedom, and transmit it unimpaired to posterity."
It was under this animated and eloquent appeal to his
patriotism, and solemn pledge that a proper compensation
and provision should be made for his family, that Colonel
Johnston marched to the field of his death and renown.
That pledge, sir, was never redeemed by the State of
New Jersey; and that pledge devolved upon the United
States, and was solemnly assumed by them when they as-
sumed the revolutionary debt and obligations of the several
States. It rests upon the equity and humanity of those
who are now enjoying the fair inheritance of freedom
which Colonel Johnston died to obtain. In addition to all
this, the claim of the petitioners is also sustained by the
equity, if not the express letter, of various resolutions of
Congress. I refer particularly to those of the 15th May
and 26th September, 1778; the 94th August, 1780, and the
26th May, 1781. It is likewise sanctioned by several laws,
of Congress, making compensation for revolutionary ser-
vices in analogous cases, which I forbear to detain you by
enumerating.
Strong as the claim of the petitioners is upon its own
merits, there is another consideration which, sir, I feel
bound to press on your attention. It appears that 'one of
the petitioners is the wife of Joseph;Scudder, Esq. His
youth was devoted to the service of his country, in one of
the bureaus established by the Revolution. He'is the sur-
viving son of Colonel Nathaniel Scudder, one of that illus-
trious band of revolutionary patriots and heroes who de-
voted himself to theservice of his country, both in the cab-
inet and in the field, and was alike distinguished for his
wisdom as a statesman, and bravery as a soldier. Among
the first in his native State to espouse the cause of Amer-
ican independence, he was, from its declaration until his
death, honored with a seat either in the councils of his na-
tive State, or in Congress. But he did not avail himself of
the exemption which his civil employment conferred to re-
lieve him from military duty.
At an early period of the revolutionary war, Colonel
Scudder was honored with the command of a regiment of
militia of his native county, then peculiarly exposed to the
invasion of the enemy. In the hour of danger lie was al-
ways to be found at its head, bravely defending his native
soil. But it-Was not his fate there to fall in all -" the pride,
pomp, and circumstance of glorious war." He was killed
on the 16th October, 1781, near Black Point, in the coun-
tv of Monmouth. while bravely leading such of his fellow-


Sir, no monument has been erected, by the gratitude .f' soldiers as could be collected on a sudden alarm, to repel a
his country, to the memory ofColonel Johnstons; no record- predatory excursion of the enemy. The honors of war
ed honors thicken around his tomb; no history displayshis were the only public tribute paid to his memory ; and to
feats of renown ;" for, unfortunately for his memory, the this day his children have neither asked nor received any
revolutionary history of New Jersey is yet to be written. thing from the bounty of their country, as a compensation
His fame rests in the memory of his few surviving gallant for their irretrievable loss.
companions in arms, or happily may be faintly recorded Thus, sir, by a happy coincidence, this petition presents
among the memorials of frail and decaying memory in the. before you the daughter of the first militia colonel of New
Pension office. One memorial of the heroic deeds" of Jersey, and the son of the last who fell in achieving our
Colonel Johnstonr gathered from the only Whig newspa- glorious independence. Never did death confer greater
per of the day, that circulated in New Jersey, blotted with lonor upon children. If it cannot disarm poverty of its
the tears of his widowed wife andfatherless daughters, has miseries, it ennobles it.
been treasured up by their affection, and is annexed toe their The children of Col. Johnston, now aged, infirm, and, it
petition. With your permission, Mr. President, I will gives me pain to add, poor, are compelled to ask of their
read it: country the redemption of that pledge, solemnly made to
"We hear that in the late action on Long Island, Colonel their father. to relieve them from the severe pressure of
Philip Johnston, of New Jersey, behaved with remarkable in- misfortunes which have resulted from neither crime nor
trepidity and fortitude.' By the well-directed fire from his bat- vice. Their father died on the first battle field, where the
talion, the enemy was several times repulsed, and lanes were star-spangled banner was unfurled in defence of American
made through them, until he received a ballin his breast, which independence; that glorious prize for which he fought and
put an end to the life of as brave an officer as ever commanded, died, which animated his exertions and nerved his arm
a battalion. General Sullivan, who ivas close to him. when hlie when that banner waved fitfully over the field of his death
fell, says that no man could behave with more firmness during and his country's misfortunes, has been obtained by his
the whole action. As he sacrificed his life in detfenee of the in- country.. The star-spangled banner now waves in triumph
vaded rights of his country, his memory must be dear to every over the land of the free and the home of the brave ;" the
American who is not insensible to the suferings of his injured pride and protection of a great, prosperous, and happy na-
country, and as long as the same uncorrupted spirit of liberty and prosperous, and happy na
which led him to the field shall continue to actuate the sons of on.
freemen in America." The petitioners now submit their case to the equity, the
Mr. President, the tree of American liberty was nourish- humanity, and plighted faith of their country.
th blood of such heroes. Mr. W. concluded by moving that the petition be read,
ed by the blood of such heroes andand referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims;
But, Mr. President, whem the husband and the father, which motion was agreed to.
at the call of his country, steps from the circle of domestic whichh motion was agreed to.
endearments, a patriot and a hero, it is the safety and pro- .
tection of his wife and children that nerves his arm and TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27.
animates his exertions in the hour of battle; and if he falls, A message was received from the President of the Unit-'
his last prayer is for his country, and his last earthly con- ed States, through A. JACKsoN, jr. his Private Secretary,
solution is, that his death commits them to its gratitude on thesubjectof the admission of Michigan into the Union,
and protection. with documents, stating that Michigan, by Convention,
This obligation, which springs from the grave of heroism, had, at a late day, complied with the regulations of the con-
is sanctioned by the purest and noblest feelings of our na- ditional act of admission.
ture, and the highest dictates of policy, and creates a debt Mr. GRUNDY moved that the message and documents
which descends upon all who inherit the blessings thus ac- be printed, and referred to- the Committee on the Judi-
quired., ary.
If, sir, the claim of the petitioners had no other founda- Mr. BENTON remarked that, as the President hadgiv-
tion than this, it would, in my humble judgment, be irre- en his opinion that Michigan had complied with the requi-
sistible. But it does not rest on this alone ; it is supported site terms of admission, and as he had said that he should
by the plighted, and, I iam sorry to say, the unredeemed have issued his proclamation accordingly, had the informa-
faith of their country. tion arrived during the recess of Congress, he (Mr. B.)re-
To say nothing, sir, at present of the pledge fairly to be garded the proposed reference as a mere matter of form, and
implied from the addresses of General Washington calling would prefer that a joint resolution of admission should
the militia to arms, and animating them to battle, that the forthwith be passed by both Houses.
country would provide for their wives and children, this Mr, GRUNDY said he would still prefer the course
.pledge was distinctly made to Colonel Johnston and his which he had suggested, and, on this account-that the
companions in arms. On the 3d of Juno, 1776, Congress "first'Coilvention- had not assented to the terms of admis-
resolved that 13,800 militia should be employed to reinforce sion ; but another Convention had decided to accede to the
,the army at New York, and that New Jersey be requested proposition made by the Congress of the United States.
:to furnish 3,300 of their militia to complete that number, to The'great inquiry now was, are the proceedings in accord-
be engaged until the 1st of December, unless sooner dis- ance with the act of admission ? The decision of which
charged by order of Congress. This was to form the fly- question depends on information which ought to be asccr-
ing camp destined for the defence of New York. On the tained before the actual admission, though the President
5th of June, 1776, Congress resolved that the flying camp had said that, in his opinion, all was right, and, if the in-
be placed under the command of such continental general formation had come during the recess, he would have act-
officer as the commander-in-chief should direct. That tile ed accordingly. Mr. G. had no design to produce any de-
militia, when in service, be regularly paid and victualled, lay by a reference to a committee. He should not with-
in the same manner as the continental troops. General draw his motion, and he hoped the Senator would with-
Mercer was appointed to the command ofthe flying camp, draw his opposition.
thus formed, on the 20th July, 1776. The Convention of Mr. BENTON said that, as the committee might draw
-New Jersey was requested by Congress to raise for the fly- up a joint resolution for admission to-day, he should not
ing camp, under General Mercer, three battalions of mili- opposesthe reference.
tia, in addition to the five formerly desired by Congress, The message was also accompanied with a report from
and send the same with all possible despatch to the flying the Secretary of the Treasury, in compliance with the Sen-
camp; and that they should be officered, paid, and provid- ate resolution of the 19th instant, in relation to the unex-
ed as directed by the former resolutions for forming the ended balances remaining in the Treasury on the 1st of
flying camp. a January, 1836.
Thus sir it is plain that the detachment of New Jersey The CHAIR presented a communication from the See-
militia required to forein the flying camp for the defence of retary of the Treasury, in compliance with a Senate rose-
New York, was called out by the Continental Congress, lution, offered by Mr. WEBSTER, relating to thile transfers,
and for the general defenceoi'the country; and was placed &c. of the public money, since the 21st of June last. Re-
'in the service of the United States under the command of ferred, and ordered to be printed.
continental officers, and on the same footing in all respects Mr. TOMLINSON presented the petition of a large
as continental troops. In fact, the battalion commanded by number of the inhabitants of Norwich, in Connecticut.
Colonel Johnston was enlisted under a resolution of Con- praying for a total repeal of the duty on foreign coal;
gress, placed under its control, received into its service, which was referred to the Committee on Manufactures,
commanded by its officers, and entitled to all the benefits and ordered to be printed.
and advantages, immediate and prospective, which resulted Other petitions and memorials were presented lby Messrs.
from that situation. So it was considered by the Conven- WRIGIHT, GRUNDY, BAYARD, TIPTON, EW-
tion of New Jersey, in the several ordinances which they ING, of Ohio, and BROWN, and referred.
passed to raise the men required to reinforce the army at Mr. HUBBARD, from the Committee of Claims, re-
New York. ported the bill, referred to them, to provide for the payment
In the last ordinance passed by the Convention of New of indemnities for horses and other property lost in tilhe
Jersey on the llth August, 1776, to carry into effect the service of the United States; together with an amendment,
resolutions of Congress to which I have referred, the pre- which was reAd.


The following bills were severally introduced, on leave,
read twice, and referred :
By Mr. PRENTISS: A bill for the relief of Elishba
Town.
By Mr. SOUTHARD:
A bill for the relief of the heirs of the late Henry Eck-
ford.
A bill to establish a naval asylum.
A bill for the relief of Commodore Isaac Hull.
A bill to establish arid regulate navy rations, and for
other purposes.
A bill to regulate the pay of the officers of the marine
corps.
A bill for the erection of a dry dock at Pensacola.
A bill tore-organize the Navy of the United States.
A bill to defray the expenses of a rendezvous and naval
depot at the southern extremity of Florida.
By Mr. DAVIS: A bill to remunerate the captors of
.the privateer Lydia.
By Mr. BUCHANAN: A bill to extend "to a longer
period the several acts for the relief of certain insolvent
debtors of the United States.
By Mr. ROBINSON: A bill for the relief of Daniel
Bush.
By Mr. MOORE : A bill authorizing the Secretary of
the Treasury to invest the two per cent. fund set apart for
the construction of a road or roads, to the State of Ala-
bama.
By Mr. TIPTON : A bill to authorize J. D. Bencraft
to locate certain lands in Indiana.
By Mr. HENDRICKS: A bill for the completion of
certain internal improvements in Florida.
Mr. DAVIS gave notice that he should to-morrow ask
leave to introduce a bill in addition to the act for the relief
of sick and disabled seamen.
THE TREASURY CIRCULAR.
The Senate now proceeded to the special order, the far-
ther consideration of the joint resolution introduced by Mr.
EwING. of Ohio, on this subject, the question being on the
amendment or substitute offered by Mr. RIvES to that reso-
lution, which substitute proposes to refuse to receive for the
public dues the lills of such bans as issued after certain
specified periods bills undercertain specified denominations;
the substitute also leaving in the power of the deposit
banks to refuse such funds as they may think proper.
Mr. HUBBARD addressed the Senate at large on the
subject of the resolution and the amendment.
Mr. HUBBARD having concluded his remarks,
Mr. EWING, of Ohio, inquired whether he was to un-
derstand Mr. H. as including in his argument of justifica-
tion the discrimination made in the order between citizens.
of different States of the Union, requiring of one class to
pay gold and silver, and permitting the other to pay in the
ordinary currency t
Mr. HUBBARD replied that he had not turned his at-
tention to that point, considering it as having been suffi-
ciently met in the able speech of the Senator from -Mis-
souri, (Mr. BENTON.)
Mr, MORRIS obtained the floor for to-morrow; and
then
The Senate, at a little past three, went into executive
business; after which, there Senate adjourned.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SJ TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27.
Petitions and memorials were called for in the order of
States and Territories, and were presented by Messrs.
EVANS and HALL, of Maine; Mr. D. J. PEARCE,
of Rhode Island; Messrs. HARD, WARDWELL,
HAZELTINE, McKEON, REYNOLDS, and RUS-
SELL, of New York ; Mr. GALBRAITH, of Penn-
sylvania; Mr. WASHINGTON, of Maryland; Mr.
LUCAS, of Virginia; Mr. W. B. SHEPARD, of North
Carolina; Messrs. BOYD and HARLAN, of Kentucky;
Messrs. SLOANE and KENNON, of Ohio; Mr. CA-
SEY, of Illinois ; and Mr. WHITE, of Florida.
Mr. JARVIS, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, re-
ported against the petition of Abigail Morgan; which re-
port was laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Abigail Fuller; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Elihu Noyes ; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of Eli Darling; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of James Ware, Anthony
Mendes, and James M. Blye; which was laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of John Tupman; which was
laid on the table:
Also, againstthe petition ofmCatharineRead ; which was
laid on the table.
Also, against the petition of the heirs of Lydia Crans-
ton, deceased ; which was laid on the table.
Mr. RUSSELL made an unfavorable report upon the
petition of Marinus W. Gilbert; which report was laid
on the table.
Mr. PARKER made an unfavorable report upon the pe-
tition of Lot Davis ; which report was laid on the table.
Mr. RICE GARLAND made a report upon the peti-
tion of Polly Lemon, accompanied b a bill for her relief;
which, was read twice, and committed to a Committee of
the Whole House.
Mr. CAMBRELENG, from the Committee of Ways
and Means, reported a bill making appropriations for the
civil anid diplomatic expenses of Government for the year
1837; which bill was read twice, and committed to the
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
Mr. BEALE, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions,
reported against the petition of Alexander Phelps.
Mr. LINCOLN, from the Committee on Public Lands,
reported a bill to grant the Atchafalaya Railroad and
Banking Company a right of way through the public lands;
which bill was read twice, and committed to a Committee
of the Whole House.
Mr. LAWLER, from the Committee on Private Land
Claims, reported a bill for the relief of James Moor and
William Moor, which bill whih bill was read twice; and on the
question Shall the bill be engrossed?" it was decided in
the negative, and the said bill was subsequently rejected
by the House.
MICHIGAN.
A message was received from the President of the Unit-
ed States, transmitting proceedings of a late Convention
held in Michigan, for accepting the conditions of the
act of Congress for admitting the State of Michigan into
the Union; of which message we hae we have not been able to
obtain a copy in time for this day's paper.
The message was read; and,
On motion of Mr. CRAIG, the message and accompa-
nying documents were referred to the Committee on the
Judiciary, and ordered to be printed.
On motion ofMr.E.WHITTLESEY, the House recon-
sidered the vote by which the bill for the relief of James
Moor and William Moor 'had been rejected ; and on mo-
tion of Mr. LAWLER, the bill was committed to a Com-
mittee of the Whole House.
On motion of Mr. BRIGGS,
Resolved, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be
instructed to inquire into the expediency of continuing to
the widows and children of the officers and soldiers of the
late war with Great Britain, the pensions to which their
husbands and fathers were entitled.
TThe following resolution was offered by Mr. JARVIS:
Resolved, That a committee be appointed whose duty it
shall be to consider all matters touching the public build-
ings and public grounds within the City of Washington,
with leave to report by bill or'otherwise.
Mr. J. said (on offering the resolution) it had been cus-
tomary to appoint such a committee annually, and lie was
aware it was usual to place the mover at the head of the
committee. In the present instance, however, he must beg
to be excused on account of ill health. The resolution was
adopted.
On motion of Mr. CUSHMAN,
Resolved, That the Committee on Naval Affairs be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of reviving the
act granting pensions to the widows ard orphan children of
persons who. were employed on board of private armed ves-
sels of the United States, who died in such employment
during the late war.
On motion of Mr. SMITH,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of extending the
provisions of the act entitled An act for the relief of cer-
tain insolvent debtors of the United States," passed March
2, 1831, to such persons who were indebted to the United
States in the manner provided for by said act on the 1st
day of January last past.
On motion of Mr. HALL, of Maine,
Resolved, That tlie Committee om Iivalid Petsions be
instructed to inquire into the expediency of placing the
name of Moses Smith on the pension roll from the 10th of


March, 1814, to the 8th of April, 1.18.
On motion of Mr. PEARCE, of New Hampshire,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary be in-
structed to inquire into the expediency of removing the
location of the District and Circuit Courts of the United
States for the District of New Hampshire, from Exeter to
Concord.
On motion of Mr. BURNS,
Resolved, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be
instructed to inquire into the expediency of placing the
name of Ezekiel Burnham on the pension roll.


