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49


S' PUBLISHED BY
'GALES SEASON.
PrtCr,.FO-R A yEAR, T14.rDQLLAOa FOn sIX MONTHS, SIX
DOLLARlS. PAYABLE If AVANCR.
- h"Tlhoe subscribing for -a year, who-do not, either at the time of
orlering the i-apr, or subseTrentlygive notice of their wish
1.0 have the ipper discontinued at the expiration of their year,
will he prestoined as desiring its continuance untilcounter-
Sianded, and it will be continued accordingly, at the option
ofortheEditors.

TVIMBER AND MINERAL LANDS-AUlegha-
Siy Coluty, Maryland-Withi a Charter from
the"SAte.-The lat6 law of, Maryland,,appropriating three
millions 4f dollars to .thie-Chesapeake and'Ohio Canal, and a
like siim to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, having been ac-
cepted by buoth companies, and the early prosecution and com-
pletion"of both works thereby-secured, the subscriber deems it
a proper tipe.to otrer to the notice of capitalists and others his
estate in A-lUghapy county. The Legislature, at their last-De-
cember session, gr-ited him a liberal and very valuable charter,
with authority to take .in partners, at such valuation of the land
as might be agreed on, f&T-further developing and bringing into,
activity its resources for operating in every description of lum-
ber and mining business, and with- the privilege of purchasing
ten thousand additional acres; the capital two hundred thou-
sand dollars, and the company to be -organized as soon as fifty
thousand doUarss are subscribed, and twenty thousndul actually
jil in.- -.Tbe lands identified with. the charter wil. *embrar-o
about twelve itousand five hundred areefjt itg on theq~tot
river aid waters of Fifteen Mile creek, between, fbrty and fifty
miles bdow -Cunmbterland, byjhe, iver, and twenty-two by the.
turnpike, fronting on thoezanal about half a mile, and within
sir ht of wiere.it is now constructing. And as a route for the
railroadhas been rn, within a few days, through the ravine of
the creek, and Olfrouth the heart of the property for several
mnties, and tbl grades found satisfactory, there is every reason
forsupposi'r it will have the advantage of this great work pass-
ing,.eaplar through the middle of it, the canal touching it on one
side, arid the turnpike near iton the other. The timber consists
of frit forests of white and yellow pine, white oak, rock oak,
Spanish oak, &e. &c. The whole tract is in woods, except a very
small tenement, and the farm on which the subscriber resides,
containing about one hundred and forty'acres of cleared land,
yielding good crops of corn and small grain, and tobacco of the
finest ~ilor and texture, and highly adapted to grass, of which
there is a good deal laid down, The Dwelling is new, and the
out-buil4ings such, as are usual, with a barn, stables, and tobacco
houses.
The scenery from the homestead, which is three miles from
the river, is extremely picturesque and commanding, with fine
health and water. An excellent saw-mill has been recently
built on the creek, which affords seats for others. Operations
in th'hiumber business could be carried on to great profit, and on
an: extended scale. Large supplies will be required for both the
canal and railroad; and, the distance being short to Williams-
port, any quantity could be readily sold there, and at the various
marts for lumber below, as well as-in the District of Columbia,
and at Baltimore and Annapolis, as soon as their contemplated
canals tointersect the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal are finished.
To say nothing of the plank, scantling, shingles, spars, and ship
timber of every description, it is believed that the trade in
staves alone, for foreign export and home consumption, would
make a very profitable concern.
There is no large estate on the line of the canal below Cum-
berland so conveniently situated, with such a supply of timber
of the first-quality, connected with such mineral prospects. With
regard to the minerals, it is to be observed that the lands lie in
the range of the fine Jqniatta iron, are strictly within the mine-
ral region, and are supposed, from the samples distributed
through the estate, from the indications of the springs, and from
some partial diggings, together with the opinions of scientific
men to contain extensive beds of iron ore ; and, from the range
of country, the nature of the rocks iwn any places, with marine
and other impressions, and from the actual discovery of a vein
of anthracite'coal a few miles below, on the Virginia side of the
river, thatvaluable mineral is likely to be found. Extensive
beds objtuminous coal exist, and have been long used, about
thirty-five or forty miles northeast of this, near McConnell's
town, in the same run of hills; and, as the out-runnings of coal
have been recently discovered within a short distance of the
lines of thisA-trff6t, teiFe reason to hope it tiay be found within
its limits.
There can be scarcely a doubt, if iron ore in the greatest
abundance, and of coal in quantity, should be discovered, it
would be difficult to estimate the real value of the property, so
near to markets for all its productions, and situated, as it will
be, on two of the finest works of internal improvement in the
world. It must be readily seen that the lumber concern would,
beyond doubt, be one of great magnitude; and that a large ac-
cession to the present value of the estate may, most reasonably,
be calculated on by stockholders, as soon as proper means are
applied for developing its mineral resources, which may even
extend beyond those before enumerated. A company organized
under this charter would have very peculiar advantages in con-
necting the iron with thfe lu-nber business ; no timber would be
lost. The most valuable portions could be used for market, and
the tops and inferior qualities converted into charcoal, the sup-
ply for which, on so large a district, would be perpetuated by
the after-growth. If bituminous coal should be preferred for
manufacturing iron, and that mineral be not found on the pre-
mises, the Cumberland coal could be had at three or four cents
the bushel, when the canal reaches that place; or the iron ore
might be transported to points where it would be required.
Under these views of the resources of his property, connect-
ed as it is with a most valuable charter, the undersigned solicits
a thorough examination of it by those who may wish to have an
interest in both, and believes it will be found fully to correspond
with the description given. He desires to make the earliest ar-
rangements possible for the organization of the company, and
will promptly answer any letters on the subject addressed to
him "near Bevansville, Alleghany county, Maryland."
aug 10O-d&ctf WM. CARROLL.
N OTICE TO TEACHERS.-Vacancies in the Aca-
demy at Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, being'
about to occur, other teachers will be necessary on the last
Monday of September next; and to fill such vacancies, proposals
(post paid) directed to the undersigned, will be received and
Considered at any time before that day, when an examination
will be had of those who offer for the places.
These vacancies are confined to the English department
of the Academy; two Teachers will be required, who will have
equal degree, teaching separate schools.
To each of these Teachers two hundred dollars will be paid
from a fund provided by the State of Maryland; in addition, he
will receive the price of tuition of the scholars committed to his


charge, it being twelve dollars per annum for the ordinary
branches ofan English education, and sixteen dollars per annum
if mathematics shall be taught. Not more than thirty-five scho-
lars can be received in either of the English departments, ex-
clusive of three free scholars, which are to be educated in each,
f so many shall be offered.
The tuition money (save the two hundred dollars to each teach-
er) to be made and collected by the teachers.
The English department embraces now sixty students, and
there is strong promise of increase.
It will be expected that respectable evidences of the fitness of
an applicant will accompany his application.
The vacancies will happen by resignation of the teachers, in
consequence of bad health in the one, and the other having an
interest in a different business which he wishes to prosecute,and
which he finds incompatible with his duties in the Academy.
JOSEPH H. JONES,
BEN. S. FORREST,
RICHD. I. BOWIE,
Committee of the Board of Trustees of the
july 23-t20Sep Rockviile Academy.

W ISCONSIN TERRITORY.-Notes on Wiscon
W sin Territory, with a Map, by Lieutenant Albert M. Lea
of the United States Dragoons. $1. On sale by
june 20 PISHEY THOMPSON.

CASH FOR 500 NEGROES,
INCLUDING both sexes, from 12 to 25 years of age. Per-
sons having likely servants to dispose of, will find it to theii
interest to give us a call, as we will give higher prices, "in
Cash, than any other purchaser who is now, or may hereafter
come into the market. FRANKLIN & ARMPIELD,
mar 8-d&ctf. Alexandria.
In Prince George's County Court, sitting as a Court
of Equity-July Term, 1836.
Samuel Duvall and Eliza, his wife,
Vs.
Grafton Hall.
ORDERED by Prince George's County Court, sitting as a
Court of Equity, this 12th day of July, 1836, that the
sale made and reported by N. Carroll Stephen, trustee for the
_.l- -nf t h 1 r i l .qtn :-

WASHI1NGTJ)N: SATUROA1t),


- AND FOR SALE.-That part of the plantation of
Archibald Van Horn, deceased, which lies in the District
of Columbia, containing about two hundred acres, more or less.
Also the tract of land, lying south of the Beaver Dam branch,
and east of the Bladensburgh and Alexandria road, containing
one hundred and eighty-seven and a half acres, more or less.
.And the farm on which the subscriber resides, containing one
hundred and five and a half acres.
Terms-Cash for the last tract; and for the two other tracts,
one-half of the purchase money in six, and the other half in
twelve months from the 1st day of January, 1837.
Sale to take place at the log house on the first tract, at twelve
o'clock, on the 1st day of September next.
july 6-wtseptl ALEX. McCORMICK.
0J1IHE SUBSCRIBER hereby gives notice thatapplica-
tion will be made to the next Congress of the United
States of America, at their next session, for the renewal of a pa-
tent granted to'Willard Earl, being a patent for a machine Ifor
sawing shingles, dated 28th day of December, 1822.
WILLARD EARL,
Of the County of Albany and State of New York.
may 19-lamo3mo
VALUABLE POTOMAC LANDS & THREE
FISHERIES FOR SALE OR RENT.-With
a view to a further removal to Alabama, the subscribers will sell
their Deep Hole and Farm Plantations, adjacent, containing two
thousand seven hundred and twen' -eight acres,, lying upon
Occoquan bay, from the junction of" ccoquan river to Neabsco
- Creek wTth the Potomac, and botbuiftd on the west by the old
mail stage road to Colchester, along which the contemplated
railroad from the South must be cQnstructed. The farm and fishe-
ries are of easy access, by land and water, about 18 miles from
Alexandria, three from Occoquan, and one from Colchester.
These are unquestionably the most fertile lands in Prince
William county-adapted to the growth of wheat, corn, tobacco,
oats, timothy, &c. and highly susceptible of improvement by
clover and plaster. The Occoquan mills and factory are a conve-
nient market. The overseer's house, barns, quarters, wheat
machine, fencing, &c. are in corresponding condition.
The Deep Hole fishing shore is known to be among the best
upon the Potomac. The Farm Marsh (or Mud Haul) fishery has
been fished several years successfully; also the Plum Tree fish-
ery, between the two. Houses are on each shore. There is
abundant sea-room for seines of the largest class.
Many hundred cords of wood might be cut and sold'on the
land, immediately on Neabsco creek,for which there is a constant
demand; and there might still remain sufficient wood and timber
for the use of the estate.
The winter fisheries and ducking shores are also valuable.
Liberal terms are offered. The fisheries, well managed, will
more than pay the interest of cost. One-fourth cash; the bal-
ance in three equal annual instalments. Possession may be giv-
en at the ensuing Christmas.
Such an opportunity is rarely offered for judicious investment.
For terms, (if by letter, post paid,) apply to William Hindman,
Esq. Baltimore, or to the subscribers.
BEN. OGLE TAYLOE, Washington, D. C.
WM. H. TAYLOE, Warsaw, Va.
aug 20-d&ctf
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA-Medi-
cal Department.-The Course of Lectures will com-
mence on Tuesday, the 1st day of November, and be continued
under the following arrangement:
Practice and Theory of Medicine, NATHANIEL CHAPMAN,
M.D.
Chemistry, ROBERT HARE, M. D.
Surgery, WILLIAM GIBsoN, M. D.
Anatomy, WILLIAM E. HORNER, M. D.
Institute of Medicine, SAMUEL JACKSON, M. D.
Materia Medica and Pharmacy, GEORGE B. WOOD, M. D.
Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and Children, HUGH
L. HODGE, M. D.
Clinical Lectures on Medicine and Surgery are delivered
regularly at the Philadelphia Hospital, (Blockley,) and at the
Pennsylvania Hospital, from the beginning to the end of the
session.
The amount of the fees of tuition is the same as heretofore ;
no increase having been made in consequence of the augmen-
tation in the number of Professorships, and the improvements
in Clinical instruction .....--.. W. E. HORNER,
Dean of the Medical Faculty, Philadelphia.
aug 20-2awllw
THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD
will be given for apprehending and securing JOHN,
who calls himself John Redmond, so that I get him again. He
absconded from my farm, in the upper end of Fauquier county,
on the night of the 16th instant.
John is a bright mulatto, about 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high,
well proportioned, and very likely. He has no particular mark
or characteristic about him by which the attention of strangers
would be'attracted, except, perhaps, that he lisps in speaking, and
has a rather bold address. He took with him a variety of cloth-
ing, among which a blue cloth coat, slightly worn, and a'short
drab coat, are particularlyrecollected. He is a remarkably fine
looking servant, and prides himself upon his genteel appear-
ance, which perhaps may be laid aside in order to escape de-
tection.
He started upon a sorrel horse with a blaze face and a white
foot or two, not recollected which ; the horse is what is called a
crib-biter.
Iv will give the above reward of $300, if he is taken within the
State of Virginia, and delivered to me or secured in the jail of
Fauquier county ; or if he is taken without the State, and se-
cured so that I can obtain possession of him, I will give the same
reward. Letters on the subject may be addressed to me at
The Plains" Post Office, Fauquier county, Virginia.
july 28-2aw2m WILLIAM BYRNE.
Y ORK SPRINGS FOR SALE.-The subscribers
authorized by the Trustees of the late Robert Oliver,
Esq., to offer for sale by public auction, on the premises, on
MONDAY, the 22d August, the property of York Springs.
This celebrated watering place is situated in a beautiful and
most salubrious part of Adams county, Pennsylvania, about three-
quarters of a mile from Petersburg, fifteen from Hanover, fif-
teen from Carlisle, twenty from York, twenty-one from Harris-
burg, and fifty-seven from Baltimore, to and from which city a
daily mail passes during the watering season. York Springs
have enjoyed during many years a high and constantly increas-
ing reputation from the valuable medicinal properties of their
waters; and for a long series of years they have been the resort,
each season, of a large number of visitors from Baltimore, Phila-
delphia, and, indeed, from almhnost every portion of the middle
States.
Attached to this property, is a tract of about 139 acres of high-
ly improved land,comprising a large quantity ofvaluable meadow
extensive gardens and orchards. The improvements consist of
three large HOUSES, two of which, being of stone and brick,
are very spacious, and are built in the most approved style for
the accommodation of a large number of visitors. These build-
ings contain 82 rooms, having a very spacious dining room, ball
room, &c. There are also a billiard-room, ninepin alley, hot,


cold, and shower baths, ice house, &c. Bermudian creek pass-
es through the estate, on which, about two years since, there
was erected a Stone Merchant MILL, of 40 by 45 feet, with four
run of stones, worked by a copious stream of water, and for
which an ample supply of wheat is furnished in the neigh-
borhood,
There is also a Coach House and Stabling for from 80 to 90
head of horses. The grounds around the house and near the
spring are laid out with great care and attention to the comfort of
visitors. The neighborhood affords fine fishing and shooting,
and the country around abounds with woodcock, pheasants, snipe,
squirrels, &c.
York Springs will, it is believed, before the next season, be
connected with Baltimore and Philadelphia, by continuous lines
of railway; with thie former, by the Baltimore and Susquehanna,
and the York and Gettysburg railroads ; with the latter, by the
Columbia, Wrightsville, York and Gettysburg railroads. Under
such great facilities of access, it cannot fail to be the place of a
resort that must increase with each succeeding season.
The property, to a capitalist or to a company, would prove a
most valuable investment.
The terms of sale will be liberal, and will be made known on
the day of sale. Possession will be given the 1st day of Novem-
ber next.
For. further particulars apply to
WILLIAM WOODVILLE,
Gay street, opposite the Exchange, Baltimore.
aug5-
LOWERS.-Language of Flowers, 1 volume, with gilt
edges. Price 371 cents.
The Calendar of Flowers, with illustrative poetry, beautifully
bound, and embellished with numerous colored engravings.
Price $2.
Flora's Interpreter, with numerous colored engravings, or,
Flowers and Sentiments. Price $1 75.
The Florist's Manual, 1 vol. 8vo. with nearly 100 engravings.
The Garland of Flora. I vol. small 8vo.


Alexandria and New Orleans Packets.
Brig TRIBUNE, Samuel C. Boush, master,
S to sail 15th September. Brig ISAAC FRANK-
IN, William Smith, master, to sail 1st October.
These vessels are of the first class, and fitted, expressly for
the trade, having excellent accommodations for passengers, and
commanded by men experienced in the business.
Th6 above vessels will at all times take steam up the Mis--
sissippi.
Persons wishing to ship will please make early application to
I r %JOHN ARMFIELD,
aug 6-tf Alexandria.
P-UBLIC SALE OF IMPROVED PROPERTY.
By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court for the District
of Columbia and county of Washington, the subscriber will sell
atpublicauction, on Wednesday, the 14th September, at 5 o'clock
P. M. partoflot No. 5, in square No. 219,with the improvements,
consisting of a twvo-story.frame dwelling, the property of the
late John Connell, deceased.
Terms of sale.-One-fourth cash, the purchaser to give his
notes for the balance, with an approved endorser, bearing inter-
est, payable in four, eight, and twelve months after date. When
the notes are fully paid, the trustee will convey to the purchaser
the interest vested in him by said decree. Sale on the premises,
directly no h of the residence of Richard Cutts, Esq.
w JOHNSON HELLEN, Trustee.
E. DYER, Auctioneer.
aug 10-2aw&ds
Y ~. MAURO & SON-SALE UNDER THUE
DECREE OF THE COURTS, OF VALUE"
ABL.E PROPERTY.-By virtue of a decree of the Cir-
cuit Court of the District of Columbia, sitting as a Court of
Chancery, the subscribers will offer for sale, by public auction,
on Tuesday, the 24th day of September next, that part of Lot
number 1, in Square 770, in the City of Washington, bounded
as follows : Beginning at a point in the line of South N Street, at
the distance of forty feet from the Southeast corner of said square;
thence, running due West'ot the line of said street, forty feet;
thence, running North, one hundred feet; thence, due East,
forty feet; and thence, one hundred feet, to the beginning ; with
the two Brick Houses thereon. This property is very advanta-
geously situated, near the termination of the Canal at the East-
ern Branch, which is now in the progress of a final completion,
so as to be rendered navigable for boats and craft throughout'its
whole extent within the city.
The terms of sale are, one-fourth of the purchase money to
be paid in cash on the day of sale, and the residue in equal in-
stalments of one and two years, with interest from the day of
sale. On the payment of the purchase money, and ratification
of the sale by the Courts, the Trustee will convey said property
to the purchaser or purchasers. Sale on the premises at five
o'clock P. M. By authority of the Trustee.
P. MAURO & SON,
aug 17-3tawts Auctioneers.
"W ASHINGTON MUSEUM.-The subscriber re-
spectfully invites Members of Congress, Officers of the
Army and Navy, Strangers visiting the city, and the Public gen-
erally, to examine his Collection of Curiosities, at his house, on
5th street west, opposite the City Hall, and next to Trinity
Church.
This collection, containing many interesting articles, is the
result of the labor of nearly eight years, and is intended as the
foundation of a Museum at the National Metropolis, on a plan of
comprehension and variety which may be favorably compared
with any former enterprise of the kind in the United States.
Donations of specimens in the Arts and Sciences will be thank-
fully received by the subscriber, at his Museum.
july 4-tf JOHN VARDEN.
SCIENTIFIC CLASS BOOK,-A Familiar Intro-
duction to the Principles of Physical Science, comprising
Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Acoustics,
Optics, Electricity, Galvanism, Magnetism, Pyronomics. One
volume of nearly 500 pages, handsomely bound, and containing
exceedingly numerous engravings, is for sale by F. TAYLOR.
Price only $1 25.
This day is published the second part of the same work,com-
prising, in one volume of the same size, valuable& Treatises on
Chemistry, Metallurgy, Mineralogy, Geology, Crystallography,
Meteorology, &c. Handsomely bound, containing several hun-
dred engravings. Price $1 25.
At the Waverly. Circ'tlating Library, immediately east of
Gadsby's Hotel. July 29
PUBLICC WORKS IN INDIANA.-Notice to
X Contractors.-Sealed Proposals will be received at La-
fayette, on the 23d day of August next, by J. B. Johnson, Acting
Commissioner, for the construction of all the heavy sections on
that portion of the Wabash and Erie canal lying between
Georgetown and Lafayette, 32 miles in length. The work to
be let embraces several of the most important and expensive
jobs in the State, amongst which are three dams-one across the
Wabash, one across Deer creek, and the other across Wildcat;
two bluffs,each near one and a fourth miles inlength,along which
the canal will be formed in the river; six lift locks, and three
guard locks, together with several sections of deep cutting and
high embankment.
Also, at Brookville, on the 13th day of September next, by
Elisha Long, Acting Commissioner, for the construction of
about 34 miles of the White-water canal, extending from Brook-
ville to Lawrenceburgh. This division embraces 2 dams across
the White-water, 14 lift locks to be built of stone, 2 aqueducts,
several large arclied culverts of stone, 6 or 8 heavy bluff sec-
tions, and some deep cutting, together with the usual variety of
earth work common to all canals.
Also, at Madison, on the 27th day of September next, by John
Woodburn, Acting Commissioner, for the grading and bridging
on 22 miles of the Madison and Lafayette railroad, extending
north from the Ohio river. The line to be let embraces some
heavy work, consisting of the usual variety of cuttings, embank-
ments, and bridges, common to works of this kind. The road-
bed to be graded for a double track.
Also, at Indianapolis, on the 4th day of October next, by I).
Burr, Acting Commissioner, for the construction of 25 miles of
the Central Canal, extending from the feeder dam above India-
napolis to "the Bluffs." This line embraces a dam across the
White river, an aqueduct over Fall creek, 8 lift locks, most of
which will be built of cut stone, 2 or 3 bluff sections, and several
large culverts.
Also, atPaoli, on the 18th day of October next, by John G.
Clendenin, Acting Commissioner, for the grading and bridging
on 41 miles of the New Albany and Vincennes MacAdamized
turnpike road, extending from New Albany to Paoli, and em-
bracing such a variety of cuttings, embankments, and bridges
as is common on turnpike roads.
Also, at Evansville, on the 1stday of November next, by Sam-
uel Hall, Acting Commissioner, for the construction of 25 to 30
miles of the Central canal, extending from a point near the
head of Big Pigeon creek, to Evansville. The work to be let
on this line is of the ordinary character, embracing several
locks, to be built of stone, and one or mare aqueducts, with a
number of culverts.
Also, at Tcrre Haute, on the 15th day of November next, by
Thos. H. Blake, Acting Commissioner, for the construction of
about 20 miles of the cross-cut canal, extending from Terre


Haute to Eel river. This line embraces a deep cut of consider-
able magnitude, a dam across Eel river, and 8 or 10 cut stone
locks.
The several lines to be let will be divided into sections of
suitable length for the convenience of contractors. The length
of time given for the completion of the work, the terms of the
contracts, the manner of performing the work, &c. will be fully
made known at the time and place of letting. The various lines
will be staked out and ready for the inspection of contractors ten
days previous to the day ofletting; and the plans, profiles, and
estimates of qualities, will -be at the place of letting for three
days immediately preceding the day of receiving bids. Bid-
ders are requested to make themselves fully acquainted with
the character of the work, so that they may not be mistaken in
regard to its value. "
Bidders who are not personally known to the Acting Com-
missioner or Engineer in charge of the work, will be expected
to present with their proposals satisfactory testimonials as to
their qualifications and character.
Dated Indianapolis, 4th July, 1836.
By order of the State Board of Internal Improvement:
DAVID H. MAXWELL, President.
JAMES MORRISON, Secretary.
july 19-tlOct
F RENCH FASHIONS.--F. TAYLOR will receive
subscriptions for the Journal of French Fashions, which is
to be published on the 1st and 15th of every month, immediate-
ly upon the arrival of the French packets. Each number will
contain numerous colored engravings of fashions from thie Pari-
sian magazines, which are regularly shipped from France to the
editors of this work a week before they are made public there,
and are each accompanied by an explanatory letter from a Pa-
risian artiste of celebrity.
Subscribers will, therefore, have the advantage of receiving
the fashions direct from Paris every two weeks, instead of'
waiting, as heretofore, several months, until they make their


"AIJUST


27, 1836,


4 GENERAL MEETING of the Subscribers
.3-. to the capital stock of "the Annapolis and Potomac Canal
mnilpany" will be held at the City Hall, in thie city of Anha-
Polis, un WVednesday,.the 7th of September next, at 10 o'clock
A. M., agi eeably to the provisions of an act of the General As-
setibly of Maryland, entitled "An act to incorporate the Anna-
* p0fs and Potomac Canal Company," and the several supple-
,ients thereto, at which meeting the Commissioners will lay be-
foirq the subscribers as aforesaid the books containing the state
l lihe said subscriptions, and will take and receive further sdb-
.criptiuns to the capital stock of said company.
- Wri. H. Marriott, Leonard Iglehart,
John B. Morris, Somerville Pinkney,
S Daniel Cobb, A. Randall,
Francis S. Key, Richard T. Lowndes,
-.:. Roger C. Weightman, Robert Wright,
a ; Jno. Randall Hagner, Nich's Carroll Stephen,
aug 1--t7S Commissioners.
HRISTIAN EXAMINER.-A set of Dr. Chan-
.- ning's Review, "The Christian Examiner," running back
ni e years front the present time, (warranted complete and per-
fect,) is-offered for sale by F. TAYLOR, in neat binding, at a
price tin,-h below the cost of it, as it is published in paper covers.
Apply at the Waverly Circul.!:i:g Library, immediately east
ofGls.y's Hotel. aug 15
flRY COWS WANTED.-I wish to purchase dry
..PC Gow&. Persons having the same to dispose of will find
it to their advantage to give-me a call. I-can be found at the
Oentre Market on -Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday mornings,
At other times, call on Mr. N. Barber, at' the National Hotel
Livery Stable. CHARLES MILLER,
aug 13-eotf Victualler.
SALE OH FURNITURE, FARMING U'EN-
SILS, HORSE, DEARBORN, &c.-On Wednes-
day, 31st August, at 1.0 o'clock A. M., I shall sell at the Par-
sonage of Rock Creek Church, the residence of Rev. C. Wilt-
berger, all his Household and Kitchen Furniture, comprising a
very general assortment.
Also, Farming utensils, Horse, Dearborn, Cart, Cows, Shoats,
Corn standing, &c. &c.
Terms at time of sale. EDW. DYER,
aug 20-eodc&c&ds (Met. & Glo.) Auctioneer.
EXTENSIVE SALE OF VERY VALUABLE
FURNITURE.-On Thursday, 1st September, at 10
o'clock A. M. I shall sell, at the residence of Mrs. Latimer, op-
posite President's Square, all of her very valuable Household
Parniture, consisting of every article useful and necessary,
such as
Sideboards, spring-seat and other hair Sofas,
SMahogany Chairs, Cane-seat and Windsor Chairs,
Best Brussels and-Ingrain Carpets,
A. Imperialand Wilton Rugs,
Hall and Passage Carpets,
Flat Stair Rods,
Handsome Pier and Centre Tables,
Pillar and Claw Card Tables,
Mantel and Pier Glasses,
Very handsome Chintz and Moreen Curtains, with appur-
tenances, best plated Candlesticks,
Castors and Branches, '
Rich Dinner, Dessert, and Tea Services of China,
Astral and Mantel Lamps,
-Mantel Ornaments, Time Piece,
Ivory Knives and Forks,
Cut Glass of superior quality,
Best Plated Dining and Dessert Forks,
Brass Fenders, Fixe Sets,
superiorr Feather Beds and Mattresses,
Toilet and Column Bureaus,
Clothes Presses,
chamber Carpets, Washstands, &c. &c.
The house will be open for the inspection of the Furniture the
day previous to sale. In this collection will be found articles of
the best quality, which have been selected with much care and
attention. A better opportunity for persons furnishing may not
offer this fall than the present. EDWARD DYER,
ag ll-eo&ds Auctioneer.
"Y EDWARD DYER.-Sale of Fashionable
.jL. Furniture.-On Thursday, the 8th September, I shall
nt^ ih, r-;rlnenp. of r gntleman removing, on 1tith street,
north of F, adjoining the dwelling of 1). Clagett, Esq. ill the
fashionable and handsome Furniture, consisting, in part, of as
follows:
Superior new parlor Carpets and Rugs, hair seat ;'ofa
Elegant dining, card, and centre tables, pillar and claw
Do. mantel Timepiece, running 21 days
Astral and mantel Lamps, pier Glasses
Brass Fenders and fire Sets, suits handsome Curtains
Passage and step Carpets and Rods
Plated Castors and Coasters, Trays, ivory Knives and Forks
Handsome china Tea Service, Dining do.
Cut glass Decanters, Celeries, Pitchers, Tumblers, Cham-
pagnes, Wines, &c. &c.
Elegant toilet Bureaus
Very elegant maple and mahogany Bedsteads
Mahogany Wardrobes, Washstands, Toilet Sets
Chamber Carpets, Toilet Glasses
Best Feather Beis and Mattresses, Bureauns
Superior cane-seat and Windsor Chairs, Sideboard
With almost every article used in fashionable and genteel
housekeeping, all of which have been selected with much taste,
and of best workmanship.
Also, Cooking-stove and apparatus, and a very general assort-
ment of kitchen requisites.
Sale at 11 o'clock A. M.
Terms will be liberal, and made known at time of sale. ,
aug 17-eots&ds (Globe) EDW. DYER, Auct.
ILT ORNAMENT'S.-The subscribers have just re-
ceived a large assortment of rich Ornaments, in part, viz.
100 Gilt Rods.-, 5. and 6 feet long
100 dozen Gilt Rings to match
50 do do Rosettes
10 do rich Centre-pieces
50 do Gilt Darts, Spears, Lancets, Quiver-s, and Knobs
The above have just been received direct from France, and
will be sold low. BRADLEY & CATLETT.
aug 20-dlw3taw2w (GI & Alex Gaz)
N OTICE.--Miss HENDERSON takes this method to no-
tify the Public that she has taken that commodious house
on P street, between 12th and 13th, and is now prepared to ac-
commodate yearly and transient boarders upon terms as moder-
ate as can be obtained at any genteel establishment in Wash-
ington. The house is spacious and airy, and the location is de-
sirable from its healthfuiness and proximity to the best water,.
as also that of being sufficiently near to all the most attractive
public points in the city to make an agreeable walk.
aug 18-eo3t
N OTICE TO TEACHIERS.-The Trustees of Cham-'
lotte Hall School wish to engage Ihe services of two gen-
tlemen. The duties of one will be confined exclusively to the


English and Mathematical Department; the other will he ex-
pected to aid, as necessity may require, either the English or
Classical Instructor. The salary of thie former will be $650
per annum; the assistant will receive $500 per annum. The
salaries will he paid quarterly. Commodious and pleasant rooms,
in the immediate vicinity of the Academy, will be furnished by
the Trustees. The above appointments will be made on the 2d
Monday of September next. Applicants fir either situation will
please address their communications, postage paid, to the sub-
scriber, at Charlotte Iall, St. Mary's county, Maryland. Tes-
timonials of capacity and character will be oquired. Board
can be obtained at from $90 to $100 per annum.
By order of the Board of Trustees :
J. MILTIMORE.
aug 6-cptd Charlotte Hall, St. Mary's Co. Md.
The Saturday Evening Post, Philadelphia, will publish the
above, and send the account to this office.
L EONARDTOWN RACES.--The Fall meeting of
the Leonardtown Jockey Club will commence on Tues-
day, th-27th of September next, and continue three days.
First Day.-PPurse $250-3 mile heats, free for any h. min. or
g. in the United States.
Second Day.--Purse $,100-mile heats, best three in five,
confined tohorses raised and owned in this county.
Third Day.-Purse $150-2 mile heats, free for any horse,
except the winner of the first day.
By order of the Stewards:
THOS. H. MILES, Secretary.
aug 20-law3w
THE LAW OF DISCOVERY, by James Wig-
ram, one of His Majesty's Counsel.--The above
work is contained in a complete and perfect form in the August
number of the Law Library, which is day received by F. TAY-
LOR. The Treatise is published (so as to be bound separately
if required) with title page, notes, index, appendix, &c. ; thus
furnishing to subscribers of the Law Library, for about 45 cents,
furni__1_ 09


^^itiona^ 't[


P UIILIC SALE.-Intending to remove to his farm in
J Illinois, the subscriber will offer for sale, at 10 o'cock, on
Monday, the 26th September next, the well-known farm called
NEABSCO, in Prince William county, Virginia, lying within
three miles of the Potomac river, and within half a mile of the
canal leading to it. The farm contains 500 acres: about 200
cleared, of which there are upwards of 50 acres of first-rate
meadow land in timothy, clover, and corn, seldom if ever ex-,
celled. The -improvements are a Dwelling House, with eight
rooms, two cellars, kitchen, laundry, dairy, meat-houses, &c.;-
three other Dwelling Houses for overseer, &c., Barn, Stabling
for twelve horses, Corn Houses, Carriage House, Blacksmith
Shop, and Granaries. On the said land there is a Saw-mill, on
the well-known stream Neabsco, well situated for custom to
keep it well employed, wkhi the timber on the land. There is
also an abundance of fruit and good springs of water. The pro-
prietor would invite the attention of capitalists to the Slate
Quarry recently opened by him, as he knows this can be made
a profitable business ; none split better, and none. are more du-
rable. The subscriber has invented a machine which is woik-
ed by water power, and at one-third of the usual expense, by
which the slate is squared better than it can be done by hand,
and can be sold in the District and surrounding country cheaper
than any other that can be brought into the market. This, with
the advantages of the Potomac river, renders the Quarry an ob-
ject worthy of the attention of capitalists. Those who are de-
sirous of engaging in this business are referred for the quality
of the slate to slating done with his slate on Mr. Brown's ta-
v.ern, Mr. Withers' store, &c. on Pennsylvania,Avenue,Wash-L
iihgton city ; and to Mr. Kert's new.store, Mr. Ladd's.tteam-
njit-l, auil 'Mr. Smithls foundry, Alexandria.
He will sell his Household Furniture, Stock, four yoke Oxen,
miilch Cows, fat Cattle, young stock, five Horses, Farming
Utensils, &c. &c. Any person wishing to purchase will do well
to examine the prope-ty, as i t is thought wi not .sell for half
its value, and they cannot help being pleased with it, if they
want a healthy, pleasant, and productive situation.
All will be sold, without reserve, on the day of sale, if fair;
if Pot, then the sale will take place on the next fair day, provi-
ded the property is not disposed of by private contract before.
Terms accommodating, and made known at the sale,. which
will take place on the premises.


aug 17-eots


WILLIAM WAITE,
Neabsco.


T RUSTEES' SATE.-By virtue of a decree of the
Chancery Court of Maryland, the subscribers, as Trustees,
will offer at public sale, on Thursday, the 1st day of September
next, at the residence of Mr.-Joseph N. Burch, sen. in Prince
George's county, at 12 o'clock M. a tract or parcel of LAND,
lying and being in Prince George's county, which was hereto-
fore, by deed bearing date the 5th day of May, 1830, conveyed
by the said Joseph N. Burch, sen. to a certain William L. Hodg-
son, in ti ust, for certain purposes therein mentioned, the said
parcel of land comprising part of several tracts of land, to wit:
a tract of land called "the Enlargement of the Mill Dam," with
the water-mill thereon, containing fourteen acres and an eighth
of an acre; part of his "Lordship's Kindness," containing two
hundred and thirty seven acres; part of Piscataway Forest,"
containing sixty-three acres ; a tract of land called "Plymouth,"
containing one hundred and forty aces ; a tract called Mill
Dam Enlarged," fifty-eight and three-quarters acres ; a parcel
of land not named, containing seven and a quarter acres ; a tract
not named, containing fourteen acres; a part of the Widow's
Trouble," containiing two hundred and fifty acres of land ; and
a part of a tract of land called Joseph and Anne," containing
forty acres and a quarter ; the whole containing eight hundred
and twenty-four acres and three-eighths of an acre, more or less.
Also, an undivided moiety of a parcel of land, a part of three
treats of land called Joseph and Anne," Hazard and Pre-
vention," and Inclosure," containing two hundred and eighty-
six acres and an eighth of an acre. Also, several valuable ne-
groes.
Terms of sale.-The negroes will be sold for cash, to be paid
on the day of sale, or ratification thereof by the Chancellor.
The lands will be sold on the following terms : One-third of the
purchase money to be paid on the day of sale, or ratification
thereof by the Chancellor, one-third in six months, and the ba-
lance in twelve months.from the day of sale, the purchaser giv-
ing bonds or notes, with security, to be approved by the Trus-
tees, for payment of the purchase money, with interest from the
day of sale. The Trustees a.-e authorized perty to the purchaser upon payment of the purchase money.

JOHN J. LLOYD,
SOMERVILLE PINKNEY,
aug 8-2awtd Trustees.
Am(ericaia Life .insurance and Trust Company.
OFFICEs-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and corner
of Wall and Broad streets, New York.
AG-NCY--Pennsylvania Avenue, opposite Fuller's Hotel, and
two doors from the Buildings occupied by the Treasury Depart-
meoit, Washington city.
CAPITAL $2,000,000.
PATRICK MACAULAY, President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBINSON, Vice President, New York.
SONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
-N- be allowed, payable semi-annually. The Company also
insures lives, grants annuities, sells endowments, and executes
trusts.
Rates of Insurance for $100, at the following ages :
Premium n Premiuin Premium
Age. for one year. for seven years. for whole life.
25 1.00 1.12 2.04
30 1.31 1.36 2.36
35 1.35 1.53 2.75
40 1.69 1.83 3.20
50 1.96 2.00 4.60

Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
MACAULAY, Esq., President, Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
BINSON, Esq., Vice President, New York; to which imme-
,liate attention will be paid.
Applications may also be made personally, or by letter, post
paid, to FRANCIS A. DICKINS, Agent for the -Company in the
City of WASHINGTON. His office is in Pennvslvania avenue,
opposite Fuller's Hutel, and two doors from the buildings occu-
pied by the Treasury Department. aug 3
C ARPETJNGS, RUGS, CURTAIN ORNA-
MENTS, &c. &c.-The subscribers having entered
largely into the Carpet and Ilouse Furnishing trade, will re-
ceive by the 20th August, a splendid assortment of the follow-
ing, in part, viz.
4,500 yards super Brussels Carpeting
6,500 do do Ingrain do
3,500 do Venetian do to match
125 Imperial Rugs
150 Wilton do
50 Tiufted do
800 yards Green Floor Cloth 4,
900 do Figured do do
100 pieces Damnask Moreens
100 do Cuiriail Muslins
And a great variety of rich Curtain Ornaments, Bindings,
Laces, Fringes, &c. &c.
The above goods will be sold unusually low, and we invite
customers to call and examine. 'L C
aug 5-3taw6w BRADLEY & CATLETT.
ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.-
S Broke jail at Leonardto n, St. Mary's County, Maryland,
on the night of the 15th August, ALEXANDER YATES, who
was there confined on a conviction of murder in the second de-
gree, and sentenced to the penitentiary for fourteen years. The
said Alexander Yates is about six feet high, stoops in the shoul-
dere, and limps in the right leg ; his right arm is nearly useless,
having been much injured. The subscriber will give the above
reward, and all necessary expenses paid, if delivered to him at
Leonardtown or the penitentiary of the State of Maryland.
GEO. H. MORGAN,
ang 20-2aw4w Sheriff of St. Mary's County.
ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.-Ran-
away from the subscriber, in Washington county, Virgi-
nia, on Saturday night, the 28th of May last, a negro boy named
ADAM, or, as he called himself, WATSON, about thirty years
old, black complexion, about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, thick
lips, quick spoken, rather a coarse voice, short face, low fore-
head, and weighing about 170 pounds He had on when he left
a blue broad cloth suit of clothes. It is probable that he is in
possession of-free papers, and will change his name; he can
read printing.
It is believed that this boy, the night before he ran off, stole
from Mr. James Denison, of my neighborhood, a dark bay horse,
about 16 hands high, black mane and tail, one white hind foot,
(believed to be the right,) with a white spot upon his back about
the size of a dollar, and seven years old last spring. It is likely
that he went off upon this horse. A reward of $20 will be given
for retnrning the horse.
A day or two before Adam ran off, a man by the name of Isaac
HIutton left this nighiborhood, as he said, for Alabama, but, from
circumstances which have come to my knowledge, I think it not
-. t- ..,- T..... ,-,ir ,n ti ,n-dn nnl toolr Adam xvwih


;rWIPli~ti~i~tr~25~o~s~~l~Fc~.ra~i~~4a~l ~?-~jrr~rP~Sdi"u;ic~*sr~iu~L~- --~~-ri~qrCaas~Yp~-~p~~'~'~nrtu(pP~~YL~ ZXp~-~-~I~LZC~C'V~OLbl~


If the above property is not disposed of at private sale before
Tuesday, the 27th September next, it will then be offered at
public sale at the first named' place, at 12 o'clock. 'The terms
will be accommodating, and made known on the day of sale.
HENRY CULVER, Bettsville.
aug 19-eots
.FtEW BOOKS.-Elkswatawa, or The Prophet of the
.-L% West, a tale of the frontier.
Also, The Old World and New, or A Journal of Reflections
and Observations made on a tour in Europe, by the Rev. Orvfile
Dewey, are this day received, for sale by F. TAYLOR, at the
Waverly Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's
Hotel. ly 18-
OTICE.-All persons to whom JOHN B. BOONE was ih-
_L debted on the 8th of August, 183-4, and who intend to re-
ceive a proportion of the effects in the hands of the subscriber,
and sign his release, according to the terms of his deed of trust
to me, are requested to place their claims, duly .authenticated,
in the hands of the subscriber, on or before the 1st day of Oc-
tober next. W. C. ORME, Trustee.
july 30-eo4w
G OVERNESS WANTED.-The subscriber wishes
Sto employ in her family, a young lady who is competent
to give instruction in the various branches of an English educa-
Stion, Music, and Drawing. To one with these qualifications, a
desirable situation, with a liberal salary, now offers itself. Ad-
dress the subscriber at Upper Marlborough, Prince George's
County, Maryland. MARY ANN MAGRUDER.
P. S. Satisfactory references are required.
july 8 -2awtf
C HALIENGE BLACKING.-Just received,a large
quantity of fresh Challenge Blacking, which will be found
superior to any thing of the kind ever offered to the A~teicafin
Public. It is an effectual preservative of the leather, and'aftfor
with infinitely less than the usual labor, a dry, lasting,, andbril-
liant jet polish. r
The decided preference shown by all who have used it is a
sufficient roof of its great superiority. A single trial will con-


cx


~


)


1C~~'~ic`iiEl~;d~n~Y~""l~`wnsr~;~uff-~a~s IL*~rq~yCsqg--opi~r~ ~PYII~


SBALTIMORE ANB-ASflft .
STON RAIYIOAD4.- pliesit.
tionl of the Potomac Steati SoiEt
QIWSJUW uff'Q and for the convenience of ptnW.-
letr, the arrangement advt -tA
effect on the 20th insLant has been revoked. =
therefore, depart from this city as heretofore, viz.
At HALF-PAST TWO o'clock A. M., and at FOl Iock
P. M.W
]FOR NORFOLK.-The Steameir-,.
.c ,d LUMBlA, Captain James MitchUi havi
placed permanently on the route between the District of
bia and NIorlolk, will leave Washington every Mondanyan -
day at I11 o'clock, A. M. and, returning, will leave Nor fok "
Wednesday and Sunday at 3 o'clock P. M. ,o '
Passage and Fare $5.
Freight destined toPetersburgh or Richmond, mi atMbta
forat the time of shipment. n "-
C.ANAL LINE. BE'IWEEN WAMUSHT[-"
ANDTHE WEST.-United States DI W
jine.-The Packet Boats run between GeorgetoWn ".h
heidstown daily, Sundays excepted. Hour of starting, 4oxe
A. M. Fare through, 83; intermediate distances in lmold
tion. .
.Stages, in connexion with the line, will run regularbeti n.
the boats at Georgetown and the city of WashJng~n,
f-. passengers at the principal Hotels, and afl interedidate
pint on Peansylvania Avenue, at an extra charge of ate ent.
Of ces-eIn Wasblineton, at ihe Ainerican Hotel, Fullbr'sa iR.
St.e+,w,, *.4-m & o-I's efwy ; i Sheerdeita at .
A. Huminickldouse's, and Short & Harris's.
Pur tle ci,.nexicon of the line %ililrthe West, and widt iter-
ni..liate point-, s-e ihe Company's cardMand former adv'rie-
tueuls. J. 1. SMILL, S cret6-ri--
may SO-d,;m Georgetoi.w -
l"IT OMINOUS COAL LAND FOR SAIE. I ,I.
-i hbo.l ,,fabot -l001, acres of bitunminous coal-ind, offering
uncoinmn advantages bhrh for the Soal and iron lnens.' 'It it "
simuntlI. in FPanklin township, Bradiford county, Ste of Pena-
sylvania, on the S.clirader or middle ranch of TorWida cret
about seven miles Irom its confluence with the north'-,brhBch'of
the S,,squehannah, and about fifleenmiles from Towagda, ihe
county town; fiumn careful explorati at ut two-thitd of this
land. is esmii:ited to be coul land. Seve;.'al d ifts have been open-
ed, and the coal fii.iad to be of the beat qt lity, and etoform a
coke equal to that .f any English coal. An dnple supply of iron
ore, i :.-ve:.ral kinds, more especially the arg laceQop.carbonaa
of iron, of whirli there is a bed of lirst-ratenqualiy, supposed,
upon g.),d grouni.ds, i., lie coi-extensive with the coal mnasure-,
i.s tLunld upol. this property; as also fire-clay, qnd a coagloie-
rpte rock, ,much valued for hearth stones, andf'nrnacb lini5-*,
and f(or mill IItones. There is good bottom land vithin-its liito
along itheScerader Branch, and a large proportio, of upland dfa -
goMd iiiialTv for cultivation, and throughout the whole a ai n"-
dance of excellent timber, consisting of hliite adf yellow pine'
of Ilie finely description, rock oak, chestnut, hiemloci, poplar, &e.
The streak, affords numerous sites for,.~ale-r poyer4, which,
from the formation of the beds, mny be brought into applicationew--
at a trifling cost. -
The extensive market offered by theltaie of New York aiid.
-the whole line of internal insprovemenisofthat State, wills 1 y
be fully opened to the productions of the district, by the'H- .
provements of Pennsylvania, -the' continuation of the 14ort.
Branch Canal to the New YQrk State line having been provided
for at the recentsession qf the Legislature, and a charter h ip
been obtained for a railroad from the mines to the canal." A adt.'
vey for the greater part of this railroad, particularly-the portion
of it near the mines, has already been made, by which it has
been ascertained that the ground is peculiarly favorable for the "
purpose, and that it may be effected at-a very moderate e -
pense. ,-
Persons wishing to view these lands, can, have every.assaist
ance by applying to Eliphalet Mason, Esq., at Monreetown,
within five miles of the premises. ,
An unexceptionable title will be given. Apply'to
CLEMENTS S. MILLER,
july 6-2aw6w 93 South Third Streer, PhiadelphiY,,
"MALTING AND BREWING EST4L M~
N MENT FOR LEASE OR SALE.--- ~toirable
opportunity now presexam ilJgif to any person deieAr eitte- ,
ing into thbe Ma'.l;~ 'and "'rewing bn ne.f, by leasihg or'
chasing a well-establishefd Brewery in the city cf WNNa li ow.
This property i- Nin-tly located upn the basin that for~in th -
eastern ter,.naii.,, ol il ,- Clihe.a,ck:r. .au 1i Olhi Canal, in'the
deep navigation and secure harbor of thte Eastern Branch river,
a little below the navy yard of the United States.
The lot forms the northeast corner of square No. 744 upon
the plat of the city, fronts upon the canal basin one hundred and
twenty feet, and, at a right angle, extends westward one hun-
dred feet to the western extremity of the lot. The improve-
ments consist of an excellenttwo-story brick house, with others ;
a brick, and, in part, slated brewery, mnalting, mill-house, and
offices; extensive arched cellars, cooper's shop, stable, wash-
ing room, &e. which extend the length of the east front on the
basin, and along the south side to the western termination of the-
lot. The buildings are now capable of brewing from twelve to
fourteen thousand bushels of barley annually, and cani be readily
increased. The coppers will each boil off nearly thirty barrels,
and all the plant, being in a good state, with the usual annual
preparations, may be ready for commencing business at the be-
ginning of the approaching season. There is not, perhaps, a
more eligible situation for an extensive business, having com-
munication by rivers, canals, and railroads in every., direction.
Persons desh ous of entering into such a business will ofeourse
visit the premises, so that further amplification is not necessary,
and they will then form their own opinions. Any information
relative to the business can be obtained on application to me.
CLEMENT T. COOTE.
N. B. Persons desirous of making an investment, and wishing
some other arrangement for conducting the business, might pro-
bably have their views served by communicating them to me
immediately. C T. C.
aug 22-2aw3w (Globe)
L AND FOR SALE.-The subscriber offers for sale the
farm on which he resides, lying between the Baltimore
and Washington railroad and Baltimore and Washington Turn-
pike road, 22 miles from Baltimore and 12from Wiashington,
containing about 150 acres, most of which is of good quality, and
well adapted to plaster and the growth of tobacco, grain, and
grass. The situation is elevated, agreeable, and healthy. lthe
improvements consist of a comfortable brick dwelling, andall
other necessary buildings for convenience or comfort. -
Also, a small farm of about 150 acres, lying one mile soutlfof
the.above ; most of which is fertile, well adapted to plasterlid
the growth of flue yellow tobacco, grain, and grass. The im-
provements on this farm consist of a small frame dwelling and
a large new tobacco house.
Persons disposed to purchase are invited to call upon the sub-
scriber, who will show the lands to those who may wish to see
then,.


I I~ I


^


'No 7-34S...'










COMMUNIGATION-

MESSRS. EDITORS: While the public mind is so intent
Upon the eventful scenes in Texas, while the public presses
throughout the Union are teeming with notices of the
war in that region, and the sympathies of all are enlisted
in a political struggle in a foreign dominion, it is most
strange to witness the indifference and apathy evinced to-
wards the unfortunate inhabitants of Florida, an integral
part of bur ow0n 'nation, engaged in a doubtful struggle
with a savage foe.
Towards Texas all eyes are turned ; in its cause are all
voices raised~ in its defence all arms enlisted, and to its
wants thp purses of all seem spontaneously to open. No
distance is too great to stop the warlike tide which is flow-
ing froi all'quarters to its relief; no season is deemed too
irisaklbHius to delay its defenders. A crusade has gone
forth against the Mexicans, and in behalf of adventurers
engaged in' revolutionary struggle in a foreign country ;
while our own citizens, cultivating their own soil, which
they have purchased from their own Government, are
scarcely' noticed while contending for their property and
their lives, in the very territory of the United States. To-
WVards Florida no volunteers are yet marching, although
the, Indians passing the feeble cordon" which our Gen-
eral deemed adequate to their occlusipn, are spreading
themselves through the Sparse settlements, and carrying
ruin, devastation, and death in their paths. The health
of our citizen soldiers are too precious to be risked in a
suivier campaign in Florida -
While hundreds of houseless, naked wretches, our own
citizens, driven from their homes, bereft of every thing,
are 'subsisting on the charity of the few remaining settlers,
and on the bounty of the Government, a prey to that dis-
ease, not the effect of climate, but of poverty, of broken
spirits,, of squalid wretchedness, we hear of no meetings
hed,. no contributions raised, to alleviate their sufferings.
O Ou" telescopic" humanity. can discern no object but
through the medium of distance; our exotic feelings are
only alive to the interests of strangers, of aliens; our phi-
lanthropy isso expansive that it deals not with cases ofdo-
inestic misery.-
Shin the political struggle in Texas our people are volun-
tary actors, or deeply interested speculators, and Santa
-Ana and the Mexicans are denounced 'and vilified by eve-
ry term of opprobrium and hate. But the war in Florida
is viewed with the listless indifference of a scenic repre-
Sientation-ias an arena, wherein the savage Oceola is view-
q4 with complacency or admiration, in his contest with our
ba4fed Generals, and where the spectators, with the char-
actristic liberality of a Spanish assembly at a bull fight,
take the part of the brute against the man, and the con-
4uoit of the former over his human victims is greeted with
"vcaas" of applause. Christian men and soldiers in Mex-
ico.(?ruel and perfidious though they be) are degraded into
monsters, while in Florida savage miscreants are elevated
into heroes. This Oceola, a petty chief of a petty clan,
obscure in his origin, mean and contemptible in his early
history, and who hasonly risen into notice -by one signal
act of perfidy, cruelty, and ingratitude, is held up as the
"exemplar,'>the abstract of the heroic and savage vir-
'lnes. -
Thus are the lionest feelings of the Public diverted
abroad from cases df real domestic distress, their aid and
sympatlhie.all absorbed in a foreign quarrel, and their judg-
ments perverted by the substitution of idle romance for so-
bet history; and it is because my fellow-citizens in Flori
da are the immediate sufferers from this Texan mania, and
the character of the nation for justice and good faith
thereby impeached, that I have directed my pen against so
ruinous an Infatuation.
But, gentlemen, our case is still worse; not only .are the
People of Florida thus deprived of the sympathy and aid
they have a right to expect-not merely are they treated
with indifference-'-they arc actually maligned and calum-
niated in their distrdss.
The denunciations of a baffled General, smarting under
merited censure, they could endWre ; for when was it oth-
erwise than that mortified vanity iught to find an excuse
for its own failures in the imputed misconduct of others ?
The Public can always rightly appreciate recriminations
from such' 'sources. Moreover, the extraordinary versa-
tility of this commander, in taking back these charges and
imputations when their truth was challenged, and, after a
general attack upon the volunteers of three States and one
small Territory, in making the "amende" to all but the
last, exhibited in himself such a degree of inconsiderate-
ness and evity as removed all weight from his censure.
1lit, froilm whatever tause, the same imputations are
made by otherie; and it is"to vindicate my fellow-citizens,
and, if possible, to disabuse the public mind, that I thus
trouble you with this piece. We are taunted in our dis-
tresses in 4th of July toasts and elsewhere, and sneeringly
told to fight our own battles, before we call upon others
for. assistance."
Such remarks can only ha made by those who nothing
know of the matter, or who, knowing the truth, wilfully
pervert it. At what period of the war have not the People
of Florida been fighting their own battles Correctly
speaking, the battles were not their own, for the war was
not their own. The war in its origin was a national war,
in the fomenting of which the People of Florida had not
the least agency; and yet, by the waste and misdirection
of the ample means entrusted to officers of the Federal
Government, after a miserable exhibition of feeble and
abortive measures by all the Generals in the field, except
the nelectetfinmeh, and after the enemy has thus become
emboldened by success, the war threatens to become truly
a Florida war, and the battles all our own. Their own
zeal, in the first instance, led the Florida volunteers into
the field; self-preservation must now force them to bear the
brunt of the battle.
Let me not be misunderstood. I mean not to reflect
upon our gallant little army now in Florida. They have
ever acted, and will continue to act, with their character-
istic valor. But they are dispersed and broken up into
such small detachments that they have barely force to pre-
serve their positions, without the ability to pursue and drive
back the predatory bands of savages that are spreading
themselves through the country, and marking their route
by devastation and death.
TO omit noticing any earlier instances of the valor of
_egular troops in Florida, I need only mention their con-
dlct in the sortie from Micanopy, .under the lamented Col,
Heileman, when they defeated a superior force of the In-
dians, exhibiting what they can do, when properly com-


manded.*
But, to return from this digression, I ask again in what
battles have the citizens of Florida not borne their part 1
They marched with the gallant Clinch in the first ad-
ance aen the enemy, after shedding their blood on the
rote. That a larger portion of them were not actually in
the fight with the regulars, was not their fault, but owing
to accident, to the foree of circumstances. That a portion
of them rendered most important aid in the fight, no one
will deny. A large body of volunteers (for this popula-
tion) woer in the field under Major General Scott, and
that they were not in battle was not their fault, but because
they were under the command of Major General Scott,
who, by a strange fatality, fought no battle in Florida.
SVTna ealus ambobus fruit ] commune periculum." These
brave men, with their intrepid officer, that General has
denounced, while the two commanders of the regular army,
with whose divisions they acted, have publicly borne testi-
mony to their efficiency and good conduct.
They were Florida meen, wh yolunteered-ta.eatablish a
post, and to furnish supplies to General Scott on the Wyth-
oacoochee; and who, when left alone in the heart of the
Indian nation, by the sudden ,and unaccountable retreat
and disbanding of the army, in April, gallantly defended
a miserable blockhouse, for weeks, against the whole power
of the enemy. And it was a mall band of Florida volun-
teers who, when they were left destitute of all other suc-
cor, -qd against every calculation of success, nobly relieved
them frona their-perilous condition.
And now, at this moment, when this much-lauded mili-
tary eordon" of General Scottis proved powerless to keep
the enemy confined; when the brave regular troops are
Snecessariy ceoped up in their stockades, surrounded by
Indifssi tt is the Florida volunteers who are relied upon
to keep open the communication between these posts, to
furnish escorts for their supplies, and to chase away the
predatory murdering bands from their own fire-sides.
*'Aid here I cannot avoid exhibiting the conduct of Colonel
Heileman in bright contrast with that of a popular General in
Plorida, who, with an army large enough to meet and overcome
the combined force of the, Indians, suffered himself to be cooped
up.4ad besieged, in his fortified camp, in an open wood, to be-
theip braved and insulte4,, and nearly starved, by the very en-
emy. h9 set out "to pursue and chastise, There he remained
"herm'atically sealed," without an effort at self- extrication, until
relieved by the gallant Clinch. This might all be passed over;
but because the Indians, for some perfidious purposes, held out
--------- 1- % ... h -ld


k iJA~l is ,f o army in the spring, nearly
k1il the s ri ents in EaT Florida beyond the vicinity of
the military, posts are abandAid to the Indians. Since
the 1st of May they have been a nitervals extending their
ravages to witl 0 miles of TallaMW ee, and in all Middle
Florida the onl troops to oppose them in the field (except
about 130 regular troops at Old Town; on the Stiwannee)-
are the vituperated Florida militia. Each day are these
men traversing the wilds and swamps of their extensive
country, subject to the daily alternations of a summer sun and
drenching rains, following the phantom-like steps of their
wily foe, and doomed to be only certain of their presence
in witnessing the ruin they have caused. Day after day
are they pained to see the ibofi settlers reluctantly retiring
from the fields they ventured to cultivate at the constant
peril of their lives, but whose harvests they at last despair
of gathering. Every day is the position becoming more de-
populated and difficult of defence; while the few resolute
men who still hold on to their possessions do so more from
a spirit of hardihood and from the point of honor than from
any well-founded hope of ultimate safety.
During this same period, too, this section of the country
has been constantly" menaced by inroads of savage infuri-
ated Creeks,struggling to escape into Florida to join the Sem-
inoles ; and frequently have our harassed volunteers been
obliged to narch into Georgia to oppose these new enemies.
And when it is borne in mind that all this duty falls up-
on a population in the whole not equal to that of a single
county in several of the States-upon a few whites enga-
ged in the labors of the field, and embarrassed with a large
colored population, who can add nothing to their active
force ; when it is recollected that this population is sparsely
scattered over an extensive region, every where offering
swamps and thickets, deemed heretofore impenetrable, save
by Indians or wild beasts, and which nothing but an in-
domitable spirit, prompted by the principles of self-preser-
vation, could induce the white man to penetrate ; when all
these circumstances are regarded, and that thus far so ex-
tensive a frontier has been guarded, and not abandoned,
then the nation will be able to do justice to these neglected
and abused citizens of Florida.
And now, sirs, if it be asked what has caused this disas-
trous state of things ; why, after the Executive and Con-
gress have made such ample provision for our defence,
we are still thus exposed, the cause is to be found in the
failure of our Generals ; in the disbanding of the Army,
and closing the campaign in April, through fear of the dis-
eases of the climate.
Now, sirs, I aver that, up to this date the Floridas, gene-
rally, have been as healthful, so far as regards diseases
of climate, as the greater part of the Middle and Southern
States of this Union. Such I know to be the case in Mid-
die Florida; and as to the diseases which have been report-
ed in East Florida, they have not been diseases of the cli-
mate, but of accidental circumstances. They have been
caused by the very errors, in our military operations, of
which we complain; by forcing the troops, and the mise-
rable inhabitants, to be cooped up in crowded stockades and
block-houses, frequently suffering for needful supplies. Po-
verty and want have been here, as elsewhere, the parents
of pestilence. But if the troops had been in the field, all
experience has proved that they might have preserved their
health. It is confinement, and not action, which has caus-
ed disease.
The remedy for this state of things was obvious, and
clearly pointed out by our energetic and intelligent Execu-
Sive, and received the sanction of the President of the Unit-
ed States. It was to march an army into the nation, when
the Indians were known to have been engaged, with their
families around them, in cultivating their corn. For this
service only 1,000 men were asked out of Florida, and
in addition to the regular troops and militia in the country.
All experience has shown that the only sure way of defend-
ing a frontier against Indians is to carry on an offensive
war into their own country. Here, with the force asked
for and promised, Governor Call would have been able to
engage and to defeat the Indians-mto destroy their crops,
capture their families, and force them'to submit.
But, although these troops have been expected for more
than a month, we do not even hear of their advance. The
phantom of disease haunts their imaginations; and while
the people whose cause they have volunteered to defend,
have to encounter these dreaded perils of disease in an ac-
cumulated degree)from their increased labor and exposure,
and while braving also the more formidable savages, these,
our promised defenders, will not march to our relief until a
frost shall have disarmed this invisible ideal enemy of its
terrors.
And when before was ever a small and gallant popula-
tion left to encounter such real dangethrough through the mere
apprehension of disease ? When before did a nation aban-
don any portion of its people or territory even to tempo-
rary conquest by an enemy, much less to actual destruc-
tion, because of.the dangers of a summer sun g The sittra?
tion of Florida at this moment is a signal disgrace to the
nation, and to the chivalry of its citizens. The Executive
and Congress have made every provision for its defence ;
the People of the United States, and those charged with
the application of the public means, have not seconded
their intentions.
Almost on the borders of Florida, a large, regular and
volunteer force, principally relieved from the engagements
of the Creek war, part of them raised for the defence of
Florida, rest on their arms until a frost shall remove all
danger of sickness.
Why does not the fear of disease stop the volunteers now
recklessly rushing into Texas ? Will any man hazard the
assertion that Florida is less salubrious than Texas? Must
we conclude that as our nation is charged with the lust of
foreign acquisition or conquest, our people are only active
in the cause of humanity when this influence is reinforced
by the promise of reward-by the promised bounty of Lands
held forth to the Texan volunteers ? Here unfortunately the
Government neglected to offer any such bounty, and thus
in violation of the laws of their country, and of its neutral
obligations, the People are volunteering for Texas; bul
with the invitation of a law of Congress to that effect, they
hesitate or refuse to engage for Florida.
In concluding this long piece, I have only to disclaim all
personal or party feelings, and to rest my apology for any
supposed undue severity of remark upon classes and indi-
viduals on the actual state of suffering and deep wrongs ol
my friends and neighbors, caused by the measures I have


ventured to criticize.
One explanation is yet to be made, which is, to except
our neighbors of Thomas and Lowndes counties in Geor-
gia, from the charge of insensibility to, or neglect of, ou
condition in Florida. They havepver been prompt and ready
to cross the borders, and assist us in our difficulties, when-
ever allowed a respite from watching the Creeks whose fugi-
tive bands, when escaped from the Creek army, have been
more than once gallantly encountered and defeated by
them.


A Citizen of Middle Florida.


AUGUST 8, 1836.


DANCING AND WALTZING ACADEMY AT
CARUSI'S SALOON.-L. CARUSI, having been
solicited by a great number of families to spend part of his
tima in the District, for the purpose of teaching the delightful
science of DANCING, respectfully announces to the citizens of
Washington, Georgetown, and Alexandria, that he has yielded
to their requests, (which are commands to him,) and will open
his Saloon for instruction,rand Cotillion Parties, on the first
Monday in October next. =
Long experience has given to L. Carusi a thorough know-
ledge of all the tact necessary to render a teacher pre-emi-
"nent in his profession,- and the power to communicate his
knowledge with ease and pleasure to his scholars. He will
teach Dancing, Waltzing, Gallopades, Hop Waltz, Spanish
Dances, Reels, &c. &c. in one quarter, for the moderate sum of
twelve dollars per quarter.
It is desirable that the scholars should join the school as soon
as possible, that they may be prepared for the Cotillion and pri-
vate parties of the coming season.
Private Balls will be given through the quarter, to which the
scholars will be admitted, free of charge.
Private lessons will be given by L. Carusi to ladies and gen-
tlemen, either at the Saloon or at their dwellings, as they may
desire. He will also devote a portion of his time to giving in-
structions in the Academies of the District.
Iyt. The Saloons are iow undergoing a thorough repair, and
such alterations as have been suggested, for comfort and con-
venience, and will be beautifully and appropriately ornamented
with classic embellishments. They will shortly be in readiness
to let to public and private parties, concerts, &c. on the most
reasonable terms. aug 27-eotf.
W ANTED, by a graduate of the University of Dublin,
Ireland, a situation as Principal of an Academy, or tutor
in a private family. He is competent to prepare young gentle-
men for admission into any of the American Colleges, and also
for the Counting House. U1is attainments in the Greek and
Latin Languages, and in all the English branches, are of the first
order, as his numerous letters of recommendation will show.
Any person wanting a teacher of the qualifications here describ-
ed, will be sure to have an efficient one in the advertiser. His
recommendations for morality will also be found unexceptionable.