On motion of Mr. LAWRENCE,
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be instr
ed to inquire into the expediency of appointing a surv.
of the customs at Brunswick, in the State of Georgia.
On motion of Mr. BEAN,
Resnolvd, That the Committee on Commerce be instr
ed to inquire into the expediency of granting an additi'
appropriation fosr removing the obstructions in the CoCl
branch of the Piscataqua river, near the harbor of Do
in the State of New Hampshire.
On motion of Mr. EVERETT,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Library be
structed to inquire into the expediency of publishing a
reotype edition of the laws of the United States.
On motion of Mr. BORDEN,
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be
structed to inquire into the expediency of changing
name of the revenue district, Dighton,in the Stateof Md
sachusetts, to that of Fall River; also, into the expedi
cy of allowing vessels arriving from the Cape of G(
Hope, and places beyond, to enter in said district.
On motion of Mr. HALL, of Maine,
Resolved, That the Committee on Revolutionary p,
sions be instructed to inquire into the expediency of
lowing to Elijah Barden the arrears of pay as a revolutic
ary soldier from the 25th day of September, 1820, when
was stricken from the pension roll, until the 19th day
January, 18332, when his name was restored to the roll.
On motion of Mr. JARVIS,
Resolved, That the Committee on the Post Office ai
Post Roads be instructed to inquire into the expediency
establishing a post route from Danville, through Wald,
and Lamoile village, to Wolcott, in the State of Vermon
and that the papers now on file in relation to the same l
referred to the same committee.
On motion of Mr. PEARCE, ofRhode Island
Resolved, That the President of the United States I
requested to communicate to this House, if, in his opinion
not incompatible with the public interest, what steps,
any, have recently been taken to recoverofthe Kingdom,
Denmark the claim of the United States for three pri7
.ships, viz. the Betsey, the Union, and Charming Polly, v;
lued by Dr. Benjamin Franklin at 50,000 sterling, cai
tured by the squadron under the command ot John Pat
Jones, during the war of the Revolution, and carried int
the port of Bergen, Norway, apart ofthe Danish dominion
seized by the officers of His Danish Majesty the King
Denmark, in October, 1779, and unlawfully delivered t
the British authorities. If no steps have been so taken t
recover said claim, to communicate to this House whether
it has ever been waived or given up ; and if the same ha
been waived or given up, when and if upon any, what
consideration.
PROTECTION OF SEAMEN.
Mr. CAMBRELENG offered thefollowing resolution
Resolved, That the Committee on Commerce be instruct
ed to inquire into the expediency of repealing all laws au-
thorizing protections to be issued to American seamen.
Mr. C. briefly explained the object ofthlisresolution. He
said it was matter of surprise that these laws had not been
repealed before this time. In the early stages of our Gov-
ernment, in the infancy of our dangers, such laws were ne-
cessary. But now, the time had arrived when the flag of our
country was in itself a sufficient protection. The Ameri-
can seamen were taxed heavily for the payment.of these
protections; and no necessity, he thought, existed for their
continuance.
Mr. PARKER was understood to oppose the object of
the resolution on the ground that there were many cases
in which such protections were indispensable; such, for
instance, as shipwreck.
Mr. McKEON hoped that that the gentleman from New
Jersey would yield his objections. It was merely for in-
quiry, and he trusted thatthat the House would not oppose a
proposition which made an inquiry into the propriety of
relieving a highly deserving class of our citizens from an
onerous tax. t
Mr. PARKER said he would not oppose the adoption
of the resolution.
Mr. D. J. PEARCE said that he should, at he should, at a proper
time, object to any alteration in the law referred to. It
had been adopted with a view to increase e te number of
American seamen. The resolution, like many others sub-
mitted to this House, looked to an existing evil, and took
the present year as a standard for years to come. The'
law, as it now stood, served to increase the number of our
seamen ; the resolution, to his mind, looked to a decrease,
Mr. CAMBRELENG could not understand how the
removal of an actual existing tax upon seamen was to de-.
crease their number. In his opinion, the tax ougth i-jxbe
abolished. If the Committee -on Commerce should s's
any reason why it should he continued, he would yield had
own opinion to that committee. He wished to refer it t
them simply as a matter of inquiry. So far as he hadt
himself examined the subject, and from the information
he had collected from sources where the subject ought to
be best understood, he was decidedly of opinion that the
law ought to be abolished. :
Mr. GILLETT hoped the resolution would pass ; but
suggested to Mr. CAMBRELE*G so to enlarge the resolu-
tion as to instruct the committee to inquire into the expe-
diency of abolishing the fees.
Mr. CAMBRELENG accepted the modification.
Mr. ADAMS said he was very glad the proposition had
been made; that he hoped the subject would be referred to'
the Committee on Commerce, and that they would consi-
der it in all its aspects, and present a report on which the
House might act with deliberation. It was a great andim-
portant change which was proposed to be made in the con-
dition of the seamen of the United States. He had said it
was a great and important change ; great and important in
the present state of things, and which might become much
more important from day to day by a change, not in our
own condition, but in that of other nations. He had, his
doubts, therefore, whether this resolution was not too ex-
tensive. If, however, a report was made by the Committee
on Commerce, they would present their views fully on the
subject. He had his doubts whether it was expedient to-
repeal all the laws for the protection of American seamen..
He doubted very much whether, even in a state of peace,
American seamen ought not to be furnished with some
document or paper, constituting their national.character,,
which should protect them over the surface of-the globe..
He did not know but that, in the present condition of the
world, American seamen might cross over the ocean with-
out any serious danger from wanting such a document;
but inasmuch as they had been possessed of such a docu-
ment for more than forty years, he had some hesitation ii"
abolishing it altogether, lest thereby that very useful and
important class of men should lose the protection which
was afforded them by that document, when distant from
their country.
The world, or, at least, the United States, had been at
peace for upwards of twenty years; and there might be
gentlemen in that House who did not know what was the
origin of the protection which it was now proposed to take
away. It originated in the practice of impressment by the
British Government in time of war; the practice of taking-
out of all vessels every seaman whom the officers of the.
British armed ships might thirk proper to consider as a
British subject. The United Shates had.endured this na-
tional indignity,, and our seamen had endured this heavy
affliction, for a period of five and twenty years, during all
the wars of the French Revolution: and all these laws.had
been founded upon the practice of the British Government,
by which, from the moment it entered upon or projected a
war, the King, by an order of council, authorized his offi-
cers on the sea to take British seamen wherever they were
to be found, without regard to their condition, without re-
gard to their rights, and without regard to the engagements
by which they might be bound. This order of the British
council was not legal, even in England, in time of peace;
but the King, by his prerogative, had the power of making
war; and whenever he projected any thing like hostilities
against another nation, from that moment an order of coun-
cil was issued to take British seamen wherever they were
to be found, from all American vessels. By this order, for
twenty-five years, every seaman whom the officer sent to
search or examine our vessels choseto consider as a British
subject was taken, and the only check or counteracting influ-
ence ever enjoyed by the U.States was this very same protec-
tion which it was now proposed to take away. It was in-
troduced as an expedient for saving native American citi-
zens, or naturalized American citizens from being taken
away in this manner, and impressed on board the British
.ships of war, to serve the King of England for an indefi-
"nite length of time; to expose their lives in his wars, and
to be entirely deprived of that protection which their coun-
try "owed them. Now, he hoped that, if the resolution
passed, and was considered by the committee, they would
consider 'it, with very serious reference to this state
of things; ;nd that, if all the laws of protection were to,
be repealed, they would provide some substitute by which
the American seaman should still be protected. He hoped
it was not the intention of the gentleman from New York


(Mr. CAMBRELENGo) to take from the seaman the actual
protection of his country.
Mr. CAMBRELENG explained that the role d'equi-.
age, which every master of a vessel took from the custom
house, was a sufficient protection to the sailor when on the
ocean. He did not sc that any American seaman could
require a greater protection. The law of the land express-
ly provided that no seaman should be discharged abroad;
on that score, therefore, there was ns, difficulty. It was


4l~ii.~Sd3 5~'~










his design to take away any protection from seamen; spected. But as to whether these protections could operate
wished only to relieve them from a grievous tax. if it in warding off the calamity of war, Mr. C. ridiculed the-
ild be done'without impairing any important principle, idea. He (Mr. C.) must beg the honorable gentleman's
Mr. A DAMS, in continuation, said it had not been his pardon, (Mr. J. Q.. ADAMS,) but really he must say that he ,'
mention when he rose to oppose the resolution, nor did (Mr. A.) appeared to him ever on the alert to watch each
mean now to oppose it; but he did mean to remind the little speck upon the horizon and make it out as if it were
)use that a proposition thus made was a proposition in- a cloud portending war; lie (Mr. A.) could see nothing
lying a question of peace and war; and it was a ques- before him on that horizon but war and blood. These
n of peace and war with no less a Power than Great laws, (Mr. C., said,) he had thought for years past were
itain; and he hoped that the committee would view the unnecessary and ought to be repealed; he hoped, there-
bject with reference to that role d'equipage which the fore, they would be totally abolished.
ntleman from New York declared to be a sufficient pro- The question wva then taken on agreeing to the resolu- an
tion. Did not that gentleman know that there was not tion as ',.', and determined in the affirmative, bu
officer in the British service who would look upon it as ORDERS OF THE DAY. th
,y more than a piece of waste paper ? If the order of Mr, Wai;B's re_-olution for the appointment of a select
uncil, authorizing this impressment of seamen, were is- comutpittee to h quire intu the conduct of the different De- o'
ed to-morrow, and it infallibly would be issued in case lparttents, i...1. tA11tll Mr. PEARCE'S proposed amend- di
reat Britain was arrayed against any maritime Power- mnt to the tami o resolution, being the first thing in the
ainst France, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, or any other Orsa of the .1'. -- W
ower-I ask the gentleman what good his :...'.. Ih aleotio I *l., h,,. 1... n read, Mr. CAMBRELENG a
would do to protect an American citizen, i,.it., ,, moaxl tha t its ,,.n.-..k, .n be postponed till Thursday
ise, against that order ? It would be n.. i'r..tn' I 1 et., it order to take up several bills which he deemed of an
ut the British officers would ransack >. t, '. ... I i. gtrea tnplrtiae -
;ean, and would take out every able-bodied lma whom Mr> CAM BRELENG repelled the charge of postpon-
ey chose to say was a British subject. And what wutld ing tthi resolution in order to evade the question of inqui- of
e do ? We would remonstrate; we would iAstrtet rtit v,' NY t n nly in this, but in the last session, lie had voted
minister in England to remonstrate; and we would evil .. 1.1rita I, on every question involving an inquiry into
nd quarrel as we did twenty-five years ago and finalhy, ... .." Government; the only object he now had in
'e would come to a war. That was the cause of tha war; view wxas the public benefit, as'several bills relating to ap-
core never would have been a war but for that cause; it ;,,. .; ,ti,... of immediate necessity were waiting to bepass- ti(
ras a war as righteous as was ever waged on the face of i.' IiI..vever, the House should seem to desire it, he
ie earth; and much as he abhorred war upon earth, he (Mr. C.) would withdraw his motion to postpone. s
.oped it would come in less than twenty-five weeks, if a The House was proceeding to the debate upon this re- or
raman should ever again be taken out of an American solution, when
*essel. That was the cause of the war. MrPICKENS observed that, as he did not see the th
Twenty-two years had now elapsed, during which, in honorable mover of this resolution (Mr. WIsE) in his seat, w
ime of peace, the United States had been constantly en- and as that gentleman, no doubt, would be anxious to
leavoring to settle this matter with Great Britain, and had watch the progress of the debate, and perhaps might wish ha
lever been able to do so. The United States had made to make a reply to what had been opposed to his resolution, tic
var, and had been obliged to make peace, without remedy- perhaps it would be according to Parliamentary use, and
ng the evil. Would they, then, now take away this pro- respectful to the mover, to postpone the subject until his bi
section from an American seaman, not perhaps very ne- return. He therefore moved that it be made the special th
-essary, yet it might he very proper in time of peace This order of the day for Thursday next.
was a proper subject for inquiry by a committee. But he At the suggestion of Mr. HARPER, Tuesday next was of
wished especially to caution the House against the aboli- substituted, it being doubtful whether'Mr. WISE would be (t
tion of that particular protection, without something were in his seat on Thursday. '
substituted which would secure the seaman on the ocean. Mr. BOON hoped the consideration of this important mi
As to the fecs which the seaman paid for the protection, he subject would not be postponed another hour; for if it were
(Mr. A.) would vote for their abolition at this time; but, much further postponed, it would be too late in the session -
under the color of relieving the sailor from that trifle, he to obtain the information to be called for. im
was not willing to take from him that which was a taells- The question of postponement was then put; and a di- it;
man to carry him safe through the world, against the prac- vision being called for, there appeared 98 for the postpone-
tice of the British Government, (and he did not wish to ment, and 51 against it. So the further consideration of 8
bandy words or to qualify the truth,) of seizing seamen up- the subject was postponed, and made the special order of
on every occasion to serve the British King; and, under the day for Tuesday next.
the pretence that he spoke the same language, taking it for The engrossed bill to regulate the disposition, in certain G
granted that every stout able-bodied American seaman was cases, of the proceeds of lands belonging to the Indian
a British subject. He wished to say no more, nor did he tribes, was read a third time, passed, and sent to the Sen- K
wish to oppose the resolution. ate for concurrence.
Mr. CUSHINGsaidlhedid not riseforthe particularpur- THE MINT AND COINAGE.
pose of opposing the adoption of the resolution before the The House then again resolved itself into a Committee hi
House. Indeed, he thought some inquiry, upon a point of the Whole on the bill concerning the Mint (to consoli-
closely connected with the present, not undesirable. He date all existing and some other regulations concerning the c
referred to the provision of the law requiring the employ- Mint-and Coinage.) es
ment in the merchant service of a certain proportion of The question being upon the motion of Mr. HARPER to
American, as distinguished from foreign, mariners. Owing strike out 140 grains (the proposed weight for the new p
to causes not immediate only, as implied in the remarks of cent) and insert in lieu of it 168 grains, the weight of the to
the gentleman from Rhode Island, (Mr. PEARCE,) not tern- present cent. th
porary only, but permanent in their operation, there is a de- The debate on this proposition was resumed, in which is
ficiency of seamen for the supply of our mercantile as well- the motion was opposed by Mr. CAMBRELENG and th
as our military marine. Not only does the difficulty exist, Mr. McKIM, and supported by Mr. HARPER, and at v
but it operates unequally in the different parts of the Unit- more length and with great earnestness by Mr. ADAMS. i,
ed States. At some custom-houses, as he (Mr.-C.) had The motion of Mr. HARPER was finally agreed to with- qc
had occasion to know in his own business, there is more of out a division; and Mr. ADAMS then, as the section had
rigor in the administration of the law in this respect, in been amended, withdrew his motion to strike out the see-
others less; which gives a sensible advantage to the com- tion respecting copper coin. c(
merce of those ports where the most liberality is manifested. Mr. HARPER then moved further to amend the bill so do
It might deserve consideration whether some relaxation of to reduce the minimum amount of gold and silver bullion re- di
the existing laws in that particular may not be proper and ceivable at the Mint for coinage from two hundred to one h
expedient. There certainly could be no serious objection hundred dollars; in support of which he made some co- h
to having the subject examined by a committee, gent observations.
But (Mr. C. said) he wished- to object most distinctly Mr. CAMBRELENG made no opposition to this.mo-
Sand emphatically to the reasons with which the gentleman tion. o,
E from New York (Mr. CAMBRELENG) advocated the passage The motion was agreed to, nem. con.
of the resolution. He entertained views the very opposite Mr. ADAMS then moved to amend the bill so as to hg
of those which that gentleman had expressed. raise the proposed weight of the dime, or tenth part-of a to
The gentleman from New York says a protection is not dollar," from 40 to 411 grains, so as to make it correspond m.
necessary to the seaman, because the role d'equipage will in weight with the weight of the new dollar (412% grains.) a
licate his citizenship. But is not the role a secondary Unless this amendment was made, Mr. A, said, the bill to
ce of evidence only, made up from the protections them- would include the absurdity of declaring that the tenth part fc
eves 1 And what foreign officer, then, would receive the of 412 was 40! Mr. A. protested, besides, against this c:
rtle as conclusive pro6f of the citizenship of any individual debasement of the dime, one of the most useful of our coins, b
whose name happened to be borne upon it Beside which, because it was entirely at war with the decimal system, as s
the individual needs a document which may accompany well as tending in practice to introduce confusion into the
Pis person. But the r-le I. 'q.'.j'..- belc:.rn to the ship. currency. a
FIhe individual seaman min,- b di-charEd His contract Mr. CAMBRELENG inclined to agree in the proprie- tt
f service-may expire in a i.roign po:.rt The ship maybe ty of this amendment, being as much opposed as the gen- i:
wrecked. And what, then, becomes of his protection? Is tleman from Massachusetts to depreciating the coin. The n
it not self-evident that. he should have a separate document reduced weight had been introduced into the bill at the I
to prove his citizenship to accompany himself wherever he suggestion of the Director of the Mint, from a desire that "
navigates the seal- these coins should be kept in circulation by being made
But Mr. C. had a still graver difference with the gentle- less liable to be exported or melted up, and also because
man from New York. He (Mr. CAMBRELENG) seems to the coinage of small coins was more expensive to the Mint Y
think there is something discreditable, either to the coun- than of the large.
try or the individual, in the fact of the latter bearing a pro- The amendment moved- by Mr. ADAMS was agreed to t
section. I's not this a most mistaken view of the subject 1 I without a division. d
heartily rejoice, (said Mr. CusHING,) in common with the The Mint Bill was then laid aside; and
gentleman from New York, that a series of brilliant naval The bill (before the same committee) for making further
victories, during the last war, has vindicated the honor of appropriations for the suppression of Indian hostilities, was
our flag in this matter ; and I trust we shall never cease to taken up and read through, no objection being made to it.
maintain the same controversy with equal decision and Both :he I, ItI, were then reported to the House; and the
triumph. But is it dishonorable to carry a protection 1 By amendments to the Mint Bill were immediately taken up e
no means. I-low stands the fact ? If an American citi- for consideration t
zen desires to travel in foreign countries, he sends to the The question being on concurring in the amendment t
Department of State, and, upon proof of his citizenship, which strikes out the provision makingcents and half cents
obtains a passport; if a seaman desires to pass on the ocean, a iggal tender for all sums less than a dime, it was opposed
he repairs to an officer of the customs, and on similar proof by Mr. GILLETT, who maintained that if the coin was '
obtains a'protection. The things differ in name: in sub- made, it ought to be a legal tender to some amount, if for
stance they are one. Each of them is a certificate, signed no more, at least for half a dime ; and he made a motion so
by some officer of the Government authorized by law, at- to amend the bill.
testing the citizenship of the individual named and describ- Mr. ADAMS, suggesting that this amendment had been
ed in the document. Is it any disgrace to the United States introduced on the motion of a gentleman now absent, pro-
to give, or the citizen to receive, such a document 1 Sure- posed on that ground to postpone.the further consideration
ly not. The protection is to the mariner at sea what the of the bill, unless gentlemen would consent'to let the bill P
passport is to the landsman-on shore. Am I (said Mr. C.) pass as amended.
dishonored by bearing such a document in foreign lands or Mr. GILLETT'S opposition, however, was overruled by the
distant seas 1 On the contrary, is it not matter of pride, as House; and the amendment made in Committee of the
well as convenience, that, armed only with a paper bearing Whole was concurred in by the House: yeas 8G.
the seal of the United State.s, I may travel the earth over, Mr. GILLETT then moved to strike out the 12th section
secure, in every place, of the protection of the ministers of (being all that part ofthe bill which establishes the weight
my country, of the good-will of the functionaries of other and value of the copper coin.) The motion was negatived,
countries allied with us, and, if need be, of the guns and without a count; and
whole public force of the Republic to vindicate any injury The bill, as amended, was then ordered to be engrossed
done to my person ? That I may go unharmed throughout for a third reading.
the world, under thae magic influence of the broad seal of The Indian Hostilities Appropriation bill, as well as the
the United States bill making appropriations for payment of the Revolutionary
Besides, it is not material to remember, as suggested by pensioner-, were then also ordered to be engrossed for a
my honorable colleague, (Mr. ADAMS,) the origin ot the third reading, and
particular usefulness of protections. We speak the lan- The House adjourned.
guage, inherit the blood, and wear the features of the inha-
bitants of the British Islands, from whom most of-us are The following petitions, among others pre-