WASHINGTON.
4 Luibei'ty tid Union, now and forever, one and
inseparable.9

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 1836.

THE ELECTIONS.

From ALABAMA, our Election news is more
favorable than hitherto, but not yet conclusive.
Returns from South Alabama give the follow-
ing number of Members elected by each party :
Whigs 43 ; Van Buren men 19. Against these
are 18 Van Buren men claimed, as heretofore
stated, from the four great northern counties.
We have satisfactory information that two of the
eighteen so claimed are decided friends of
Judge WHITE; and it may be that more of
them are. But, admit all the remaining sixteen
to be Van Burenites, the result of the election
for the State Legislature, as far as heard from,
will stand thus:
WHIGs. VAN BUREN.
Southern counties 43 19
Northern counties 2 16


Total, so far as heard 45 35
In ILLINOIS, the success of the Van Buren
party, at the late election for members of the
State Legislature, has not been so decisive as
has been boasted. The Missouri Republican,
received yesterday, says that the Legislature of
Illinois, on joint ballot, will be found pretty
' equally divided, judging from the returns, be-
tween White and Van Buren." The Republi-
can then gives a table of members elect, from 27
counties, which have chosen 35 Whigs, and 37
Van Burenites.
From MISSOURI, we have returns of the elec-
tion of Governor from about two-thirds of the
counties of the State, which exhibit a 'majority
in favor of Gen. ASHLEY, for Governor, but not
so large a majority as the wailings of the Globe's
correspondents had led us to anticipate.

The tone of the communication on the con-
duct of the war in Florida, which will be found-
in the preceding columns, is that of severe repre-
hension, a good deal of which we dare say is
merited, but some part of which is, according to,
our judgment, with the lights we have, unde-
served. Much allowance must be made for the'
feelings of the writer, and much respect is due:
to his personal character and his motives: for
he is, as he subscribes himself, a citizen of Flori-
da, in no way connected with the Army, but a
sufferer in common with his fellow-citizens,
whose wrongs, both real and supposed, he feels
as acutely, probably, as he paints them vividly.'
But, notwithstanding the influence of all these
considerations, we doubt whether we should
have given a place to his communication in our
columns, but that the discussion of the merit of
these campaigns had been previously opened in
this paper by the very able writer, a week or two
ago, in defence; of one of our most esteemed
Captains. We: regret that discussions of this
n nature have a sprung from Aifjer _o if pJ of iono
not likely to be reconciled, and wlricn, we are
afraid, public discussion will rather aggra-
vate than heal. It is not in our power, how-
ever, either to control events or mould public
opinion. It is one of our duties to keep our
readers advised of all the occurrences and inci-
dents which compose the current of daily news.
Perhaps, also, it is as much our duty to admit
into our columns, under a proper responsibility as
to facts, &c. a pretty free examination of the
conduct of public officers. Such appears to us
to be at least the duty which circumstances now
require of us in regard to these Indian wars,
their origin, conduct, and consequences.
In the case immediately before us another
consideration in favor of the free admission of
the article is, that of the natural sensibility felt
by the writer for the honor of his fellow-citizens
of Florida, which he deems to have been assail-
ed, lnd the difficulty of fully vindicating them
without bringing into the discussion the merits
of those officers who have commanded in Flo-
rida, and especially of those from whom the of-
fensive imputations have proceeded.

It is stated that the revenue which has ac-
crued at the New York custom-house during
the last two quarters, exceeds nine millions of
dollars !

Mr. CLAY being unable to attend the late
Whig Festival at Cincinnati, sent the following
toast:
The Distribution of the Surplus Revenue: The bright-
ef ray of light during seven years of political darkness."
NEWSPAPER CHANGE.-The establishment of the Win-
chester (Va.) Republican, (lately owned by Messrs. BROOKS
& FREELAND) has passed into the possession of Mr. WIL-
LIAM TOWERS, by whom the paper will in future be con-
ducted. In a.well-written article, announcing the change,
and his new responsibilities to the patrons of the Republi-
can, which we find in that paper of yesterday, the new edi-
tor declares himself as an old school republican, a believer
in the political doctrines taught by those fathers of democ-
racy, JEFFERSON-and MADISON, and, as a consequence
promises to use every fair and honorable means to prevent
the election of Mr. Van Buren tothe Presidential Chair.
[Baltimore Patriot.
BALTIMORE, AuG. 25.
The FUNERAL PROCESSION in honor of the late ex-Presi-
dent MADlsoN, took place this morning. The ranks of all
professions were well filled, and the whole scene presented
one of the most impressive spectacles of the kind that we
recollect to have witnessed in our city on any former occa.-
sion. It was alike honorable to the dead and the living.
[Patriot.


PHILADELPHIA, AUG. 23.
We learn with regret that Dr. SUTHERLAND is danger-
ously ill. Two physicians are attending him. He has
been confined to his chamber since Friday of last week.
A number of the members of Congress who took an active
part in the arduous duties that marked the close of the last
session, are now laboring under the effects of indisposition.
We are not at all surprised at this ; for the night sessions
of the last Congress, the excitement, turmoil, and confu-
sion-to say nothing of the loss of sleep, night after night-
were enough to shatter the strongest constitution. In the
present case, we feel satisfied that all parties, and especi-
ally the constituents of Dr. S. will sincerely regret his ill-
ness.-Inquirer.
IL 1*, -. f TT 1 m 1


SPIRIT OF THE WHIG PRESS.

FROM THE ALBANY ADVERTISER, AUGUST 23,
Our lukewarm politicians, the waiters tipoi
Providence, who hate been lamenting over the
inevitable ruin of our country, and yet refused to
act like men and freemen to recover their rights
are now nobly rebuked by the efforts and the
glorious triumph of the North Carolina Whigs.
Had they too-folded their hands, and given up
all for lost without a struggle, ruthless proscrip-
tion and party violence would have still conti-
nued their sway in that portion of our land. .But
unintimidated by power, unawed by menace,
uncorrupted by the spoils, the gallant sons of
North Carolina have rushed gallantly to the
field, and with upwards of 15,000 majority
against them, nothing daunted, contended hand
to hand, and gloriously conquered the enemy.
FREEMEN OF NEW YORK, GO AND DO LIKEWISE.


FROM TH' SALEM (N. J.) BANNER.


NEW JERSEY is invariably ranked among the
States certain at the coming election to give her
vote for Van Buren. Why this is so calculated
upon by the Whigs of other States, we cannot
perceive. A majority of the votes in New Jer-
4sey has not been given to Gen. Jackson since
1824. And why they should (and they never
will be given to Van Buren) we cannot divine.
It is true Jackson electors succeeded in 1832,
but it was by a minority vote. It is true also,
that the Legislature has been of the sarffe com-
plexion these several years past; yet this is
easily accounted for. The People of this State
;gre not sufficiently awake to the importance of
unceasing, eternal vigilance ; they do not, as
they should, always exercise that right which is
inestimable ; in a word, they cannot every year
be brought to the polls. We have now in this
State a certain majority against Van Buren, and
that majority will, most assuredly, exhibit itself
at the coming contest. The State is forHARRI-
SON. Salem county will greatly increase her
former majority for the Whigs.

FROM THE BOSTON ATLAS.
THE PATRONAGE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The
moral sense of the country has been hitherto
shocked by the sentiment originally avowed by
Governor Marcy in the Senate of New York,
and since adopted as one of the rallying cries of
the Van Buren party, that to the victors belong
the spoils." The Globe has now unblushingly
gone beyond this, and declared that the pa-
tronage of the Government should be used to sus-
tain the Republican party." It will be under-
stood what the Globe means by patronage. It
is not office alone which is intended. The co-
hort of office-holders is constantly filled to the
utmost limits permitted by the law. The "hire-
lings" know the tenure by which they hold their'
places, and outvie one another in subserviency
to the Administration. The Globe means nothing
less than that the PEOPLE'S MONEY should be ex-
pended in perpetuating the dynasty of the office-
holders; that it should be lavished for electioneer-
ing purposes, and against the People them-
selves-in other words, that the stewards should
dishonestly employ the money consigned to
their trust, ip gaining an ascendnecy over their
masters.
The infamous sentiment advanced by the'
_fLJbe occurs in a letter fromSt. Louis the _Nrv
ter of which complains that the patronage of the
General Government has not been used to defeat
General Ashley, the people's candidate for Gov-
ernor in Missouri, who has succeeded by more
than two-thirds of the popular vote. We have
before charged it upon the Administration that
the public money was perverted to party pur-
poses-but this is the first time that we have
heard the principle daringly avowed by the lead-
ing press of the party. The plunderers of the'
Treasury mean doubtless to carry on their sys-
tem of rapine with renewed vigor, as the time
approaches when they will be thrust 'out of
power. They may throw off all disguise, and
openly come forth in their true characters of
bandits and pilferers, ready to make a desperate
stand against those who are hurrying to the
rescue of the Constitution. But the day of re-
tribution is at hand.

FROM THE PITTSBURG ADVOCATE.
A STRANGE PARALLEL.-This caption heads
a piece published on the 16th inst. in the Unit-
ed States Gazette. Amongst the many other
good things in this effusion, is the following:
"It is remarkable how closely political errors
'approximate, when the circumstances of na--
'.tions are in any degree similar."
In his parallel, so little flattering to the People
of the United States, we agree with the writer in
the Gazette; but must remark, that when circum-
stances are in any near degree similar, events
must conform to their causes. One great error
was very prevalent in the United States after the
consummation of "the Revolution"-and that
was, that the People were exempt from many of
indeed most of the causes of decadence, so ru-
inous in all other countries, and in all former
ages. Under the influence of this fatal error;
the Constitution was formed. Power was given
by that instrument, with not only a lavish but a
careless hand, as it was not admitted that, in
this country, power could be abused. As dis-
pensed by such men as those who held the Pre-
sidential chair during most of the time between
1789 and 1829, power was not abused. A
Washington, a Jefferson, a Madison, anrd a


Monroe, used power cautiously, as a prudent
father would over his family-but the evil lay in
tlhe Constitution, and displayed itself the mo-
ment that instrument came to be acted upon by
an incumbent who used power because he pos-
sessed power. If'men are disposed to eradicate
evil, they must begin by removing its cause.

The gentleman who handed us the subjoined copy of an
advertisement found on board the steamer Mountaineer,
plying on Lake George, assured us of its accuracy in word
and letter. It is among the rarest original orthographical
curiosities we have ever seen. The writer said he had
been twenty years endeavoring to spell according to usage,
but finding it impossible to attain any decent proficiency,
he had adopted the plan of spelling by sound, and thought
it decidedly the easiest and best.-Balt. Gaz.
SICKS RATTILL SNAIX AND A MUD TURKEL FUR
SYTE OR SAYLE.


Y
2



fi
f
b
3
b

14


All of which are in a fast improving part of the city.
EDWARD DYER,
aug 27-2aw&ds Auctioneer.


N OTICE.-By virtue of two commissions issued out of
Montgomery County Court, and to the subscribers direct-
ed, we will proceed on Saturday, the 17th day of September
n'extat the hour of 12 o'clock M., on the premises, to divide
the real estates of which Thomas B. Offutt and Selah Offutt died
seized, lying and being in Montgomery county, Md.
BURGESS WILLETT,
THOSE. S. WATKINS,
julyl4-2mcp SAMUEL T. STONESTREET.
OVERNESS WANTED.-The subscriber wishes
SW to'employ in her family, a young lady who is competent
to give instruction in the various branches of an English educa-
tion, Music, and Drawing. To one with these qualifications, a
desirable situation, with a liberal salary, now offers itself. Ad-
dress the subscriber at Upper Marlborough, Prince George's
County, Maryland. MARY ANN MAGRUDER.
P. S. Satisfactory references are required.
july 8 -2awtf
PRIVATE TUTOR WANTED.-A gentleman
A wishes to employ, at a moderate salary, a Teacher capa-
ble of preparing boys to enter a college, and who can produce
satisfactory recommendations as to character and conduct. The
situation is a pleasant and desirable one, in a private family,
about 20 miles below Washington City, on the Potomac river.
For further information apply to WM. L. BRENT, Washington
City. aug 23-eotf
A FEMALE TEACHER WANTED.-A Lady of
good character, and well qualified to teach the ordinary
branches of an English education, can hear of a situation in a
private family by applying to W. Y. through the post office at
Upper Marlborough. aug 13-2awtf
CLASSICAL TEACHER WANTED.-The Prin-
C. dcipal of the classical department of my institution having
been chosen Principal of an academy in Alabama, I wish to en-
gage a person well qualified to teach the Latin and Greek lan-
guages, to fill the situation thus made vacant. There are classes
of students now in Horace, Tacitus, and Cicero de Oratore ;
and in Hohirter, Sophocles, Euripides, &c. and therefore no per-
son need apply for the situation except he is qualified to instruct
iri'the highest authors read in our colleges, has had considerable
experience in' teaching and governing, and intends to devote
himself exclusively to the profession of teaching. Such a per-
son would find a pleasant and permanent situation, and would
receive a liberal salary. A single man would be preferred, but
convenient arrangements could be made for one with a family.
Applications may be made (if by letter postage paid) until the
24th of the 9th month, (September,) and they should be accom-
panied bypunexceptionable evidence of character, ability, and
experience in teaching; and it is desirable that they should
contain a brief statement of the views of the applicant on the


COMMERCIAL.

NEW YORK MARKET.-AuGuST 24,
COTrTON.-The packet ship George Washington arrived
yesterday from Liverpool with advices from that port to
26th July, which confirm the advance previously noticed.
he sales for the week ending with the 22d July, were 30,020
nales, and on the 23d about 2,500, including Uplands at 8a a lid.
Accounts have also been received from Havre to 18th July.
That market continued heavy, with a still further decline of 2 a
8 centimes ; sales of the preceding wek, 2,729 bales; stock in
first hands of all kinds, 58,131. Our own market continues
v'rry languid, atid a further reduction of a cent to 1 cent has
been submitted to on inferior qualities ; the sales from 20th to
23d, inclusive, amount to about 900 bales, of which 300 were
Upland, at 121 a 201 cents, including upwards of 100 at 12 a 121 ;
300 Florida, 131 a 20 ; 250 New Orleans, 13 a 19 ; and 50 Mo-
bile, 16 a 184.
FLOUR AND MEAL.-Extensive purchases of Western flour
For the South, commencing at the close of last week, created
some excitement in the market, attended by an immediate ad-
vance in price. The demand has since continued very animat-
ed, and fresh common brands Canal are taken immediately on
arrival. The sales yesterday -were at $7 75j which is an ad-
vance of 50 cents since our last notice ; fincy brands sold ex-
tensively at $7 75, but yesterday were firmly held at $8; Ohio,
via canal, sold at $7 a $7 37j; the latter for good fresh, which
is a further considerable advance. Southern also has improved,
although the sales continue limited, and are confined to lots for
city use ; Georgetown sold at 88 25 a $8 50; Howard street,
from wharf, $8 371; Richmond country, $7 621; and Philadel-
phia, $7 871. Nothing doing in sour. Rye flour continues
scarce, and yesterday advanced to $5 50. Corn meal in barrels
sold at $4 50, and hhds. at $20 75.
SUGARs.-Prices remain firm, and a fair demand continues
from the trade; the sales embrace about 300 hhds. good to prime
Porto Rico at 10 a 11 cents ; 50St. Croix, 114 a 11.; 100 Cuba
Muscovado, 10; 300 a 400 boxes brown Havana, 10 a 101 ; 75
common, 9. ; and 50 extra fine, 104 a 11; 65 very common white
Trinidad, 11 ; 2,000 bags Manilla, the balance of the parcel, 6a,
short price, for export, 6 mos. ; and, by auction, 1,500 loaves re-
fined, 14 a 154 1 and 60 barrels brown Brazil, 9 a 9j, 4 mos. ;
white box sugars continue very scarce.

Pown-, the inimitable and only true living theatrical re-
presentative of Irishmen, has got back, and looks more
fresh and youthful than ever. before, by his successful so-
journ at home. He is to re-appear at the Park Theatre,
in New York, on Monday, in the ever-favorite and amus-
ing character of the Irish Ambassador."-Star.
Of 229 cases of suicide in Paris during the last year 78
were females. Suffocation by the fumes of charcoal is the
most general mode used.
NEUKOMlM, the distinguished musical professor who had
taken passage from Liverpool for Boston, in the ship New
Jersey, and sent his luggage on board, was compelled to
stay behind from indisposition.
The State Society of the CINCINNATI of Rhode Island is
about to dissolve and divide the funds, amounting to about
eight thousand dollars, among the heirs and survivors of
the deceased members. The society has dwindled down
from seventy-eight to eight members.
A Good One.-A boy was asked, Does the leopard
ever change his spots 1" Oh yes,when he is tired of one
spot,he goes to another."
ACCIDENT.-Mr. Seth Sumner, of Bowdoinham, Maine, was
accidently shot in the legs a few days since by a companion with
whom he was out shooting pigeons. It became necessary to
amputate one of his legs, which operation he only survived a
few hours.

MARRIAGE.
In Warrenton, North Carolina, on the 4th instant, by
the Rev. Mr. Norwood, JOHN TAYLOR WILLIAMS,
Esq. United States Navy, to Miss CATHARINE, only
daughter of JAMES SOMERVILLE, Esq.
DEATHS.
On Thursday morning last, Dr. HENRY REINT-
ZELL, aged 31 years, a native of Georgetown, D. C. but
for several years past a resident of Mansfield, Ohio.
Inr Funeral this afternoon, (Saturday,) at 5 o'clock, from
the dwelling of his father-in-law, WM. S. NICHOLLS, in
Georgetown, which his friends and acquaintances are invited
to attend, without further invitation.
On Monday evening, after a short illness, in the 82d
year of his age, SAMUEL MYERS, Esq., one of the
oldest and most respectable inhabitants of Richmond.

SHIP NEWS-PORT OF ALEXANDRIA.
ARRIVED, AUGUST 24.
R -.'eWr.':a'Britoin, New York ; sugar and coffee o t .
Shinn & Co. and WinN. McVeigh, and freight for the District.
SIoop Frieon y,4e U fuck atstphpIa 'p iman, and,
freight for the District.
Several bay and river craft, with usual cargoes. Wind S.
W. and fine weather.
SAILED, AUGUST 24.
Schr. Repeater, Travers, Baltimore.

j Trinity Church.-The Rector of Trinity Church
having returned to the city, the Church will be open for public
worship to-morrow, at the usual hours, aug 27
ALIE BY ORDER OF INSOLVENT'S TRUS-
STEE.-On Saturday, 27th August, instant, at o5 o'clock
P. M. I shall at my auction rooms, by virtue of an order from
the Hon. Wm. Cranch, in the matter of George F. Berry, an
insolvent debtor, as follows, viz.
Lot 15, in square south of square 562, on H street north, be-
tween 2d and 3d streets west.
Also, articles of personal property, consisting of silver spoons,
&c. &c.
Terms of sale : For the personal property, cash; the real es-
tate at a credit of three and six months, for notes, with good se-
curity, bearing interest from the day of sale.
aug 6-3w&ds ED. DYER, Auct.
T RUSTLE'S SALE OF LOTS.-By virtue of a
deed of trust executed by James Greer, on 8th January,
1835, for certain purposes therein expressed, I shall sell atipub-
lic auction, on Tuesday, 27th September next, at the auction
store, at 5 o'clock P. M. for cash, the following Lots, viz.
Lots Nos13 and 14, in Square 401 ;
Lot 2, in* iuare west of Square 484.


O PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.-The sub-
scriber respectfully informs the Public that he will open,
on the first of October next, a French and English Boarding
School for Young Ladies, at Bordentown, New Jersey.
The advantages of Bordentown, as a place fitted forthe estab-
lishment of schools, if equalled, are certainly not surpassed by
any in the whole country. Situated on the Delaware, and eigh-
ty feet above its level, proverbial for health, at the head of'
steamboat navigation, accessible from Philadelphia and fiom.'
New York twice in every day, and at all seasons of the year,
furnished with excellent boarding houses for the accommodation
of parents and visitors, this beautiful village offers indeed all
that can be desired for the purpose.
The buildings occupied by this Institution were recently
erected by the Count de Survilliers: they stand- on a hill, imme-
diately opposite his mansion, and are, in fact, a portion of his
splendid estate. In preparing them for the reception of young
ladies, nothing was omitted that could contribute to their health
and comfort. There is on this property a chalybeate spring,
whose water was analyzed, and found to be equal in every re-
spect to that of Schooley's Mountain.
The different branches taught in this school will be Reading,
Writing, the English, French, and Spanish Languages, Gram-
mar, Composition, Literature, History, Geography, Arithmetic,
Geometry, Book-keeping, Plain and Ornamental Sewing, Mu-
sic, Dancing, and Drawing.
Languages.-The English language, being that of the coun-
try we inhabit, will necessarily occupy a prominent place in our
plan of instruction. Besides the lessons received in the school
room, the French and Spanish youth entrusted to our care will
have constant opportunity of practically acquiring it by their in-
tercourse with their American classmates.
The distinctive features of this Institution, however, will con-
sist in its being essentially a French School. It is generally ad-
mitted that the French language his now become an important;
not to say an indispensable, branch of a polite education. Yet
it is a truth, no less indisputable, that the attention it usually re-
ceive in schools is comparatively small, and attended with lit-
tle or no success. Ten years' experience, and much reflection
upon the subject, have led us to act according to tke following
propositions :
1st. The knowledge of a language is two-fold: it embraces.
theory and practice.
2d. Theory may be learnt in less than one-fourth of the time
needed to acquire practice.'
If this be true, we may draw from them the following conclu-
sions :
In studying the English, the Americaa youth have only theo-
ry to learn. In studying the French, both theory and practice
are to be acquired : from which it necessarily follows that the
attention given to the foreign idiom should be at least four times
as great as that given to the vernacular. Welitherefore, use
the French language in our intercourse with our pupils, and, as
- far as is practicable, French text books of History, Geography,
Mathematics,&c. are made use cf in the tuition of these branches.
A. N. GIRAULT.
Bordentown, N. J., August, 1836.
REFERENCES.
Bordentown.-Joseph Bonaparte, Compte de Survilliers, Rev.
Edwin S. Arnold, A. M., Rev. John C. Harrison, E. Dubarry,
M. D., William Cook, Esq. Lucien Murat, Esq. John L. Mc-
Knight, Esq. Nath. Dayton, Esq.
Burlington.-Right Rev. George W. Doane, D. D., Rev.
Samuel Aaron, Samuel R. Gummere, Esq. Hon. Garret D. Wall,
Captain John T. Newton, U. S. N.
Bristol, Pa.-Rev. Charles Williams, D. D.
Philadelphia.-Hon. Joseph Hopkinson, Peter S. Duponceau,
LL.D., Hon. John Sergeant, Charles Picot, Esq., Charles J. In-
--11 .-i ^- W01-ii P ?- Rlb~ d-<-ra./r Mi-.0III MU TW


Orrcz CHES.'& Ont CANAL CoMPAir,
Washington, August 26, 1836.
P ROPOSALS will be received at the Office of the Com-
missioner of the Canal in Hancock, until Saturday, the
10th day of September next, and at this office until t o'clock oin
Tuesday, the 13th day of September next, for constructing -6
Dam across the Poatmac river, a short distance ahobe Vhsh
mouth of the great Caeapon rier. The dam wiDl be of "crib
work," filled with stone, and will be about 500 feet long.
Proposals will be received a tthe same time aad places, for
constructing the abutments'of the said data, and a Guard Lock
to be connected therewith. These will be of rubble masonry,g
laid in cement, and will contain about 5,000 perches.
Plans and specifications of the work will be exhibited at this'
office, and at the office of the Commissioner of the Canal at
Hancock.
The masowyjnmustbe completed by the 1st day of September,,
1837, and the entie-l)am by the 1st day of November, 1837..
JOHN P. INGLE,
aug 27-eotl3thSep Cl'k C. & 0. C. C..
SCHOOL FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS, connect-
ed with the Georgetown Collese, Kentucky.-Thew
Professor having matured his plan and extended his course, it
is considered proper to lay before the Public such information as'
may satisfy the inquiries directed to him from different parts o
the country. The demand for Civil Engineers throughout the
Union, and the impetus which the Surplus Revenue" will
give to Internal Improvement, must make this the most lucrative
profession in America.
It is not hazarding much to predict that, in less than three.
ears, the wages of well-instructed Assistant Engineers will be
$3,000 per annum-as in many parts of the country they are now
82,000. Principal Engineers in different part of the United
States now receive from $4,000 to $10,000 per annum.
Several young men have completed the course of studies in.
this institution, and immediately obtained employmentat $1,000,.
$1,200, and $1,500 per annum. Young men who have studied'
a regular course of Mathematics may complete lbe course here
in six months, at an expense 'of from $100' to $120. Others&
will require at least 12 months.
COURSE OF STUDIES AND INSTRUCTION.
1st. The full course of Mathematics studied at West Point
(Davies's Mathematics,) from Arithmetic to Fluxions, inclusive.
2d. Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Geology, and Miner-
alogy.
3d. Drawing and the principles of Construction.
4th. GC ~ieiGINERamjs, theoretical and practical.
STJha wi : Books :i Esgineering are Sganzin, Long, and Ma-
han (Professor of Engineering at West Point,) Wood on Rail- .
roads (American edition,) Inland Navigation' from Brewster's
Encyclopedia, and various other standard works in the different
departments of Civil Engineering, which will be used for works'
of reference.
The practical part of the course will be attended to in the
months of April and October. During these months the Profes-
sor will be engaged with the Class, in a regular toqr, with the *
Theodolite,Compass, Level, &c. making preliminary, definitive,
and final surveys for Railroads, Canals, and Turnpikes; inspect-
ing the public works of the State, the Railroads and .Canals', the
Curves, Culverts, Bridges, Embankments, Excavations, Inelin-
ed Planes, Locks, Dams, &c. to conclude with a Report of the
Survey.
The Students of this School have the privilege of attending,
gratis, any other department of the Georgetown College, which
is perhaps the most fully organized institution in the West. The
Faculty consists of a President and Professor of Moral Philoso-
phy ; a Professor of Ancient Languages ; a Professor of Modern
Languages (a foreigner;) a Professor of Metaphysics, Belles
Lettres, and Political Economy ; a Professor of Mathematics ; a
Professor of Drawing; a Professor of Civil Engineering, and an
Assistant. They have likewise the free use of the Library,
Philosophical and Chemical Apparatus.
EXPENSES.-Tuition for the first session (six months) will
be $50 in advance, which will include the regular College fee of
$20, the fee for the Practical Tours, Drawing, Drawing Instru-
ments, Materials, Stationery, &c. Tuition for every session after
the first will be.$30 in advance, including the above items.
Board from $40 to $50 a session. Fuel, Lights, and Washing
a separate charge. August, 1836.
The following extracts of letters from two of the most scientific
men in our country, will serve to show the utility of this
School : -
FRANKFORT, JULY 13, 1836.
Dear Sir : The four young gentlemen from the Georgetown
Mathematical School, who are engaged as assistants in the Engi-
neer corps of the State, have performed the duties assigned them
in a very satisfactory'manner. Among the young gentlemen' of
my acquaintance who have embraced the profession of Civil En-
gineering, those who have been educated at MathematicaL
Schools have generally succeeded better than the graduates of
our common Colleges.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
SYLVESTER WELCH,
Engineer-in-Chief for the State of Kentucky.
To the Professor of Civil Engineering,
Georgetown College, Ky. 5
LOUISVILLE, JULY 29, 1836.
Sir : It affords me pleasure to testify to the very correct and
-satisfactory manner in which the -two young gentlemen from
your school have conducted themselves during the time they
have been in the service, and the ability manifested by the
prompt and skilful discharge of their several duties is alike
creditable to them and the character of the institution in which,
they were instructed.
The books comprised in your course of studies are appropriate.
and well selected.
I am pleased to hear that Topographical and Architectural
drawingg is to form a part of your future course. This is an ele-
gant accomplishment to an Engineer, and in the early part of his
career will frequently bring him into notice, and hasten his pro-
motion to more responsible stations, where his talents may be
fully developed. Your most obedient servant,
THOSE. F. PURCELL,
Engineer-in-Chief Lexington and Ohio Railroad.
To the Professor of Civil Engineering,
Georgetown College, Ky.
aug 27-8t










COLlERCTO'S SALE OP CITY LOTS FOR TAX IS,
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE OF THE 5TH AND 6TH WARDS,
Washington, August 26, 1836.
" N SATURDAY,. the 2bt day of November, 1836, I shall proceed to sell at Public Bale, at the City Hall, in the
City of Washington, the following described property, or such part thereof, not less than half a lot, except where
less than half a lot has been- assessed; Then such part'as will be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of Washington
City for the taxes due thereon up to the year 1835 inclusive!; together with all costs and charges, unless the said taxes
are previously paid to the-..abcriber, with such expenses and fees as may have accrued thereon at the time of payment.


/


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


TO WHOM ASSESSED.


Square. Lot.
Barnes, William H.'s heirs 907 pt. & imps.
For 1831, $6 78; 1830,'$5 06; 1829, $5 06; 1828, 7 03; 1827,
*7 03; 1826, $703; 1825, $703.
Beginning for said part 50 feet from the southwest corner of said
square, running thence east with the line of M street south 25 feet;
thence north 75 feet; thence west 25 feet; thence south 75 feet, to
the beginning.
Bean, Benjamin 570 D & imps.
For 1831, 39 cts.
573 B & imps,


For 1831, 18 ets.
Pamp tax, &c. for 1830, $12 60.


A so. pt. 12 & imps.


For 1831, $5 68.
Beginning for said part at the southwest corner of said lot 12 feet,
running thence north with the line of 4j street 79 feet 4 inches ;
thence northeastwaqdly 61 feet 6 inches to lot 11; thence south to
Missouri street; thence west 32 feet to the beginning.
Paving, curbing, and tax for 1831, $46 31, on interest from April
1st, 1832, at 10 per cent. till paid.


For 1831, 87 74.


768 & imps. 1
906 pt. & imps.


For 1831, $6 24.
Beginning for said part 69 feet from the southwestcorner of said
square; running thence north with the thie of 7th street eaet 26
feet; thence east 75 feet; thence south 26 feet; thence west 75 feet
to the beginning.
Blagden, Thomas 738 so. part 1
Beginning for said part at the southeast corner of said lot 1, and run-
ning thence northwestwardly with New Jersey Avenue 36 feet;
thence sputhwestwardly to lot 2; thence south 14 feet 4 inches to
south K street; thence east 84 feet to the beginning.
Brent, Daniel, for Miss E. Carroll, .609 7


Brent, R. Y. and Eleanor


Bennett, Charles


Boardley, John B.


18.32.



9 95





23 67

25

9 43






14 29

7 14




& imps.


501 east half 5
6
north half 27


793


603
south of 667


Brent, Robert Y. 555 25
26
616 20
21
22
23
24
26
673 23
414 half 1
472 part
Containing 27,268 square feet, according to R.Y. and Eleanor Brent's
division.


544











593
594
595
653


Ball & Ford


Columbian College.
For 1831, $15 76; for 1830, $11 77; for
$12 05; for 1827, $12 05.
Caldwell, Ehas B.'s heirs


467
471
north of 471


504
1829, $11 77;

128


569
767

769
1023


Carroll, Henry H.'s heirs.
Qarroll, Daniel, of Duddingtont


2
3
4
half 21
25
26
28
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
27
28
west half
north half
west half
half 11


all
all
all


&imps. 1
for 1828,

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3
4
2
14


613 7
536 sub. 30
sub. 31
sub. 33
sub. 36
576 9
635 7
8
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
636 3
4
5
6
10
11
16
17
18
638 4
5
7
680 1
2
3


1833.


9 95







25









14 28

9 14









1 04

70
2 82
51


2 84
1 92
1 98
2 51
2 51
1 98
1 92
2 84


51
52


82
1 42
1 42
70
94
1 03
95
80
82
1 42
1 42
1 41
1 41
1 42
1 42
82
80
94
1 04
1 03
1 04
4 43
8 48
7 24
78


23 11


















6 53
4 43
2 02
3 07
2 37
2 19
3 76
2 39
2 13
2 69
2 70
1 30
1 51
I 27
1 72
1 34
1 22
2 18
2 35
2 53
2 36
2,65
3 95
41
25
31


23 11


1835.


18.34.



4 81







22 50









9 88

4 73




2 31



53

35
70
25.


16 69

1 73
1 54
1 54
1 51
1 98
1 74
66
2 19
3 28
2 04
16


3 15
33
23
24
24
8 17
2 96
1 35
2 05
1 58
1 45
2 55
1 58
2 09
1 79
1 80
87
1 01
85
1 14
89
81
1 09
1 17
1 26
1 77
1 99
2 96
41
28
31


4 81





19 42

2-2 50

-18 78






9 88

4 73




2 31



53


20
16
10
9
9
8
10
8
48
1 48
9 00

40
70
70
35
6G
47
51
47
20
20
35
35
35
35
35
35
20
19
23
25
25
25
74
1 05
1 21
39


28 91
24 76
8 84


16 69

1 73
1 54
1 54
1 51
1 98
1 74
66
2 19
3 28
2 04
16


3 14
33
23
24
24
8 17
2 96
1 35
2 05
1 58
1 45
2 55
1 58
2 09
1 79
1 80
87
1 01
85
1 14
89
81
1 09
1 17
1 26
1 77
1 99
2 96
41
28
31


'


14




$74 54





43 48

58 28

80 20






58 06
33 98

274 00


4 62



2 10

1 40
4 22
1 01

6 63

6 60
4 49
4 62
5 85
5 85
4 62
4 49
6 60

43 12

1 56
1 57

3 13

59
50
45
44
44
39
43
35
1 44
4 96
27 00

1 63
2 83
2 83
1 40
2 78
1 88
2 06
1 89
1 19
1 23
2 12
2 12
2 11
2 11
2 12
2 12
1 23
1 19
1 40
1 54
1 53
1 54
5 91
10 59
9 66
1 57

105 73

101 18
86 66
25 42

213 26

143 00

6 05
5 40
5 40
5 28
6 93
5 98
1 98


6 57
10 94
6 12
83

61 48

6 43
66
46
48
48
29 40
14 78
6 74
10 24
7 90
7 28
12 62
7 94
10 44
8 96
9 00
4 34
5 04
4 24
5 72
4 46
4 06
6 54
7 04
7 58
8 26
9 28
13 82
1 64
1 06
1 24


"TZJa;i~8,,UYr~nS,'~ /c~ 'A.-- --~ F, .' -


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE,


TO WHOM ASSESSED,


1832.


Carrom, Daniel continuedd)


Square. .
685


687


689




691
693
694
700
For 1831, 54 cents; for 1830,41 cents; pu, p tax for 1830, $2
1829, 41 cents; for 1828, 41 cents; for W28, 41 cents.


















700



701

720








721









722
'723




724





724




725






732



753


Lot.
1
4
9
5


4
5
6
9
10
9
5
6
6
7
96; for


759



759



743 sub
sub
sub
sub
sub
sub
sub
sub
sub
sub.
780


783
792
853
E. of 643
647
N. of 650
E. of 667
679
786


8
9
10
11
12-
13
144
15
16
17
181
19
207
218
23


230
24
25
26
27
28
29
30-
31
32
5
6
10
2'
3 :
420
10
11'
121
13
20'
21
22
5
6
7
8
9
10
16
17
18
19
20
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
4
.5
8
9
10
13
14
18
19
22
-23
24
27
8
9
20
21
25
26
30
31
18
19
41
42
43
1
2
3
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16.
17
18
. 4
. 5
. 6
. 7
. 11'
. 12
. 17,
. 20
. 23

4i
5i
6
T7
all


6
all
1
all

3
1
4
10


1 76
1 35
1 22
1 64
1 22
4 40
4 40
4 40
2 20
3 30
'4 42
3 50
2 20
2 20
25
23
23
23
9 76
1 92
6 95
3 47
10 21
59
38
36
2 00
1 19


Dobbin, John's heirs 906 part & imps.
Beginning 12 feet from the northeast corner of said square, on 8th
street east, running thence south on 8th street east 55 feet 4 inches,
thence west 51 feet 2 inches, thence northwardly 55 feet 9 inches,
thence eastwardly 26 feet 5 inches, to the place of beginning.
Givison, William 501 24
Dougherty, Thomas's heirs 523 10


10 44
5 00
1 42
8 92
5 08
3 58
3 52
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00
91
90
1 66
1 37
96
4 79

84
1 69
1 69
1 49
1 50
1 69
1 69
1 69
85
79
96
1 05
1 05
79
1 72
59
1, 26
1'26
1 26
1 12
1 12
1 26
1 26
64
79
73
24
17
36
36
28
33
50
36
21
21
20
25
25
17
21
17
20
25
26
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
58
23
1 59
1 59
1 26
96
70
1 02
76
1 59"
S38
1 26
>- 96
70
1 02
.-5 12
3 25
2 87
2 50
1 30
94
1 41
2 11
2 17
2 17
I 25
1 79
2 15
11
13
14
14
13
11
13

19
18
23
13
1 277
1 65
1 41
1 29
1 91
1 97
:1 63
1 81
1 76
2 57
2 57


10


183.3.


10 44
5 00
1 42
8 92
5 08
3 58
3 52
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00-
91
90
1 66
1 37
96
79

84
1 69
1 69
1 49
1 50
1 69
1 69
1 69
85
79
96
1 05
1 05
79
72
59
. 64
1 26
1 26
1 26
1 19,
1 12
1 26
1 26
.64
79
73
24
17
36
36
28
33
50
36
21
21
20
25
25
17
21
17
20
25
25
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
58
23
1 59
1 59
1 26
96
70
1 02
76
1 59
1 38
1 26
96
70
1 02
5 12
3 25
2 87
2 50
1 30
94
1 41
2 11
2 17
2 17
1 25
1 79
2 15
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
18
22
13
1 27
1 65
1 41
129
1 91
1 97
1 63


1 2"2
1 35
1 18
1 71
1 71
1 18
1 35
81
1 09
81
2 20
2 20
2 20
1 10
2 20
2 58
55
2 63
1 10
1 10
12
11
11
11
4 98
1 92
3 47
1 15
1 69
10
38
36
1 33
71


11 62



40
15


-1834.


3 48
2 50
95
6 86
2 14
2 39
2 34
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00-
89
91
82
60
24
20

21
42
42
37
37
42
42
42
21
20
24
26
26
26
24
20
21
42
42
42
37
37
42
42
21
52
48
24
17
36
36
28
34
50
36
21
21
20
26
26
17
21
17
20
26
26
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
59
23
1 06
1 06
84
64
47
68
50
1 06
92
84
64
47
68
3 07
1 95
1 43
1 24
65
47
70
1 41
2 17
2 17
1 88
1 34
1 62
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
19
22
13
85
1 10
93
86
1 27
1 31


1 35
1 18
1 71
1 71
1 18
1 35
81
1 09
81
2 20
2 20
2 20
1 10
2 20
2 58
55
S 63
1 10
1 10
12
11
11
11
4 98
1 92'
3 47
1 15
1 69
10
38
36
1 33
71


11 62


40
15


1835.


3 48
2 50
95
6 86
2 14
2 39
2 34
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00
89
91
82
60
24
20

21
42
42
37
37
42
42
42
21
20
24
26
26
26
24
20
21
42
42
42
37
37
42
42
21
52
48
24
17
36
36
28
34
50
36
21
21
20
26
26
17
21
17
20
26
26
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
59
23
1 06
1 06
84
64
47
68
50
1 06
92
84
64
47
68
3 07
1 95
1 43
1 24
65
47
70
1 41
2 17
2 17
188
1 34
1 62
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
19
22
13
85
1 10
93
86
1 27
1 31
1 22


4 30
6 36
6 56
5 70
6 32
5 88
8 56
8 56
5 88
5 40
4 06
6 46
4 06
13 20
13 20
13 20
6 60
9 04
13 70
5 50
12 26
6' 60
6 60
74'
68
68
68
29 48
7 68
20 84
9 24
23 80
1 38
1 52
1 44
6 66
3 80

1,014 58

41 74



1 60
45


O- l N. ~"-~ 1 I~Il~ P.I~ J-- --
V F "..,


TO WHOM ASSESSED.


1832.


- -5n




27 84
15 00
4 79
31 56
14 44
11 94
11 72
4 36
3 68
4 04
5 04
4 00
3 60
3 62
4 96
3 94
2 40
7 14

2 10
4 22
4 22
3 72
3 74
4 22
4 22
4 22
2 12
198
240
2 62
2 62
2 10
1 92
1 58
1 70
3 36
3 36
3 36
2 98
2 98
3 36
3 36
1 70
2 62
2 42
96
68
1 44
1 44
1 12
1 34
200
1 44
84
84
80
1 02
1 02
68
84
68
80
1 02
1 02
68
96
68
1 72
180
80
1 08
84
2 34
92
5 30
5 30
4 20
3 20
2 34
3 40
2 52
5 30
4 60
4 20
3 20
2 34
3 40
16 38
10 40
8 60
7 44
3 90
2 82
4 22
7 04
8 68
8 68
6 26
626
7 54
44
52
56
56
52
44
52
88
76
74
88
52
4 24
5 50
4 68


Pearson, Joseph, Mary, and Anna Maria


Containing 27,268
Brent's division.


square feet, according to R.


616
673
414
472
Y. and


1
9


19
22
4 I
part
Eleanor


14,
15
16
... .. 17.
18
east 20
j 21
644 iL3,
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
.24
25
26
55T 23
24-
593 east half
594 south half
595 east half
053 j 11


Phillips, Samuel res. 11 part 7
For 1831, $2 35.
Fronting 25 feet on 3d street west, and running back that width
100 feet.
Stuart, Richard H. and others 903 G


1046


Spooner, Noble H.'s heirs 878
Fronting 24 feet on 7th st. east, and running back 129 ft.
Sayre, Daniel 655
Talbott, Isham 389


N. pt. 38
6 inches.
8
13


Thomas, Richard's heirs 142 east pt. 11
Fronting 26 feet on north G street, and running back the depth
of the lot.
For 1831 $1 42.
Paving tax for 1831 $17 87, on interest from August 1st, 1832, till
paid, at 10 per cent.
Tilghman, Frisby 663 6
Pump tax for 1830 $3 16. 703 15


Square. Lot.
Hickman, William 1128 & imps.
For 1831, $1 10; 1830, 56 cents; 1829, 56 cents.
Horsey, Outubridge 598 8
Hanson, Samuel 705 4
For 1831, $1 08; 1830, 81 cents; 1829, 81 cents.
Kingsbury, Sarah 770 part
For 1831, 73 cents.
Beginning 72 feet from the northeast corner of said square, on 3d
street east, running thence south 23 feet, thence west 84 feet 81
inches, thence north 23 feet, thence east 84 feet 81 inches, to the
place of beginning,
Leakei Francis 613 8
Longacre, J. B. 768 2
Maddox, Notley 881 12
Palmer, Morris & imps. 928 east pt. 1
Fronting 16 feet on south K street, and running back 50 feet.
Pearson and Brent 472 pt & imps,
Containing 56,698 square feet, according to R. Y. and Eleanor
Brent's division.


Judge, John


577
579
For 1831, 52 cts. 1000
Fronting 18 feet on llth street east, and running back the
the lot.
For 1831, $1 68, 1000


6
7
8
4
1
north 6
depth of


Venable, Charles's heirs 905 pt. & imps.
Beginning at the southwest corner of said square, running thence
north on 7th street east 41 feet, thence east 78 feet 6 inches, thence
south 26 feet, thence southwest to the line of Virginia avenue 40
feet, thence westwardly with the line of said avenue 69 feet 1 inch,
to the place of beginning.
Young and Fayles 667 16


Young, Margaret


2 48


23 59


665
706


Terms of Sale cash. Sale to commence at 10 o'clock A. M.


aug 27-wts


F ARM AT PUBLIC SALE.-If the farm advertised'
below is not sold at private sale, before the 17th of Sep-
tember next, it will on that day be sold, at public sale, on the
promises. Terms at sale. J. S.
FARM FOR SALE.
With the view of emigrating to the West, the subscriber of-
fers the farm on which he resides for sale, containing aboutifive
hundredand thirty-three acres of land, lying in Fairfax county,
Virginia; distant from Alexandria, Washington, and George-
town from four and a half to five miles. The farm is divided
into five lots of different sizes, by the following roads passing
through it : the middle turnpike road from Alexandria to Lees-
burg, the gravel road from Washington to the Little River Turn-
pike, and the old Leesburg road from Alexandria. The farm
will be sold altogether or in lots, as divided by said roads ; about
two-thirds of which is in wood, the balance cleared, and in
good state of cultivation. The land is sufficiently level, of easy
improvement, and well watered by constant streams and springs
of the purest water. The mansion house is a two story frame
building, built of the best materials, and finished in a modern
style, with a good dry cellar. Adjoining is a large frame kitch-
en and pantry, likewise meat house, corn house,-stables, sheds,
&c. At the intersection of the above-mentioned road there is a
log hose and stable, which has been occupied as a public house
for many years, with a well of never-failing water at the door,
than which, for business of many kinds, no place in its vicinity
is more suitable. As the great western road, from the Capitol
of the United States, passes through it, dividing it into nearly
two equal parts, and would make two very desirable farms,
being in a gocd neighborhood, andconvenient to meetings, mills,
schools, and within two and a half miles of the Theological
Seminary, it is deemed worthy the attention of any person de-
sirous to purchase.
It is unnecessary to state further particulars, as it is presumed
any one wishing to purchase will first view the premises.
JOHN SMITH,
aug 26-2aw3w Fairfax County, Virginia.
If AND FOR SALE.-That part of the plantation of


IMPORTERS
aug 25-d2mi


1833.



1 10
55
1 57

1 06


I 10

1 57

1 07









& imps.













34
& imps.





































2 44



&imps.
& imps.



-


&i0ps.





2 07


2 07


55
41
41
22
22
33
22
1 40
4 95
76

2 48


23 59




53

41
3 29


1834.



1 10
40
S79

86


3 14
3 28
10 72
5 109
!9 71

39
1 51


S47
51
52
47
39
40

23
S72
35
35
23






21



20
35
435
135



S6 9
35
SI

23
25
25
212














212S


2 08


61


16 98




54

20
2 46


1835.



I 10
40
79


3 14
3 28
10 72
5 10

29 71

39
1 51


10
41
1 48-
900

,47
"51
47,
409
41
71
71'
35
.35
'35
235



35
35
35
35



20
25
25
20
S 74
1 06

40


4 95


1 48
89


2 12


2 08




52
79


62


16 98




54

20
2 46


81-
8 21
902


GEORGE ADAMS,
Collector Fifth and Sixth Wards.


HUGH SMITH & CO.
OF CHINA, GLASS, & EARTHRNWARE,
ALErXANDRIA) D. C.
if (Met.)


INT' RESTING TO CAPITALISTS who are dis-
posed to encourage extraordinary mechanical ingenuity, and
at the same time vest their funds profitably.
For sale, half of the patent right of one of the most astonishing.
mechanical curiosities in the woild-Thomson's invention for
cutting laths, matches, and shoe pegs.,
This is probably one of the most famous and wonderful pro-
ductions of mechanical ingenuity in. the world. Although but
three of the machines are yet in operation, and that but a short
time, its fame has already extended to France, and a Prench.gen-
tieman who viewed them lately declared that he would not have
missed seeing them for ten dollars.
The three machines produce from the logs the astonishing.
number of 20,000 perfectly formed pegs in a minute, though
about 3,000 a minute is about the average product.from each,
machine. The same invention can be used for other purposes:
,,also, at immense profits, which will be explained to those who
wish. to engage in an interesting and lucrative enterprise.
Half of the patent for the United States, and of the three ma-
chines now in operation in the city of Rochester, may- be ob-
tained by any person who will pay or secure the greatest amount
for it previous to the 1st of September next, provided it be not
less than $5,000, payable one-fifth cash, and the balance in an-
nual payments, without interest.
Applications, or proposals by mail, maybe made or addressed
to J. TORREY, Jr.
aug 26-3t At the Monroe House, Rochester.
AND FOR SALE.-The subscriber offers for sale the
farm on which he resides, lying between the Baltimore
and Washington railroad and Baltimore and Washington Turn-
pike road, 22 miles from Baltimore and 12 from Washinigtonh,
containing about 150 acres, most of which is of good quality, and
well adapted to plaster and the growth of'tobacco, grain, and
grass. The situation is elevated, agreeable, and healthy. The
improvements consist of a comfortable brick dwelling, and all


--


18 70

804
S42


1


1 81
1 76
2 57
2 57
1 76
1 35
1 22
1 64
1 22
4 40
4 40
4 40
2 20
3 30
4 32
2 20
3 50
2 20
2 20
25
23
23
23
9 76
1 92
6 95
3 47
10 21
59
38
36
2 00
1 19


18 50


1 42
1 5b
1 55,
1 42
1 0
1 421
1 42
70
70
1031
94
80
i 42
1 42
1 42
1 41
1 41
142-

80
94'
1 03
25
21
4 42
: 48
7 24
78


3 44


5 2"2
2 34'


3 01

1 57
1 34
34 34


E -



7 4 -
4 58




S7.102

2201

78 12
15%,

6-44
8r 14 -

4C
1 23"

27

r36
258
58.
2 36


'85

1 40
140


1 -, 2 -
1 23
1 40







1 357







-108 96
192

4 11
8 14










S23
S490





5 8

















62 31
763
1 5

103 236
2 12












318

415











7121
1 340
4 15

4 12












81-









i- T -" ........ ... +....


COLLECTOR'S SALE OF CITY LOTS FOR TAXES.
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE OF THE 1ST AND 2D WARDS, l
Washington, August 10, 1836.
ObN SATURDAY, the 12th day of November next, (1836,) I shall proceed to sell at public vendue, at the City
'I Hall, in the City of Washington, the following described property, or such part thereof, not less than half a lot,
(except where less than half a lot has been assessed, then such part,) as will be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of
the City of Washington for the taxes due thereon, up to the year 1835, inclusive; together with all costs and charges,
unless the said taxes are previously paid to the subscriber, together with such expenses and fees as may have accrued
thereon at the time of payment.


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


IN WHOSE NAME ASSESSED.


Alien, John
Alexander, Ashton
Austin, Wm.


Square.
63
141
169


1832.


1833.


1834. 1835.


02
(.d a) ._r


Lot.
1
8
6


Barcroft, John 75 part 19
Being the east three feet front on Pennsylvania Avenue by the
whole depth of the lot.
& imps. pt. 20
Being the west 17 feet front on Pennsylvania Avenue, adjoining lot
No. 19, and running back with that width the whole depth of the
lot.
Brooks, Peter 0258 3
Brumley, Joseph's heirs 119 7


Buckey, George


12
part 13


Boyer, Jacob
Bosworth, Josiah


Benning, James, Lucy and others


57
;res. 10


348
770
950
982


1,027

1,032
1,053


Barcroft, John, and Sarah Hutchinsoh



Bank of Virginia,
Bond, William's heirs

Berry, Zachariah


Cutts, Richar


west 1 2
part 4
27
4
6
1
6
7
5
1
2
3
10


47

19 22



& imps.






& imps.

& imps.
36


48
29
29


319 10
289 east 1 3

142 14
847 18
19
20


rd [ 250
According'to Daividson's subdivision.

1,105


For 1830, 7 cents.; for 1831, 13 cents.


Cailan, Nicholas, in ,trust for Jane Lynch 729 part 17
Being the east 20 feet 11 inches front, on East Capitol street, by the
whole depth of the lot.
.Cloakey, Samuel's heirs 377 south j 11
14


Corcoran, James
Clarke, Elizabeth
Olarke, Frances
Clarke, Letitia


196
-224
224
224
252


7
part 5
10
part 5
26


Campbellr James' heirs


.Campbell, Eleanor and Catharine
Caldwell, Timothy, and James Moor'e

Caldwell, Timothy


Corcoran, Wm. W.

Davidson, Henry


Davidson, Justina
Doll, Joseph
.Durilap, James


' 16
760


78 part 4
5
part 6


218


186
*east of 87


950


116
186


for 1831, $11 25.


SEtting, Benjamin


290 part 9


286 part 7
8
9
11


English & Nevius


77
172


Freer, James B.
Fletcher, Betsey and others

Fre.ich, George


10
N. k 14


Gattrell, Benjamin 343 part 1
-Commencing at the southeast corner of said square, running thence
on a line with New York Avenue 36 feet 10 inches, thence at
right angles to said avenue 74 feet, thence due east 63 feet 9 inch-
pim -I^^ them*-P A r^ n&;fh^ IA41 I^ A _-A rQ P?--4. 0- -I 4- *1,-


13


& imps.

& imps.



& imps.
& imps.
& imps.
& imps.
& imps.












& imps.



3 92


















& imps.

16 50

& imps.














& imps.
& imps.









& imps.


47

19 22


5 44

2 02
1 65


36


48
29
29


2 86


41

18 81


5 44
4 16

2 02
1 65


4 05
45 98

20 88
36
RO
19
19
48
29
29
34
24
23
26
30



4 22
4 44


3 97
6 87

7 12


41

18 81


5 44
4 16

2 02
1 65


4 05
45 98

20 88
36
19
19
48
29
29
34
24
23
26
30



4 22
4 44


3 97
6 87

7 12
1 39
1 39
1 51


3
3
1
1


8 54


3 92






2 01


1 36





22 00

15 58














19 95










6 30


3 72

6 17
11 07


2 73
33 93
32 87
27 47
9 84


1 72
1 43
1 23
1 25


1 41
31 17


2 34

6 30
2 85


9 84
2 02

53
59
80
67
80
80
80
67


5 20
8 66

8 80

21 92
7 39


2 88
82


14 46
3 65


5 75


3 72

6 17
11 07


2 73
33 93
32 87
27 47
9 84


1 72
1 43
1 23
1 25


1 41
31 17


2 34

6 30
2 85


9 84
2 02

53
59
80
67
80
80
80
67


5 20
8 66

8 80

21 92
7 39


1,61
2 19
1 95
2 42


2 88
82


14 46
3 65


5 75


1 76

76 06

77 82
16 32
8 32

' 6 06
4 95

11 01

8 10
91 96

41 76
1 44
1 60
38
38
1 92
1 16
1 16
68
48
46
52
60

52 74

8 44
8 88

17 32

10 80
13 74

14 24
2 78
2 78
3 02
22 82
7 93
7 93
4 36
3 88
72

24 82

7 44

20 88
22 14

43 02

5 46
67 86
65 74
54 94
19 68

74 62

5 16
4 29
4 10
4 17

17 72
2 82
62 34

18 58
168 96
3 24

190 78

12 52

12 60
5 70

18 30

19 68
6 05
2 13
2 38
3 22
2 70
3 22
3 22
3 22
2 70

22 79

10 40
17 32

75 75

59 42
14 78

149 95
3 22
4 38
3 90
4 84


16 34

5 76
1 64

7 40

48 87
7 30

7 74
10 70
9 86
9 24
7 24
27 54
12 14
84 46



23 05


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


IN WHOSE NAME ASSESSED.


Hay, George
Herbert, Mary
Houston, Mary T.


Hoban, Joseph


1832.


Square.
200
215
42


10
16
147
491
729


part 1
17
part 2
east k 5
8
S9


Hilleary, Henry

Harris, Thomas


8


Hoban, James's heirs 10 3
Pump tax,
Ish, Jacob 119 part 10
Being the west part of said lot, fronting 28 feet 3.inches on Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, and running back with that width the whole depth
of the lot.
Jones, John G. 38 5


Joncherez, Alexander's heirs
For 1831, $4 23.

Kerr, Alexander's heirs

For 1829, $5 16; for 1830, $5
Water tax for 1830, $13 40.


& imps. 81

288
& imps. 458
16; for 1831, $6 92.


part 21

6
sub. 9


& imps.


& imps.
sub.

& imps.

& imps.
& imps.





sub.
sub.
sub.
sub.



5 00
& imps.



& imps.


4 23

& imps.
10 14


1833.


2 50


55
55
55
55


2 35

6 48







4 23


10 14


1834.


25 06
1 39
1 24

2 87
5 29
1 05
83 47
3 21
1 01


3 03

83
83
83
83


1 57

9 84


2 00
8 62


6 98

8 56
10 14


Kuhn, Joseph L.


Lowe, Lloyd M. -252 12
Lambert Morris's heirs res. 10 17
Lowry, Mary 75 east j 17
Leckie, Robert's heirs 84 15
Litle, Hannah's heirs 141 part 16
McCerrin, Andrew's heirs 293 part 11
Mayberry, Justinian 103 10
Miller, George 321 part 12
Being the west part of said lot, and containing 1,382 square feet.
Martin, Honore 599 4
610 16
658 8


Meigs, Francis C. 224 part 5


Mantz, Peter
Munroe, David
McMurray, William, and John Crawford
Natt, Thomas
Noer, Andrew
O'Neale, Lawrence
Oliver, Benjamin
Paulding, Henry

Peck, Margaret


Palmer, Innis B.


Being the north part, adjoining lot 32,
street, by the whole depth of the lot.



Peter, George


Pump tax


252 27


143 north k 8
A & imps. 35
62 11
168 sub. 5
322 9
143 11
317 6
81 4


21
22


1
16
17
1
2
3
9
10
11
12
42
part 31
on Union

32


5
6
5


503
fro ling 46 feet




1

6


s4ith of





West of


Peter, Thomas










For 1831, 72 cts.


For 1831, 27c ts.
For 1831, 64 cts.
For 1831, 30 cts.


nortNl ,of


Pierce, Thomas


11 part 2
12 6
13 9
14 12
13
14
15 11
18 3
23 3
24 1
13
25 17
27 1
32 18
42 3
51 9
70 10
11
12
13
72 16
203 all


1 22
2 1
5 19
20
14 5
17 6
18 2
20 18
24 32
25 28
28 22
32 1
2
15
51 19
20
21
54 l 10
35
150 7
8
189 all
272 all
330 all
331 all
357 all
358 all


101 7
& imps. 20


& imps.


& imps.
& imps.

& imps.






& imps.
& imps.



2 75
& imps.
& imps.
& imps.































3 00

3 17

2 30


& imps.

3 12
1 40

55

90






& imps.







1 06




39
64
30




& imps.



4 43
7 15


3 01




1 10
25
1 04







2 02
2 75


10 12

4 05











1 09
1 09
83
1 10
73
3 52

2 79






4 25

1 81
3 00

3 17

.2 30



3 12
1 40


55

90














1 06
1 88



39
64
30

2 24





4 43
7 15


28 03
24 83
5 21
3 04
15 18
5 42
7 08
8 42

55
53
79


27 95
9 15


2 27
2 52



2 65
1 22
1 65
4 23
3 67
2 77
73
73
55
55
36
1 21

1 40


10 90
9 71
1 50
3 31

2 13
1 21
2 99
2 72
2 24
2 11
3 62
71
1 84
1 08
3 30
17 64
67
1 87
1 04
29
33
24
31
46
4 70



3 19
7 30
2 41
3 23
3 54
1 19
3 51
87
1 23
2 02
3 67
99
1 06
93
90
1 04
97
3 39
78
64
30
25
2 66
2 24
1 52
2 06
2 21


3 17
6 82


1835.


25 06
1 39
1 24

2 87
5 29
1 05
83 47
3 21
1 01


3 03

83
83
83
83


1 57

9 84


2 00
8 62


6 98

8 56
26 30


4 85
3 88
4 50


28 03
24 83
5 21
3 04
15 18
5 42
7 08
8 42

55
53
79


27 25
9 15


2 27
2 52



2 65
1 22
1 65
4 23
3 67
2 77
73
73
55
55
36
1 21

1 40


10 90
9 71
1 50
3 31

2 13
1 21
2 99
2 72
2 24
2 11
3 62
71
184
1 08
3 30
17 64
67
1 87
1 04
29
33
24
31
46
4 70



3 19
7 30
2 41
3 23
3 54
1 19
3 51
87
1 23
2 02
3 67
99
1 06
93
90
1 04
97
3 39
78
64
30
25
2 66
2 24
1 52
2 06
2 21


3 17
6 82


, Ct~4'-


IN WHOSE NAME ASSESSED.


Squ e.
1P2


Simm ons, William (continued)


6 38
14 60
4 82
6 46
7 08
2 38
7 02
1 74
2 46
4 04
7 34
1 98
4 96
3 74
1 80
2 08
1 94
6 78
2 61
3 20
1 50
50
5 32
6 72
3 04
4 12
4 42

120 03

15 20
27 94
A-


1,036


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


1831. 1833. 1834. 1835.


L ot.
6
12
13
14
15
16
19
20
5
12
13


1 85
1 23
1 23
1 03
82
80
1 45
1 45
25
25
25


1 04
28


Smith, Amos


Snowden, Thomas


214


8 39
16 96
3 90
229 06
13 10
5 73

277 14
6 06

2 21
2 21
2 21
2 21

8 84

10 49
21 16


4 00
17 24'

21 24

26 65

17 12
87 36

104 48


21 34
19 40
18 00

58 74

56 06
49 66
10 42
9 09
30 36
10 84
14 16
16 84

2 20
1 31
2 62

6 13
54 50
18 30

72 80

7 08
18 96
11 56
20 00
119 62
22 32
3 76
10 11

4 54
5 04

9 58

5 30
2 44
3 30
8 46
7 34
5 54
2 55
2 55
1 93
2 20
1- 45
5 94

5 59

57 59

21 80
19 42
3 00
1 10 87
4 26
4 23
11 88
5 44
4 48
10 56
7 24
1 42
828
2 16
6 60
35 28
1 34
9 98
4 88
58
1 76
48
62
2 72
9 40

188 68


252

282
287K
341


Smoot, Samuel

Small, Andrew


1 & imps. 7


292
928


Smith, Henry


part 2
5


7
8
west 9


Swimley, Lewis 319 part 3
part 4
Beginning for the same at the southwest corner of said square 319,
running thence north with the line of 12th street west 100 feet; thence
east 25 feet; thence south 100 feet, to G street north ; thence in a line
with said street to the beginning.
Sutherland, Thomas J.'s heirs, 253 part 5
Being the east part of said lot, fronting 31 feet 6 inches on F street
north, by the whole depth of the lot.
348 part 10
Being the east 24 feet front on E street north by 50 feet deep.


Thomas, Ann
Thompson, Julia

Thomas, John H.


317 1
290 & imps. 14


Temple, John T.


Villard, Adam 348 pt. 14
Commencing for the same at the southeast corner of said lot, and
running thence west- 100 feer; thencenorth 13 feet; thence east
50 feet; thence north 7 feet; thence northeastwardly until it inter-
sects a line drawn perpendicular to the line of 10th street, 44 feet
therefrom; thence with the said perpendicular line 44 feet, to the
line of 10th street west; thence with the line of said street, 26
feet to the place of beginning.
Vallette, Mrs. 227 15
For 1831, $6 57.
Wormley, Mary 199 1 (sub.)
Watson, Alexander R. 214 part 6
part 7
Beginning for.the same at the distance of 80 feet from the corner of
north L and 15th streets west, running thence north on 15th
street 23 feet, thence east 50 feet, thence south 23 feet, thence
west to the beginning.
Washington, Peter G. 502 43


White, John B.

Winder, Levin H.


348 W. half 12


sub,





















21 99

& imps.



& imps.

& imps.


& imps.




& imps.

& imps.


& imps.
26 36










& imps.






6 57

& imps.
& imps.






& imps.


& imps.


-
-
I

-

---

-
-
-i

I
I
-





21 99


59
59
69
64
58
3
2 60
1 78
1 78
1 76
3 51
3 04
3 53
58
55
5 20
59
59
59
59


17 96

15 20
3 17


1 85
1 23.
1 23
1 03
82
80
1 45
1 45
25
25
25


1 04
28


59
59
69
64
58
53
2 52
2 60
1 78
1 78
1 76
3 51
3 04
3 53
58
55
5 20
59
59
59
59


17 96

15 20
3 17


8
7
53


19 25
68











26 36










24 05






6 57

1 84





2 97
2 02
18 26


18 70
1 37



9 49

5 94


4 95
21 97

2 02
3 04


4 07
4 07


20 33






3 27


3 78
4 62
4



1 48
1 01
14 08


8 24


18 70
1 37



9 49

5 94


4 95
21 97

2 02
3 04


4 07
4 07


20 33






3 27


3 78
4 62
4



1 48
1 01
14 08


8 24


218


Wilson, Jonathan


Wilson, John A.


south of 104


2 &imps.


19 26


Washington Tontine Company,


2 02
2 00


14 96

90
3 26
1 20
-1 79
99
1 06
89
1 22
91
3 42
2 18
1 06
1 41
1 11
1 51
1 19
1 35
1 86
2 53


2 02
2 00


14 96

90
3 26
1 20
1 79
99
1 06
89
1 22
91
3 42
2 18
1 06
1 41
-1 11
1 51
1 19
1 35
1 86
2 53


Warring, Marsham,


east of 88


Cpl -r 'II ---r I


5 93
4 04
46 42

56 39

16 48

4 85
4 32
4 56

13 73

4 04
4 00

8 04

49 18

1 80
6 52
2 40
3 58
1 98
2 12
1 78
2 44
1 82
6 84
4 36
2 12
2 82
2 22
3 02
2 38
2 70
3 72
5 06

58 68

8 00
6 78
3 02

17 80


Sale to commence at 10 o'clock A. M. Terms cash. B L
W. W. BILLING,
Aug 13 Collector of the First and Second Wards.


G I ALL'S COMPLETE WORKS.-Just published
and this day received, for sale by F. TAYLOR,
The complete Phrenological works of Gall, in 6 volumes,
just translated from the French edition; price $1 25 per vol.
Also just received, additional supplies of Combe on the Con-
stitution of Man, Combe's Phrenology, Practical Phrenology, a
newly published work.
Spurzheim's Phrenology, Spurzheim's Anatomy of the Brain,
Spurzheim on Insanity.
Combe on Mental Derangement.