ment which ertfee the citizenship ofthe seaman andre- sented, were specially brought to the notice of
claims for him, as its name denotes, the protection of his our Reporter :
nation'? Which affords him the convenient proof of his By Mr. RUSSELL: The petition of Melancthon
nationality, which his person and language do not fur- Wheeler, John H. Boyd, and others, inhabitants of the
nish ? And to maintain which the United States should coun'.y of Washington, in the State of New York, r',ch.-
stand ready now, as they had heretofore done, to recur, if an appropriation to improve the harbor at White -i:Ill, in
necessary, to the ultimate remedy of war said State; which, on motion of Mr. R. was referred to
One thing, in this connexion, (Mr, C. said)deserved the the Committee on Commerce.
interposition of this House. The landsman, though proba- Also. itfe petition of Lewis Hatch, praying for apension
bly better able than the mariner to pay for his passport, ob- for revolutionary services; which, on motion of Mr. R.
tainedit from the Department of State free of cost. The was referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions.
seaman ought to have his free of cost. The fee paid by Also, the petition of Samuel Weeks, of the county of
him to the customs for his protection ought to be imme- Washington, in the State of New York, a soldier of the
diately abolished, and then the situation of all citizens, in Revolution, praying for an increase of his pension for re-
this particular, would be equal. And he should insist, if evolutionary services; which, on motion of Mr. R. was re-
the resolution was to be adopted, on amending it to this ferred to the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions.
effect.
Mr. CAMBRELENG expressed his astonishment at "uINE DUELLING AND POCKET PISTOLS.
what had fallen from-the honorable gentleman (Mr. CusIe- At private sale a pair of each of the above articles; they
INo ;) this was thle first time he (Mr. C.) had even heard are of very excellent quality, and may be Lbought cheap.
that protections were given to our seamen with a view to EDWe. DYER,
their convenience when on their travelsin foreign countries, dee 28-3t Auct. and Comn. Merchant.
He must express his astonishment at the pertinacity with T" EW-Yi EAR'S PRESENTS.-Splendid Silver
which some members still persisted in holding allegiance to _.L| Ware.-A valuable Tea and Coffee Set, of solid silver,
the British flag. The protection referred to had nothing richly embossed and beautifully chased-valued at nine hun-
to do with travelling in foreign countries. Every captain dred dollars.
of a vessel was bound by the law to pay three months' Likewise, sundry valuable articles of gold and silver, worthy
wages to a seaman if he loft him in a foreign port; ifin an tthe attention of thel ladies and gentlemen of Washington, to
island where there was no consul of oursresiding,yet a cap- which their attention is respectfully invited, are to be seen at
tain dare not leave any of his hands, because the owners EMACK'S Office, sign of tih Flag of Scarlet and Gold, three
of the vessel are liable. No protection is necessary to the doors west of Brown s Hotel. dec 28-3tif
seamen for these purposes, and, therefore, the tax imposed Ei'V ARRIVALS.-Six Cases of Eniglisle Sta-
upon that useful class is both odious and unnecessary. .L't tionery and Fancy Goods, now landing at Baltimore


That tax, (Mr. C. observed,) was not merely 25 cents as fi'om the ship Potomac, troan Liverpool, will be unpacu nit
the honorable gentleman (Mr. CusmrNo) had stated; onthe Stationers' Hall, on Friday next. Persons wishing to obtain
contrary, it was more than a dollar. As to the origin something anew and handsome, are respectfully invited to exa-
which.had been assigned to these protections by the honor- mine the extensive assortment, and low prices of articles con-
a member from assachusetts,(Mr. .. ADAMs,) Mr. ,. for sale at Stationers' Hall, where a strict uniformity of
able member from Massachusetts, (Mr. J. GL. ADAMS,) Mr. j. -i,,.- is observed. W, FISCHER.
C. desired that our flag alone should be a protection to our dec 28 (Tol.)
seamen, and not a paltry slip of paper for-which they were OV VMAN'S Course of Legal Study, second edi-
made to pay an onerous arid odious tax. This was the chief tion, re-written, and much enlarged, addressed to stu-
cause of the last war, namely, tlhat..our flag was not itself d and to the profession generally, is lately received, and:
alone a sufficient protection, that it'Wvas not sufficiently re- for sal by F. TAYLOa. l ec 2a
for sale by F. 'TAYLOR. cisc 28


WASHINGTON.
Lti'iimety asnd Union, lnoIW andl forever. one an ilses parable .35

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1S36.

In the case of RICHARD H. WHITE, indicted
md tried in our Circuit Court on a charge of
lining the Treasury building, in the year 1833,
e Jury came into Court yesterday, about two
clock, being still unable to agree upon a ver-
ct, and, by consent of counsel, a juror was
withdrawn, leaving the case to be tried over
gain. In this state of the case, we forbear
my remark upon either the trial or its result.
he jury was confined upon this case upwards
f seventy hours!

THE MINT AND THE COINAGE.-The import-
nt bill consolidating into one, with slight altera-'
ons, all the existing laws and regulations re-
ecting the Mint and Coinage, was yesterday
ordered to be engrossed for a third reading in
e House of Representatives, Mr. ADAMS having
aived his objections to parts of the bill, after'
having maturely examined it, and other objec-
ons being obviated 'by amendments. As the
ll now stands, the Gold Coin remains as now;
he Silver Dollar is to be hereafter of the weight
f 412 grains instead of 416, its present weight,
he-quantity of pure silver in it, however, re-
aining the same,) and the parts of a dollar of
proportionate weight; and the copper coin re-
nains, instead of being reduced as proposed, at
s present weight of 168 grains to the cent, and
4 grains to the half-cent.

Amongst the visitors at present at the seat of
-overnment we observe Brigadier Genieral AT-
INSON, of the Army.

The-London Times of November 8, founding
is reasoning on the opinions of his'American
correspondent, under the signature of a Gen-
see Traveller," says:
"We see in the late proceedings of the Government and
people of the United States a confirmation of the suspicion
ng entertained in the best informed diplomatic circles that
ie.annexation of Texas to their already unwieldy territory'
a favorite project.. Texas would be the stepping-stone to
he acquisition-of Mexico. Will such a result, probably not a
ery distant one, be most injurious to Spain or to the Amer-
an Union ? Meantime, will Europe be content to be a
uiet observer of the progress of events 1"
From the turn of the subjoined paragraphs, which we
opy from a journal formerly favored with the correspon-
ence of Major Jack Downing, one might suppose that that
defunct worthy had come to life again. Perhaps, however,
e has left some son behind him who inherits his father's
umor.
PROM THE PORTLAND COURIER, DEC..22.
r Apology.-We have to apologize to our readers for the
on-appearance of the Courier yesterday. It must be a pretty
aod vessel that could keep under sail in such a storm as we
ad yesterday, and not be obliged to furl all sails snug and lay
or scud under bare poles. Our little ship can generally stand
most any kind ofa storm ; but she had not been under way half
n houryesterday morning, before the Captain had to call all hands
a take in the light sails, and close reef fore and aft. And be-
ore noon, he had to furl- every rag of canvass, and drive the
rew into the forecastle to keep them from being washed over-
oard. The rest ofthe day she lay rolling in the trough of the-
ea. However she moves again this morning like a bird, and
we believe she has sustained no damage.
P. S. Lest our land readers may not perfectly understand
ll this, we must add that the violence of the storm was so great
hat it drove all the smoke and fire from the stove and funnel
nto the office, and all the workmen out of it; and we could
ot make it go any other way all day, no how we could fix it.
f there should be a reddish appearance about our eyes to-day,
we beg leave to assure our readers that swe don't drink.

We have not yet heard of any serious damage by the storm
yesterday though we fear we shall. There was a rumor about
aown that the roof of Park street Church had started, and that it
ook all the neighbors around there to hold it on. We are in-
lined to think, however, that the rumor had not so good a foun-
lation as the building has.

FROM THE CONNECTICUT COURANT.
It appears, by the annual report ofthe Secretary of War,
hat there have been mustered into the service ot the Unit-
ed States, during the past year, no less than twenty-four
thousand five hundred militia and volunteers. Wobelieve
he troops under the command of General WASHINaTON,
luringthe Revolutionary war, frequently fell short of this
number. And yet they have not been found sufficient, un-
der this warlike Administration, to put an end to hostilities
with a handful of Indians. The Seminoles, a mere rem-
nant of a tribe, and being able to bring into the field only
a few hundred warriors, have stood out against all the force
that has been sent against them, and at the end of a year
and a half or thereabouts, the war appears as likely to last
as it did a twelvemonth ago. In the mean time, a large
proportion of the officers of the regular army have resigned
their commissions, and quit the service in disgust. Amona
these are many individuals of high reputation for expert-
ence and conduct, whose places cannot easily and readily
be supplied. That the War Department, in all its branch-
es, requires a thorough overhauling, we do not doubt. An
extensive.and minute examination into all its business, pe
cuniary as well as military, should be. made, and measures
adopted to place it upon a more safe and profitable footing
That a multitude of abuses will be discovered upon such at
investigation, we do not question; and among them, if we
are not greatly mistaken, one important ground of dissatis
faction will be traced to a system of favoritism, by which
the rights of many meritorious officers have been disregard
ed or sacrificed, and many unjust instances of promotion o
preference have occurred, in which higher claims have been
overlooked and trifled with.
LOUISVILLE, DEC. 19.
COAL.-We have seen specimens of coal taken from .th
mine of Mr. F. W. Hunt, about 120 miles belong LoTi:
ville: In this mine there are two strata, one of n h,.:? ,
the real Kennel coal, so celebrated in England. The othe
resembles the Pittsburg coal. A part of the stratum o
Kennel coal has b'cen analyzed by a distinguished cbemais
of Boston, and found' to contain 484100 of bitumen, Th
Kennel coal is superior to any other for generating gAs. I
is also preferable to any other kind, whereer i 1.1 ..z
is required, as in locomotive engines, steamiboats, &c.. Th
steamboat Harry Hill now lies at the wharf with a load
Mr. Hunt's coal.-Journalt
BRINGmING UP. -Children1 if the cities of Europe, ar
brought up better than ours are. The nurses do not kee
them in their chambers, fondling over them all day. Th
children are made to exercise in the open air. There the
stay all of thie day that the tihe from school or from meal
will permit. The consequence is, that they grow up wit
health, and with a ruddy ph'ysiognomy.-Dewey.
MUnDEn.-A most horrid murder was committed in Hopkin
county, Kentucky, a few days since. A man by the name
Brown had been outduring the day on which the murder lhap
opened, hunting hogs; in thle evening lie called at a house where
he observed several meon, whom he believed his emanemies, and tw
or three whom he thought hlis friends; hlie requested some
the latter to go home wilh him, alleging his leers for his per
sonal safety; but before theystarted,a door was opened,,and th
unhappy iman (Brown) received eighteen buckshot and a ball
his body, which instantly killed him. It is to be hoped that thi
wicked assassin will be ferreted out, and made to answer to th
insulted and violated laws of his country. Brown was deemed


an honest, industrious man, and has left a family to feel his los
and deplore the manner of his death. A vigilant search to d,
tect the murderer is going on, and the whole county is agitate
with indignation. T vo or three persons have been arrested
and committed to jail.- Hopklinsville Gaz.

MARRIAGES.
In Charlcstown, Mass. Master Commandant JAME
ARMSTRONG, of the U. S. Navy, q Miss ELIZA
BETH, daughfiter of the late Mr. BENJ. CRONINrmSIEL:
ofCharicstown. -


FROM FLORIDA.-OFFICIAL.

ExEr act from a letter from General Jesup.
HEAD QUARTERS, ARMY OF THE S:;UTII,
Volusia, Florida, Dec. 9, 1836.
The command of the forces in Florida was transferred
to me yesterday. I would greatly have preferred that Go-
vernor CALL had been permitted to close the campaign.
He has had difficulties to encounter of which no man can
form an adequate idea, who has notbeen here. I have ex-
amined carefully the state of the service, and have looked
into every matter connected with the recent operations ;
and I am sure that no man could have done more under
the circumstances. He established this post, and took eve-
ry preliminary step to supply it. Supplies and means of
transportation are rapidly arriving; and had he retained
the command, he would soon have struck an important
blow.
-' The term of service of the Tennesspe volunteers will
expire in a few days. To avail myself of their services in
the attack I propose to make, I shall move sooner than, in
my own judgment, I ought to move, and may have to fall
back; but I am so arranging my depots, that, if compelled
to relinquish one object, I shall readily strike another. If
I should not succeed in dislodging Powell, I can, on re-
turning to this place, strike Micanopy, Philip, and Cooper,
who are about a day's march from each other, each with
from one hundred and twenty to two hundred Indian and
negro warriors; the latter perhaps the more numerous.
My object will be to strike them in succession, and prevent
them from concentrating."