STO BOOKSELLERS AND COUNTRY MER-
CHANTS.-F. TAYLOR has this day received one
thousand Comic Almanacs for the next year, (1837,) which con-
tain all the usual matter of an Almanac, and also one hun-
dred engraved caricatures and two hundred jokes, jests, anec-
dotes, narratives, &c. &c.; retail price only 12 cents, from
which art unusually liberal deduction will be made to those who
buy for the purpose of selling again. Apply at the Waverly
Circulating Library, immediately east of Gadsby's Hotel.
july 25


Davis Peter's heirs
DaVidson, Sarah


Davidson, John
For 1830, $8 40;


---T-- ----


220


toSC
S.2



3 70
2 46
2 46
2 46
1 64
1 60
2 90
2 90
50
50
50

29 26

2 08
56

2 64

1 18
1 18
1 38
1 28
1 16
1 06
5 04
5 20
3 56
3 56
3 52
7 02
6 08
7 06
1 16
1 10
10 40
1 18
1 18
1 18
1 18

65 66

79 90

30 40
6 34

36 74

26 56
21 01
160 68

208 25

56 65
3 42

60 07

18 98

11 88

30 86

9 90
96 66

4 04
6 08

10 12

8 14
8 14

16 28

64 71






26 25


---- --


dE




Daily national intelligencer
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073214/00003
 Material Information
Title: Daily national intelligencer
Alternate title: National intelligencer
Sunday national intelligencer
Physical Description: v. : ; 50-60 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Gales & Seaton
Place of Publication: Washington City D.C.
Creation Date: August 27, 1836
Publication Date: 1813-
Frequency: daily (except sunday)[feb. 6, 1865-]
daily[ former 1813-feb. 5, 1865]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Washington (D.C.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Coordinates: 38.895111 x -77.036667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Brigham, C.S. Amer. newspapers
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microform from Readex Microprint Corp., and on microfilm from the Library of Congress.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1813)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1869.
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended Aug. 24-30, 1814.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02260099
lccn - sn 83026172
System ID: UF00073214:00003
 Related Items
Related Items: Weekly national intelligencer (Washington, D.C.)
Related Items: National intelligencer (Washington, D.C. : 1810)
Related Items: Universal gazette (Philadelphia, Pa. : Nov. 1797)
Succeeded by: Washington express
Succeeded by: Daily national intelligencer and Washington express

Full Text

















itt]

~


SVol., XX'yV.


.ALt 4'_


WA SINGTON: SATURDAY9? A.AGULST 27, 1836.


'" PUBLISHtD BY
"GALES- &. SEATON. -
F-7.r, A A RYDa, Tr DOrtAss;i'FO SIX MONTHS, SIX
DOLLARS. Pin'.'At.. IN ADVANCE. I ,
-sosimbscribing for a /.- ,... -._ I 4 m, rIii .-. ,I time timne oa
-dering time paper, or in-'.- A i.:i--,', W- n .'.: ..f their wish
Have the paper discontinued at thue expiration of their year,
-ill he presumed as desiring its continuance until-counter-.
anded, and it will be coitihnued accordingly, .at thecoption
'the Editors. .

1I! IBER .%. ND f INNER iL. E LANDU-3- UesI.|-
Slv yCo 1113t\-, MlarItandtl-- ith il a rtlaer front
S' tate.-- l'i I.. :P)r-I I' II.~ tr.J, -,.i....1,r, ,liiii- ih"....
lien..4 -1 .11 ir: h h. A. oR d t 1. ,n -1. .i
I E ... i- : B i lA ,ni .r e -,r. !- i |.. R ,II. ,hir- inj h:,ii ,: i. -. : A
ted by both ..:...i. ,' 111. mt. 1" ,..:. ,a, --:,'I...r i .0 ,"'A
don of both, "..-, KI il- lcb ,- t--ur Jd. ik-. ott. f it-. -i' nle -n ; i
"oper time to -i-.:, ih- Ii .. .m.: : -A.,ipE1i.li i .in.I itb t I,
Itein Allegh..-.,- : T... Th. L.:..:, i.ii,: .. it [ i i -
t.i.: r :.: :;..i", ._"1 rn[.: I I.,.,, ; ]it,.:td r|J~i I r,,' ,il~i P.hi.l ,lri.r,: i ,
Ii ,uli,:,rl\ m(- ljk.. i i,,,, ,,.:.i 1m --s -- i ',ih jl ,:.e i .:. l Ih u I
niglitbe agr.-:d .-..i, l : '. ,J i. :. ,..- .1 i-, ,,A 'r, .:,
v ity i : m .. :.... r t-n:-t i 'r s a:. I n ml. r i .. : i f-i ., l
hJ l..r,.,..,u ,n,:::, ueJ ',.IhlLh." 1.*ll lJ.I ,.*' pu,,:L II
,[.,l i.ar 1-1. r, l A.,t:. r in i Lin U .: .ii-.i ui :,. ..n ,a 1l'1
,: ri.( dj.fl~r: ei : '_i. .c ?r L,:,|, i n d t nt" it -.., ..,r .. ,.mmi'
-I Ei, i--.Ir s'.1 i,,'l .d r i 11 T .: i C tA Il I.- ..nu ,
si l r. ".l ,i lb'.:..- >lJ i ,. *i t ti u-..J.-..l' i a ,-ls l'., A i-in va \ILL P.'.r, l,.r ,:
r "u.ilJ 'ii, ; i n. 'F ,. .:: -'~ :.: it It.:n1. bEl," '- i iC-, ,' ui. l tti fti
as be.'i.wC 1'.,. -r n.J, !.' .- :r -. twventy-two by the.
ipike, fr;..itn .-.o hei m, l i.l.-t' tin If .a mile, and within
It of .-I ,- ,ui'd tot -n, -u'i;i,,. Aid as a route for tile
roade i ,T -' t,:. ,r ', l.[ 1.A u t f: Ac ..', :, ih'... .'A-i .6 1 i. ,n,1"
creek it.- id't.tm l 1 intI ,' 1 i" t ,ini .: L- ._Im: l
2s aId Ill 1 j. ..' .u -.J .!i.l' '' ..I-, I .:i q I; ':> l ] I a..rI

i. '. lr. I ..l I I,'ll,- ll I I.:.. : I.th -A'l i. ,..,: z- .:1
A Ii .Ik, .,. i..-. Il.. -whole tract is in woods, except a very
II i.:ii. iit, and the farm o0 which the subscriber resides,
ii,,,- ri..iii ,one hundred- and foty'-acres of cleared land,-
ding 'ood crops of c--. rAi -:nA'j ll 'iri, iI.-Id .-l-.'co of the
st e:--.r and texture, i-I .l.,lih l -f SJpi-, h.. i of whiMch
e is a good deal laid J--'A T II- rI...: II]|| ;: A.. and the
buildings suchl as are usual, with abarn, stables, and tobacco
ses. '- .
'1,, ,,:,-ru f'1l--mu too',---m-ull .- mlr tal -h M ;.i, A. h ., u,: t',
ci.:i ,i. -.o.[r.i.- pIt c um.:in.seo u i. ::u[i.li m- iu0 -u- mn "ir inm
Itixnl d ui [- :.i'. Nit a. ,,lmi-.m:l i n : -o,im l i,:- ,.-a-n rci'ne illt
l [l.j ,-r,: -. iin; li,:- mi,:nl't-c i ,. .l .it ,.,h -- U npl'l, sl'i.x..Al
url Isid--,,u L-uiti,- '2,:c--il-i tin -e A--i -,. in15[ i f ]-,tA' fi.hn xi,.i ,,Ui
xi. .led -.--al I L-,l .-e .i:. pl.!- mull L.,. r -...| .. I--in I...:. li
-, A-I 11s.-. P i%,.t '., I Z .. i e'v: = i r.,s tent in t\'lt '-
.ll',' q lAt.' .: t-ul,: r.s ],id.j -:, IJ 'a:l .- ,-r.J l ; I "A ,., :
t0 l'.r lu.ni b. L. m .:t. l..., \m ~ 11-.ll [ll..i'ni-.iii [ .-,"it 'C .,hlu .l.l:.,
a B ilt i;.I '.c a r.- .\rini -.:.l, :,l !.:..- Hmt i .:. -.i.n- rf lr.A -.l
i ,. in~ r. n :. ?[ -e gi i t~ A1: 1u-. ]k. 3i falm.:. ( ..":.-stem. ft inlli...,
_. utn'mhinr. r, o1:[ Hi s pl.ir., '.anilisig, ..t'i r :, fi ':, j .i -I.l.u-
:o; ,.,i : n ,-r.. ,jr t : .: ,;,, ,r r..-: 1:, |:li,.'.,'J I I h au .: i.
i ; 51.)[r, ', :i l'," r,:,r, ,rn >|i',,:,1l L..aIJ ]ni. aJ:-. ,7,: ,' .*:r:'m |-p .,ir.,1 iitjij
i cry pr.,llinbl, l : 1,:, il.
here is no large estate on the- line of the canal, below Cum-
-,:, ..[...,--,. i-: ,ty ;,, i.i' .u,:lh a m :,-f'ly -..- I riber
ir lir-' -ui l.i, .---snn .l.-tm i-tit :,i-'h tia-. Wl pfm -.:-.'i. W ith
Ed [.. I, i ._ n or .i:, .:d-I 'i: A 1 .-. l l .I ., 1 .i: h.: ilrr
i,.,ir :- .: ii l ;l'so f ie. ---ur i i .:. a, mI- "i i..: l] ...1.-1 [ it: uiII .

ai',h 1.1r, e ; -,Ams:in mi-ln -ih, :s, I[.. : ,:W, lil.- l! i.-,
I.:. ':-.n :ll'l *:- i[.rni1 i ..?.l: .', 1" hn n :-., ; *l ', I,'.,, Al,.- i'j -e ..
;.,.*,''lf ,', t~ eh-: ru.-S: .-."' rh .: i .:... k : "t Qj :":i.,' |-.l *...-- 'Tllh e :f -.,
.'1}1'?1 lad'i .r : ll:I!: rjD..l h .":.m lh1.2 ;):r....l ,1 [.1 l:-:. ,." ,- *' a i ,:.r,
.. ib, ,;.; .:.v a l .: t u ,ii .: b.:ti..I- .:.. n h.. if;s'--ini.i i '...i ,:.fl the
,,1 rti-. i n s i,.:., -.., .: ,'r, i ..[i a- t"..:rl I-.-.- -: -I. a t-.-ut
S .- i .l -'.i- i i A l r ,- ,. i' _.
t,,i-,iso "-.L-ii ,:"ifi I td,.i,im. tuij. -, tA-, innr.l --in ,.'...-
U','[ ,j r.i. i h 5.j .l i -. I 2j i.. '. int.i nilir.
mits.
lei'e can be scarcely a doubt,-if iron ore in thIe greatest
idance, and of coal in quantity, should be discovered, it
Id be difficult to estimate the real value of the property, so
- to markets for all its productions, and situated, as it will
an two of the finest works of internal improvement in the
Id. It must be readily seen that the lumber concern would,
>nd doubt, be one of great magnitude; and that a large aec-
ion to the present value of the estate may, most reasonably,
alculated on by stockholders, as soon as proper means are
ied for developing its mineral resources, which.may even
nd beyond those before enumerated. A company- organized I
r this charter would have very peculiar advantages in con-
lng the-iron with the lumber business ; no timber would be
The most valuable portions could be used for market, and I
)ps and inferior qualities converted into charcoal, the sup-
br which, on so large a district, would be perpetuated by
ifter-growth. If bituminous coal should be preferred for
ifacturing iron, and that mineral be not found on the pre-
I, the Cumberland coal could be had at three or four cents
ushel, when the canal reaches that place ; or the iron ore
t be transported to paints where it would be required.
der these views'of the. resources of his property, connect-
it is with a most valuable charter, the undersigned solicits
-ougli examination of it by those who may wish to have an
ast in both, and believes it will be found fully to correspond
lie description given. HIe desireq to make the earliest ar-
ments possible for the -._ :-;--., 'A] of the company, and -
ironptly answer any 11t m-i .m, 1:.. subject addressed to
near Bevansville, Alleghany county, Maryland."
10-d&ctf WM. CARROLL.


)TICE TO TtACHERS.-Vaeancies in the Aca-
demy at Roclkville,'Montgomery County, Mmaryland, being
to occur, other teachers will be necessary on the last
y of September next; and to fill such vacancies, proposals
laid) directed to the undersigned, will be -received and
ered at any time before that day, when an examination
) had of those who offer for the places. '
se vacancies are confined to the English department
Academy; two Teachers will be required, who will have
legree, teaching separate schools.-
ach of these Teachers two hundred dollars will be paid
fund provided by the State of Maryland ; in addition, lihe
ceive the price of tuition of the scholars committed to his
, it being twelve dollars per annum for the ordinary
es ofan English education, and sixteen dollars per annum
ematics shall be taught. Not more than thirty-five seho-
1 i.. ,. ;,.*1 in .-i...r of the English departments, ex-
:. 11 .'.'...: .:r...- ir, which are to be educated in each,
mny shall be offered.
tuition money (save the two hundred dollars to each teach-
oe made and collected by the teachers.
English department embraces now sixty students, and
strong promise of increase.
11 be expected that respectable evidences of the fitness of
mcant will accomnpany his application. ,
vacancies will happen by resignation of the teachers, in
once of bad health in the one, and the other having an
in a different business which lie wishes to prosecute,and
e finds incompatible with his duties in thie Academy.
JOSEPH H. JONES,
BEN. S. FORREST,
RICHD. I. BOWIE,
Committee of the Board ofTrustees ofthe
3-t20SeD Rockville Academy.

SCONSIN TERRITORY.- Notes on Wiscon
sin Territory,i within a Map by Lieutenant Albert M. Lea
united States Dragoons. 1. On sale by
0 a PISHEY THOMPSON.

CASH FOR 500 NEGROES,
UDING both sexes, from 12 to 25 years of age. Per-
having likely servants to dispose of, will find it to theil
:o give us a call, as we will give higher prices, 'in
an any other purchaser who is now, or may hereafter
S the market. FRANKLIN & ARMFIELD,
-d&ctf. Alexandria.-
ice George's County Court, sitting as a Court
of Equity--1uly Term, 1836.
Samuel Duvall and'Eliza, his wife,
Vs.
Grafton Hall..
,RED by Prince George's County Court, sitting as a
urt of Equity, this 12th day of July, 1836, that the
o and reported by N. Carroll Stephen, trustee for tihe
ie real estate of Riclard D. Hall, deceased, be ratified
rmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or be-
hird Monday in November next: Provided a copy of
I be infiserted in some newspaper published in Wash-
ity, once ayveek for three successive weeks before thie
t Monday of November next. The report states the
3old for three thousand three hundred and fifty-fouar
:3,354 37!) and thirty-seven and a half cents.
C. DORSEY.
copy : Test, AQUILA BEALL, Clerk.
-law3w


AND FOR SALE.-ThatI part of the plantation of Alexandria asld New Orleans Pavhets. "
Atchibald VanI Horn, deceased, whliclh lies in the District ,EZ, Br:: TRIBUNE, Samunel C. Boush, master, -
"of Columbia, containing about two hundred acres, more or less. .. 5di September. Brig ISAAC FRANK- mI -
Also the tract of land, lying south of the Beaver Damn branch, LI N, -l.ll i..,i.-,..iter, to sail 1st October.
and east of the Bladensbargh and Alexandria road, containing These v. .. .. i.. first class, and fittel f I ,' Ie;-I
one hundred and eighty-seven and a half acres, more or less. t-. f.' .: *:.. h i..-i ..J.. 11 fo .: ..-...
And the farm on which the subscriber resides, containing one C:.- ii.J.! 1-,. .., ,.:.:. Hi t...-Iness.
hundred and five and a half acres. i t.-,.....: :.: ill il -It I,,.j, i,,.: steam up iLt. :
Terms-Cash for the last tract; .and for the two other tracts, isisippi. .
one-halfof the purchase money in. six, and tihs' other half in P., -," wishing to ship will' please make early application to
twelve months from the lii .l,' .-.f January, 1837. 0 JOHN ARMFIELD, '
Sale to take.pla'e at l,. I-I.-- I..,." on the first tract,'; at twelve "aug -tf Alexandria.-
o'clock, pn.the 1st day of September next. U U f LII-,ALL O"IlPROVtiLD 1'R1 PIfERT1 .
july 6-wtseptl ALEX. McCORMICK. P, ... .,..' --:r. .. ofthe Circuit I-.... [ i., ti.. i,-i,,.-i:t
7pHE ISUBSCRIBER hereby gives notice thatapplica- .'-. -, ,: .,,,.., ,A .i-, F .I ,. I |
Stion.willbe made to the next Congress of the United ir't'.t, ,.. \ N-.. %i-a m.,.' .i., ,.. :h:,,:r.
Siii..: .,i r ,-i, -,r,. .. xtsession, for the renewal of a pa- i..N.i i. t -. ,, 1!f,,.mm -d a hhin I.. ..... f ,n .
'rr,m _, ,,f,,. i. \in ',tt .| E ,.t, being Ilatent for a uachinegfor .. -t-, 5., ,. .. -. medwellin- *: ,, I h
-:, A- ml,, ., ..r .l -il, day of Decem ber, 1822; ... I.. -.i C-- A t.c h,.. _.e..i "
XWT T ACT fATt.:..,,_'"- .1 : *'.:* -'-O.,* .*l I.,,,,hCesh, tile "*.,. ll,., ," ,., -,.. lI,,
WILLARD EARL, notes fo['the balance, with an el. I.-u.i.....,. -
Of the County of Albany and State of New'York. est, payable in four, eight, and [V I.: ......... J A- hr,-
may 19lamo3mo the notesare fully paid, tiehtru- .....,,.,.- ., i.,t,,.-, .
"W"ALUABLE POTOIMAC LANDS & THREE. the interest vested in him by s;,.l .i. ,-1.- 1 :- : i| ... ,,.
V FISHERIES F'OR SALE OR RENT.-With "J.-O ':i .fi. residence .-.1i I, -i, L.," "
a view to a further remnovl to Alabama, the subscribers will sell A JOc- INftN teIsdLLence Nr. ,."'.A
their Deep Hole and Farm Plantations, adjacent, containing two E. -j | ,\u.1[.o.t-.
i,..,. ,.i r even hundred and t.. i -'; liit i, ,.. lj.A --i.-...n ,,.- i-- "
0:, _;iay,,fr.; fi'mi the A A,,,,:,G N0., ,.. ,-N ,. i 1_ 1'T, ,iA.iRl.a .> ---1A.lC LiiL>/ 1 -TCill.
i-; A. the Potomac : ,d I.... -' ,. in mm ml. h iI E OFII (. Ti 'i Cl)tUiiT'S. Or O %LUT-
mail stage road to Colchester,..I .,: '-. ,,, l, ,, ,..,,,.,.- ,iI-,d A-EILL P.l-i.PRT .--. ,,, I ..-.. -,",,,:,.
,,h,.5.> i r t ,,i AS ,,,h0 i .,Ii i .. ., il-i..... Ii, '. ,,,- 1:, A.- .,, [x t..,,r ..1 it.- D)is'trict of Cotfuim ,i ,- mt-,,, as a C o rt olic-
oes are of easy access, by land. '.f i Distrcat',"-'," i.irs whiea.,t .a.s.o-:-, m.. ih, -% it vi ll ofe r -I. ly: I a Cou, A .l;-
Alexandria, three[m..s .. 0-:, o .... f Col1hes ter. e '.- ,;I,, .. ., ofdSeptembet next, :.I. ,.-'-, I,.
i:-. u t- t ..- I t I.: lands-in. Prince :z.I,. t ^,,.- : tO ite- City of W ashington, ,.,.,,iml.:.
XVI u~.,..p t -.5 inI Iin.iti...~ t.- r-I. ', C ti, ~t~~ ~ ~ t..,,,.A ti-'in timelise of'SoothsN -...u

.ma c h in e G.' L .- I. ..: n ...: .: .. rh .. ..,1.1,1,,.n '. .... ,1 . ..:r e.. .. I to, s l... I'' ....
nietit snarhet.'This 7'1i in WI ,v.,-m, xvleat N i i-sm .. Nt., 1.......l.micclretl fett; it.-. -i-u-L.'
maohinsI '.: --; a- i : i .r, l. A, -- .... Ired feet, to I .. .i ... -
SThe I ...-, I'-.-i,; fistir.c : . .. i -. I ., .t,-..:.i. thie best . h i rop- .
upon the Potomac.. The Farm Marsh-(or Mud Haul) fishery has -. U,-.. misc'.l th ...min Tionpoftl' .' ,t .. ..t -i,.n'-
been fished several years successfully; also the Plum Tree fish- ern Branch, which is nowi n the progress of a final completion,
ecry, between the:two. Houses are on each shore. Thersle is. so as to be :..-',.1. ,.:I n .i.1-: for boats and t, ,tu i,.....,
abundan" m[-.. i F. : [fd... |,,.: in whole extevm u I,,, It. it..
Many ah..m,.ir. ...,.I .. ...A.. n -, [ ,,. i;.I ,~ ..,... The term sa of sale are, one-fourth of th 1 -...-1 ,:.: .- ... 7- ,..
land, [m ,. l ,,.. ....t -.: : ..._ ..., .,. i ,A ,,-. .be paid in cash on the day of sale, and the r- ..:,.i, .- ii,.l ,,I-
demand : .iu ~ ,t.. t.. ...,_ m,[ tf t'. Au., L-i2 l,.,.t~ ...).). --lam- tbk-ib -in #.hi,!.i .'.f.., coa d twxo years, with hinstemeel f--,., i1.. i .,'
for these ofthe estate. a !.t-,-.",Il.,"k .- adtwo ars yt i ,
o. ]' iil,.: ;i C,. il. ,..,,r ,', tl .. l ,i-;.iL ., ,i convey -:.,,l I:"", ,
-Ln i i nl is-, ,1' !,. T i,.'l..... ,-, i .It : ', ,,,! to the purchaser or purchasers. Sale on the premises a r I,,
mo A. ilh.n pil-e e .q ,. [ .. ... 't .I t i o'clock P. M. Byauthority of the T.-,-,. .
ances inthree.equa ..&a--A... ... .-I ." -be giv- P. M INiRt i & SON,
C:,.,:tm-,as, an,, .3mat Auct.heners.
Sucha,.ra.r.,,uti.,,';. raoely offered forjudicious investment. aug -twts Autioheers
FI- ,'[. -,,, : :', I, l.:,, post paid;) apply to W illiaimHI-Iindman,- A7.%1li-i' ''IT;T N i', 'EU ( .- :,,..., ..i .
El B ,. .., L.-) the subscribers. & "r.' hi ll iro-i IM it- .- a -I L'.:.rtr,. :,:, A0'-'... ..'ll:
BCN. -OGLE TAYLOE, Washington, D. C. Army and Navy,-_, ,-..:. ,; ;,ling the city, and the Publiegen-
WM. H. TAYLOE, Warsaw, Va. rally, to oxamii.. ..1.:. ,..i of Curiosities, at his house, on '
aug 20-d&ctf 5th street west, opposite the City Hall, and next to Tii,,ii,


ITNIVERSITY OF _PENNSYLVANIA-i(dai-
4. cal Department.-The Course of L.: I.. :. .. ..:.,i
mence on Tuesday, the 1st day of November, and be continued
under i ,". i in: ,u.r.
--ract.:,a -.. ri--.:... ..'"i Mh.. ...., NATHANIEL CHAPMAN,
M.D.
C 'lA:,: POL.: i. ver M D. :
"t. ... ., \\ in' ,,i~ :Il:, .ILs.:.?'. M D.
LA:. .---I-0.
,\,...:..... W i.Li... E." H.:a' r, M. D.
l I ] .j ,. .:. M 1. .. .: .. 5. '. i .i L J A C K S O N ,- M D -
I.,', ,,. M.:,,.. ,oI pl.i .i ,: ';t. :.:.,.r W 6onD, M D.
(-[..i... i t.,i h.: f',.l ,:,- I "V\...,, I..j ,,.J Children,-HUciH
L I-..l .,--c- Ir D r'
..,i.:.i L ......-.: :.. l. ..icine and .,.- delivered
,._:, l. ,i, Hi, P .i -l,.',,; Hospital, ,I l....i. l ,. andat the
pr',: ,, H":'.r', ... the beginning to- the end of the
session. -
The amount of the fees'of tuition is the same as heretofore;
no increase having been made in consequence of ih, ...--..
.-: i i.. ,, --... Professor-ships, and the i.,A ...i .'A
,r, :'j,t,,,. ii i,,.-i....... .... .. .W E. HORNER,
SDean of thl.eMedical Faculty, Philadelphia.
dug 20 -aiwtlvIw
THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD
will be given for apprehending and securing JOHN,
who calls himself John Redmond, so that I get him again. He
absconded from my farm, in the upper end of Fauquier county,
on the night of the 16th instant.
John is a bright mulatto, about 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high,
well proportioned, and very likely. He has no particular mark
or characteristic about him by which the attention of strangers
would be'attracted, except, perhaps, thathe lisps in speaking, and
has a rather bold address. He took with him a variety of cloth-
ing, among which a blue cloth coat, slightly worn, and a'short
drab coat, are particularly recollected. He is a remarkably fine
looking servant, and prides himself upon his genteel appear-
ance, which perhaps may be laid aside in order to escape de-
tection.
He started upon a sorrel horse with a blaze face and a white
foot or two, not recollected which ; the horse is what is called a
srib-biter.
L will give the above reward of $300, if he is taken within the
State of Virginia, and delivered to me or secured in the jail of
Fauquier county ; or if he is taken without the State, and se-
cured so that lean obtain possession of him, I will give the same
reward. Letters on the subject may be addressed to me at
The Plains" Post Office, Fauquier county, Virginia..
july 28-2aw2ain WILLIAM BYRNE.


Y ORK SPRINGS FOR SALE.-The subscribers
authorized by the Trustees of the late Robert Oliver,
Esq., to offer for sale by public auction, on the premises, on
MONDAY, the 22d August, the property of York Springs.
This celebrated watering place is situated in a beautiful and
most salubrious part of Adams county, Pennsylvania, about there e-
qinarters of a mile from Petersburg, fifteen from Hanover, fif-
teen from Carlisle, twenty from York, twenty-one from Harris-
burg, and fifty-seven from Baltimore, to and from which city a
daily mail passes during the watering season. York Springs
save enjoyed during many years a high and constantly increas-
ng reputation from the valuable medicinal properties of their
waters; and for a longseries of years they have been the resort,
each season, of a large number of visitors from Bainmore, Phila-
delphia, and, indeed, from almost every portion of the middle
States.
Attached to this property, is a tract of about 139 acres of high-
y improved land,comprising a large quantity ofvaluable meadow,
extensive gardens and orchards. Thie improvements consist of
threc large HOUSES, two of which, being of stone and brick,
are very spacious, and are built in the most approved style for
he accommodation of a large number of visitors. These bnild-
ings contain 82 rooms, having a very spacious dining room, ball
oom, &c. There are also a billiard-room, ninepin alley, hot,
old, and shower baths, ice house, &c. Bermudian-.creek pass-
s through the estate, on which, about two years since, .there
was erected a Stone Merchant MILL, of 40 by 45 feet, with four
un of stones, worked by a copious stream of water, and for
alieh an ample supply of wheat is furnished in the neigh-
)orhood.,
There is also a Coach House and Stabling for from 80 to 90
iead of horses. The grounds around the house and near tho
spring are laid out with great care and attention to the comfort of
isiters. The neighborhood affords fine fishing and shooting,
And the country around abounds with woodcock, pheasants, snipe,
quirrels, &c.
York Springs will, it is believed, before the next season, be
onnected with Baltimore and Philadelphia, by continuous lines
railway; with thie former, by the Baltimore and Susquehanna,
nd the York and Gettysburg railroads ;, with the latter, by the
olumbia, Wrightsville, York and Gettysburg railroads. Under
uch great facilities of access, it cannot fail to be the place of a
resort that must increase wiLh each succeeding season.
The property, to a capitalist br to a company, would prove a
lost valuable investment.
The terms ofsale will be liberal, and will be made known on
ie day ofsale. Possession will be given the 1st day ofNovem-
er next.
For-further particulars apply to .
WILLIAM WOODVILLE,
Gay street, opposite the Exchange, Baltimore.
aug5-


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F LOWERS.-Language of Flowers, I1 volunome, within gilt
edges. Price 37h cents.
The Calendar of Flowers, with illustrative poetry, beautifully
bound, and embellished with numerous colored engravings.
Price $2.
Flora's Interpreter, with numerous colored engravings, o,
Flowers and Sentiments. Price 81 75.
The Florist's Manual, 1 vol. 8vo. with nearly 100 engraviogs.
The Garland of Flora, 1 vol. small 8vo. -
The'Book of Flowers ; Flora and Thalia ; Gems of Flowers
and Poehty; with very beautiful and numerous colored engrav-
ings, in beautifully embossed and gilt binding.
Flora's Dictionary; Comstock's Young Botanist; Flora Bri-
tannica; Botany for Beginners; the various Botanical Works
of Eaton, Torrey, Lincoln, Nuttall, Elliot, Blake, Conmstock,
and many others.
Also,. 'Treatises on Drawing and Painting of Flowers, &c. &c.
all at tho lowest prices, for sale hy
aug 19 F. 'PAYLOB.


Church. '
Ti;: .ii:. i.i. ...:.,.- ,; many interesting articles, is the;
Sr- :.1.[l-:-1"I.. Itl..., ..4 ,,:-iiy eight years, and is intended as the
foundation of.a Museum at the National Metropolis, on a plan of
comprehension and variety which may be favorably compared
with any former enterprise of the kind in the United States.
Donations of specimens in 'the Arts and Sciences will be thank-
.-Ii .i--:i.:. by the subscriber, at his Museumn.
I,- l-i-, JOHN GARDEN.
tBIEN iI(FK' CL. S O[110i.-\ rFi..-, i,..-...


I, ,." ,. ,. i I -., :.", i in-,.. .. .. I boun d, and containing
.,::...h,.:- ......:.., ... is for sale by F. TAYLOR.
P c ,.. ,. ..r,I ,' 'i 1 :- .. -
This day is published the second part of their same work,com-
prising, in one volume of the same size, valuable' Treatises on
Chemistry, 'i: t,l, ,. M i,-, .- ,11 e,[,:. i ... ,
Meteorology. -I-; [,,r. .iO .It:l I,, I
d,. .:i,,..,;,,:. 'Price $I 25.
,, \-..-., Circivlating Library, inmnediately east of
Gadsby's Hotel. july 29
P TRLI1C WORKS IN INDIANA.-Notice to
Countraotors.-Sealed Proposals will be received it La-
fayette, on the 23d day of August next, by J. B. Johnson, Acting
Commissioner, for the construction of all the heavy sections on
that portion of the Wabash and Erie canal lying between
Georgetown and Lafuyette, 32 miles in length. The work to
be let embraces several of thie most important and expensive
jobs in the State, amongst which are three damns-one across the
Wabash, one across Deer creek, and the other across Wildcat;
two blufis,each near one and a fourth miles in length,along which
thle canal will be formed in the river; six lift locks, and three
guard locks, together with several sections of deep cutting and
high embankment. -
Also, at Brookville, on the 13th day of September next, by
Elisha Long, Acting Comnmissioner, for the construction of
about 34 miles of the White-water canal, extending fionn Brook-
ville to Lawrenceburgh. This division embraces 2 dams across
tile V'hitc-water, 14 lift locks to be built of stone, 2 aqueducts,
several large arelred culverts of stone, 6 or 8 heavy bluff sec-
tions, and some deep cutting, together with the usual variety of
earth work common to all canals.
Also, at Madison, on the 27th dayofSeptember next, by John
Woodburn, Acting Commissioner, for the grading and bridging
on 22 miles of thie Madison and Lafayette railroad, extending
north from the Ohio river. The line to be let embraces some
heavy work, consisting of the usualvariety ofeuttitgs, embank-
ments, and bridges, common to, works of this kind. The road-
bed to be grauided for a double track.
Also, at Indianapolis, on the 4th day of October next,,y 1).
Burr, Acting Commissioner, for the construction of 25 miles of
the Central Canal, extending from thie feeder dam above India-
napolis to tthe Bluffs." This line emnibraces a dan across the
White river, an aqueduct over Fall creek, 8 lift locks, most of
which will be built of cut stone, 2 or 3 bluffsections, and several
large culverts.
Also, at Paoli, on the 18th day of October next, by John G.
Clendenin, Acting Comnmissioner, for thle grading and bridging
on 41 miles of the New Albany and Vincennes MacAdacuized
turnpike road, extending'from New Albany to Paoli, and em-
bracing such a variety of cuttings, embankmnents, and bridges
as is common on turnpike roads.
Also, at Evansville, on the Istday of November next, bySam-
unel Hall, Acting Commissioner, for thie construction of 25 to 30
miles of thie Central canal, extending from a point near the
head of Blig Pigeon creek, to Evansville. The work to be let
on this line is of the ordinary character, emnbiacing several
locks, to be built of stones, aind one or more aqueducts, with a
nuUnter tof culverts.
Also, at Torre lHaute, on the 15lli day of Novembnler next, hby
Thos. H1. Blakcd, Acting Commiissimcer, for thie construction of
about 20 miles of the cross-cut canal, extending from Torre
Haute to Eel river. This line embraces a deep cut of consider.
able magnitude, a damta across Eel river, and 8 or 10 cut stone
locks.
The several lines to bie let will be divided l into sections of
suitable length for iheo convenience ofocontrctors. Tie length
of time given for the completion of the work, the torinms of the
contracts, the manner ofperformning the work, &c. will be fally
made known tit the thne and place of letting. The various lines
will be staked out and ready for the inspection of contractors ten
days previous to the day of letting; and the plans, profiles, and
estimates of qualities, will be at the place of letting for three
days immediately preceding (lie day. of receiving bids. Bid-
ders are requested to make themselves fully acquainted witli
the character of the work, so that they may not be mistaken in
regard to its value.
Bidders who are not personally known to the Acting Com-
missioneor or Engineer in charge ef the work, will be expected
to present with their proposals satisfactory testimonials as to
their qualifications and character.
Dated Indianapolis, 4th July, 1831.
By orderof the State Board of Internal Improvement:
DAVID H. MAXWELL, President.
JAMES MOREisoN, Secretary.
july 19--tlOct


F RENCH FATSHIONS.--F. TAYLOR will receive
subscriptions for the Journal of French Fashions, whiicli is
to bIe published on the 1st and 15th of every month, immediate-
ly upon the arrival of the French packets. Each number will
contain numerous colored engravings of fashions from the Pari-
sianmagazines, which are regularly slipped from France to lthe
editors of this work a week before they are made public there,
and are each accompanied by ani explanatory letter from a Pa-
risian artiste of celebriy.
Subscribers will, therefore, have lihe advantage ofreceiving
the flashions direct from Paris every two week, instead of
waiting, as heretofore, several months, until they make their
way to this country, through the English magazines. -
Subscription price $8 per annum.
The work will be sent in perfect safety to any part of ire
United States, ifapplication is made to the advertiser, at the
Waverly Circulafting Library, immediately east of Gadsby's
Hotel, where the first two numbers may be seen..
july 22
ij O1,D TEAF.-A large rinantily of King's superior deep
%A Gold Leaf, just received and fior sale at Statioer-' hI1all.
aug 19 (Tel.) W. FISCHER.


GENERALI MEETING of the Subscribers
.- to thile capital stock of "the Annapolis and Potomac Canal
Company" 3%ill be held at the City Hall, in tlie city of Anna-
'-1 ".,. \'1. 1 i.- "1, .S September next, at 10 o'clock
M -,.:, i. .: 'ji.."..i.. of als act of' the General As-
sembly of Mit, J, ,|l..J 'Ac act to incorporate the Anna-
Spolls and P...-. ... ...pany," and the several supple-
ments thereto, atxwhich meeting the Commissioners will lay be-
fore the subscribersas aforesaid the books containing the'state
of the said subscriptions, anid will take and receive farther sdb-
.criptions to the capital stock of said-compiany.
W; W H. Marriott, Leonard Iglehart,
Jolhn B. Morris, Somerville Pinkney,
Daniel Cobb, A. Randall,
Francis S. Key, Richard T. Lowndes,
i- :.- C. Weightman, Robert Wright,
o,,.. K ndall Hagner, Nioh's Carroll Stephen,
,ug 12-t7S Cominissioners.
'ila{ l _T.%_14 [XAMINER.-A- set of Dr. Chan-
Sning 's Review, The Christian Examiner," runuin back
e~u ',. Li ", l .. i C.. I ... W ,J. -,, 1d .: I." 1.:l [ ,'



l s'J %', l ,%_'I iN' ] rL.- l ,,r.,. r- ,,,.-h, h .. z ,

'" ,: ," I i,, 11., 1' U" I -.. I" l -:,
\ ..i,. ,* .,,s : ., 1,,,,, ? ,t N [ i, ,.:, ,, ,. ,,,',,, ,, i i.. ,,i


I.,.' ,', -1.1 I Cii.tLLEa tMILLEtR,
.aug13-eotf Victualler.
,,i.I:" e; g-'ilNIaIv jic'. I"AL- .ssl.t. Li ]EN-
-1. .IL. 1OEiaE. f)E lU R IlEIN. ..t'.-- h'. i. -

-"", of Rock Creek'Cliureh, the residence of Rev. C. WVilt-
t.,.i, all his Household and Kitchen Fitrntiture, comprising a
-' .ctieral assortinent. .
.., Farmig utensils, Horse, Dearborn, Cart, Cows, Shoats,
'...,,, landing, &c. &c. : -
I. irms at time of sale. EDW. DYER,
'- aug 20-eodc&c&ds (Met. & Glo.) Auctioneer.
.J,,-XTENSIVE SALE OFt VERY VALUABLE
t U_ Ii'URNITURE.-On Thimrusday, 1st September, at 10
.. A. M. I shall sell, at the residence of Mrs.' Lati ner, op-
I-.. -,.i...,ts Square, till of her very valuable Household
F. ..... .:, L ...Iisting of every article usefil and necessary,

..l.'l. .,1il spring-seat and other hair Sofas,
Mahogany Chairs, Cane-seat and Whidsor Chairs,
Best Brussels and-Ingrain Carpets,
lopi.-rut' xi..' ii,.... H.i;. -
[1 .' 1-1 '11 ...J 1 V .. ''. .;! ,
Flat Stair Rods,
Si andsomoe Pier and Centre' Tables,
S Pillar and Claw Card Tables,
SMantel and Pier Glasses,
.- Very handsome Chintz and Moreen Curtains, with appur-
.tenances, -best iplated Candlesticks,
.4 Castors and Branches, '
S Rich Dinner, Dessert, and Tea Services of China,
SAstral and Mantel Lamps,
S: Mantel Ornaments, Time Piece,
', Ivory Knives and Forks,
-. Cut Glass of superior quality,
i Best Plated Dining and Dessert Forks,
:Brass Fenders, File Sets.
SSuperior Feather Beds and Mattresses,
SToilet and Column Bureaus,
Clothes Presses, -
Chamber Carpets, Washstands, &c. &c.
The house will be open for the inspection of the Furniture the
day previous to sale. In this collection.will be found articles of
I, .* *. .-A,.I,. which ,have been selected with miulch care and
-.-,.:,,.I.. I\ better opportunity for persons furnishing may not
offer this fall than tihe present. EDWARD) DYER,
aug ll-eo&ds Anuctioneer,
B WEDWARD DYER.-Sale of Pasliionauble
1'urtniture.-On Tliurstlay, the Stll September, I shall
ltr dIth,- r.oidrnc of ;t geontleman removing, ox Ilth street,
north of F, adjoining theld dwelling of i). Clagelt, Es.q. all tile
fashionable md hacndsonme Furniture, consisting, it part, ofas
follows: x.
Superior new parlor Carpels and Rugs, hair scat Sofa
Elegant .1.:. ..., ... I -entre tables, pillui-r andl claw
Do. i. .. i i ...i... -, runt ing 21 days
Astral and mantel Lamps, pier Glasses
Brass Fenders and fire Sets, suits handsomnc Curtains
Passage and step Carpets and Reds
Plated Castors and Coasters, Trays, ivory Knives and Forks
Handsome china TeaService, Diinig do.
Cut glass D.canters, Celeries, Pitclleis, Tainblers, Cham-
pagnes, 'Vines, &c. &c.
Elegant toilet Bureaus
Very elegant otaple and mh---."-',- Bedsteads
Mahogany Wardrobes, \ i, i .,.i., Toilet Sets
Chamber Carpets, Toilet Glasses
Best Feather Beds and Mattresses, Bureaus
Superior cane-scat and Windsor Chairs, Sidebloard
With almost every article used in fashionable and genteel
housekeeping, all of which have been selected withi much taste,
and of best w'orknmnship.
Also, Cooking-stove and apparatus, and a very general assort-
ment ofkitchen requisites.
SSale at 11 o'clock A. M.
Terms will be liberal, and made known at time of sale. ,
aug 17-eots&ds (Globe) EDWV. DYER, Auct.
G9-LT ORNAMENTS.-The subscribers have just re-
ceived a large assortment of rich Ornaments, in part, viz.
100 Gilt Reds, 5. and Gt feet long
100 dozen Gilt Rings to match
50 do do Rosettes
10 do rich Centre-pieces 0
50 do Gilt Darts, Spears, Lancets, Qiuivers, and Knobs
Thie above have just been received direct from France, and
will be sold low. BRADLEY & CATLETT.
aug 20-dlw3taw2w (GI & Alex Gaz)


N OTICE.-Miss HENDERSON takes this method to no-
tify tmie Public. lhat stie has taken tsat comn dilous house
on Street, between 12th and 13th, and is now prepared to ac-
commsodate yearly and transient boarders upon terms as moder-
ate as can be obtained at any genteel establishment in Wash-
ingtoi. The lihouse is spacious and airy, and thie location is de-
sirable from its healthfulness and m proximity to the bF-t .i.1
as also that of being suffliciently near to all the nmost :m ,.i ., ,
public points in thlie city to make an agreeable walk.
aug 18-eo3t
NOTICE TO TEACIHERS.-The Trustees of Chair-'
-L' lotte Hall School wish to engage the services of two gen-
tlemen. The duties of one will be confined exclusively to the
English and Mathematicsl Department ; the other will he cx-
pected to aild, as necessity miay require, either thie English or
Classical Instructor. The salary of ihe former will bho $650
per a1umnsi1; the assistant will receive $500 per tannul. The
salaries will he paid quarterly. Cemmodioeas and i plesasnt rooms,
in thim immediate vicinity of thlie Academy, will be furnished by
thIe Trustees. The above appoinlmsents will be made on the 2dl
Monday of Septemtber next. Applicants for cither situation will
please address their communications, postage paid, to hie sub-
scriber, ait Charllotte Ilall, St. Mary's county, Ma'yland. Tes-
timonuials of capacity and character will be s.equirsd. Board
can be obtained at ferom $90 to $100 per annuon.
By order of the Board of Trustees :
J. MILTIMORE.
aug 5-cpid Charlotte I-Hall, St. Mary's Co. Md.
'Thce Saturday Evoning Post, Philoidelphis, will ipublishl tie
above, and soi d thie account to this office.
L 1 EONARDTOWN RACES.-The Fall meeting of
the Leonardtown Jockey Club will contimmence oil 'ues-
day, th<27th of September next, and continue three days.
Ft-rst Day.-Purse $250-3 mile heats, free for any h. min. or
g. in the United States.
-Second Day.--Purse .i1iOO-mile heals, best three in five,
confined to horses raised anid owned in this county.
Third Day.-Purse $150-2 mile beats, free for any horse,
except the winner of the first clay.
By order of tlie Stewards:
TI-IOS. H. MILES, Secretary.
aug 20-Iaw3wv
THE LAW OF DISCOVERY, by James Wig-
rain, ome of His Majesty's Counsel.-The above
work is contained in ai complete and perfect bforin in the August
number oftihe Law Library, which is day received by F. TAY-
LOR. The 'ITratise is published (so .as to be bound separately
if required) wiltI tile page, notes, index, aippeuldi:a, &e. ; thus
furnishing to subscribers of the Law Library, for-about 45 cents,
a work of which thIe cost, in the couinmon fbrm, is nearly $3.
The same number of the. Law Library contains the conclusion
of Binghaunm on the Law and Practlice of Judgments and Exe-
cutions." Thie Law Library is issued in large monthly nunm
bears for St0 per annum, and furnislhes for that sum nan amount
of legal master whlichi, in thie usual law book form, would cost
about $Jo0. It will be safely forwarded to snypert of lie United
States, ifapplieatioun be mnade to F. TAYLO at Ihie WVaverly
Cir culating Libraury, iumtncdlielv east oft Gulbiy'A,. Ilhotl.
aug 12


P Uf ILIC SAlE.-Intending to remove to his farin in
.. Illinois, file subscriber will oiler for sale, at t10 o'clock, on
-. .-*. ',i 26.h -.i, .,, i, the well-knaown -.'. ... .|.
', t- t -', -in P. ,,.,: ,h .oariunty, Virginia, lying within
three miles of the Potomnac river, and W within half a mile of the
canal leading to it. The farm contains :..:,.::-; about 200
cleared, of which there are upwards of "- a.: .: of first-rate
meadow land in timothy, clover, and corn, seldom if ever ex-
celled. The' improvements are a Dwelling House, with eight
rooris, two cellars, kitchen, laundry, dairy, meoat-houses, &e.;
Ihree other Dwelling Ilouses for overseer, &Rc., Barn, Stabling
lbr twelve horses, Corn Houses, Carriage House, Blacksmith
Shop, and Granaries. On tihe said land there is a Saw-mill, on
thIe well-known stream Neabsco, well situated for custom to
keep it well employed, wih thie timber oin hie land. There is
also an abundance of fruit and good springs of water. Thie pro-
prietor would invite ithie attention of capitalists to the Slate
Quarry recently opened by him, as he knows this can be made
a profitable business ; none split better, anid none. are more du-
rable. Thie subscriber lies invented a machine which is wink--
ed by-water power, and at one-third of thee usual expense, by
which the slate is squared better than it can be done by hand,
and can be sold in time District and surrounding country cheaper
-than any other that can be brought into the market. This, with
the advantages of thIe Potomac river, renders thie Quarry an ob-
ject worthy ofthe attention of capitalists. Those who are do-
-sie-on of enrvxin" in thi-. business are referred for tle quality
ri A. I.. .,. :1 t .,,,: .1 ,,,.: with his slate on MI r.,Brown's ta-
i vt, i t, ,1h... :, .., & c.. i, p, ,,i t.l ., .\ .- ,,,i..,W\ .,,,h-
,m" f ., itf '**' ,,,,A.l *- r.l l. i -' A 1 i.. :, M .. ,
He will sell his Household Furniture, Stock, fouryolke Oxen.
-milch Cows, fat Cattle, 'young stock, five Horses, Farimning
Utensils, &c. &c. Any person wishing to purchase w-ill do well
to examine the property, as it is thought it will not sell fir half
its value, and they cannot help being pleased withiit, if they
want a healthy, pleasant, and productive situation.
All will be sold, without reserve, on the day of sale, if fair;
if riot, then the sale will take place on the next fair day, provi-
ded the property is not disposed lof by private contract before.
Sterns accommodating, and made known at tire sale, which
will take place en thle premises.
WILLIAM WAITE,-
aug 17-eots Neabsco.
VW RUSTEES' SALE.-By virtue. of a decree of the
.-1 Chancery Court of Maryland, the subscribes, as Trustees,
will offer at public sale, on Thursday, the Ist day ofrSeptember
next, at the residence of Mr.-Joseph N. Burch, sen. in Prince
George's county, at 12 o'clock M. a tract or pareel of LAND,
lying and being in Prince George's county, which was hereto-
fore, by deedl bearing date the 5th day of-May, 1830, conveyed
by the said Joseph N. Burch, sen. to a certain WilliamL. Htdg-
son, in tinust, for certain purposes di.. :;i [-....i;.-.-.:i, hi.: said
parcel of land comprising part of 7...:, 1 i ,.. .:.r I ..-., i:. wit:
a tract of land called the Enlargement of the Mill Damn," with
the water-mill thereon, containing fourteen acres and an eighth
of an acre; part of his "Lordship's Kindness," containing-two
huicidrd and thirty seven acres; .- ..r i.. aji,.. F.. i
containing sixty-three acres; a track i .:.i 1 .: '.i .: 'lt, .."..
... i;,-. ... houndlred and forty acres ; a trat :( '. Mll
I'm'. it r. ,,. ..i," fiflty-eiglht and three-quarters *.:i-: ; a I.-l
of land not named, containing seven and a quarter acres ; r .,
not named, containing fourteen acres a part of tle "Widow?'s
ITrouble," containing two hundred and fifty acres of land ; and.
a part of a tract of land called Joseph and Anne," containing
forty acres and a quarter ; the whole containing eightsmndred
and twenty-four acres and three-eighths ofan acre, more or less.
Also, an undivided nmoiety of a. parcel of land, a part of three
traicits of land called "Joseph and Aine," "Hazardand Pre-
vention," and "Inclosure," containing two hundred and eighty-
.ixacres and an eighth of an acre. Also, several valuable ne-
groes.
Terms ofsale.-The negroes will be sold for cash, to be paid
on thIe clay of sale, or ratification thereof by the Chancellor.
The lands will be sold oni the following terms : One-third of the
purchase money to be paid on tise day of ,, -: ..i A .Ii:.,.i:
thereof-by thie Chancellor, one-third in sixm nr,,hl:, i.-I\ ,l. lv-
lance in twelve months, from ithe day of sale, 0..; -u-. I :.:;, -. -
ing bonds or notes, with security, to be approved by tbe Trus-
tees, f,, p..0",,... .",' ,.: "i-' chase money, with interest front tihe
dcay of i i.------ ...... A. t. .o
perty 1h:I- .,--------- -------- iu,,.I
J.im IF "N J I_\1- 1 ,
S. SOMERVILLE PINKNEY,
ng 8-Sawtd Trustees.
A-imcricau Life ftlsutraiitce andl Trust Company.
OFFICrES-No. 136 Baltimore street, Baltimore; and corner
of Wall and Broad streets, New York.
AGo1Ncv--Pennsylvauia Avenmue, opposite Filler's Hotel, and
two doors from the Buildicigs occupied by the Treasury Depart-
men t, Washington city.
CAPITAL $2,000,000.
PATRICK MACA[TLAY,- President, Baltimore.
MORRIS ROBhINSON, Vice President, New York.
ONEY received daily on deposit, on which interest will
be allowed, payable semui-annnally. Thle Company also
insures lives, grants annuities, sells endowments, and executes
trusts.
Rates of Inssranc for S100, at the following ages :
Preminmt Preliusnm Premiutm
Age. for one year. for seven years, for whole life.
25 1.o00 1.12 2.04
30 1.31 1.36 2.36
35 1.35 1.53 2.75
40 1.69 1.83 3.20
50 1.96 2.00 4.60

Applications, post paid, may be addressed to PATRICK
MACAULAY, Esq., Presidcnl, Baltimore; or MORRIS RO-
BINSON, Esq., Vice President, New York; to which iiime-
dliate attention will be paid.
Applications may also be made personally, or by letter, post
paid, to FRANCIS A. DICKINS, Agent for the -Company in the
City of WAsHMG-roNr. His office is in Pcnnvslvania avenue,
opposite Fuller's Hotel, and two doors from the buildings occu-
pied by the Treasury Department. aug 3
f-ARPE'UTJGS, RUGS, CURTAIN ORNA-
%t AENTS, &c.. &c-The subscribers having entered
largely into the Carpet and House Furnishing trade, will re-
ceive by the 20th August, a splendid assortmetnt of the follow-
ing, in part, vie.
4,500yards super Brussels Carpeling
6,500 do do Ingrain do
3,500 do Venetian do to match
125 hImperial Rungs
150 Wilton do
50 Tufled do
800 yards Green Floor Clolh
000 do Figured do do
100 pieces Damiask Moreens
100 do Cnrial hMuslins
And a great variety of rich Curtais Ornaments, Bindings,
Laces, Fringes, &c. &c.
The. above goods will be sold unusually low, and we invite
customers to call and examine. I
aug 5-3taw6w BRADLEY & CATLETT.


ffONPE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.-
S Broke jail at Leonardto aivn, St. Mlary's Counity, Maryland,
on ithe night of the 15th August, ALEXANDER YATES, who
was Ilhre confined oln a conviction of murder in the second de-
gree, sand sentenced to tme penitentiary fisr fourteen years. The
said Alexander Yates is about six feet high, stoops in the shoul-
ders, and limps im tihe right lelg ; his right anrm is nearly useless,
having been much injured. The subscdbrier will give tie above
reward, and all necessary expenses paid, if delivered to him at
Leonardtown mor the penitentiary of thime Stale of Maryland.
GEO. H. MORGAN,
aug 20-2aw4w Sherillff of St. Mary's County.
O 1NE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.-Ran-
Y away from the subscriber, in Washington cotmnly, Virgi-
nia, on Saturday night, the 28th of May last, a nogro boy named
ADAM, or, as he .called himself, WATSON, about thirty years
old, black complexion, about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, thick
lips, quick spoken, rather a coarse voice, short face, low fore-
head, and weighing about 170 pounds,* He had on wvhein lie left
u blue broad cloth suit of clothes. It is probable that hlie is in
possession of -free papers, and will change his name ; lie can
read printing.
It is believed that this boy, the night before he ran off, stole
from Mr. Jamues DnAnison, of myneighborhood, a dark bay horse,
about 16 hands high, black [iance and tail, onei white hind foot,
(believed to be the right,) with a white spot upon his back about
the size of a dollar, and seven years old last spring. It is likely
that lie wentoll'upon this lorse. A reward of $20 will begiven
for i etnruing tlie liorse.
A day or two before Adoan ran off, a man by the name of Isaac
luht'on left .this neighborhood, as lie said, for Alabama,. but, from
circumstances which have come. to my knowledge, I think it not
improbable thai tHutton took another course, and took Adam with
him. Said Ilumtton is about feet high, 22 or 23 years of age,
slender form, and is itmuch addicted to drunkhciness anid gambling.
Tie above reward of St00 will lie given for the apprehension
and delivery of Adam to tme ; also all reasonable expenses for
bringig hig m i home, or 8100 for securing himn in jail so that 1
get him again. I will also pay thie reward of $20 for the delive-
ry of Mr. DeBnison's iorse.
ROBERT MEEK,
july 29--w2 im Washington county, Va.


a 1n BAILTINMORc AN
rm~j ION RAIIII.ItOil
-% ...' .- 0-` P ..t.,,r. -,. r
and for the convenience(
S lers, the arrangement
effect on the 20th instant has been revolt
therefore, depart fi-m this city as heretofor,
At HALF-PAST TWO o'clock A. M., at
P.M.

9M a I FOR QNORPOLK.-
I LUMIBIA, Captain James Mi'
placed permanently on the route between tli,
bia and Norfolk, will leave Washington eve
day at II o'clock, A. M. and, returning, will 1
Wednesday and Sunday at 3 o'clock P. M.
Passage and Fare $5. "
Freight destined to-Petersburgh or Riclin
for .at the time of shipment. I
CANAL LINE BETWEEN 1M
.. AND TIE WEST.r-Umlited St.
Lilme.- The Packet Boats i-un between Goee
hem dstown daily, Sundays excepted. Hour of
A. Mi. Fare through, $3;. intermediate dio
tion. /
Stages, in connexion witli l..: I. ,i ; .ii/i
thie boats at Georgetown A. I ,,. ", \--t
for Up:isseni ern ot mt|e pu-,.. ifpin hI.,t, I., an(
min "' l''.,I .. h----r,h:'Irac

N II,. : l i..... i.. .. li ,,, I..,,. 1 '..-
r. A ** *.-**. ,..- A it., li-u-. .11 iti,- them
iAte.ilue-pointS, See tile Comnpany's cards and
inments. J. I. STUL
,may 20-d6m I
9IT'UMINOUS COAL LAND F i
S body of about 4000 acres of bituminous
muncommon advantages both aur the coal andu i(
situated in Franklin township, Bradford council
sylvania, on thle Schrader or middle branclh o
about seven miles from its confluence with thi.
the Susquehannah, and about fifteenmiles fi
county town; fronm careful exploration, about
land is estimated to be coal land. Several drift;
ed, and the coal found lo be of the best quali
coke eqiuai to that of any .-:I;:I. .:..- h t s slm
Ore, ofseve. ,J II,.. .-,.- .- .- i,. argil
of iron, of i I,,.l.. h .. i abed of first-rate .
tpon good grounds, .lo lie co-extensive with itl
is found upon this property; as also fire-clay,
rpte rock, tnuch valued for hearth stones, an
and for mill stones. There is good bottori lan
'aloug theu Scrader Branch, and a large pr6poro
getd quality for cultivation, and throughout ths
dance of excellent timber, consisting of whitt
of thie.finest description -rock oak, chestnut, hien
The stream affords numerous sites for vate
from tlIe formation ofthe beds, may be brought
-. : 8 : .- 1 .
fii- h i n.:,,, .-, umxarkuhc '. i-i- [. | -, i|,i ,,i l.-
tl-. w hole line ofinterii, i ii., ,., .. ..,it- i.:.1', i,5 1
De fully opened to thlie productions, of.the dish
proveromenus of Pennsylvanuia, -the' continuatic
Branch Canal to Ihie.New York State line havir
for at the recent ses: IL ,i ff i- I.[:. -, ,1:,.]
been obtained forsa ] .,.... i:t-ou iln. a.4 i .-. l1
vey lbr the gr( .. [.,-i ,:.e'i. r....., ,,c J
of it near the ,,inir .I,:',.J L.-.. -J-,
been ascertained that the ground is peculiarly I
purpose, and that it may be effected at a ve
pense.
SPersons wishing to view these lands, canmsh
ance by applying to Eliphalet' Mason, Esq.,.
within F-,- -i,:l. ...rrl,,-- ;. ..
A lix ,.. ,..: p, ..r.-,l.. til fll I---..- A I-'i
i: Ljj M L N % F '
Ajuihy K-- 1 'o ill'..I C ,.. ,

,%LTIN; .\Il) BRELA I'NP. C;
l-S;_ t CN i FOR L.EA-E OR _.LO
'1" 1 in,,, 1 ,' I I -" .,..l. 1iI L Z [ 11 1 L m I
.... .. .ui. ,... i3,.m..... -
.it. i-.,- ----it-_A i.I.
I.- ., i .'1 r', IA-l',.l 'l ,,r i, .:,.",-
mu.,. u --ur I"i~,' J, ul., 0 i
".easter.- --: -,-, .-. -.i -.... I ,I- ih. --L. i,. ,,',. (-,",-
deep navigation and secure lurIarbr ofalredEr.sle,
alituhe below the navy yard of tdie United State
The lot forms the northeast corner of square
the plat of the city, firontis upon thie caunal basin (i
twIenty feet, and, at a right angle, extends wes
dred feet to thIe western extremity of the lot.
mnlts consist of an excellenttw-o-story brick hoi
a brick, and, in part, slated brewery, iualtiig,
offices; extensive arched cellars, cooper's sliot
ing room, &c. which exted thle leigtill of ie i'
basin, and along the south side to the western te
lot. The buildings are now capable of brewing,
fourteen thousand bushels of barley annually, ae
increased. The coppers will each boil effnear
aind all the plant, being in a good state, within t
preparations, may be ready for comnuencing bst
ginning of the approaching season. There is
more eligible situation for an extensive bnsine.
mlication by river, canals, and railroads in ev
Persons desil eus of entering into such a busint
visit thIe premises, so that further amplificaiou i:
and they will them form their own opinion. .
elativee to tie bmsilness cal be obtained on appli
CLEMENT
N. B. Pu-rsons desirous of making amn ivestinl
somee other arrangement for conducting the busi
bably have their views served by coninmmunicati
immmedialely.
aug 22-2aw3w (Globe)
L AND FOR SALE.-The subscriber r,
tarm onua which lie resides, lying between
and Washington railroad and Baltimore and 1A
pike road, 22 miles from Baltimhorc and 12'frl
containing abont 150 acres, most of which is of'
well adapted to plaster and the growth of tob;
grass. The situation is elevated, agreeable, an,
improvemente s consist of a comfin-rtable brick dl
other necessary buildings for conveni-ence or co
Also, a small farmn of about 150 acres, lying
the.above ; most of which is fertile, well adapt
tile growth of flue yellow tobacco, grain, and i
proveunments on this Iarm consist of a small frai
a large new tobacco house.
Persons disposed ho purchase are invited to c
scriher, Iwho will show the lands to. those who
then,.
If tihe above property isnotdisposed of at pri
Tuesday, the 27th, September next, it will th
public sale at the'first named place, at 12 o'clo
will be accommodating, and made known oi thf
HENRY CULVE
aug 19-eots
0'1EW BOOKS.-Elkswatawa, or The
X 'West, a tai sisCthe frontier.
Also, The Old World and New, or A Journ
and Observationes made on a tour in Europe, by I
Dewey, are this day received, for sale by F. T
Wavmcrly Circulating Library, immediately eC
Hotel.
'N OTICE.-All persons to whom JOiN B.
I e debted oil thie 8th of August, 1831, and xN
ceive a proportion of thIe effects in Ihe hands of
and sign hi; release, according to the terms of I
to tine, are requested to place their claims, dul3
iu thIe hands of the subscriber, on or before.ith
tober next. W. C. OB
july 30-eo4w
%ThOVERNESS WANTED.-Tho su
J to employ in hec family, a young lady wl
to give instruction in the various branches of an
tiho, Music, aocd Drawing. To one with these-
desirable situation, witlm a liberal salary, now al
dress thIe subscriber at Upper Marlborouglh, I
County, Maryland. MARY ANN i
P. S. Satisfactory referenees are required.
july 8 -2awtf
CIHALMENGE BLACKING.-Just
'a' quantity of flesh Challenge Blacking, wh
superior to any thing of tis kied ever offered
Public. It is an effectual preservative of the lea
witul infinitely loss than th'e usual labor, a dry,
hiot jet polish.
T'le decided preference shomen by all waio
sa[lhicient proof oftifs great superiority. A slog
vince tIme most scrunpuius, and isrove its ,seper
Mecrcf'emts, taverm-keepers, and others, supp
fuucttrer's price, l'y his special appooited agent,
aug 19 (Tel.) X
1 OR SALE, a large biown HORSE, y
a- accustomed to work im double or sing
match to.him offers, this ow'er would purcliasa
atL. Pnoplihirec's stable on C sheet.


.,-Ys~acc~as~-zi~9~i~r~-an~sMr;j;rurib~; ;I~aYF~PY~;;(~-~i~LS~Y111~%*;L~ih~4Bt~j Y~S_~Z-CI~Ci~ii5i~:~?ii~iiliCIU~i~-4~2 -----~-~------i~T -~~.