Extract from. a letter from General Jesup.
HEAD .UARTEUis, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,
Volusia, Florida, Dec. 12, 1836.
A sufficient supply of subsistence having been receiv-
ed yesterday to enable me to move with twenty days' ra-
tions, the army will march to-day. The advance is now
moving. At the Ocltlawaha I shall have the choice of two
objects-Micanopy, wlo is about thirty miles south of the
point heree I shall cross that river, and Powell, who is
fifty miles southwest of it.
I propose, after placing the train safely across the Ock-
lawahoa, to leave a sufficient force to protect it, and with
the remainder make a forced march, and strike either Mica-
nopy or Powell, and, if successful with the first, immedi-
ately attack the other.
My movements are not in accordance with my own
judgment; they are controlled by the necessity of availing
myself ofthe few days that yet remain of the term of service
of the Tennessee brigade, and I am, therefore, compelled
to march on theirroute to the mouth of the'Wythlacoochee,
where they expect to embark for New Orleans, on their
way home. This movement will enable me to strike at the
two chiefs mentioned above, and to cover the frontier ; but
had I the control of my measures, I could employ the force
to much more advantage, in a succession of attacks along
the Ocklawaha, and thence down the Wythlacoochee."

COMMERCE OF CHICAGO, (ILLINOIS.)

The rapid growth of CHICAGO is a subject of remark and
wonder throughout the Union. The growth of the town,
however, bears no comparison with that of its commerce,
as will be seen in the following statements: In 1833, there
were, as we are informed, but four arrivals from the lower
lakes, viz. two brigs and two schooners, say 700 tons. In
1835, there were about 250 arrivals, nearly all of which
were schooners, averaging about 90 tons burden each, or
22,500 tons in all. In 1836, the first arrival was on the
18th day of April. From that time to the first day of De-
cember, 226 days, 456 vessels (49 steamboats, 10 ships and
barques, 26 brigs, 363 schooners, and 8 sloops) arrived,
averaging 57,550 tons, as follows: 85 ships, steamboats,
barques, and brigs, at 250 tons each, 21,250 tons; 363
schooners at 100 tons each, (many of them carry 150 to 200
tons,) 36,300 tons: or 57,550 tons in all, without including
the sloops. To give a more concise view of the increase of
our commerce, for the years above named, we place it in the
following order:
Year. Number of arrivals. Average tonnage.
1833 4 700
1835 250 23,500
1836 456 57,550
As there are several vessels now on the way, which will
arrive here this season, we may safely state the tonnage at
60,000 being an increase of 59,300 tons in three years!
Is there any other town within the borders of our Union
which can boast of as large an increase in its commerce as
this We challenge 1-Chicago American.

CHRISTMAS IN PHILADELPHIA.
PROM THE PENNSYLVANIA SENTINEL OF DEC. 26.
CHRISTMAs.-We never saw a festival more generally
celebrated or "more heartily enjoyed than Christmas has
been this season. Christmas comes but once a year.'
Alack I that it should be so! If we had our will, we
would have at least a score of domestic and holiday festi-
vals, scattered pleasantly through the year. Your fourths
t: of July are a rough and unchristian -enjoyment; they deal
tv wholly in masculine pleasures, and are accordingly forced
to put up with drunkenness without exhilaration, and noise
i without pleasure. St. Nicholas, on the contrary, gathers
all round his shrine-the venerable- grandsire, the manly
father, his smiling partner, the ardent youth, blushing
maid, and, noisier than all, shouting master and romping
Smiss are all there, and are all happy. Religion and do-
mestic affection throw their influence over the day. It is
the -festival of hearts-the festival of home. Commend us
e ever to Christmas--ancient, merry-hearted Christmas, witt
all its old observances, its sacred recollections, and home-
s bred joys
The scene presented by the streets of our city on Christ
s mas eve was one of the most peculiar and joyous we eve:
witnessed. The evening was clear and pleasant; and the
T streets were crowded with children. The toy and confec
I tionary shops were filled with a happy concourse of tnhe
r little folk. Each little fellow was happy as a prince
t Drums, trumpets, whistles, were all in requisition-'an
such a concert has not been heard since the days of Babel
Several hundred little boys collected, and made a military
p procession-a more joyous one was never witnessed. Tha
m- usic was peculiar, and, if somewhat inharmonious, wa
Y certainly enlivening.
- Yesterday the city was all, alive. Every heart was glad
n every face was smiling. Ten thousand turkeys smoke'I
upon the altar of St. Nicholas-a hundred thousand re
s joining disciples gathered around it. May our goodly cit
enjoy many such days; and may we be there to see!"
n
e NEW HUMAN BEINes.-Hotels and public houses have
phraseology of-their own. On an inquost held somn year
a since on the body of a gentleman whio died suddenly at a Lor
- diona hotel, one of the witnesses, Mr. Boots, deposed that th
r chambermaid desired him to run for a doctor, as Numaber foe
n was in a fit." And at one of the suburban tea gardens, a waite
loaded with a tray containing tea and m ullins for twelve, wha
observed a bolt before the bill was paid, roared out to & brother
attendant, Run, run, Bob, there's two teas and a'glassof bran
e dy and water escaping over the paling; catch 'em."


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N OTICE.-A meeting of the citizens of the First Ward is
requested at the room over the West Market, this even-
ing, (Wednesday, 28th instant.) The object of the meeting is
the organization ofa Fire Company, and to take soine steps to
obtain from Congress a charter for a Fireman's Insurance Com-
pany. dec 28

a CARD.-Dr. PLANTOU invites the patrons and friends
AtL of Internal Improvement to see his Models of a railroad
car and of a canal steamboat, now in the Rotundo of the Capi-
tol. 'He at thile same time offers his services as a Surgeon Den-
tist to the Public. Dr. P. may be found at Mrs. Turner's, oppo-
site Brown's Hotel. dec 28-eo3t
W ILLIAM B. TODD, six doors west of Brown's
Hotel, has lately received a fresh supplyof-
Gentlemen's Beaver and Silk Hats, Otter, Fur, Seal,
Muskrat, Sealette and Cloth Caps
Ladies' Beaver and Silk Plush Bonnets
Medicated Russia Hare Skinas
Ladies' Fur Cloak Linings, Capes-
Lynx Boas and Mulfs, Swansdown Trimming
Splendid white Cashmere Boas
Carriage Mats, Buffalo Robes
Leather Hat Cases. dec 23-7tif
F 1[OOWARD'S Improved Chemical Chloride'
S Soapa.-This deservedly celebrated Soap may at all
times be had, wholesale and retail, of the subscriber, inventor
'and sole proprietor. For sale, also, at most of the Drug and
Fancy stores in Washington, Georgetown, and Albtxandria.
N. B.-The genuine will have the signature of the proprie-
tor on the envelope of each cake.
FLODOARDO HOWARD,
Chemist and Druggist, near Seven Buildings.
dec 20-2aw3wif


C ECKLOFF, Merchant Tailor, Penn. Avenue,
0 has the pleasure of informing his customers and the Pub-
lic that he lis just completed a Fashionable and Elegant Stock
of Fall and 'Winter Goods, comprising Cloths, Cassimeres, and
Vestings, of every quality and color.
Also, Ready-inade Clothing, as heretofore, made of then most
fashiommable goods and newest style, to which, with a full assort-
ment of fancy articles, he respectfully calls the attention of a
discerning Public. nov 56-co2nmos.


DANGERS OF THE SEAS.

Loss of the brig Gambia, of NeA York.-The brig Gam-
bia. which sailed from New York for Lisbon on the 16th
ultinmo, was Capsized on the iiil-it of the 19th, while lying
too in a ga!e of wind, in the ,.,11 The captain, first mate,
-and a passenger were in the cabiirat the time, and were
drowned. The survivors. seven in number, clustered
around the forecastle, the only part out of the water, and
'lashed themselves to the bitts. Here, for three days and
nights, they were exposed to.the peltings-of the storm, with
nothing to eat but a few raw potatoes, and no water. At
this period, two of the crew died, and the cabin Iboy died
raving mad; and, to satisfy the cravings of hunger, the
boy was cut up for food On the night of the 22d the re-
mainder of the crew, who had succeeded' in reaching the
main-top, saw a vessel-to leeward, which proved to be the
ship New England, on board of which they were taken,
and landed in Boston.
The names of the-survivors are Joseph Couilland, se-
cond mate, Samuel Presson, Andrew Smith, and A. Smith.
Those drowned were Captain French, M. Jordan, mate,
and John Dean, passenger; Jacobs, the cook, Andrew
Paterson, seaman, and a Portuguese boy,- named Alexan-
der, died from fatigue and hunger.

By the arrival ofthe ship Brandt at New Bedford, (Mass.)
news has been received of the loss in the'Mozambique Chan-
nel, in the months of June or July last. of-Captain Edw'd
Howland, of Dartmouth, master of the ship-Lalla Rhook,
of this port, and G. Howland, (son of Stephen Howland,)
3d mate, and a boat's crew. belonging to said ship.
The particulars which have come to hand are as fol-
lows: The mate, William C. Swain, and second mate,
were absent, chasing whales, for several' hours, and, on
returning on board the ship, learnt from the ship-keeper
that whales came up near the ship soon after their leaving.
Capt. Howland lowered his boat, and fastened to a sperm
whale, which was the last that was seen either of the un-
fortunate captain or boat's crew. We have been unable
to learn the names of the seamen who composed the boat's
crew. "
A letter dated York, Me. Dec. 20, gives the following
particulars of another shipwreck :
I hasten to inform you that three dead bodies were
brought into this harbor last evening, taken from a wreck
partly under water, on York ledge, where she was disco-
vered on Monday morning. She is a vessel of about 100
tons; Lean (probably Leander) is discovered on her stern,
but where from is not yet discovered. Two bodies, two
men and a boy, were found lashed to the taffrail and lar-
board quarter. The vessel is a schooner,, two white stars
on her stern, white streak around her; trimmings green.
The main swifter shrouds new, new flying jib and boom,
remnant of colors fastened at fore rigging, decks ripped up,
and not known whether she is light or loaded; probably an
eastern built. One of the men about 30, one probably 50,
and the boy about 16."


RAILROAD A-RRANGEMENT.
S8Until further notice the cars will depart as
follows:
P Fromr Washington for Baltimore,
AT HALF PAST NINE O'CLOCK A.M.
AND
AT HALF PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
From Baltimore for Washington,
AT NINE O'CLOCK A. M.
AND
AT A QUARTER PAST THREE O'CLOCK P. M.
dec 28-d6t&w6t [Alex. Gaz. & Met.]


FRESH ARRIVALS-No. I.
As a passenger in the steamboat from the city of Brotherly
Love, I was much amused at the sight of, and to hear the obser-
vations and jokes of some very learned and-scientific men, by
their remarks or, the persons who arrived here this morning in
the railroad cars from Baltimore. One, whom I supposed to be
perfectly acquainted with the structure of the human eye, very
rudely asked Dr. WVILLIAMs, the Oculist, if the one nearest to
him was a Lion or T iger? No, sir, replied Dr. Williams, "it
is one of the Lambs- and those who insult them are the Lions
and theTigers." I afterwards learned, in thecars this morning
from Baltimnore,from thepatients themselves, the following in-
teresting facts: That one of the "Lions and Tigers" had
been totally dark from her birth, but who now sees A second
said sh a had been nearly blind fifteen or sixteen years, but
could now see to read large print. A third said she had been
blind eight years, or nearly so, but that she is now, at the
age of twenty-four years, learning to read. A fourth said
that she was blind three or four years, and totally dark seven
weeks, yet now sees every object distinctly! A fifth, a little
girl, about ten years of age, said elie had disease in the eyes
and eyelids for many years, nearly amounting to blindness,
which was very distressing No one in the profession at Phi-
ladelphia (said the young woman who had been blind eight
years) could relieve her in the least degree they said as she
grew up to womanhood she would grow out of it, as it was ow-
ing to the impurities of her blood. Her eyes now appeared to
me no worse than mine, after so long journey. All the above-
mentioned persons appear to regard the Oculist as their greatest
benefactor, and declared, all of them, if they had not been aban-
doned by Mr. Williams, by his quitting the city of Philadelphia
and Baltimore,that their cures would have perhaps been perfect
as all the women declared that they had not lost any of the
benefit they had derived!!
Excuse this scrawl, as I am just arrived from New York.
AN OBSERVER.
P. S. 1 had foi gotten to add that all of the ladies (except one
who resides in Baltimore) declared that they had been attend-
ed to by all the very first physicians and oculists in Philadelphia
for years, and abandoned by them all as incurable.
Friday, December 23, 1836.
FRESH ARRIVALS-No. 2.
TO THE EDITORS OF THE CITY PAPERS.
Gentlemen : I was so pleased the whole of the past night
at having yesterday done my duty, that I wasinduced, this morn-
ing, to find out the females who were brought herein the Steam
Packet and Railroad ears from Philadelphia and Baltimore, by
the English Oculist, Dr. WILLIADS.
1 will begin with the lady from the last named city. Mrs.
Foley, in answer to my questions, said she was aged forty years,
lives with her children and grand-children in Liberty street,
Baltimore. Said she had been sometimes totally blind, at others
nearly so, during the whole period of fifteen, or sixteen years.
Said she never applied to any physician or oculist, from herap-
prehensions of being made worse, but that, onDr. Williams's ar-
rival in Baltimore, she, with upwards of a hundred other per-
sons, of all ages, attended upon him every day, at the Baptist
Church, until his departure.
SI asked if she had received benefit? In answer, said she
could now see to read large letters, and she well knew another
poor woman, named Margaret Vanderford, who had been blind
nine years, but who was also restored to sight by Dr. Williams
within fourteen days. On my asking her wohy Margaret was
not also with Dr. Williams, said that the Doctor wemit up to the
almshouse yesterday morning, and requested Mr. Holten, the
keeper, to allow her to go down with him to General Smith, the
Mayor of Baltimore, in order that he might obtain a certificate
oflier being in a measure restored to sight, promising the keep-
er thatmhe would send her back again to the almshouse in a
close carriage; but, I understand that that honorable gentle-
man (Mr. Holten) insulted Mr. Williams by positively refusing
him his demand, slating that lie would not lend his assistance to
such an abominable imposition. Then, sir, you refuse to let
the poor woman, that I have restored to sight, go with me to the
Mayor." ." Yes, sir, I do refuse." Dr. Williams then told me
tliat he put on lis ibat ant came away. Is it possible, thought
I, that there can be such a man in tile United States.
Mrs. Foley also informed me that she knew a gentleman,
aged forty-three years, who was born totally dark on one eve,
and almost so on the other, who was so farrestored to sight as
perfectly to see the light, and also to distinguish many objects
without knowing what' they were.
Another gentleman, lshe said, she knew had been blind up-
wards often years, by what is called a gutta serena, aiho is also
so much benefited in- Ils eyes thoughh Ire enjoys very bad
health) as to be able to walk without a' guide.
Another gentleman, who was formerly a. master of a vessel,
and who had lost the sight ofone eye, now sees with both.
Another, a colored man, who said lie had been blind in both
eyes ten years, but now sees with both.
Another, a colored young woman, aged fourteen years, whom
I heard tell General Smith that she was born with the sight of
one eye only, but now she sees with both.
Samn sure, also, of many children having been brought to the
Church, totally blind in both eyes, whom some of them their
mothers declared had been blind from their birth, but that they
now see every object.
I will only mention another, which is the daughter of an inti-
mate friend of my own, whose case is noticed by the Mayor of
Baltimore, namely, a little girl aged eight years, whom I know
to have been afflicted with blindness ever since she was an in-
fant. Sometimes she could see, and sometimes h-he was blind,
until Dr. Williams came to Battimore, at which time she was
totally blind, but within one hour she was so far restored to
sight, in presence of several clergymen, as to be able to see
every object distinctly ; which benefit continues to this day.
All theladies knew (they said) a great many other cases which
they would intorm me of at any time. 1 therefore must post-
pone the third and last part till Monday. OBSERVER.
AN OBSERVER.