2ak- Au.ehe d;br.n.m-n i .oibarmy in the spring, nearly
iil h i l tjl| ,Th I:,r,, i 'm.-t Florida beyond the vicinity of
COMMUNICATION- in ,at .-',r% ,,-e abandoned to the Indians. Since
lthe lst of May, they have been at.intervals extending their
is. EDnITos: Whilethe public mind is so intent ravages to with 0 miles of TallatHassee, and in all Middle
eventful scenes in Texas, while the public presses Florida the only troops to oppose them in the field (except
emt the Union are teeming with notices of the about 130 regular troops at Old Town; on the Stiwannee).
tat region, and the sympathies of all are enlisted are the vituperated Florida militia. Each day are these
itical struggle in a foreign dominion, it is most men traversing the wilds and swamps of their extensive
to witness the indifference and apathy evinced to- country, subjecttothcedailyalterhationsofasummersunand
s unfortunate inhabitants of Florida, an integral drenching rains, following the phantom-like steps of their
ur own nation, engaged in a doubtful struggle wily foe, and doomed to lie only certain of their presence
avae foe. in witnessing the ruin they have caused. Day after day
trds'Texas all eyes are turned; in its cause are all are they pained to see the liboi' settlers reluctantly retiring
raised ie its defence all arms efilisted, and to its from the fields they ventured to cultivate at the constant
hei puro'; of all seem spontaneously to open. No peril of their lives, but whose harvests they at last despair
i i' ,o-;reat to stop the warlike tide which is flow- of gathering. Every day is the position becoming more de-
ail -quarters to its relief; no season is deemed too populated and difficult of defence ; while the few resolute
i'ds'to delay its defenders. A .crusade has gone men who still hold on to their possessions do so more from
linst the Mexicans, and in behalf of adventurers a spirit of hardihood and from the point ofhonor than fron
in' a revolutionary struggle in a foreign country ; any well-founded hope of ultimate safety.
ir own citizens, cultivating their own soil, which During this same period, too, this section of the country
ve purchased from their own Government, are has been constantly menaced by inroads of savage infuni-
"ioticed while contending for their property and atedCreeks,strugglingtoescapeintoFloridatojointhcSemt-
es, in the very territory of the United States. To- inmoles; and frequently have our harassed volunteers been
'lorida no volunteers are yet marching, although obliged to march into Georgiato oppose these new enemies.
ians, passing the feeble cordon" which our Gen- And when it is borne in mind that all this duty falls up-
-med adequate to their occlusion, are spreading on a population in the whole not equal to that of a single
ves through the sparse settlements, and carrying county in several of the States-upon a few whites enga-
'vastation. and death in their paths. The health ged in the labors of the field, and embarrassed with a large
citizen soldiers are too precious to be risked in a colored population, who can add nothing to their active
Campaign in Florida 1 force; when it is recollected that this population is sparsely
Ie hundreds of horseless, naked wretches, our own scattered over an extensive region, every where offering
driven from their homes, bereft of every thing, swamps and thickets, deemed heretofore impenetrable, save
hsisting on the charity of the few remaining settlers, by Indians or wild beasts, and which nothing but an in-
the bounty of the Government, a prey to that dis- donitablo spirit, prompted by the principles of self-preser-
at the effect of climate, but of poverty, of broken vation, could induce the white man to penetrate; when all
of squalid wretchedness, we hear of no meetings these circumstances are regarded, and thal thus far so ex-
o contributions raised, to alleviate their sufferings. tensive a frontier has been guarded, and not abandoned,'
telescopic" humanity can discern no object beut then the nation Will be able'to do justice to these neglected
h the medium of distance; our exotic feelings are and abused citizens ofFlorida.
ive to the interests of strangers, of aliens ; our phi- And now, sirs, if it be asked what has caused this disas-
'py is so expansive that it deals not with cases ofdo- trous state of things; why, after the Executive and Con-
misery i T o gress have made'suchc ample provision for our defence,
te political struggle in Texas our people are voln- we are still thus exposed, the cause is to be found in the
"tors, or deeply ait..-." --, cIa. ,u,-. idnd Santa failure of our Generals ; in the disbanding of the Army,
nd the Mexicans ai. 1. an.:,I .w.I ,.l ,i-.- by eve- and closing the campaign in April, through fear of the dis-
rm of opprobrium ani lil., put ih ,. .a ,. Florida eases of the climate.
red with the listless idiffierence of a scenic rcpre- Now, sirs, I aver that, up to this date the Floridas, gone-
on-as an arena, wherein the savage Oceolais view- rally, have been as healthful, so far as regards diseases
h complacency or admiration, in his contest with our of climate, as the greater part of the Middle and Southern
SGenerals, and where the spectators, with the char- : States of this Union. Such I know to be the case in Mid-
tic liberality of a Spanish assembly at a bull fight, dle Florida; and as to the diseases which have been report-
le part of the brute against the man, and the con- ed in East Florida, they have not been diseases of the cli-
)f the former over his human victims is greeted with nate, but of accidental circumstances. They have been
s" of applause. Christian men and soldiers in Mex- caused by the very errors, in our military operations, of
*uol and perfidious though they be) are degraded into which we complain; by forcing the troops, and the mise-
ers, while in Florida savage miscreants are elevated able inhabitants, to be cooped up in crowded stockades and
heroes. This Oceola, a petty chief of a petty clan; block-houses, frequently suffering for needful supplies. Po-
re in his origin, mean and contemptible in his early verty an4 want have been here, as elsewhere, the parents
e, and who has only risen into notice bs one signal of pestilence. But if the troops had been in the field, all
perfidy, cruelty, and ingratitude, is held up as the experience has proved that they might have preserved their
hiplar," the abstract" of the heroic and savage vir- health. It is confinement, and not action, which has caus-
ed disease.
is are the honest feelings of the Public diverted The remedy for this state of things was obvious, anid
I from cases of real domestic distress, their aid and clearly pointed out by our energetic and intelligent Execu-
.thiegall absorbed in a foreign quarrel, and heir judg- five, and received the sanction of the President of the Unit-
perverted by the substitution of idle romance for so- edStates. It was to march ale army into the nation, when
story; and it is because my fatellow-citizens in Florin th e Indians were knovn to have been engaged, with their
.the immediate sufferers from this Texan mania, and families around them, in cultivating their' corn. For this
character of the nation for justice and good faith service only 1,000 men were asket, out of Florida, and
y impeached, that I have directed my pen against so in addition to the regular troops and militia in the country.
a geantl annourcaseis still worse; not onlyarethe All experience has shown that the only sure way ofdofend-
,of Florida'thus deprived s s thl sympathy and aid a frontier against Indians is to carry on an offensive
e a lrih t- depre d aid war into their own country. Here, with the force asked
iave a right to expect-not r'- are they treated for and promised, Governor Call would have been able to
Indifference-they are actually maigned and calum- engage and to defeat the Indians- to destroy their crops,
I in themr distress. capture their fa.. mies, and force them to subuitet
e denunciation's ofa baffled General, smarting under caBuretheir families, and forces have been exsubmiected for mo
ed censure, they could endure; for when was it oth- than although these troops heavy e been expetir advancor The
e than that mortified vanity sought to find an excuse phantom of disee auntsevenher of their inatons; and while
a own failures in the imputed misconduct of others? Phantot of ,disia"se auntss their inagitations; -and while
o.w fa .re na e m s uct of the people whose cause they have volunteered to defend,
Public can always rightly appreciate recriminations haveto enc ter these dreaded perils of disease i an -
such sources. Moreover, the extraordinary versave t encounter thes dreaded perls of seseinan ac-
sufhsources. o Ma oreoveri tne extaordinary versa- cumulated degree1 from their increased labor and exposure,
of this commander in taking back these charges and and while braving also the more formidable savages, these
nationss when their truth was challenged, and, after a our promised defenders, will not march to our relief until a
al attack upon the volunteers ofthree States and on shall have disarmed this invisible ideal enemy of its
Territory, in making the amended to all but thie terrors
xhibitd n himself sumoved h a degree of inconsiderate- And when before was ever a small and gallant popula-
md levity as removed all weight from his censure tion left to encounter such real dangers, through the mere
t, from whatever cause, the same imputations are apprehension of disease? When before did a nation aban-
by otherssbl, and istbuis to vinde pubicate mndy feltlowha-citizenus, on any portion of its people or territory even to tempo-
le yoss with this piece. Wereb taunted in our thdus- rary conquest by an enemy, much less to actual destruc-
Is you with this piece. We are tainted n our de tion, because of.the dangers of a summer sun ? The situa-
s in 4th of July t,:. :. d elewher., and sneeringly tion of Florida at this moment is a signal disgrace to the,
to fight our ona y- ,l' h t.o re w .:dl upon .others nation, and to the chivalry of its citizens. The Executive
s stremarknc. adbythose who nothing and Congress have made every provision for its defence;
of the mattkser or who, knowing the truth, wilfully the People of the United States, and those charged with
ofthe matt, or who, knowing the truh wilfully the application of the public means), have not seconded
rt it. At what period of the war have not the People their intentions.
orida been fighting their own battles? Correctly Almost on the borders of Florida, a large, regular and-
.ing, the battle s wre not their own, for the war was volunteerforce, principally relieved from the engagements
eir own. The war in its origin was a national war, volunteer
S oentin of w rhih the People of Florida ad not of thie Creek war, part of them raised for 'the defence of
3 fomenting of which the People of isdirection Florida, rest on their arms until a frost shall remove all
'ast agency; and yet, by the waste and mnisdirectioni danger of sickness.
e ample means entrusted to officers of the Federal Why does not the fear of disease stop the volunteers now
rinment, after a niscrahie exhibition of feeble and recklessly rushing into Texas? Will anyman hazard the
ive measures by ael the Generals in he field except assertion that Florida is less salubrious than Texas? Must
eglectetlinch, and after theenemyhasthusbecome we conclude that as our nation is charged with the lust of
riened by success,and the battles all our own. Their own truly foreign acquisition or conquest, our people are only active
rtief wr astn sthne bdthtl Fle ori olu teisr onw in the cause of humanity when this influence it reinforced
in the first instance, led the Florceida volunteers into b y the promise of reward-2by thepromised bounty of Loands
old self-preservation must now for hem to bear the held forth to the Texan volunteers'? Here unfortunately the
of the not be misunderstood. I mean notGovernment neglected to offer any such bounty, and thus,
rt monot be misunderstood Inl mean not to reflec in violation of thelaws of their country, and of its neutral
our gallant little army now in Florida. They ave obligations, the People are volunteering for Texas; but
acted, and will continue to act, with their character- obligations, the People are vol en steering for T exeas;put
malor. But they are dispersed and broken up into with the invitation of a lawof Congress to that effect, they
smalL detachments that they have barely force to pre- hesitate or refuse to engage for Florida.
theirpositions, without the ability to pursue and drive In concluding this long piece, I have only to disclaim all
the predatory bands of savages that are spreading personal or party feelings, and to rest my apology for any
e through tbhe country, and marking the irs edo supposed undue severity of remark upon classes and indi-
vastation and death. viduals on the actual state of suffering and deep wrongs of
omit noticing any earlier instances of the valor of my friends and neighbors, caused by the measures I have
ar troops in Florida, I need only mention their con- ventured to criticize.
n the sortie from Miceianopy,.under the lamented Col One explanation is yet to be made, which is, to except
man, when they defeated superior force of the I our neighbors of Thomas and Lowndes counties in Geor-
,xhibiting what they can do, whenproperly co- gin, f the charge of insensibility to, or neglect of, our
t .*h condition in F lorida. They haveiver been prompt and ready
t, to return from this digression, I ask again in what to cross the borders, and assist us in our difficulties, when-a
a have the citizens of Florida not borne their part 7, ever allowed a respite from watching the Creeks whose fugi-
tey marched with the gallant Clinch in the first ad- tive bands, when escaped from the Creek arnty, have been
a on the enemy, after shedding their blood on the more than once gallantly encountered and defeated by
That a larger portion of them were not actually in themI.
ght wilh the regulars, was not their fiult, but owing A Citizen of Middle Florida.
aident, to the force of circumstances. That a portion AUGUST 8, 1836.
em rendered most important aid in the fight, no one
eny. A large body of volunteers (for this popula- fl"ANCING AND WALTZING ACADEMY AT
were in the field under Major General Scott, and CARUSI'S SALOON.-L. CARUSI, having been
hey were not in battle was not their fault, but because solicited by a great number of families to spend pa t of his
were under the command of Major General Scott, tima in the District, for the purpose ofteaching the delightful.
by a strange fatality, fought no battle in Florida. sence of DANCING, respectfully anuns to the cities of
iatl thebobkus intei comce, t Genieralt has to their requests, (wich are commands to him,) and as so en
Smen, with their intrepid officer, that General has Saloon for instruction ma, and Cotillion Parties, ion first
nced, while the two commanders of the regular army, M onday in October next.on
whose divisions they acted, have publicly borne testi- Long experience has given to L. Carusi. a thorough know-
to their efficiency and good conduct, ledge of all the tact necessary to render a teacher pre-emi-
ey were Florida men, who.volunteered.tomestablish a "nent in his proression,-and the power to communieate his
and to furnish supplies to General Scott on the Wyth- knowledge with ease and pleasure to hais scholars. He will
hee; and who, when left alone in the heart of the teach Dancing, Waltzing, Gallopades, Hop Waltz, Spanish
n nation, by the sudden and unaccountable retreat Dances, Reels, &c. &c. in end quarter, for the moderate sum of
disbanding of the army, in April, gallantly defended twelve dollars per quarter.
erablo blockhouse, forweeks, against the whole powir It is desirable that the scholars should join the schooll as soon
enemy. And it was a small band of Florida volun- as possible, that they may be prepared tfor the Cotillion and pri-
who, when they were left destitute of all othor sue- vateparties of the coming season.
nd against every calculation of success, nobly relieved Priite Ba lls wcu be bagivel thronigh the quarter, to which tmhe
;6o fthep iru cupdlisnPrivate lessons wi ll be given by Il. Crsi Io ladies and gen-
t now, at this moment, when $his nmuchi-lauded ni toletn, either adt the Sateon or at their dealing, as tley iacy
'cordon" of General Scott is proved powerless to keep desire.n e In vi also devote a portion of is tiei to iving in-
emye confined when the brave regular troops are trietious in ithe Academiesof the District. ,
.sariln y cooped up in their stockades, surrounded by The Saloons are now undergoing thorough repair, and
ns, t is the Florida volunteers who are relied upon smeh alterations as have been suggested, for oeniror, and eon-
1p open the communication between those posts, to venieonce, end will be beautif"ully and appropriately ornamented
escorts for their supplies, and to chase away the wtli classic evonbellishmients. They will shmrtly be in readiness
Ltory murdering bands from their owt fire-sides, to let to public and private parties, concerts, &c. on thime most
Ssreasonables terms. aug 27-eotf.
ad here I cannot avoid exhibiting the conduct of Colonel pafctinby a graduate of the
nan in bright contrast with that of a popular General in jrANTED, a atiraPial of anUnivershyofDublin- s
la, who, with an army large enough to most and overcomrn a Ireland, a sitmittlon as Principal of an Academy, or tutor o
bined force of the Indians, suffered hsnslf to be cooped n private family. ne is copete"l t to A lirepare yooeg gntlhe- e
1 besieged, in his fortified camp, in an open wood, to bse fr fer adision into any of thti American Coliegee, ant also
braved and insulted, end nearly starved, by the very en- Latim Coin atg i nous. lls staiEnglshr iau ts Gren the rimst w


assess the Indians, for some perfidious purposes, held ott ill s toelaso i It one iii i e Ills
of accommodation, (not of subntissioa s which thay never- reoommendations hor morality willalso be found unexceptionable.
ed to fulfil, the affair ebruited aboutssasplendid achieve- Any eommunicatlons ailddressed through the Post Office to X. Y.
the General retires from the field with a flourish oftrum- \Vashington City, D. C. will be immediately attended to. c,


nIming nimselt upon having brought the war to a close aug2-- oo t
* was thero so arrogant, so unfoundeda pretension; never FOR CHARLESTON.-The splendid new f
ere seen so ltamn and impotent conclusion, after so vaunt- packet brig, GEN. PINCKNEY, Capt. Lewis Ford, is a
entree into lhe field, now ready to receive cargo, and will meet with despatch. For a
"Quid dignun tanto forget hie promissor hiatu?" freight or passage, having superb accommodations for 30 passen- f
Paritrifunt mionto," &c grs, apply to the captain on boird, or
i1 conduct, which had so disastrous an effect in Florida, I CHARLES GWINN, g
not to pass without comment. aug 2 7-- 7, Spear's wharf, Baltimore, cl


WASHINGTON.
6i lWtieity ari dVi Uion, now ania forever, one an1d
inseparable."

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 1836.

THE ELECTIONS.

From ALABAMA, our Election news is mor
favorable than hitherto, but not yet conclusive.
Returns from South Alabama give the follow
ing number of Members elected by each party
Whigs 43 ; Van Buren men 19. Against thesis
are 18 Van Buren men claimed, as heretofore
stated, from the four great northern counties
We have satisfactory information that two of th,
eighteen so claimed are decided friends o
Judge WHITE; and it may be that more o
them are. But, admit all the remaining sixteei
to be Van Burenites, the result of the election
for the State Legislature, as far as heard from
will stand thus :
vWHIGS. VAN BUREN.
Southern counties 43 19
Northern counties 2 16
Total, so far as heard 45 35
In ILLIN6IS, the success of the Van Burei
party, at the late election for members of -th
State Legislature, has not been so decisive a
has been boasted. The Missouri Republican
received yesterday, says that the Legislature o
Illinois,'" on joint ballpt, will be found pretty
equally divided, judging from the returns, be
tween White and Van Buren." The Republi
can then gives a table of members elect, from 2,
counties, which have chosen 35 Whigs, and 3,
Van Burenites.
From MissoURi, we have returns of the elec
tion of Governor from about two-thirds of th(
counties of the State, which exhibit a majority
in favor of Gen. ASHLEY, for Governor, but no
so large a majority as the wailings of the Globe'!
correspondents had led us to anticipate.

The tone of the communication on the con
duct of the war in Florida, which will be founm
in the preceding columns, is that of severe repre.
hension, a good deal of which we dare say ii
merited, but some part of which is, according t(
our judgment, with the lights we have, unde-
served. Much allowance must be made for th(
feelings of the writer, and much respect is due
to his personal character and his motives foi
he is, as he subscribes himself, a citizen of Flori-
da, in no way connected with the Army, but ,
sufferer in common with his fellow-citizens
whose wrongs, both real and supposed, he feel
as acutely, probably, as he paints them vividly
But, notwithstanding the influence of all these
considerations, we doubt whether we should
have given a place to his communication in oum
columns, but that the discussion of the merit oi
these campaigns had been previously opened in
this paper by the very able writer, a week or two
ago, in defence of one of our most esteemed
Captains. We regret that discussions of this
nature have sprung from differences of opinion
not likely to be reconciled, and which, we- aie
afraid, public discussion will rather aiggra-
vate than heal. It is not in our power, how-
ever, either to control events or mould public
opinion. It is one of our duties :to keep oui
readers advised of all the occurrences and inci-
dents which compose the current of daily news.
Perhaps, also, it is as much our duty to admit
into our columns, under a proper responsibility as
to facts, &c. a pretty free examination of the
conduct of public officers. Such appears to us
to be at least the duty which circumstances now
require of us in regard to these Indian wars,
their origin, conduct, and consequences.
In the case immediately before us another
consideration in favor of the free admission ol
the article is, that of the natural sensibility felt
by the writer for the honor of his fellow-citizens
of Florida, which he deems to have been assail-
ed, and the difficulty of fully vindicating them
without bringing into the discussion the merits
of those officers who have commanded in Flo-
rida, and especially of those from whom the of-
fensive imputations have proceeded.

It is stated that the revenue which has ac-
crued at the New York custom-house during
the last two quarters, exceeds nine millions oj
dollars !

Mr. CLAY being unable to attend the late
Whig Festival at Cincinnati, sent the following
toast:
The Distribution of the Surplus Revenue: Thebright-
et ray of light during seven years of political darkness. ,
NEWSPAPER CHANGE.-The establishment of the Win-
chester (Va.) Republican, (lately owned by Messrs. BROOKS
& FREE.AND) has passed into the possession of Mr. WIL-
1IAM TOWERS, by whom the paper will in future be con-
ducted. In a-well-written article, announcing the change,
and his new responsibilities to the patrons of the Republi-
can, which we find in that paper of yesterday, the new edi-
tor declares himself as an old school republican, a believer
in the political doctrines taught by those fathers ofdemoc-
racy, .JseaRSoN -and MADISON, and, as a consequenic,
promises to use every fair and honorable means to prevent
the election of Mi'. Van Buren tothe Presidential Chair.
[Baltimore Patriot.
BALTIMORE, AUG. 25.
The FUNERAL PROCESSION in honor of the late ex-Presi-
dent MAnuSoN, took place this morning. The ranks of all
professions were well filled, and the whole scene presented
one of the most impressive spectacles of the kind that we
ecollect to have witnessed in our city on any former occa-
lion. It was alike honorable to the dead and the living.
{Patriot.
PHILAnELPIA,, Att. 23.
We learn with regret that Dr. SUTHERLAND is dainger-
ously ill. Two physicians are attending him. He has
becn confined to hiL chamber since Friday of last week.
A number of the members of Congress who took an active
art in the arduous duties that marked the close of tile last
session, arc now laboring under the effects of indisposition.
We are not at all surprised at this ; for the night sessions
f the last Congress, the excitement, turmoil, and confu-
ion-to say nothing of the loss ofsleop, night after night-
vere enough to shatter the strongest constitution. In the
resent case, we feel satisfied that all parties, and especi-
Ily the constituents of Dr. S. will sincerely regret his ill-
ess.-Inquirer.


The editor of the New Hampshire Telegraph announ-
os that lie has commenced living on his own hook, and
hat lie will take all kinds of country produce in payment
ir his dues. The editor of the Methuen Gazette also
announces that he has commenced a similar mode of living,
nd will also take any kind of country produce in payment
)r his paper-except children.
At the recent commencement at Union College the de-
ree of A, M. was conferred on 71 scholars of the senior
ass,


,- i "" i i- --
SPIRIT OF THE WHIG PRESS.
I FROM TRsE _L.xANY ADVERTISER, AUGUST 23.
Our lukewarm politicians, the waiters tipomn
Providence, who have been lamenting over the
inevitable ruin of our country, and yet refused to
act like men and freemen to recover their rights
are now nobly rebuked by the efforts and the
e glorious triumph of the North Carolina Whigs.
Had they too-folded their hands, and given uip
all for lost without a struggle, ruthless proscrip-
tion and party violence would have still conti-
inued their sway in that portion of our land. .But
e unintimidated by power, unawed by menace,
e uncorrupted by the spoils, the gallant sons of
North Carolina have rushed gallantly to the
field, and with upwards of 15,000 majority
e against them, nothing daunted, contended hand
f to hand, and gloriously conquered the enemy.
)f FREEMEN OF NEW YORK, GO AND DO LIKEWISE.

rROM THE SALEM (N.J.) BANNER.
n NEW JERSEY is invariably ranked among the
States certain at the coming election to give her
.ote for Van Buren. Why this is so calculated
upon by the Whigs of other States, we cannot
perceive. A majority of the votes in New Jer-
sey has not been given to Gen. Jackson since
1824. And why they should (and they never
SWill be given to Van Buren) we cannot divine.
n It is true Jackson electors succeeded in 1832,
e ,but it was by a minority vote. It is true also,
ts that the Legislature has been of the sale com-
plexion these several years past; yet this is
Easily accounted for. The People of this State
f enot sufficiently awake to the importance of
Y 'unceasing, eternal vigilance ; they do not, as
they should, always exercise that right which is
inestimable ; in a word, they cannot every year
7 be brought to the polls. We have now in this
State a certain majority against Van Buren, and
that majority will, most assuredly, exhibit itself
at the coming contest. The State is forHARRI-
SON. Salem county will greatly increase her
e ;former majority for the Whigs.
y FROM THE BOSTON ATLAS.
t THE PATRONAGE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The
s moral sense of the country has been hitherto
shocked by the sentiment originally avowed by
-Governor Marcy in the Senate of New York,.
and since adopted as one of the rallying cries of
di the Van Buren party, that to the victors belong
the spoils." The Globe has now unblushingly
s gone beyond this, and declared that "thepa-
; tronage of the Government should be used to sus'
-i tain the Republican party." It will be under-
ei stood what the Globe means by patronage. It
el is not office alone which is intended. The co-
r, hort of office-holders is constantly filled to the
-t Utmost limits permitted by the law. The "hire-
a lings" know the tenure by which they hold their
places, and outvie one another in subserviency
to the Administration. The Globe means nothing
less than that the PEOPLE's MONEY should be exA
ended in perpetuating the dynasty of the office-
I holders; that it should be lavished for electioneer-
ring purposes, and against the People them-
Sselves-in other words, that the stewards should
dishonestly employ the money consigned to
their trust, in gaining an ascendnecy over their
masters.
The infamous sentiment advanced by the'
Globe occurs in a letter from St. Louis, the wri-
ter of which complains i atTie pafironage of the
General Government has not been used to defeat
General Ashley, the people's candidate for Gov-
ernor in Missouri, who has succeeded by more
than two-thirds of the popular vote. We have
before charged it upon the Administration that
the public money was perverted to party pur-
t poses-but this is the first time that we have
3 heard the principle daringly avowed by the lead-
ing press of the party. The plunderers of the
s Treasury mean doubtless to carry on their sys-
tem of rapine with renewed vigor, as the time
approaches when they will be thrust' out of
power. They may throw off all disguise, and
openly come forth in their true characters of
f bandits and pilferers, ready to make a desperate
t stand against those who are hurrying to the
rescue of the Constitution. But the day of re-
tribution is at hand.

FROM THE PITTSBURG ADVOCATE.
A STRANGE PARALLEL.-This caption heads
a piece published on the 16th inst. in the Unit-
ed States Gazette. Amongst the many other
good things in this effusion, is the following:
"It is remarkable how closely political errors
S'.approximate, when the circumstances of na-
'.tions are in any degree similar."
In his parallel, so little flattering to the People
of the United States, we agree with the writer in
the Gazette; but must remark, that when circum-
stances are in any near degree similar, events
must conform to their causes. One great error
was very prevalent in the United States after the
consummation of the Revolution"-and that
was, that the People were exempt from many of
indeed most of the causes of decadence, so ru-
inous in all other countries, and in all former
ages. Under the influence of this fatal error;
the Constitution was formed. Power was given
by that instrument, with not only a lavish but a
enreless hand, as it was not admitted that, in
I/;f coutmij, power could be abused. As dis-
pensed by such men as those who held the Pre-
sidential chair during most of the time between
1789 and 1829, power was not abused. A
Washington, a Jefferson, a Madison, avrd a
Monroe, used power cautiously, as a prudent
father would over his family-but the evil lay in
the Constitution, and displayed itself the mo-
ment that instrument came to be acted upon by
an incumbent who used power because he pos-
sessed power. Ifmenare disposed to eradicate
evil, they must begin by removing its cause.

The gentleman who handed us thIe subjoined copy of an
advertisement found on board tlhe steamer Mountaineer,
plying on Lake George, assured us of its accuracy in word
and letter. It is among the rarest original orthographical
curiosities we have ever seen. The writer said he had
been twenty years endeavoring to spell according to usage,
but finding it impossible to attain any decent proficiency,
lie had adopted the plan of spelling by sound, and thought
it decidedly the easiest and best.-Baot. Gaz.
SOKS RATTILL SNAIX AND A MUD TURKEY, PUR
SYTE OR SAYLE.


* The Snaix that was oaned buy the subsIcrybours is now you-
nightod into wun carryvan, and may ben scan for thee youshu-
all pryce ofsickspunts a syto fur gentelmun and wiming ; andv
childring haf pryco for admittuns. Awl them snaix was kochti
on tung mownting and are now living alive in a bocks with theo
mud turkol without notliin to eit and hoave gunod younanyinous
applause tu a man.
Thoes sod snaix wil be should hull-sayle or retail til sowt tire
cumnpany.
P. S. Pleese tu lett thee advurtyse nt stan whare it tis,


COMMERCIAL.
NEW YORK MARKET.-AUGUST
C(OYTTON.--The packet ship George Washing
yesterday from Liverpool with advices from ti
26th July, which confirm the advance previous.
Thlie sales for the week ending with the 22d July, N
bales, and on the 23d about 2,500, including Uplands
Accourits have also been received from Havre to
That market continued heavy, with a still further d(
3 ce'ntimes ; sales of the preceding week, 2,729 balh
first hands of all kinds, 58,131. Our own mark(
very languid, and a further reduction oft a cent to
been submitted to on inferior qualities ; the sales fi
23d, inclusive, amount to about 900 bales, of which
Upland, at 12 a 20b ceents, including upwards of 100
300 Florida, 135 a 20 ; 250 New Orleans, 13 a 19 ;
bile, 16 a 18+.
FLOURI AND MEAL.-Extensive purchases of %V
for the South, commencing at the close of last we
some excitement in the market, attended by an im
vance in price. The demand halis since continued
ed, and fresh common brands Canal are taken init
arrival. The sales yesterday Were at $7 75i which
vance of 50 cents since our last notice; fincy brain
tensively at $7 75, but yesterday were firmly held
via canal, sold at 87 a $7 374; the latter for good
is a further considerable advance. Southern also hl
although the sales continue limited, and are confine(
city use; C. sold at 88 25 a 88 60; He
firomWhaei, -" ", Richmend country, $7 062; a
phia, $7 874. Nothing doing in sour. Rye fli
scarce, and yesterday advanced to $5 50. Corn in
sold at 84 50, and hhds. at $20 75.
SUGAaRs.-Prices remain firm, and a fair demai
from the trade the sales embrace about 300 hhds.,
Porto Rico at 10 a 11 cents ; 50St. Cioix, 11i a 11
Muscovado, 10; -300 a 400 boxes brown Havana, 1(
common, 9 ; and 50 extra fine, 10O a 11; 65 very cc
Trinidad, 114 ; 2,000 bags Manilla, the balance of tl
short price, for export, 6 mos. ; and, by auction, 1,5
fined, 14 a 154 ; and 60 barrels brown Brazil, 9 a
white box sugars continue very scarce.

POWER, the inimitable and only true living t
presentative of Irishmen, has got back, and
fresh and youthful than ever before,, bjyhis su
journ at home. He is to re-appear at the Pai
in New York, on Monday, in the ever-favorit
ing character of the Irish Ambassador."-,
Of 229 cases of suicide in Paris during the
were fen'ales. Suffocation by the fumes ofch
most general mode used.
NtUiEKoSif, the distinguished musical profes
taken passage from Lilverpool for Boston, in tl
Jersey, and sent his luggage on board, was
stay behind from indisposition.
The State Society of the CINCINNATI of Rh
about to dissolve and divide the funds, amount
eight thousand dollars, among the heirs and
the deceased members. The society has dw
from seventy-eight to eight members.
A Good One.-A boy was asked, Does
ever change his spots "Oh yes,when he is
spot,he goes to another."
AccIBENT.-Mr. Seth Sumner, of Bowdoinliham
accidently shot in the legs a few days since by a co
whom he was out shooting pigeons. It became
amputate one of his legs, which operation he on
few hours.-

MARRIAGE.
In Warrenton, North Carolina, on the 4th
the Rev.Mr.Norwood, JOHN TAYLOR VW
Esq. United States Navy, to Miss CATHA
daughter of JAMES SOMERVILLE, Esq.
DEATHS.
On Thursday morning last, Dr. HENR
ZELL, aged 31 years, a native of Georgetbw
for several years past a resident of Mansfield,
1- Funeral this afternoon, (Saturday,) at 5
the dwelling of his father-in-law, WM. S.
Georgetown, which his friends and acquaintance
to attend, without further invitation.
On Monday evening, after a short illness
year of his age, SAMUEL MYERS, Esq.
oldest and most respectable inhabitants of Ricl

SHIP NEWS-PORT or ALEXj
AnltIVED, AUGUST 24.
Scr. Atlecandria,-'Britttn,- New-Yotk-c-sngar ai
Shinn & Co. and in. N. McVeigh, and freight fi
Stoop Friendship, Hollinger, Philadelphia; to
freight for the District.
Several bay and river craft, with usual carg(
W. and fine weather.
SAILED, AUGUST 24.
Schr. Repeater, Travers, Baltimore.
I!- Trinity Church.-The Rector of T,
having returned to the city, the Church will be
worship to-morrow, at the usual hours.
QALE BY ORDER OF INSOLVEN
7 TEE.-On Saturday, 27th August, instae
P. M. I shall at my auction rooms, by virtue of
the Hon. Win. Cranch, in the matter of Georg
insolvent debtor, as follows, viz.
Lot 15, in square south of square 562, on H st:
tween 2d and 3d streets west. .
Also, articles of personal property, consisting o
&c. &c.
Terms of sale: For the personal property, casi
tate ata credit of three and six months, for notes
eurity, bearing interest from the day of sale.
aug 6-3w&ds ED. I
RUSTEIE'S SALE OF LOTS.--
deed of trust executed by James Greer, c
1835, for certain purposes therein expressed, I s
lie auction, on Tuesday, 27th September next,
store, at 5 o'clock P. M. for cash, the following I
Lots Nos. 13 and 14, in Square 401
Lot 2, in squaree west of Square 48&
All of which are in a fast improving part ofthe
EDWAR
aug 27-2aw&ds
,' OTICE.-By virtue of two commission
i l Montgomery County Court, and to the sul
e vl,-we will proceed on Saturday, the 17th day
n'ext, at the hour of 12 o'clock M., on the prea
the real estates of which Thomas B. Offutt and S
seized, lying and being in Montgomery county,
BURGESS WILL
THOSE. S. WATKI
julyl4-2mep SAMUEL T. STO_
OVERNESS WANTED.-The su
G to'emnploy in her family, a young lady wl
to give instruction in the various branches of an
tion; Music, and Drawing. To one with these
desirable situation, with a liberal salary, now ol
dress the subscriber at Upper Marlboroughi, I
County, Maryland. MARY ANN t
P. S. Satisfactory references are required.
july 8 -2awtf
A PRIVATE TUTOR WANTED.
.t. wishes.ta employ,.nt a moderate salary,
hble of preparing boys to enter a college, and
satisfactory recommendations as to character an
situation is a pleasant and desirable one, in
about 20 miles below Washliington City, on the
For further information apply to We. L. Ba
City.
A FEMALE TEACHER WVANTE
good character, and well qualified to tea
branches of an English education, can hear of
private family by applying to W. Y. through tl
Upper Mariborougih.
CLASSICAL TEACHER WVANTI
cidpal of the classical department of my i
been chosen Principal of an academy in Alabal
gage a person well qualified to teach the Latin
guages, to fill the situation thus nmadeo vacant. I
of students now in Horace, Tacitus, and Ci(
and in IIbhibr, Sophocles, Euripides, &c. and
son need apply for the situation except lie is qu
idl' thle highest authors read in our colleges, has
experience ia teaching and governing, and i
himself exenlusively to the profession of teachlii
son would find a pleasant and permanent situ
receive a liberal salary. A single man would I
convenienat arrangements could be made tfor one
Applicatiois may eh mdc (i f by letter posta
24th of thib 9th month, (September,) and they
panited hyyuaoxccptionalilc evidence of chara
explerieoice ii tecliinig; and it is desirable t


contain a brief statement of the views of tile
subject of government, where educated, his a;
a family, the compensation expected, and any i
that might have reference to the subject. A
view with the applicant, either at the time of al
quently, would, however, be greatly preferable
The appointment will be made on tho 24th <
(Septembler,) and it is wished that the person c
ter upon his duties immediately thereafter.
BENJAMIN HAl
Alexandria Boarding School, 8th I
aug 20-faw4wop











OLIJ CTO1'S SAtE OF CITY LOTS FOR TA.X]8.
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE OF THE 5TH AND 6TH WARn,
.Washington, August 26, 1836.
r,. She 26tb day of November, 1836, I shall proceed to sell at Public Sale, at the City Hall, in the
rton, the following described property, or such part thereof, not less than half a lot, except where
s been assessed. then such part'as will be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of Washington
thereon up to the year 1835 inclusiveY; together with all costs and charges, unless the said taxes
the.subscriber, with such expenses and fees as may have accrued thereon at the time of payment.