WASHINGTON, Saturday morning.
OARDIN G.-Mrs. SAWKINS can accommodate a small
goo family with Board, an excellent Parlour anad three or four
'good Bed Rooms, at the corner of Twelfth and F streets.
dec 2S-4t
N EW-YEAR'S PRESENTS.-GARRET ANDER-
SON has this day received an addition to his selection of
New-yeer's Presents. Persons wishing to make splendid Pre-
sents will find it advantageous to then to call and see his assort--
ment, which is entirely new, at P. Thompson's old stand, Penn.
Avenue, between llth and 12th streets. dec 28-3t


NATIONAL THEATRE-WASHINGTON.
Second night of Mss' CLIFTON, the highly celebrated Native
Actress, who is engaged for a few nights only.
By particular desire, will be performed the ROSE OF KER-
RY, being positively the last night it can be performed this
season.
THIS EVENING, DEC. 29,
Will be performed Sheridan Knowles' play of the
HUNCHBACK.
Julia, Miss CLIFTON.
To conclude with (by particular desire
THE ROSE OF KERRY;
Or, Murder Will Oet.
Miss CurptOa's third appearance on' Tlursday evening.
In preparation a new comedy called Snakes in the Grass,
with a strong cast of characters, which will be produced on,
Thursday evening,
0IVIC ANDt MILITARY BALL.-At a large and
%-- respectable meeting, held at the Masonic Half -on the eve
ning of the 22d inst.,for the purpose of celebrating'.the anniver-
sary of the Battle of 1New Orleans, by a Civic and Military Ball,
to be held at the Masonic Hall on the evening ofthe 9th of Jan-
nary, 1837, the following gentlemen were unanimodisly eleata
Managers :
Col. Peter Force, Capt. 3. Mason,
Capt. J. H. Bradley, Capt. J. H. Doughty,
Capt. J. A. Blake, Lieut. R. FPrance,
Cupt. J. Bronaugh, Lieut. G. Naylor,
Lieut. T. Lloyd, Lieut. S. M..',: le.:.n,
Lieut. J. Y. Young, Lieit. J. 1.11:,
Lieut. W. H. Mauro, Lieut. N. P. Causing,
-Lieut. 3. Ragan, Mr. C. F. Lowrey,
Lieut. C. Calvert, Mr. E. Raymond,
Mr. W. Kirkwood, Mr. J. W. Maury,
Mr. G. Hill, Mr. Samuel M. Bootes
Mr. S. Cunningham, Mr. W. W. Berry,
Mr. N. Callan, Jr., MI. G. W. Phillips.
dec 28


CARUSI'S SALOON.
N EW YEAR'S COTILLION PARTY.-Mr. L
CARUSI respectfully informs his friends, members of
Congress, strangers, and time citizens of tha city and- District,
that his first COTILLION P.\t f1\ ',11 ake place on Mon-
day, the second day of .-. ,,,, .,, at his Grand Saloon, to
which they are respectfully invited. The saloon and other de-
partments are properly and tastefully fitted up, and every comn-
fort and convenience provided.
g_ Ladies who have not received their cards of invitation,
will please send in their address to Mr. L. Carusi.
n Tickets of admission one dollar ; to be had at the fancy
store of Mr. Fischer, and at tlie door of the Saloon.
dcec24-iftd
SOIREE DE DANSE.-Mr. F. C. LABHE trespect-
fully informs the ladies and gentlemen of Washington,
Capitol Hill, and Navy Yard, that his second Soiree de Danse
will take place on Capitol Hill, on Friday, 30th. For tickets
apply at his dwelling,ror on Capitol Hill. I .
Ladies having received invitations for the first Soiree, are-
considered to be invited for all the season to both place's, arid
those wishing to attend will please to give Mr. 'D.. itfolr-mation,
and they shall be attended to.
N.B. Mr. F. C. L.'s second quarter ofinstiiction in dancing
and waltzing will commence ona Monday, the 2d"bf January, on
Capitol Hill, and on Tuesday, the 3d, at his dwelling.
dec 27-3t .


FURNITURE SALE.-By Edward Dyer.-On
Thursday, 29th inst. at I Io'clock A. M. if fair, I shall sell
in front o the auction store, a variety of Household Furniture,
Bueli ns
Sideboards, Mahogany dining and breakfast Tables
Handsome Card Tables, Bureaus,- Bedsteaas-,Feather Bedi
Handsome Rush seat and Windsor Chairs
Spring seat Sofa, very superior' '
Handsome maple French post Bedstead
S1I new Carpet
Maple Workstand, Washstand,.ClothesPresses
Crockery, China, and Glassware
With many other articles
Rotary, Cooking, arid other Stoves, Grates, &c .
dec 28-2t EDW. DYER, Auctioneer.
Vj O GROCERS-Peremptory Sale.-On Friday,
-S- 30th instant, at 12 o'clock M. I shall sell, at the ware-
house, corner ofC and 10th streets, without reserve-
9 hhds of prime Porto Rico Sugars, 10 bbls do
5 bbis and 1 cask Lamp Oil, Pepper, Teas -
G qr casks of very pure and superior Champagne Brandy
I half-pipe superior Teneriffe, & 2 qr-casks She Bry-Wines
10 qr casks dry Malaga and Marseilles Madeira do
2 parts of pipes old Holland Gin, -excellent
6 boxes St. Julien and Lafitte .Claret, basketsChamp. good
10 baskets best Olive Oil, boxes bunch Raisins,.
50 drums superior fresh Smyrna Pigs, &e. &c.
Terms will be very liberal, and every inducement- offered to
purchasers, as the sales of the above must be forthwith closed.
dec 28-3t D.. El). DYER,. Auctioneer.,
deci28-3t e1eOh ,,-
--X ,t. .;, F,. '" .:.. r.,-M ..... .:., ,\.. ,...,_ .;, -....I 5 :
Dupuytren's Lecture;- -_.%. .'.1 uo.. I vol. 83.
Louis s Pathological it.:.. .r.: '. .... PI',ir.ul, 1 vol. $2.
SECOND-HAND BOOKS.
Constantly on sale an increasing stock of Second-hand&Books,
in the various languages-many rare and valuable. They will
be sold low, for cash, or exchanged for others, with a view to
furnish an interesting variety.
School Classics always on hand, at about lialf-pri e.
JAS. RIORDAN,
Antique Book Store, Penn. Avenue.
V' Wanted, a copy of Cleveland's Mineralogy.
dec 28.
OOD.-1,000 or 1,500 cords of Wood for sale, cut or
standing, on the lands of Mr. REDIN, about two-miles
from the city and town, between the race-ground and Pierce's
mill. Offers can be addressed to him at Georgetown, or made
to the subscriber, his agent, on the land.
RICH'D SOUTHERN.
Wood-cutters and haulers wanted. Wood for sale on the
land. .-dec 28-3t
N OTICE IS HfEREBY GIVEN to all persons hold-
ing Certificates of Stock of the Corporation of Washing-
ton, thatnthe interest on the same, due for the quarter ending on
the 31st instant, will be paid to the stockholders, on or after the
10th day of January, on application at the Bank of Washington
Given under my hand this 27th December, 1836.
WM. HEWITT,
dec 28-tJan10 Register..
Off1UGE'S HISTORY OF PAPER MONEI
AND BANKING IN THE U. STATES, to.
gether with the Provincial and Continental, with an hnquir;
into the Principles and Rffects of the System, the whole intend
ed as an exposition of the way in which paper money and me
ney corporations affect the interest of different portions of th
community. An additional supply of the above (second stereo
type edition) is just received in a cheap pamphlet formal and ft
sale by P. TAYLOR, who has also for sale, at the lowestprice
a large collection of the most esteemed .works on Bankini
Currency, Commerce, Statistics, Taxes, &c. &c. and' all- oth(
branches of Political Economy, by Bentham, Say,- McCelloc
Adam Smith, Cooper, Phillips, Malthus, Raymond, Simpso
Chalmers, Seybert, Marshall, Taylor, Oddy, Pitkin, &c. &
and many others, at time Waverly Circulating Library, immed
atcly east of Gadsby's Hotel. dec 28


NRUIT,ORNAMENTAL TREES, & SHRUB!
F For sale at Clairmont Nurseries, near Balt
more.-The subscriber hereby notifies his friends and custom
ers in the City of Washington, and others that he has a lar
stock of the above articles, covering about twenty acres, offi
thlrify plants of proper size for transplanting, carefully raisE
and the fruit trees correctly grafted under his immediate supt
intendence, consisting of the.new and most valuable varieties
'apple, pear, plumi, cherry, peach, nectarine, apricot, graI
quince, gooseberry, currant, raspberry, strawberry, figs, filbem
and English walnut; European and'American'Linden, Chin(
Silantias, English, Scotch, and'Dutch eln, abeal orsilver-leai
.oilar, horse chestnut, catalpa, yellow locust, European
t'uerican larch, Weymouth pine, balsam fir, baln of gilead,
silver fir, garden and East India roses, a very extensive ass<
ent, of best shlde and colors, and the same as to double d
as. My stock of other shrubs, vines, creepers, and sAccul
')ots is full, and good sized plants; all Whicm'dwill besold
ery moderate terms. For very many articles and prices,
printed catalogues, to be had gratis of his agents, G. S. F.
S.UHAs, Druggist, City of Washington, andu G. PAnQUHAR, At
1,.ndria. ROBT. SINCLAII
P. S. One hundred thousand trees now ready to dig, of
u'us multicaulis and white Italian mulberry, and cutting
'bhe former, which are from two to six feet high will be sold
moderate prices by the 100 or 1,000. R.
oct "27-lawtawif
INES.-Splendid Madeira, Sherry, and Pi
The subscribers beg leave to notify members of C
gross and others, that they have 'on hand, remaining from
sale on the instant, a few of the splendid wines'tfien offe
and have since received, of same importations, an additions
of other sorts, which they were then unable to supply the
mand for; all of which will be disposed of at very lowa pr
Among them are splendid old East ldia Maderias, Sherrys,
Ports, which they hesitate not' to say cannot be surpasse,
quality.
They are authorized to hold themselves pledged for the
racter and reputation of these particular wines.
P. MAURO & SON,
dec 21G-dtif Opposite Brown's Hot
P OLK'S HOUSE.-This establishment i desij
particularly, for the accommodation of Ladies and
Ilemen visiting Washington at any season, transiently or z
journers-for whose comfort no trouble or expense is sparn
A mess of Members of Congress can be ac.aommodat,
usual, without interfering vith the c.',I, i, ,, n2mem1ni.
It is so near the Railroad Depot, 0",,,, 0"41. e:'-.1,ur tha
need to ride ; and a porter will ba in attendance to recel
baggage intended for this house, don 3-d4












'(Continued from the first page.)
.irty-.-ne previ tis years which had elapsed after the Mint went
into operation, The amount coined during the past twelve
months aloine'htitaterthjan that during the whole of the first
.aixteenhyebrller its establishment.
n-e.Ablsiiiaportant and graifyingeoniequence, which has re-
suited principally from the present policy.and system as to the
currency, has been, that of all the gold coi'ed before August,
S34g, .ameanli ngto about $12,000,tO0, probtb'ly not $1,000,000
then,remnained in the country, "undef that smallH amount only a
aery ihimiasative portion "was in active circulation-. Indeed, be-
'fore 1834, our coinage of gold was of little barredt except to
purify and prepare the bullion for exportation, and for the use
of foreign mints. But the great mass oftnear $10,000,000,
since coined, undoubtedly.ermains in the country, and an in-
creased and -increasingportioa of it is in active and convenient
circulation. To promote this desirable end,-a larger proportion
,than usual of quarter eagles has been recently struck; and the
-whole number of .gold pieces, of every kind, .made since the
beginning of the-present-year, is about 81,000,000, and almost
equals the &htife number'toined during the whole forty years
previous to the new coinage. The change in the amount of '
specie of all kinds, in the country, during the last three years,
"is"highly gratifying as an earnest of a more solid basis to a pa
per circulation, already too large in proportion, and as a securi-
ty, not only to those classes who are most safe in the employ-
iment of a metallic currency for allcommon purposes, but to the
.banking-institutions'themselves in periods 'of panic and unfavo-
rable balances in foreign trade.
The whole specie in the country in October, 1833, when the
public deposits were removed from the United- States Batik,
'aid'not probably exceed thirty millions, and the portions of this
,in barks is'not supposed to hare exceeded twenty-six millions; i
"while 'now the whole specie in the country probably exceeds "
seventy-three itillions, and of that the portion in banks is be-
lieved to be over forty-five millions, leaving twenty-eight mil-
luqns' in active circulation. d
The Piaer circulation within the above period has also beef i
greatly iand unfortunately enlarged.
From about eighty millions, which was then the supposed
aggregate, after deducting the large amount of twenty millions
for notes held in different banks, it has probably risen, and
'chiefly within eighteen months past, to about one hundred and
twenty millions. But this increase, though great, it will be i
seen, is not half so great a relative increase as has taken place
in the whole specie in the country, nor quite as great as has
happened in the specie of the lanks alone. t
Computing that the paper in active cihculation in the United a
States has generally averaged about two to one of specie on hand
in the banks, and was, in October, 1833, about three to one, or
near fifty per cent. over the usual proportion, the comparative t
amounts of specie at the several returns from 1833 to' 1836 pre-
seated a.very favorable change ; had become greater than the t
usual proportion, and even now, in all the banks, taken as a t
whole, are somewhat improved since 1833. But they have t
much deteriorated the last year and a half. Again, while the c
-whole amount, as well as proportion of specie in the country, is .s
'much greater than it was two years ago, and the proportion is
ample for the paper circulation in several of the banks and States, n
yet it is manifest that many institutions in other States have of" o
late departed more widely from the proper and safe proportions
than their peculiar location or advantages for business, however h
favorable, tight warrant on sound banking principles. p
As some illustration of the general changes on those points li
since 1833, the following brief exhibit, in round numbers, and in a
a tabular form, prepared partly from actual returns and partly an
from estimates, may be useful o 0e
d
Dates. Paper in act- Specie in act- Specie in c
ive circulation, ive circulation, banks. .

Near Oct. 1833 $80,000,000 $4,000,000 $25,000,000 I
Jan. 1, 1834 76,000,000 12,000,000 27,000,000 be
'Jan. 1, 1835 82,000,000 18,000,000 43,000,000,
Jan. 1, 1836 108,000,000 23,000,000 ,.' ,
D'ec. 1, 1.836 120,000,000 28,000,000 I /".1 is
te
'At'ill these periods, except the 1st of January last, twenty- pr
millions of paper have been computed as issued, but not in ac-
tive circulation among the People, being held by other banks, fi
-and so far considered as equivalent to a deduction of a like, m
amount from'their own'dirculation, liable to be redeemed in spe- si
cie. On the 1st of January last the amount so held was about is
thirty-two millions, and in-July last the active paper (,ii ... 1 sat
was also probably some millions larger than it now is.- ,.i e x- co
hibit makes-the whole active circulation, ofboth paper and spe- to
tic, about 86 50 per head of our whole estimated population in
October, 1833; about 86 50 .in January, 1834; about 87 in Ja-
nuary, 1835; about 88 50 in January, 1836; and near 810 at re
Athe present time.- Though this is a less proportion of the circu- it,
rating medium than is now usual in the countries of Europe or
which are most commercial, and where spezie-is more used co
thhn bills, yet it is a larger ratio than has ever been supposed to "
be necessary in ti.- Ur,.-i '.., **.. .-r,. .. the character
oftwo or three ru.li.:.- ..tt'.:..r ..u :t, rr I* th ,,,,,
The average here has usually been about t 86 per head; nor to
has the amiiunt ever, before 1811, been supposed much to ex-
a n
coed$5; amd, at ne [. -.', St. .I: .. .it 7 per head, f
except under the ..'.:-;,., t.:r..:r .::. '..'jr.. tm, close of or
the late war, by wh.,. ,, t. i *, i a i. ,imated to have reach- Sh
ed $11 per head.
While our country has, of late years, become more commer- be
-cial and wealthy, and has a larger portion of specie in use, see
Which circumstances would somewhat increase the necessary es
and proper amount of circulation per head, it has, as counteract- be
ing causes to these, greatly increased in the ease and quickness -G
ofcommunication, whether by mail or otherwise, and in the use
of bills of. exchange,.and drafts instead of money for distant Co
operations. ,. -
Hence ourcirculationduringthe pasttwelve months,at$8 50
and $10 per head, is deemed excessive, and, as in 1816, one
great cause of'the exorbitan-t prices which have prevailed in re-
lation to almost every article, as well as of the extraordinary co
propensity to overtrading and.speculation which has pervaded tar
almost every section of the country. It is true that, during a bee
Few months past, the paper'proportion of our circulation has, as cor
beforee suggested, been considerably reduced; but till that, with the
mar present large amount of specie in circulation added, falls as nu(
low as'abdut $7'perhesd;, ohr the bank notes to about $80,000,000, the
instead of $120,000,000, the currency may be considered as too
-edundant, and in an unnatural and inflated condition, hou
The cr-edit system has not only undergone an unusual ex- hen
)arision'among individuals and States, but it has, by means of deo
these inordinate paper issues, penetrated more deeply than is to
afe into the whole currency of the country, and rendered that con
vhich, as money, is and should be deemed the substitute or an- tor
agonist of credit, dependent too much on credit itself, and sub- son
act to many of the dangers and fluctuations in value insepara- lob
Ie from 'mere credit, rather than possessing the intrinsic and I
uniform value attached to specie. con
- This conditibi is believed to have been produced chiefly by the
trmerous incorporations of new banks, without suitable legal: froi
restrictions, in many States, on either the amount of discounts for
r the paper issued, in proportion to the specie on hand, and by car
ie excessive demands for money tlius tempted and stimulated the
iaid an unusual number of extravagant adventurers in lands, ble
ocks, and trade. oth
These, acting together, and in some degree influencing and strut
getting each other, have induced many banks to hazard un- T
tasonable and indiscreet issues, as well as loans, to supply the cas
ants of stch an' extraordinary crisis, and which there is good han
rason to believe (however large a proportion of-specie fortu- any
itely exists in the country, and which may tend sooner to avert Uni
te usual evil consequences from the above state of things) will office
oduce much distress, embarrassment, and ruin, before this T
tecie can be duly equalized, the excesses of paper sufficiently is p
irtailed, and the exorbitant discounts gradually lessened to and
airsafe and'properlimits. sugl
This increase of about forty millions, or one-third of the pa- T
'r circulation, in a year'and a half, is a sudden and great fluctu- beet
ion, which never could occur in a currency entirely metallic, ed
td which'wotild probablydruring the past year, as in 1811, have the
.en much greater, had not the larger proportion of specie now fran
the country, and the increasing disuse of small bills, operated and
anglyas preventive checks.
But even now, the excess has been sufficient to constitute the gol
ief cause for the artificial augmentation in prices-an unnatu- cha
I stimulus to speculation, and-a-rapid vacillatforiinthe regular the
>des of doing business, which cannot, under sound views of tion
litical.economy; be tooegreatly deprecated, or their recurrence oth
, carefully guarded against. age
These sudden and great vibrations in the value of property, T
'or, and debts, however-prdduced, or however flattering to Fay
my at first, are in the endidangerous to all classes, as well as nity
nous to commerce and'every species of regular industry, a'it
But.should paper issues, according to anticipation, continue to strui
reduced, as during the four months past, by tile natural and V
iservative reaction ofcommerial'.eauses, athiome and abroad, to tl
I by the general wise and increasing discontinuance of' the on,
of small bank notes, through State legislation, and provisions again
a similar characterandtendenej-by Congress, as at ithe last aten
ision, in the general appropriation act, and in the deposits law, int
I by the diminished receipt of all bank notes, tie last few pria
nths, atthe different land offices for the sales of the public Si
nain, a sounder and a less artificial state of things will ere are,
g return, beet
Phe prospect on'the s.ibject of the currency is, therefore, on bride
whole, becoming more satisfactory, even without further man
islation. But if all the States would unite in repressing en-,, ent
-ly the circulation.of smallnotes, and in rigidly restricting all prim
ter issues, so as not in any case to exceed three to one ofspe- other
on hand, which would be about two of paper in active circu- there
on to one of specie on hand, and would add a few judicious gest
stations on the amount ofdiscounts, as-cempared with the ca- 183
tl and deposites, and on the safe kind of security to be taken press
them, with the requirement of frequent publicity of their pent
lition in detail, and frigid accountability to periodical exa- at a
salons by legislative authority,-the time is not distant when lions
currency would become quite stable. Indeed, it deserve A


aeration whether, under such circumstances, the whole
opolies of banking might not, with public advantage, be en-
ay abolished, and the banking privilege, under the above Hi
eral restraints, securities, limitations, and requirements,
ieaarly if the personal liability of the stockholders is super-
sd, might not safely be thrown open to all. "e r
larger amount of tax, or bonus to the States, would proba-
be thus collected, without any increase in the ustal rate ; -


and it is belifived, that the interest now paid by borrows
would, by these changes, become, at an early day, sensibly rt
duced2 But, without the most careful and rigid restriction
such a measure in this country, whatever may have been i
operations elsewhere, would, under our different institution
and habits, probably increase rather than diminish any existing
evils in the currency.
It is conceded'that these disproportionate issues by bankin
institutions are in fact much more frequent in regions where th
number of banks is small than where it is large, provided their
dhartets be similar in omitting prudent limitations c because, i
the former case, there is less vigilance, caution, and correction
produced by thq jealousies and interests of rival institutions, t
prevent excessive issues, and irregularand dangerous discounts
But the tendency to excessive trading, excessive credits an,
rash enterprises is so strong, and sometimes ungovernable ii
individuals, and in some respects equally or more so in corpora
tions, as to endanger the stability of both banks and business, on
less the power to manufacture paper is carefully restricted an,
wisely regulated, 'Thepresent amount of bank capital, as wel
as its increase for some years past, is another kindred topic c
some interest.
But space does not exist on this occasion for its full exposition
and at the same time it is not very alarming, except where i
has been aulthorited without proper limitation on paper issues
and without other prudent bank restrictions..
The whole bank capital in active operation is computed t
have been over $200,000,000 in 1833-4; 8231,000,000 in 1834-5
$250,000,000oin 1835-6; and near $50t000,000 morb has been au
thorized) m ost of which is supposed hot yet tob be in full opera
tion.
More facts will be exhibited on these points, and particular],
on the'amount of bank capital in each State, in a special report
soon tp be piesented..from the I.:. r-n.. n i.'. '.: '.'. ::, concern
ing the detailed condition of i.,e s.-l.: ..jol. p-,a the Ist o
January) 1836-.
Had it not been for the large sales of American stocks abroad
and the very high prices given there for our principal staples,
demand for specie, for export, would doubtless have arisen ert
this from our overtrading, and have greatly enhanced the pre
sent difficulties which someof the banks now experience, chief
ly from the great excess of paper in circulation. The compa-
rative value of specie being reduced by such excesses, the evi
would have been still more aggravated if those excesses hat
not become somewhat diminished, and sp&cie had not become
in greaterdemand here, in consequence of the circular as t(
the kind of 'roney receivable for the public lands, issued, by di-
rection of the President, in July lust. This demand has con-
tributed to retain and diffuse it wider, and to make its greal
and early export less probable than it otherwise would have
been. The other objects of that circular were gradually tc
bring back the practice5 in those payments, to what was deemed
to be the true spirit as well as letter four existing laws, and tc
what the safety of the public money in the deposits banks and
the desirable improvement'bf our currency seemed at that time
:o unite in rendering judicious. The reasons more in detail foi
themeasure are contained in the document itself, of which a
copy is annexed, (G.) Our moneyed operations have also been
somewhat affected by a few difficulties abroad in the nation
with which our -commercial intercourse is greatest, and whosE
monetary syste&r of lAte years, often beating with a pulse like
our own, is underinfluences nearly corresponding.
Since 1833, the paper circulation in England is s'uppostd tc
lave increased over sixteen millions of dollars, wb'ile the specie
possessed by'the banks has diminished over twventy-three mil-
ions. The whole circulation of private banks, joint-stock banks,
and the Bank-of England, is now probably about one hundred
and fifty-two. millions of paper to les than twenty-six millions
ofspecie on hand; whereas, in 1833, it was only about one hun-
dred and thirty-seven millions to fifty millions of specie, or now
from five and-six to one, but then only two and three to one:
consequently, an alarm and pressure have arisen there, which
are operating unfavorably here, though they have arisen not so
much from an excessive amount of both thIe paper and specie
currency united, as 'from the greatly increased disproportion,
being quite doobUt, between the amount of paper issues to the
pecie on hand by all the banks.
What portion of their paper was or is now held by each other,
i not known', but, as the bills of the Bank of England are a
snder by-all the private and joint-stock banks, the amount is
probably large.
Their banking system as a whole, with every supposed bene-
t to be derived from a national bank, is believed to be under
much more defective regulations as to excessive issues, exces-
ive diseoutits, and secrecy of condition and proceedings, than
s our own in most of the States of the Union. Indeed, so un-
itisfactoi-y has been its operations,-that they have recently be-
ome the subject of parliamentary inquiry, which it is proposed
resume and push much further at a subsequent session.
V'II.-LAND OFFICE.
Immediately alter the passage of the law at the last session,
*organizing the General Land Office,som' doubts arose whether
still remained attached to the Treasury Department, and the
pinion of the Attorney General was taken on the question. In
sequence of his ophicion, that the supervision over its con.
-r,. r. r r;,..5i h. -,, ,.jaI of the direction of the- President of
SU'ri.'.,t. o'. -, .e,... whose control that law now places all
e affairs of'the General Land Office, steps were taken by me
carry it into immediate effect. The result thus far has been
sensible diminution in the pressure of the business of that of-
ce, a betterr system of supervision and despatch for most of it,
nd much less delay in completing titles to the public domain.
should the'sales not continue very large during a few ensuing
ears, it is believed that the whole arrearages of business can
e disposed of, and the promptitude in all its future operations
cured; vwhih is so immediately important to the great West-
rn and Southwestern sections of the country, and more or less
beneficial to all, as well as creditable to the administration of the
government.
The report 'of the Commissioner will speedily be laid before
tngress in a-Separate communication, and contains many sug-
:stions which seem to deserve careful attention.
IX.--MISCELLANEOUS.
Great iitncoveniences have been sustained in many parts of the
untryby-an omission to repeal or modify the provisoes in the
riff act of '1832. A detailed report on this subject has once
en submitted by this Department; and the interests of the
immunity connected with the articles of hardware affected by
lse provisoes, and convenience in the execution of the reve-
e laws, appear to require the earliest attention of Congress to
a subject.
The revision of the presentsystem ofcompensation to custom-
use officers, with'the various changes in our collection laws
retofore recommended in connexion with that revision, is
emed very important to'thle mercantile community as well as
the Treasury:; and, at the same time, to the just and ratable
mpensation for arduous and responsible duties to many collec-
rs and other officers who are now inadequately paid, while
me receive al amount disproportioned to 'their situation and
bors.
In connexion with'this subject, and in addition to former re-
mmendations to Congress, as wellas the valuable report on
e safety of-steam-boilers, submitted by me at'the last session
m the Franklin Institute, it seems proper to urge earnestly
consideration the necessity for some provision for the more
reful management of steamboats navigated under papers from
e custom-houses- subjecting their commanders, and, in suita-
e cases, their owners, to the forfeiture of their papers, and
her severe penalties, in cases ofcarelessness or neglect, de-
uctive'to property or life.
The security of the public money would be promoted in many
ses by requiring bonds from district attorneys, through the
ids of som of whom large sums pass in collections, without
y collateral'obligation being given for the indemnity of the
ited States, as requireri in most analogous cases of public'
cers.
The act in respect to insolvent debtors, the execution of Which
placed in-the charge of this t)epartmetit, expires in June next,
1 the propriety of the further continuance of its provisions is
ggested to Congress.
Tha first four instalments due under'the French treaty have
en paid'in Paris since my last annual report. -The sum claim-
by our agent, and by this Department, exceeds that paid by
French Govetrnment in the amount of more than a million of
ics, and the difference is now the subject of correspondence
d negotiation.
What was actually paid has been remitted to this country in
d, and divided among the claimants. From the rates of ex-.
ange ant price of-gold, it was deemed-most advantageous to
claimants to have it senthome in that form, though a direc-
Swas subsequently given to substitute bills of exchange or
er modes of remittahee, if more profitable, but which the
nt did not find it expedient'or beneficial to do.
7he third instalment of the Neapolitan treaty, and the first
ments due on the inscriptions, under the treaty of indem-
Swith Spain, have also been since discharged with punctu-
y, and emitted here th a similar manner, under similar in-
uctions.
variouss other topics suggested in the last two annual reports
he consideration of Congress, and not yet finally legislated
the Department would earnestly, but respectfully, psesest-
in to its attemitsin. Among them may be more particularly
ntioned'the rebrganizatibn'of this Department, and the change
he commerc.ement of the fiscal year and of the annual appro-
stione.
everael Othet subjects 'have received prope u ittertion, which
connected with the official duties of the Treasury, or have
n specially devolved on its charge, such as the repairs of the
Igs across the Potomac; the survey Of the ,coaSt; and tlte
nfactsm'e sf weights and measures, not only foer thle differ-
custom-houses, but for each State in the Union; the appro-
ite sites for new marine hospitals; the practices pursued in
sr countries as -to the transportation of their pbor'citizens hi-
, who have been burdensome for their maintenance'; adi-
of the returns and condition of State banks, near January,
6; the shams disbirsdd underach appropriation made the '
sent yea-r, a'nd more detailed exhibits of aill the contingent ex-
ditures 6fthe Departmeri't. The most impaortahtofthese will,
in easly day, be made the subject of separate communica-


s.
ll which is'respectfully bnbmjitted bi '.
LEVI W00DBURY,-
'Secrdtar' of'the TI-easut'.
Ron. MkATi VAN BttBaE, .
President of the Senate 'U. S.

UITLWIER'S NOVETIS-50 ceifts .. ,-1.: ry hand-
Ssbm'ely printed upon fire p,per, are fcr el.- t.
st It TAYLOR.


SOTICE.-Washington Branchl
N Railroad.-On and after Monday
next, the 17th instant, the cars for Baltimore
will leave the Depot in this City, until fur-
3 other notice, at the following hours, viz. 91
A. M. and 5 P. M. oct 12
NOTICE TO WESTERN TRAVELLERS.
All seats taken at the office next door
to Gadsby's Hotel have a preferenceover
allother passengers to Wheeling orPitts-
_-^-^-^-M||kburg. All passengers from the West,
coming across in the mail coach from
Frederick to Washington, will have the preference over all
others going South. JAMES FOSSETT,
dec 20- m Agent.
FALL ARRANGEMENT FOR NOR-
S FOLK.-The Steamer COLUMBIA, James
Mitchell, Master, will, for the remainder of the season, make
but one trip a week. The Columbia will leave Washington on
Wednesday, the 19th inst., at 30 o'clock in the morning, and
will continue to do so the remainder of the season, and returning,
will leave Norfolk every Sunday at half past two in the evening.
By this arrangement, the Columbia will be able always to get in
in time for the Richmond boats, Portsmouth railroad,and Charles-
ton steamboats. Owing to the high price of woodand provisions,
we shall be compelled to raise the passage and fare to six dol-
lars. JAMES MITCHELL.
oct 15-dtf


M AIL ARRANGEMENT.-Washington City.
The Eastern Express Mail is closed at 10 minutes
before 6 P. M. and arrives at5 P. M.
The Southern Express Mail is closed at 2, and arrives at
half-past 2 P. M.
The Eastern, Southern, and Western Ordinary Mails
are closed at 9 P. M. and arrive in the night. The letters wvi'll
be ready for delivery at 8 in the morning.
Their Annapolis Mail is closed on Sunday, Tuesdaay and
Thursday, at 9 P. M. and arrives on Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 3 P. M.
The Warrenton and Winchester Way 'O12iils are closed on
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 9 P. M. and arrive on
Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday at 4 P, lq.
The FWinchester Mail is sent and received daily; via Balti-
more.
Th e Leesburg Mail is closed on Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday at 9 P. M. and arrives on Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, in the night.
ThS Port Tobacco Alailis closed on Sunday and Wednesday
at 9 P. M. and arrives on Wednesday and Saturday at 6 P. M.
The Brookevile M 1ail is closed on Thursday at 9 P. M. and
arrives on Sunday at 6 P. M.
dee 17-d''w WM. JONES, P. M..
p OBGER'S CUTLERY.-The Subscriber has re-
- ceived, per ship Alexandria, and direct from the manu-
factory of the celebrated cutlers, J. Rodgers & Sons, Ivory, Stag,
Buck, and Cocoa handled Knives and Forks, in sets of 51 and
55 pieces. Also,
Buck and Ivory Knives and Porks by the dozen
Razors, Plated Forks
Britannia Tea and Table Spoons
With a few sets of Dixon & Son's Britannia Ware, of the lat-
est and most fashionable patterns.
Which are offered at'a small advance by
EDW. S. WRIGHT,
dec 19-1w High st. Georgetown.


NEW BACON, HOG'S LARD, SUGAR, &c.-I
have received, and am receiving from the Western
country and the Eastern States, large supplies of the following
articles, viz.
10,000 pounds of New Bacon, IT.:.; ...d.
t100oo kegs new (family) Lard, N :.. t. 5' "
The bacon and lardard are the handsomest articles in the
provision order ever offered for sale in this market.
20,000 pounds of Havana Sugars, in bags containing from 50
to 75 lbs. at$8 CO per 100lbs. Families will now be
able to lay in their sugars lower than they have for
several years.
60 bags Coffee at low price
Come, oh come, do come to the cheap shop, No. 110 Water
street, Georgetown, D. C. and apply to
J. N. FEARSON.
P.S. Jackson City House for rent, in Georgetown, at $100
per annumn. Apply to J. N. P.
dec 19-6t
C OLLECTOR'S SALE.-Will be sold at public auc-
tion on Saturday, the 31st day of December next, the
following articles of furniture :
5 Feather Beds, 1 Bolster, and 1 Pillow
5 Mattresses
3 Bedsteads
2 Sideboards
1 Sofa, and I eight-day Clock.
Levied on as the property of A.Fullerand will be sold to satisfy
taxes due the Corporation of Washington. Sale to take place
in front of Edward Dyer's auction rooms, on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, at 12 o'clock M. W. W. BILLING,
dec 21-dts Collector 1st and 2d Wards.
OTICE.-The books and accounts of the late firm o
DESAUQUE & HUBER having been left in my charge,
with authority to collect all balances, all persons indebted to the
said firm, uapon open accounts or otherwise, are requested to call
atmy office and adjust and settle them.
dec 17-d1w JOS. H. BRADLEY, Attorney.
ClASH FOR 400 NEGROES, including bothsexes,
from twelve to twenty-five years of age. Persons having
servants to dispose of will find it to their interest to give me a
call, as I will give higher prices, in cash, than any other pur-
chaser who is now in this market.
I can at all times be found at the MECHANICS' HALL, now
kept by B. 0. Sheckle, an-l formerly kept by Isaac Beersl on
Seventli street, a few doors below Lloyd's Tavern, opposite the
Centre market. All communicationspromptly attended to.
JAMES H. BIRCH,
nov 7- dtf Washington City.
ROSSBURG FOR RENT.-ThisTavern and
r Farm, situated 8J miles from Washington, on the
11 Washington and Baltimore turnpike road, will be rent-
ed to a good tenant on accommodating terms. The tavern and
farm will be rerited together, or the tavern alone, if the tenant
should prefer it. The house is already furnished, and possession
will be given on the 1st of January next.
GEORGE CALVERT,
dec 2-dtf Near Bladensburg.
V VALUABLE FARMS AT PRIVATE SALE.-
The subscriber will sell at private sale all or any portion
of the real estate left by Thomas Cramphin, deceased, remain-
ing unsold at this time, consisting of the late residence of said
Cramphin, and other lands adjoining, together with two or
three very valuable Farms on Rock creek.
The Dwelling-house Farmn is situated about eleven miles
from WXshington, on the Washington and Rockville turnpike
road, and contains 3751. acres of land, a large portion of which
is in wood. The improvements consist of a brick dwelling-
house nearly new, with all the necessary out-buildings.
The Rock creek Farm, situated six miles from Georgetown
immediately on the Georgetown and Rockville turnpike road,
is one of the most valuable and desirable farms in the county,
being composed of a large portion of the finest timber and mea-
dow land. The improvements consist of a commodious frame
dwelling-house, and all the necessary out-houses.
These lands have been recently surveyed, and laid off into
farms of from 200 to 400 acres; but should it be found advanta-
geous for the disposal of them, they will be subdivided to suit
purchasers. Any communications addressed to the subscriber,
at Bladonsburg, or left at the National Hotel, Washington, will
be promptly attended to. GEORGE CALVERT,
dec 21-dtf Trustee.
LOTHS AND CASSIMERES.-We are to-day
opening-
50 pieces Ladies' Cloak Cloths, very cheap
20 do figured and plain Satins
30 do heavy black and blue black Silks
100 do Irish Linens, superior and very cheap
70 do blue and black Cloths, for gentlemen's cloaks
65 do Cassimere, ribbed, plaid, and plain
150 do gentlemen's Silk Handkerchiefs
BRADLEY & CATLETT.
dec 13-eSo3w [Glo&Tel]


RADLEY & CATLETT will have clothes made up
at the shortest notice, by experienced tailors, and in the
best manner, at a lowsprice. Their stock of Cloths and Cassi-
meres at this times very large and complete.
dec 13-3aw3w (Gl. & Tel.) BRADLEY & CATLETT.
District of Columbia, County of Alexandria, set.
IN CHANCERY-OCTOBERn TERM, 1836.
Robert I. Taylor et al. (Trustees)-Complts.
vs.
Bank of Alexandria et al. Defendants.
O N the Complainants' motion, their bill is now taken for
confessed, and set for decree as to the Defendants, on
whom process has been served; and the common order of pub-
lication is granted them against the other Defendants. And, on
the motion of'tie Complainants, it is here by the Court order-
ed that Master Commissioner Auld do take an amount of all
the outstanding debts due from the late Mechanics' Bank of Al-
exandria, entitled to -payment out of tie trust estate conveyed
to the Complainants by the said Bank, and of the assets which
have been received, or ooght to have been received, by the
Complainants under the said conveyance in trust; and that he
report to Court the dividend the said asset will allow the cred-
itors of'the said Bank; and time is allowed to the creditors of
the said Bank, until the 25th dayof March next, to exhibit their
claims before the said commissioner-of which he is required to
give notice by advertisement, to be published three times a
week in the Atxtxnndria Gazette and National Intelligencer for
four months successively, nextpreceding said 121h of March.
Test- -EDM. I. LEE, C. C.

....... :NOTICE.
TTNDER the above order, the creditors of the Mechanics'
t Bank of Alexandria are hereby required to exhibit their
claidis against the said RBaik, at my office in Alexandria, on or
before the 25th day of March next, .COLIN AULD,
aow 18--64t Mastlr Com.


P KINCHY, Cotfectloner, thankfuli for pas( favors,
0 informs the ladies and gentlemen of Washington that he
continues at his old stand, where he has just received a large
assortment of French Bon Bons, and other confectionery.
Paper-shelled, Soft-shelled, and Shelled Almonds
Bunch Muscatel Raisins, in whole, half, and quarter boxes
Bordeaux Prunes, in fancy and other boxes
Malaga Grapes, in kegs and jars
Sultana Raisins, Currants, &c.
FOREIGN FRUITS IN SIRUP.
Canton Ginger, Chow Chow, Pineapple, Prunes, Limes,
Apricots, Chinios, &e.
DRIED FRUITS.
Apricots, Cherries, Prunes, Clinios, Canton Ginger, Guava,
Current, and Quince Jellies
Brandy Fruits, assorted
CORDIALS.
Mareschino de Zara, Curracoa, Absinthe, &c.
LONDON SAUCESi
Cavice, Reading, Anchovy, John Bull Sauce, &c.
French Chocolate, French Mustard, Sweet Oil
English, French, and Domestic Pickles
Rose and Orange Flower Water
SIRUPS.
Lemon, Capilaire, Pineapple, Raspberry, &c.
ALSO.
A handsome assortment of French Sugar Ornaments, Fan-
cy Boxes, Toys, Dolls, &c.
Italian Vermicelli, Maccaroni, Otanges, Lemons, Citron,
Dates, Cranberries, Nuts, and other articles, in his line
of business.
Ice-Cream, Jellies, Blanc Mange, Fromage Bavorouse
Charlotte Russe, Pyrsanids, &c., made to order.
All orders for Balls, Dinner Parties, &c. will be thankfully
received and punctually attended to, at the shortest notice.
dec 20-3taw2w


JUVENILE BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS.-Th
I Christmas Box, Parley's Library, Youth's Book of Seasons
View of the World, Missionary Voyages, Premium, Carpenter
0 Family, Domesticated Animals, Boy's Every-day Book, Child'
L 13ook of Indians, Boy's Week-day Book, Little Child's Boolk
S wiss Robinson, The Rustic, Sadoc and Miriam, Robinson Cru
so e, Home, Stories of Gen. Warren, Mother at Home, Orm
thi logy, Book of Common Things, Young Florist, Parley's LifE
I of Washington, Parley's Life of Franklin, Parley's Book o
I Poe try, Juvenile Poems, Parley's Picttir Book, Barbauld'
Lessons, Leading Strings, Clildren's Friend, Atlantic Tales
Mamina's Lessons, Adventures of Pali Pry, The VaJile of Tim.e
The Value of Money, Sanford and Merton, Stories Worth Tell
I ing, Familiar Tales, Adelaide, Daughter of-a Genius, Nina
Iceland, Poetry without Fi6tion, Original Poems; Juvenile PIn
tarc.h, Elements of Morality, Trimmer's History, of England
The- Beloved Sister, The Par''if's Assisftaft, The Young Cadet
Sto ries from Scripture, Infantife. Stories, Conversations on Mas
savchuse.ts, Godfrey Hall, The Young Naturalist, First Settler
of New England, Edgeworth's Lessons, Harrietand Lucy, Rosa
mr and, Life of Linnasus, The Story Teller, The Officer'sWidow
E evening Hours, Lights of Education, Tales for Ellen, Nursery
F ables, Boy's Own Book, American Girl's Book, Northern Re
g ions, Belzoni in Egypt, &c. together with the largest assort
n lent of colored Toy Books ever offered in this city.
For sale at the School Book and Juvenile Repository, No. 5
V-arnum's Row, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 9th and 10tl
s streets. R. FARNHAM.
dec 22-1w
( DTOCK OF' TIE1 BANK OF WASHINGTON
I S A small lot of this stock, in charge of the subsci iber, fo
s 'ale. Also, a few eligible building lots in the city of Washing
t on. Inquire of D. A. HALL,
dec 24--3t Pennsylvania Avenue.
A CARD.-Purchasers of Stationery for the public offices
L and the citizens generally, are respectfully invited to visi
Stationers' Hall, and examine the qualities and very low prices
tf the extensive asso'rtfttent of articles in this line, for sale there.
E Samples will, on the'application of heads of offices, be sent there-
t o for inspection, and purchases will be delivered without any
t trouble to' the m'ese'ngers. A strict uniformity of dealing is ob-

S.erved, and all orders will be promptly executed.
dec l-d4w (Tel) W. FISCHER.
BEAUTIFUL FANCY ARTICLES.-Christ-
S ~nas and New Year's Presents, consisting, in
I tart, of Annualsi.Albums, Scrap Books, Portfolios with locks
Si md keys, Ladies' Work Boxes, with and without Music, fur-
r dished and unfurnished, richly inlaid with pearl and ivory,
f romn $1 to $30 eaclif spTendid Card and Needle Boxes, of
p 'earl, ivory, and shell, beautifully inlaid, from $2 to $10 each ;
( .old and Silver Pencil Cases, mounted with rich stones, from
I 50 cents to $12 each ; Pearl, Ivory, and Glass Letter Stamps ;
,at rabesque (new) Transparent and Medallion Wafers; a great
v variety of now Gsmes; PDisected Monuments, &c. neatly put
u p; Writing amt f 'r-UiI. Dlesks; Ladies' and Gentlemen's
D dressingg Cases; very rich Bouquet and Cologne Stands)
si alendid China Figures for centre tables j Toilet Boxes; China
a ad Bronuze' I'stands; Ladies' and Gentlmnen's Pocket
B ooks ; Ivory and Porcelain Tablets ; Silk at'd Bead Purses ;
B ouquet, Porcelain, and Gilt Visiting Cards; Pearl Sets; Sil-
v er Instruments; Pearl .and Ivory Pen-holders and Paper-
fc dders ; Ivory Wafer, Sand, and Pounce Boxes ; Chessmen
B ;ackgammon Boards Battledores ; Damask, Tinted, and Em-
b tossed Note Paper P'e'rfumery of every description;, Ladies'
a ad Gentlemen s Penknives and Scissors ; with many other
I 'ancy Goods, too numerous to particularize, which will be sold
at: fair prices at Stationers' Hall,
dec 24 W. FISCHER.
4,NNUALS.--GARRET ANDERSON has on hand all
the Annuals, London and American, yetpublished, which
h e willsell as cheap as any person in' th city.
Persons wishing to rak splendid presents, a re particularly
requested to examine them before purchasing elsewhere, at
P- Thompson's old stand, Pennsylvania Avenue, between i 1th
anmd 12th streets. dec 23-St


SpHE SUBSCRIBER begs leave to inform his friends
and the Public generally, that he has removed his store
from Washington to Georgetown, on High street, in the store
lately occupied by his brother, where hlie has on hand and in-
te-nds keeping a constant supply of GROCERIES of the best
quality. Also, every description of country produce, best Fariii-
ly Flour, &c. He particularly invit.ep his friends in Washinfg-
ton to call and see him, as they will meet with prompt aitten-
tion and good bargains All gdddd9 delivered in Washingt8ii or
Georgetowvi, free of charge.
dec 22-6t (Met.) GEORGE LIPSCOMiB...


'J RUSTEE'S SALE.-By virtue of i. dedd of trust
from Benjamin iroimitas, .dated January 5, 1832, and duly
recorded in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court df the
IDistrict of Columbia for the county of Washington, I will offer
at public sale, for cash, at 12 o'6lock, M, on Saturday, the 21st
elf January next, at the printing dffcli of said Homaris, in tie
city of Washington, several printing presses, a standing prd 's,
and a quantity of type arid type casdi, sa particularly described
in said deed. The terms of sale to be ediiplied with before the
removal of the property; and, if not complied with in three
days, the property will be resold at auction for cash, afterthree
days advertisement, at the lisk and cost of the former purchas-
er. J; I. STULL,
dec 21-ts Trustee.
AGENCY AT WASHINGTON.-JAMES H;CAUS-.
TEN, (late ofBaltimore,}having made this city his perma-
nentresidence,and located his dwellingand office directlyopposite
to tihe Department of State, will undertake, with his accustomed
zeal and diligence, the settlement of claims generally; and
more particularly claims before Congress, against the United
States, or the several Departments thereof, and before any board
of commissioners that may be raised for the adjustment of spo-
liation or other claims. He has now in charge the entire class
arising out of French spoliations prior to the year 1800 ;
with reference to which, in addition to a mass of documents arid
proofs in his possession, he has access to those in the archives
of the Government.
Claimants and pensioners on the Navy fund, &c. bounty
lands, return duties, &c. &c. and those requiring life insurance,
can have their business promptly attended to by letter, (post
paid,) and thus relieve themselves from an expensive and incon-
venient personal attendance.
Having obtained a Commission of Notary Public, lie is prepar-
ed to furnish legalized copies of any required public documents
or other papers. He has been so long engaged in the duties of
ant agent, thatit can only be necessary now to say that economy
and prompt attention shall be extended to all :business confided
to his care;, and that, to enable him to render his services and
facilities more efficacious, he has become familiar with all the
formsoff office. teb 26-ly


C IHILDREN'S BOOKS.-Several hundred different
kinds, selected from the nost approved and popular wri-
ters, for youth and several thousand Toy Books, of all kinds
and prices.
Paint Boxes, Dissected Maps, Drawing Books,
Juvenile Souvenirs, Chess, gold and silver Pencil Cases,
Penknivesj Port Folios, Battledores, Backgammon,
Dominoes, Graces, small sets Ninepins, Accordions,
Pocket Books, Card Cases, Writing Desks, Purses,
And a great variety of goods suitable to the season, for sale
at low prices; together with a large supply of Ornamental Edi-
tions of Books in every department of literature.
F. TAYLOR,
At the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately
dec 24 east of Gadsby's Hotel.
RS. TYTE, from London, begs to acquaint the vi-
siters and residents of Washington, that she has just ar-
rived with an elegant assortment of the newest and most FASH-
IONABLE MILLINERY, consisting df Bonnets, Head Dress-
.es, Caps, Flowers, Feathers, &c., which are opened for sale,
on Pennsylvania Avenueibetween First and Second streets; and
near the railroad office,
3fa Straws and Leghorns cleaned and altered to the newest
fashions, dec 20-eotlf
C HRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S PRESENTS.
W. FISGHER has this day received from New York, by
railroad line, four Cases of Goods, containing new articles, ex-
pressly for Christmas and New Year's presents ; which, being
too numerottus for an advertlsemeht, he would respectfitully invite
ladies and gentlemen to an inspection of them at Stationers'
Hall, where the thest extensive assortment of the best Fancy
Goods are kspt for lale oh the most reasonable terms.


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NOTICE.

COMMISSARY GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Philadelphia, Dec. 1, 1836.
P ROPOSALS will be received at the office of the Commis-
sary General of Purchases, in Philadelphia, to furnishma-
terials for making Army Clothing for the year 1837, and for
sundry articles ready made, as hereafter enumerated, viz.
Blue cloth, 6-4 wide, dyed in indigo) and in the wool.
Sky blue kersey, 6-4 wide.
Unbleached cotton shirting, 7-8 wide
Flannel, of cotton and wool, 7-8 wide;
Canton flannel, 3-4 wide.
Unbleached cotton drilling, 3-4 wide.
Do do do 7-8 wide.
Bleached do do 3-4 wide.
Uniform caps for Dragoons.
Do do Artillery and Infantry.
Pompons, white, for Infantry.
Do scarlet, for Artillery.
Hair plumes for Dragoons.
Bands and tassels for Dragoons.
Aiguillettes, (white and yellow.)
Worsted sashes, (crimson and yellow.)
Shoulder straps for Artillery.
Do do Infantry.
Brass do Dragoons.
Epaulettes for non-commissioned Staff, Inf'y and Art''y.
Forage caps for Infantry and Artillery,
Do do Dragoons.
Laced boitees, pairs.
Leather stocks.
Woollen half stockings;
Woollen blanketsi six and a half feet long, five feet wide,
weight four pounds.
Bunting, (blue, white and scarlet,)
Spades.
Saddle blankets.
Strapping Knapsacks.
Making tents.
Plates and tulips for Dragoond caps
Do do bugles for Infantry caps.
Plates and X cannon for Artillery caps.
Felling axes.
Hatchets.
Buttons for Artillery, Infantry, Ordnance, and Dragoons,
coat and vest.
Buttons U. S. large and small, yellow and white.
Do for shirts and'suspenders, white metal.
Worsted binding and cord of all kinds, and Prussian lace.
[The quantities and number of these articles will be deter-
mined hereafter.]
Casks and cooperage for one year from 1st of April, 1837.
The whole are to be of domestic manufactured materials.
Patterns of all the required cotton and woollen cloths arid arti-
elps are deposited in the Commissary General's office in this
citf; for examination. Samples of any of the woollenandcotton
cloths will be sent to any manufacturer, on application to this office,
(by mail,) and such information in relation to the goods as may
be desired. The Bootees are to be of eight, and the Caps of
five sizes. The sizes and proportions of sizes will be stated in
the contracts. On the samples and patterns exhibited the con-
tracts will be founded and inspections made; and no article will
be received that is inferior in the material or workmanship, or
that does not correspond, in every respect, with the pattern on
which a contract is founded.
The supplies are to be delivered at the United States Arsenal,
near Philadelphia, for inspection, in equal monthly portions, and
the contracts are to be fulfilled on or before the 1st day of
July, 1837.
The proposals must be in writing, sealed and endorsed "Pro-
posals for materials and articles for Army Clothing," and must
reach the office of the Commissary General of Purchases on or
before the 31st day of December, 1836. Security will be re-
quired for the fulfilment of contracts. C. IRVINE,
dec 5-eot31stD Commissary General of Purchases.


DRAWN NUMBERS OF THE
VIRGINIA STATE LOTTERY,
For endowing Leesburg Academy, and for other purposes.
Class No. 8-drawn 17th Dec. 1836.
19 26 4 65 30 55 51 56 69 2 63 42

SFo Virginia State Lottery,
For the benefit of the town of Wellsburg.
Class No. S.
To be drawn on Saturday, 31st Dec.1836, at Alexandria,Va.
75 No. Lottery-13 drawn ballots.
CAPITAL PRIZES.
$30,000-$10,000.
$6,000-$5,000-$4,000-$2,500--$2,000,
25 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10; halves 5; quarters 2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets, $120
Do do 25 half do 60
Do do 25 quarter do 30

Virginia Monongahela Lottery,
Class No. 1, for 1837,
To be drawn on Saturday, 7th Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
66 No. Lottery-10 drawn ballots.
PRIZES.
$25,000-$7,000,
$4,000-$2,500-$2,000-81,486-25 prizes of $1,000, &e.
Tickets $7-Halves $3 50-Quarters $1 75.
Certificates of packages of 22 whole tickets $80.
Do do 22 half do 40
Do do 22 quarter do 20

Virginia State Lottery,
For the benefitof the Mechanical Benevolent Society of Norfolk,
Class No.1, for 1837.
To be drawn on Saturday, 14th Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
*75 No. Lottery-12 drawn ballots.
SPLENDID SCHEME.
$30,000-$8,000,
$4,000--$3,000-$2,500, and 100 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10, halves 5, quarters 2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do o10 25 quarter do 32 50

Virginia State Lottery,
Por endowing the Leesburg Academy, and for other purposes.
Class No. 1, for 1837.
To be drawn on Saturday, 21st Jan. 1837, at Alexandria, Va.
75 No. Lottery-12 drawn ballots.
CAPITAL PRIZES.
$30,000-$10,000,
86,000-$3,140-$3,000-$2,500-$2,000.
50 prizes of $1,000, &c.
Tickets $10-Halves $5-Quarters $2 50.
Certificates of packages of 25 whole tickets $130
Do do 25 half do 65
Do do 25 quarter do 32 50

For Tickets and Shares or Certificates ofPackages in the above
splendid schemes, address
D. S. GREGORY & CO., Managers,
Washington City, D. C.
In Orders from a distance by mail promptly attended to,
and the drawings sent as soon as over.
dec 23-2aw2wd&c
FASHIONABLE MILLINERY AND FANCY
GOODS.-Miss MORLEY, from New York, grateful-
ly acknowledges the liberality of the ladies of Washington last
season, and wishes to inform them that she has arrived again
with a good assortment of Millinery and Fancy Goods, consist-
ing of--
Bonnets, Hats, Caps, Flowers, Ostrich Feathers
Birds of Paradise, of very superior quality
Silk, Satins, Ribands, Blonde Gauze, for evening dresses
Fur Capes, Boa Muffs, &c.
Which will be open this day, for sale, on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, between 9th and 10th streets.
dec 26-eolm


EXTRA ORONOKO TOBACCO-
25 half boxes of this very superior pound lump Tobacco,
fitanufactured by S. S. Myers & Co. Richmond, Virginia. Just
received and for sale by J. MASON, Jr.
dec 24-3t Georgetown.
STORE FOR REN T.-The store on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, adjoining James Richey, is for rent. Inquire of Brad-
ley & Catlett, or A. B. WALLER,
dec 26-3t Agent.
SPLENDID JEWELRY & FANCY GOODS.
WM. A. WILLIAMS, second door from Brown's Hotel,
in addition to his former stock of handsome Jewelry, has just
received from Messrs. Wolfb and Wriggins, of Philadelphia,
the most splesidid assortmesit of Jewelry and Fancy Articles
ever exhibited in the Distritt; consisting of-
Splendid diamond Pins, Pat. diamond do
Slts aqua-marinei pearl and diamond do
Pull sets Silver
Splendid Head-bands ofgold, pearl, and silver
Massive gold signet Rings
Diamond, ruby, emerald, and pearl do.
Ornaments for the head ofgold, artificial flowers, &c.
Brilliant Combs, Bouqudts, Plaques and Buckles of gold,
gold and enamelled, gilt, silver, and pearl
Handsome Glove-tieq
A great variety ofgold Chains, Seals and Keys
Gold pencils, miniature Settingsi sleeve Buttons, &e.
Gold Lever Watches, independent seconds do
Silver Lever do Watch- Hooks
Rich gold plated and silver Card-cases
Snuff-boxes lined with gold, gold Thimbles arid Toothpicks
One very splendid sterling silver Tea and Coffee Set, of
solid silver, richly chased
Very superior silver-plated and silver-mounted Bread and
Cake Baskets
Silver Cups, gold inside, Card-stands for centre tables
Silver Knives and Forks, &c. &c.
Silver Spoons, Ladles, Forkst &c. of his own manufacture,
constantly on hand, or made to order.
A variety of fancy articles for Christmas and New-year's
present. dec 22-3t


STOCKS I-FRANCIS DUGENT, Stock Manufacturer,
from Baltimore, respectfully announces to the citizens of
Washington that he has arrived here with a splendid assortment
of Fall and Winter* Stocks, of the latest and most approved pat-
terns, and token lodgings at Mr. Benj. A. Thorn's, Penn-
sylvania Avenue, nearly opposite to Gadsby's Hotel, where he
noay be found until 11 o clock in the forenoon, and after 3 o'clock
in the afternoon of each day in the week, Sunday excepted,
Mr. D. has on hand, besides the articles mentioned above, a
good assortment of Silk Socks and Gloves, and superior Silk
Pocket Handkerchiefs.
Mr. D. will sell Stocks, warranted of the best materials and
of the latest fashion, wholesale or retail, at prices lowdf than.
they can be had for any where in this city, or in the District otf
Columbia. dee 26-3t
MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE, in one voluiea
price 75 cents, isjust received, for sale by P. TAYLOR'
by S. W. WILLIAMS, M. D. Professor of Medical JurisptuI
dence, being principally a compendium of the opinions of the
best writers on the subject, with an essay on the importance of
the study of Forensic Medicine. Designed for physicians, law.
years, jurymen, coroners, &c.
Also, Chitty's Medical Jurisprudence, Beck's Medical Jtris-
prudence, together with a large collection of the latest editions
of the best lawsbooks, most of which have been purchased at the
lowest prices, at the recent Northern trade sales, and will be
sold invariably at the lowest prices at which they can be pro-
cured either in New York or Philadelphia.
Purchasers are invited to call and examine for themselves on
this point, before sending their orders to the North, at the Wa.
verly Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadaby's Ho-
tel. dec 28


AND SCRIP.-For sale-
10,000 acres Land Scrip.
BANK STOCKS.
Patriotic Bank S
Bank of Washington Stocks.
Corporation 6 per cent.


C. S. FOWLER & CO.
dec 26-d3t [Globe] .
EW STEEL PENS.--W. FISCHER has just re-
ceived a large lot of New Steel Pens (superior to all others
in use) made by the original and incomparable Manufacturers,
James Perry & Co., London, being the fifth Patent they have
obtained for their improvement in the Metallic Pens.
THE UNDER SPsRIN PEN allows of an opening across the
back, which gives additional freedom and elasticity, rendering
it a most pleasant.and useful instrument for the general purposes
of writing.
THE SIDE SPRiNG PEN. The improved flexibility of this Pen
is derived from a side cut above the shoulder, passing the centre
of the back ; the increased elasticity thus obtained is atearal
and easy, gradually extending from the point upwards. Also,
United States Government Five Slit Pens, and -the Van Buren
Pens. To be had only at Stationers' Hall.
dec 26 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.
NTEW MAP OF ILLINOIS, showing the Town-
L' ships, &c. &c. is just published, and for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, being the latest Map extant, and connected with a" Guide
to Emigrants and Settlers," giving information in regard to the
productions, face of the country, public lands, internal improve-
ments, population, geography of the State, &c. &ce. Price for
the whole, put up in a portable form for the pocket, 75 cents.
dec 26
96- B "SH BUSHELS of Richmond Grate and Smith's
2390Ft Coal, daily expected, and for sale by
B. BRAWNER & CO.
Lenox's wharf, near the Long Bridge.
ON HAND.
700 cords dry oak Wood
300 do pine do
40 do hickory do
I' 110 tons Anthracite Coal.
dec 22-3t
SUPERIOR INGRAIN CARPETINGS.-Just
received-
1,600 yards best Carpetings, Brussels patterns.
dec 22-3t DARIUS CLAGETT.
N EW PLACQUES, &c.--Just received atStationers'
Hall, a choice collection of Placques, Buckles, and Berlin
Side Combs. W. FISCHER.
dec 23 [Tel]


A BAG FOUND.-Found on Sunday morning, on Penn-
sylvania avenue, a Bag, containing several articles. The
owner will please call at Mr. Thomas Lloyd's hotel, where
he can have the same, by describing the article- and p-ineg
for this advertisement. Jd.: -'-.[
B ATTEAU TAKEN UP.-A B.,'t ,:. 1,.-t.:..
boat, was taken up a few days ago, floating dov r. if.
tomac. It appears to be about :16 feet long, and ti. -
can get it by paying for this advertisement, and giving e
scriber something for his trouble. e-
SPENCER DULANe
dec 23-3t Near Capt. Howir-
F OR SALE.-A first rate Gray Mare, formerly t ir
S party of Mr. John Balcher, of Georgetown. She t
sidered inferior to no animal in the District, either una_,
saddle or in harness. She will be sold for less than hea
as I have no use for her this winter. Inquire of. %
RICHARD FRANCO-
dec 22-3t Penn. Avenue, near 13th street:-,
ERMAN TOYS AND BASKETS.-20 cases corn
uprising a handsome assortment, just received per Bremen
a'ship Alexander, from Bremen. For sale by
LAMBERT & McKENZIE,
dec 22-6t Alexandria.
iUADEIRA, SHERRY, AND CHAMPAGNE
WINES.-The subscriber hasin store a choice selec.-
tion of superior old Madeira and Sherry Wines, of his own im-
poetation, and in order for immediate use, viz.
Old L. P. Madeira, "March" brand, in pipes, half pipes, and
quarter casks.
Old L. P. Madeira, of various ages, in boxes of one and two
dozef bottles each.
Burgundy and Tinta Madeira, do do.
Gold, Brown, and Pale Sherry, in boxes of one and two doz-
ens each, very old and superior; "Romano" and "Yriarte"
brands.
Sparkling Champagne, the most approved and favorite brands'
Red Hermitage, very old and fine flavored.
dec 7-3taw4w WALTER SMITH.
ASHINGTON COFFEE HOUSE.-The Pro-
-prietor of the above establishment begs leave to make
known to the travelling Public that he has several vacant rooms
which he will let with or without board ; he addresses those
particularly who have business in the Capitol during the ses-
sion. The advantage derived by taking rooms with the under-
signed is that, during the inclement season, they could'dine at
his Refectory in the Capitol, where a great variety of articles
may be had at the shortest possible notice.
It is not generally known that there is aRefectory kept in lie
Capitol for the accommodation of the Public ; it is in the base-
ment story under the Senate, to the left of the west entrance.
Citizens of Alexandria, Georgetown, and vicinity, may be
supplied with refreshments at the above Refectory.
N. B. Families supplied with oysters by the quart, gilbton, or
otherwise, at either of the above establishments.
dec 17-3awlm JOHN PETTIBONE.
UPERIOR STATIONERY.-Thesubscriber hasso
hand from recent purchases-
400 reams best American and Errglish Letter Paper
160 do Cap Paper
100 do Demi and Medium Paper
40 do Folio Post
100 do Envelope Paper
C0,000 Quills
10 gross Inks in quart, pint, and half-pirrt bottles
200 pounds best American and English Sealing Wax
100 do Wafers
360 dozen Office Tape
500 cards most approved Steel Pens
20 gross best Lead Pencils
500 pieces India Ink
24 dozen Mouth Glue
28 do Cut Glass Inks, for office use
800 pounds of superior Black Sand
With an extensive assortment of Ivory Folders
Letter Stamps, Wafer, Pounce, and Sand Boxes
Paper Weights, Rulers
Blotting, Tracing, and Drawing Paper
And every other article in the Stationery line, all of which
will be sold on better terms than articles of similar quality can
be obtained elsewhere. Orders promptly executed at Station-
ers' Hall. (W. FISCHER.
dec 19-3ta4w (Tel)


SUPERIOR PURE WINES.-Fine old Madeira
wine, in pipes, half pipes, and quarter casks, from the
house ofMurdock & Co.
Superior rich old Port wine, from Page & Co.Oporto, in caskei-x.
and cases of one dozen bottles each.
Champagne, of the well-known Key brand, warranted of best
quality.
Sherry wine, in quarter aid half quarter casks.
Clhateau Looville, St. Julien, Sauterne, Malaga, Frontignac,
&c. &c. For sale by A. C. CAZENOVE & Co.
dec 12-3taw3w Ale'xaiidrie.
NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS.-ENOCH
TUCKER, of the late firm of Tucker & Thompson, be-
tween Gadsby's and Brown's Hotels, has lately received an ex- .'
tensive and beautiful assortment of Pall and Winter Goods,
comprising a great variety of the best and most fashionable
Cloths, Cassimeres, Vestings, and fancy articles that can be
met with in the United States, and will be sold as usual on the
most favorable terms.
FRENCH CLOTHS.-Just received a small package of
French Cloths, blue and black, a very scarce and superior ar-
tile, on account of the durability of its color, to which he parti-
cularly invites the attention of the Public.
dec 5-d3t&eo2w
SHORT HAND.-The Self-taught Stenographer, or Stc.
nographic Guide, explaining the principles and rules of the'
art of Short Hand Writing. Just received for sale by F. TAY-
LOR, price 25 cents, with numerous engravings.