'O WHOM ASSESSED.


"S,;e. ,e. Lot.
heirs 9;i pt. & imps.
830; $5 06; 1829, $5 06; 18 8, 03; 1827,
13; 1825, $7 03.
part 50 feet from the southwest corner of said
nee east with the line of M. street south 25 feet;
Sthence west25 feet.; thence south 75 feet, to
570 D & imps.


573 B & imps,

A s6. pt. 12 & imps.


art at the southwest corner of said lot 12 feet,
rth with the line of 4i street 79 feet 4 inches ;
'dly 61 feet 6 inches to lot 11; thence south to
mce west 32 feet to the beginning.
I tax for 1831, .46 31, on interest from April
cent. till paid. 768 & imps. I
768 &imps. 1

906 pt. & imps.

trt 69 feet from!the. southwest corner of said
ance north with the liie of tilI seiri cea *-"',"
eet; thence couth 26 feet; thence west-.5 feet
738 so. part 1
rt at the southeast corner of said lot 1, and run-
stwardly with New Jersey Avenue 36 feet;
'dly to lot 2; thence south, 14 feet 4 inches to
cee east 84 feet to the beginning.
s E. Carroll, .609w 7

nor 501 east half 5


YEARS FOR WIIICH TAXES ARE DUE.


1832. 1833. 1834. 1835.


9 95





23 67

25

9 43






14 28T

7 14




& imps.


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE.


YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE,


TO WHOM ASSESSED,


Carroll, Daniel (continued)


'V


9 95 4 81 4 81 $74 54


25








14 28

9 14


S 6 -
north half 27


793 3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10


603
south of 667


555 25
26
616 20
21
229
23
24
26
673 23
414 half 1
472 part
re feet, according. to R.Y. and Eleanor Brent's

501 2
3
4
half 21
S22
25
26
28
544 1
2
S3
4-
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
27
28
593 west half
594 north half
595 west half
653 half 11


467
471
north of 471


all
all
all -


504 &imps. 1
1830,.$11:77; for.1829, $11 77; for 1828,
05.
a 128 3
4
5
6
7
8
569 9
767 3
4
769 2
1023 14


613 7 -
536 sub. 30
sub. 31
sub..33 -
sub. 36 -
576 9 6 53
635 7 4 43
8 2 02
13 3 07
14 2 37
15 2 19
16 3 76
17 2 39
18 2 13
20 9 69
21 2 70
636 3 1 30
4 1 51
5 1 27
6 1 72
10 1 34
11 1 22
16 2 18
17 2 35
18 2 53
638 4 2 36
5 2,65
7 3 95
680 1 41
2 25
.3 31
4 19
10 17
681 3 31
681 12 31
683 6 31
7 23
8 17
10 33
11 28
0(84 4 25
7 24
8 19


0lI
16
25
25
25
22
24
20
48
1 99
9 00

82
1 42
1 42
70
1 42
94
1 03
95
80
82
1 42
1 42
1 41
1 41
1 42
1 42
82
80
94
1 04
1 03
1 04
4 43
8 48
7 24
78


43 36
37 14
7 74


19 42

22 50 22 50


18 78


9 88 9 88

4 73 4 73


2 31



53

35
70
25


1 88
1 29
1 32
1 67
1 67
1 32
1 29
1 88


53
52


20
16
10
9
9
8
10
8
48
1 48
9 00

40
70
70
35
68
47
51
47
20
20
35
35
35
35
35
35
20
19
23
25
25
25
74
1 05
1 21
39


28 91
24 76
8 84


23 11 23 11 16 69


2 59
2 32
2 32
2 26
2 97
2 50
66
2 19
4 38
2 04
51


14



6 53
4 43
2 02
3 07
2 37
2 19
3 76
2 39
2 13
2 69
2 70
1 30
1 51
1 27
1 72
1 34
1 22
2 18
2 35
2 53
2 36
9 65
3 95
41
25
31
19
17
31
31
31
23
17
33
28
25
24
19


1 73
1 54
1 54
1 51
1 98
1 74
66
2 19
3 28
2 04
16


3 14
33
23
24
24
8 17
2 96
1 35
2 05
1 58
1 45
2 55
1 58
2 09
1 79
1 80
87
1 01
85
1 14
89
81
1 09
1 17
1 26
1 77
1 99
2 96
41
28
31
19
17
31
31
31
23
17
33
28
25
24
19


-


830, 1 '2 ;,1.


1832. 1833.


square. LOt.
685 1
4
9
687 5
13
14
18
689 3
4
5
6
9
10


2 31



53

35
70
25


1 88
1 28
1 32
1 67
1 67
1 32
1 29
1 88


52
53


19
17
10
10
10
9
9
7
48
1 49
9 00

41
71
71
35
68
47
52
47
19
21
35
35
35
35
35
35
21
20
23
25
25
25
74
1 06
1 21
40


28 91
24 76
8 84


16 69

1 73
1 54
1 54
1 51
1 98
1 74
66
2 19
3 28
2 04
16


3 15
33
'23
24
24
8 17
2 96
1 35
2 05
1 58
1 45
2 55
1 58
2 09
1 79
1 80
87
1 01
85
1 14
89
81
1 09
1 17
1 26
1 77
1 99
2 96
41
28
31
19
17
31
31
31
23
17
33
28
25
24
19


43 48

.58 28

80 20






58 06

33 98

274 00


4 62



2 10

1 40
4 22
1 01

6 63

6 60
4 49
4 62
5 85
5 85
4 62
4 49
6 60

43 12

1 56
1 57

3 13

59
50
45
44
44
39
43
35'
1 44
4 96
27 00

1 63
2 83
2 83
1 40
2 78
1 88
2 06
1 89
r 19
1 23
2 12
2 12
2 11
2 11
2 12
2 12
1 23
1 19
1 40
1 54
1 53
1 54
5 91
10 59
9 66
1 57

105 73.

101 18
86 66
25 42

213 26

143 00

6 05
5 40
5 40
5 28
6 93
5 98
1 98
6 57
10 94
6 12
83

61 48

6 43
66
46
48
48
29 40
14 78
6 74
10 24
7 90
7 28
12 62
7 94
10 44
8 96
9 00
4 34
5 04
4 24
5 72
4 46
4 06
6 54
7 04
7 58
8 26
9 28
13 82
1 64
1 06
124
76
68
124
1 94
1 24
92
68
1 32
1 12
1 00
96
76


-1834. 1835.


3 48 3 48
2 50 2 50
95 95
6 86 6 86
2 14 2 14
2 39 2 39
2 34 2 34
1 09 1 09
923 92
1 01 1 01
1 26 1 26
1 00- 1 00
89 89
91 91
82 82
60 60
24 24
20 20


691 9
693 5
694 6
700 6
7
For 1831,54 cents; for 1830,41 cents; pump tax for 1830, $2 96; for
1829, 41 cents; for 1828, 41 cents f or lM211, 41 cents.
8
9
10
11
12
13

15
.17

19
20,
21)





29
531
2 .






720 1
:'27
700 28
29
30
31
132
701 5
6




77
9
10

116
17
18
219
20
721 1
6
S7
8
9
10





724 4
.517
8
9
10
724 18
193 5
S6






7
7 8
9
10

724 418





19.
91
10


13
14
724 18
19

21


25
S243
275




26
30
31
.'732 18
19
41
42
43
753 1
2
3









5
16
17
18
19
20
21
12
23
24
756 3
4
5
6
7
8
759 9
10
11
12
13
759 14
15'


S743 sub. 4
sub. 5
sub. 6
sub. 7
sub. 11'
sub. 13
sub. 1-7
sub. 20
sub. 23
sub, 24-
780 4
5
6
7
783 all
792 6-
853 all
E. of 643 1
647 all
i.N of 650 1
E. of 667 3
679 1
786 4
10


Dobbin, John's heirs 906 part & imts.
Beginnmmng 1a feet from the northeast corner of said square, on 8th
street east, running thence south on 8th street east 55 feet 4 inches,
thence west 51 feet 2 inches, thence northwardly 55 feet 9 inches,
thence eastwardly 26 feet 5 inches, to the place of beginning.
Givison, William 501 24
Dougherty, Thomas's heirs 523 10
Fagan, Andrew's heirs 503 39
'Fowler, -Abraham's heirs 881 east pt. 9
Fronting 23 feet on south K street, and running back the whole
depth of the lot.
950 39

Hanson, Luke 797 &imps.
Haliday, Thomas's, heirs, 728 east pt. 2
Beginning at the southeast corner of said lot, and fronting on east
Capitol street, running thence west 14 feet, thence north by the
same width, the whole depth of the lot.


10 44
5 00
1 42
8 92
5 08
3 58
3 52
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00
91
90
1 66
1 37
96
79

84
1 69
1 69
1 49
1 50
1 69
1 69
1 69
85
79
96
1 05
1 05
79
72
59
1 26-
1' 26
1 '26.
1 12
1 12
1 26'
1 26
64
79
73
24
17
36
36
28
33
50
36
21
21
20
25
95
17
21
17
20
25
26
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
58
23
1 59
1 59
1 26
96
70
1 02
: 76
1 59'
1 38
1 906
- .o- .',
70
1 02
5 12
*3 25
2 87
2.50
1 30
94
1 41
2 11
2 17
2 17
1 25
1 79
2 15
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
18
22
13
1 27
1 65
1 41
1 29
1 91
1 97
1 63
1 81
1 76
2 57
2 57
1 76
1 35
1 22
1 64
1 22
4 40
4 40
4 40
2 20
3 30
'4' 42..
3.2.80.-
S.50
2 w
2 20
25
23
23
23
9 76
1 92
6 95
3 47
10 21
59
38
36
2 00
1 19


10 44
5 00
1 42
8 92
5 08
3 58
3 52
1 09
92
1 01
1 26
1 00
91
90
1 66
1 37
96
79


84
1 69
1 69
1 49
1 50
1 69
1 69
1 69
85
79
96
1 05
1 05
79
72
59
.... 64
1 26
1 26
1 26
,1 1
1 12
1 26
1 26
.64
79
73
24
17
36
36
28
33
50
36
21
21
20
25
25
17
21
17
20
25
25
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
58
23
1 59
1 59
1 26
96
70
1 02
76
1 59
1 38
1 26
---,3(
70
1 02
5 12
3 25
2 87
2 50
1 30
94
1 41
2 11
2 17
2 17
1 25
1 79
2 15
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
18
22
13
1 27
1 65
1 41
1 29
1 91
1 97
1 63
1 81
1 76
2 57
2 57
1 76
1 35
1 22
1 64
1 22
4 40
4 40
4 40
2 20
3 30
4 32
2 20
3 50
2 20
2 20
25
23
23
23
9 76
1 92
6 95
3 47
10 21
59
38
36
2 00
I 19


18 50



80
15
1 77
9 94

1 62

1 65
2 42


TO WHOM ASSESSED.


1832. 1833.


_


21
42
42
37
37
42
42
42
21
20
24
26
26
26
24
20
S 21
42
42
42
37
37
42
42
21
52
48
24
17
36
36
28
34
50
36
21
21
20
26
26
17
21
17
20
26
26
17
24
17-
43
20
20
27
21
59
23
1 06
1 06
84
64
47
68
50
1 06
92
84
- 64
47
68
3 07
1 95
1 43
1 24
65
47
70
1 41
2 17
2 17
1 88
1 34
1 62
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
19
22
13
85
1 10
93
86
1 27
1 31
1 22
1 35
1 18
1 71
1 71
1 18
1 35
81
1 09
81
2 20
2 20
2 20
1 10
2 20
.2 58
55
2 63
1 10
1 10
12
11
11
11
4 98
1 92
3 47
1 15
1 69
10
38
36
1 33
71


11 62



40
15
88
5 52

80

1 10
79


21
42
42
37
37
42
42
42
21
20


- 26
24.
20
21.
42
42
42
37
37
42
42
21
52
48
24
17
36
36
28
34
50
36
21
21
20
26
26
17
21
17
20
26
26
17
24
17
43
20
20
27
21
59
23
1 06
1 06
84
64
47
68
50
1 06
92
84
64
47
68
3 07
1 95
1 43
1 24
65
47
70
1 41
2 17
2 17
1 88
1 34
1 62
11
13
14
14
13
11
13
22
19
19
22
13
85
1 10
93
86
1 27
1 31
1 22
1 35
1 18
1 71
1 71
1 18
1 35
81
1 09
81
2 90
2 20
2 20
1 10
2 20
2 58
55
2 63
1 10
1 10
12
11
11
11
4 98
1 92
3 47
1 15
1 69
10
38
36
1 33
71


11 62



40
15
88
5 52

80

1 10
79


27 84
15 00
4 79
31 56
14 44
11 94
11 72
4 36
3 68
4 04
5 04
4-00
3 60
3 62
4 96
3 94
2 40
7 14

2 10
4 22
4 22
3 72
3 74
4 22
4 22
4 22
2 12
1,98
.2 40
2 62
2 62
2 10
1 92
1 58
1 70
3 36
3 36
3 36
2 98
2 98
3 36
3 36
1 70
2 62
2 42
96
68
1 44
1 44
1 12
1 34
2 00
1 44
84
84
80
1 02
1 02
68
84
68
80
1 02
1 02
68
96
68
1 72
.80
80
1 08
84
2 34
92
5 30
5 30
420
3 20
2 34
3 40
2 52
5 30
4 60
4 20
3 20.
2 34
3 40
16 38
. 10 40
8 60
7 44
3 90
2 82
4 22
7 04
8 68
8 68
6 26
6 26
7 54
44
52
56
56
52
44
52
88
76
74
88
52
4 24
5 50
4 68
4 30
6 36
6 56
5 70
6 32
5 88
8 56
8 56
5 88
5 40
4 06
6 46
4 06
13 20
13 20
13 20
6 60
9 04
13 70
5 50
12 26
6 60
6 60
74
68
68
68
29 48
7 68
290 84
9 24
23 80
1 38
1 52
1 44
6 66
3 80

1,014 58

41 74



1 60
45
3 53
20 98

3 22


1
9 & imps.


1 10
55
1 57
1 06




1 04
4 37
15 95
7 45

18 70


1834. 1835.


1 10
40
79

86




3 14
3 28
10 72
5 10-

29 71


80 39
3 42 1 51


295
41
1 99
9 00


1 42
1 55
1 55
1 '42
1-20
892
1 42
1 42
70
70
1 03
94
80
82,
1 42
1 42
1 42
1 41
2 41
1 42
82
80
.94
1 03
25
21
4 42
8 48
'7 24
78


Pearson, Joseph, Mary, and Anna Maria 616 19
673 22
414 1
472 part
Containing 27,268 square feet, according to R. Y. and Eleanor
Brent's division.
501 11
12
13:
14,
15
16
-- 17
S. .18
easl I 20
S21
544 3 .3
14
15
16
17
18,
19
20
21
22
23
.24
25
26
-55 23
-4
593 east half
594 south half
595 cast half
653 111


Phillips, Samuel res. 11 part 7
For 1831, $2 35.
Fronting 25 feet on 3d street west, and running back that width
100 feet.
Stuart, Richard H. and others 903 G
1046 8


Spooner, Noble H.'s heirs 878 N. pt. 38
Fronting 24 feet on 7th st. east, and running back 129-ft. 6 inches.
Sayre, Daniel 655 8
Talbott, Isham 389 13
14
15
16
390 20


Thomas, Richard's heirs 142 east pt. 11
Fronting 26 feet on north G street, and running back the depth
of the lot.
For 1831 $1 42.
Paving tax for 1831 $17 87, on interest from August 1st, 1832, till
paid, at 10 per cent.
Tilghman, Frisby 663 6
Pump tax for 1830 $3 16. 703 15



Judge, John 665 17
18S
22
666 2
6
7
8"
577 4
579 1
For 1831, 52 cts. 1000 north 6
Fronting 18 feet on llth street east, and running back the depth of
the lot.
For 1831, $1 68, 1000 7


Venable, Charles's heirs 905 pt. & imps.
Beginning at the southwest corner of said square, running thence
north on 7th street east 41 feet, thence east 78 feet 6 inches, thence
south 26 feet, thence southwest to the line of Virginia avenue 40
feet, thence westwardly with the line of said avenue 69 feet 1 inch,
to the placeof beginning.
Young and Fayles 667 16


& imps.


& imps.





2 07









55
41
41
22
22
33
22
1 40
4 95
76

2 48


3 01

1 57
1 34
34 34
1 34
2 66
1 34


,2 07




1 04
1 57


55
41
41
22
22
33
29
1 40
4 95
.76


2 48


10
41
1 49
9 00


47
51
52
47
39
40
'72
72
35.
35
S5
23
20
21-
35
35
35
35
35,

21
20,
23
25
25
21
73
1 85
1 20
3.9



4 95


1 48
89


2 12

79
1 34
34 34
1 34
1 34
1 00


2 08




52
79


28
20
19
22
22
33
22
1 40
3 72
19

61


23 59 23 59 1698


54

20
2 46


14
1 -


Terms of Sale cash. Sale to commence at 10 o'clock A. M.

aug 27-wts


110

40
79
86




3 14
3 28
10' 72
5 10

29 71


39
1 51


10
41
148
9 00


47
59
S51
47
40
41
71
71
35
25
25
23
20
35
35
35
35
35
35
20
20

23
25
25
290
74
1 06
S -201'



4 95


1 48
89


2 10

79
1 34
34 34
1 34
1 34
1 00


2 08


27
19
20
S22
22-
33
22
1 40
3 72
19





16 98




54

20
2 46


GEORGE ADAMS,
Collector Fifth and Sixth War


Z7ARM AT PUBLIC SALE.-If the farm advertised' HUGH SMITH & CO.
,J. below is not sold at private sale, before the 17th of Sep- IMPORTERS OF CHINA, GLASS, & EARTHRNW
tember next, it will on that day be sold, at public sale, on the ALEXANDRsIA) D. C.
promises. Terms at sale. J. S. aug 25-d2mif (Met.)
R-- F S-.NTERESTING TO CAPITALISTS who ar
FARM FOR SALE. 1 posed to encourage extraordinary mechanical ingenuity
With the view of emigrating to the West, the subscriber of- at the same time vest their funds profitably.
fers the farm on which he resides for sale, containing about'five For sale, half of the patent:rightof one ofthe mostastoni
lihudredh ad thirty-three acres of land, lying in Fairthx county, mechanical curiosities-in the world-Thomson's inventil
Virginia; distant from Alexandria, Washington, and George- cutting laths, matches, and shoe pegs.. I
town from four and a halfto five miles. The farm is divided This is probably one of the most famous and wonderful
into five lots of different sizes, by the following roads passing ductions of mechanical ingenuity in the world. Although
through it : the middle turnpike road from Alexandria to Lees- three of the machines are yet in operation, and that but a
burg, the gravel road from Washington to the Little River Turn- time, its fame has already extended to France, anda Frenchi
pike, and tle old Leesburg road from Alexandria. The farm tleman who viewed them lately declared that he would not
will be sold altogether or in lots, as divided by said roads ; about missed seeing them for ten dollars.
two-thirds of which is in wood, their balance cleared, and in The three machines produce from the logs the astoni
good state of cultivation. The land is sufficiently level, of easy number of 20,000 perfectly formed "pegs in a minute, tl
improvement, and well watered by constant streams and springs about 3,000 a minute is about the average product from
of the purest water. The mansion house is a two story frame machine. The same invention can be used for other pur
building, built of the best materials, and finished in a modern ,also, at immense profits, which will be explained to thost
style, with a good dry cellar. Adjoining is a large frame kitch- wish. to engage in an interesting and lucrative enterprise.
en and pantry, likewise meathouse, corn housec,stables, sheds, Half of the patent for the United States, and of the there,
&c. At the intersection of the above-mentioned road there is a chines now in operation in the city of Rochester, may b
log house and stable, which has been occupied as a public house stained by any person who will pay or secure the greatest an
for many years, with a well of never-failing water at the door, for it previous to thlie 1st of September next, provided it b
than which, for business of many kinds, no place in its vicinity less than $5,000, payable one-fifth cash, and the balance i!
is more suitable. As the great western road, from the Capitol nual payments, without interest.
of the United States, passes through it, dividing it into nearly Applications, or proposals by mail, maybe made or addr,
two equal parts, and would make two very desirable farms, to J. TORREY, Jr.
being in a goad neighborhood, and convenient to meetings, mills, aug 26-3t At the Monroe House, Rochest
schools, and within two and a half miles of the Theologicalbscriber offers fo
Seminary, it is deemed worthy the attention of any person de- AND OR SL .T he subscriber offers aorti
r farm on which lie resides, lying between the Balti
sirous to purchase. and Washington railroad and Baltimore and Washigton
It is unnecessary to state further particulars, asit is presumed and ashington railroad and Baltimore and Washington
aiy one wishing to purchase will first view the premises, pikce r.ad, 22 miles from Baltimore and 12 from Washiu
any one wshng to purchase wJOll first N SMITH, containing about 150 acres, most of which is of good quality
aug 26-2aw3w Fairfax County, Virginia. well adapted to plaster and thie growth of tobacco, grain
grass. The situation is elevated, agreeable, and healthy.
AND FOR SALE.-That part of the plantation of improvements consist of a comfortable brick dwelling, at
AAchibald Van Horn, deceased, which lies in the District other necessary buildings for convenience or comfort. -
of Columbia, containing about two hundred acres, more or less. Also, a small farm of about 150 acres, lying one mhile sot
Also the tract of land, lying south of the Beaver Dam branch, the above ; mostof which is fertile, well adapted to plastoi
and east of the Bladensburgh and Alexandria road, containing the growth of fine yellow tobacco, grain, and grass. The
one hundred and eighty-seven and a half acres, more or less. provements on this farm consist of a small frame dwelling
And the farm on which tlie subscriber resides, containing one a large new tobacco house.
hundred and five and a half acres. Persons disposed to purchase are invited to call upop the
Terms-Cash for the last tract; and for the two other tracts, scriber, who will show the lands to those wvho wish to see t]
one-halfof the purchase money in six, and the other half in If the above property is not disposed of at private saleab
twelve months from the lst day of January, 1837. Tuesday, the 27th September noxt, it will then be offer
Sale to take place at the log house on the first tract, at twelve public sale at the first named place, at 12 o'clock. The t
o'clock, on the 1st day ofSeptember next. will be accommodating, and made known on the day of salu
july G-wtseptl ALEX, McCORMICK. aug 19-eots HENRY CULVER, BettsvilR


ingtont


Square. Lot.
Hickman, William 1128 &imps.
For 1831, $1 10; 1830, 56 cents; 1829, 56 cents.
Horsey, Outubridge 598 8
Hanson, Samuel 705 4
For 1831, $1 08; 1830, 81 cents; 1829, 81 cents.
Kingsbury, Sarah 770 part
For 1831, 73 cents.
Beginning 72 feet from the northeast corner of said square, on 3d
street east, running thence south 23 feet, thence west 84 feet 8i
inches, thence north 23 feet, thence east 84 feet 8. inches, to the
place of beginning,
Leake, Francis 613 8
Longacre, J. B. 768 2
Maddox, Notley 881 12
Palmer, Morris & imps. 928 east pt. 1
Fronting 16 feet on south K street, and running back 50 feet.
Pearson and Brent 472 pt & imps.
Containing 56,698 square feet, according to R. Y. and Eleanor
Brent's division.


I


3 44 3 44


& imps. 5 22
&imps. 2 34


24 20
3 85
4 00


Young, Margaret


& imps.


1 10

1 57

1 07






&










3 FOR TAXES.
'OR'S OFFICE OF THE 1ST AND 2D WARDS,
Washington, August 10, 1836.
proceed to sell at public vendue, at the City
y, or such part thereof, not less than half a lot,
Ls will be necessary to satisfy the Corporation of
inclusive; together with all costs and charges,
:h such expenses and fees as may have accrued

So
YEARS FOR WHICH TAXES ARE DUE. .2 'r


1832. 1833. 1834. 1835. .
'25.


47

19 22



& imps.






& imps.

& imps.
36


48
29
29


k imps.

' imps.



rimps.
i mps.
imps.
imps.
. imps.


Simps.



3 92


47

19 22


5 44

2 02
1 65


3 17
3 17
1 74
1 76
13





8 54


3 9-2






2 01

1 07
1 20
1 62
1 36
1 62
1 62
1 62
1 36





22 00

15 58


19 95


1 13
12 64
5 99

41

18 81


4 05
45 98

20 88
36
S80so
19
19
48
29
29
34
24
23
26
30


-4 22
4 44


3 97
6 87

7 12
1 39
1 39
1 51

2 38
2 38
1 31
1 76
13


3 72

6 17
11 07


2 73
33 93
32 87
27 47
9 84


1 72
1 43
1 23
1 25


1 41
31 17

9 29
84 48
1 62


2 34

6 30
2 85


9 84
2 02

53
59
80
67
80
80
80
67


5 20
8 66

8 80

21 92
7 39


1 61
2 19
1 95
2 42


2 88
82


14 46
3 65

3 87
5 35
4 93
4 62
3 62
13 77
6 07


5 75





1 40
4 93


1 35
1 35
3 11


1 1
12 6
5 99

4

18 8


4 0:
45 9,

20 8
3
8

1
4
2
2
3
2
21
2
3(


4 2:
4 4


3 9,
6 8S

7 1'
1 3;
1 3i
1 5


3 72

6 1'
11 0'


2 73
33 93
32 87
27 47
9 84


1 41
31 17

9 29
84 48
1 62


2 34

6 30
2 85


9 84
2 0O

53
59
80
67
80
8o
8o
67



5 2C0
8 6(

8 80

21 92
7 39


1 61
2 19
1 95
2 42


2 88
8;


14 46
3 65

3 87
5 35
4 93
4 62
3 62
13 77
6 07

5 75





1 40
4 93


1 35
1 35
3 11


YEARS FOR WHICII TAXES ARE DUE.


IN WHOSE NAME ASSESSED.


Square.
200
215
42


Hay, George
Herbert, Mary
Houston, Mary T.

Hoban, Joseph







Hilleary, Henry

Harris, Thomas


Lot.
3
2
10

part 1
17
part 2
east A 5
S8
S9


83 2

316 5
6
7
8*


Hoban, James's heirs 10 3
Pump tax,
[sh, Jacob 119 part 10
Being the west part of said lot, fronting 28 feet 3 inches on Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, and running back with that width the whole depth
of the lot.
Jones, John G. 38 5
6


Joncherez, Alexander's heirs
For 1831, $4 23.


& imps.
sub.

& imps.

& imps.
& imps.





sub.
sub.
sub.
sub.-



5 00
& imps.


& imps.


& imps. 81 part 21


3 2 26
4 25 28
9 11 98

1 1 76

1 76 06

77 82
4 16 32
6 8 32
2 6 06
5 4 95

11 01

5 8 10
8 91 96

8 41 76
6 1 44
0 1 60
9 38
9" 38
8 1 92
9 1 16
9 1 16
4 68
4 48
3 46
6 52
0 60

52 74

2 8 44
4 8 88

17 32

7 10 80
7 13 74

3 14 24
9 2 78
9 2 78
1 3 02
22 82
8 7 93
8 7 93
1 4 36
6 3 88
3 72

24 82

2 7 44

7 20 88
7 22 14

43 02
3 5 46
3 67 86
7 65 74
7 54 94
4 19 68
74 62
2 '5 16
3 4 29
3 4 10
5 4 17

17 72

2 82
7 62 34

9 18 58
S 168 96
2 3 24

190 78

12 52
S 12 60
5 70

18 30

19 68
6 05

3 2 13
2 38
3 22
2 70
3 22
3 22
3 22
S 2 70

22 79

S 10 40
17 32

75 75
2 59 42
14 78

149 95
3 22
4 38
1 3 90
2 4 84

16 34

8 5 76
I 64

7 40

48 87
7 30

7 7 74
10 70
S 9 86
S 9 24
S 7 24
27 54
S 1214




23 05


2 80
'9 86
12 66

2 70
2 70
6 22

11 62


Meigs, Francis C.


224 part 5
252 27


Mantz, Peter
Munroe, David
McMurray,William, and John Crawford
Natt, Thomas
Noer, Andrew
O'Neale, Lawrence
Oliver, Benjamin
Paulding, Henry

Peck, Margaret



143 north 8
A & imps. 35
62 11
168 sub. 5
322 9
143 11
317 6
81 4

106 21
22


& imps.
10 14



5 82
5 82
4 50


& imps.


& imps.
& imps.

& imps.






& imps.
& imps.



2 75
& imps.
& imps.,
& imps.


Palmer, Innis B. 231 1
535 16
578 1
2
3
502 9
10
11
12
42
503 part 31
Being the north part, adjoining lot 32, fronting 46 feet on Union
street, by the whole depth of the lot.
32


Peter, George


Pump tax


south o





west of


Peter, Thomas










For 1831, 72 cts.




For 1831, 27c ts.
For 1831, 64 cts.
For 1831, 30 cts.


Pierce, Thomas



Randall, John


Rench, Jacob, and Lodowick Young,
Smith, Ann C.

Simmons, William


1 5
6
6 5
11 part 9

f 12 6
13 9
14 12
13
14
15 11
18 3
f 23 3
24 1
13
25 17
27 1
32 18
42 3
51 9
70 10
11
12
13
79 16
203 all


1 223
2 1
5 19
20
14 5
17 6
18 2
20 18
24. 32
25 28
28 22
32 1
2
15
51- 19
20
21
54 10
35
150 7
8
north of 189 all
272 all
330 all
331 all
357 all
358 all


101 7
& imps. 20


119 1
5'


3 00

3 17

2 30

& imps.
3-1




3 12
1 40

55


& imps.







1 06




39
64
30



& imps.



4 43
7 15


6 60
3 97


122 11
17 17

158 2
3
12
172 5


4 23


10 14



5 8"2
5 82
4 50





3 01




1 10
25
1 04







2 02
2 75


10 12

4 05


1 09
1 09
83
1 10
73
3 52

2 79






4 25

1 81
3 00

3 17


-2 30



3 12
1 40

55

90














1 06
1 88



39
64
30

2 24





4 43
7 15


6 60
3 97


1 63


--- -


1 1OA
4 23
3 67
2 77
73
73
55
55
36
1 21

1 40


10 90
9 71
1 50
3 31

2 13
1 21
2 99
2 732
2 24
2 11
3 62
71
1 84
1 08
3 30
17 64
67
1 87
1 04
29
33
24
31
46
4 70



3 19
7 30
2 41
3 23
3 54
1 19
3 51
87
1 23
2 02
3 67
99
1 06
93
90
1 04
97
3 39
78
64
30
25
2 66
2 24
1 52
.2 06
2 21


3 17
6 82


4 95
2 98

7 08
1 09

70
79
48
1 85


10 90
9 71
1 50
3 31

2 13
1 21
2 99
2 72
2 24
2 11
3 62
71
1 84
1 08
3 30
17 64
67
1 87
1 04
29
33
24
31
46
4 70



3 19
7 30
2 41
3 23
3 54
1 19
3 51
87
1 23
2 02
3 67
99
1 06
93
90
1 04
97
3 39
78
64
30
25
2 66
2 24
1 52
2 06
2 21


3 17
6 82


4 95
2 98

7 08
1 09

70
79
48
1 85


~i~-.__~..--,--- -~--- ---~-~ -~I~I ss~sa ------~---I-'


5 59

57 59

21 80
19 42
3 00
10 87
4 26
4 23
11 88
5 44
4 48
10 56
7 24
1 42
8 28
2 16
6 60
35 28
1 34
9 98
4 88
58
1 76
48
62
2 72
9 40

188 68

6 38
14 60
4 82
6 46
7 08
2 38
7 02
1 74
2 46
4 04
7 34
1 98
4 96
3 74
1 80
2 08
1 94
6 78
2 61
3 20
1 50
50
5 32
6 72
3 04
4 129
4 42
120 03

15 20
27 914

43 14

23 10
13 90

37 00
14 16
3 81

1 40
1 58
96
3 70


IQOQ I


2 50

2 65
6 38
1 80
62 12
6 68
3 71




55
55
55
55


2 35

6 48


1834.



25 06
1 39
1 24

2 87
5 29
1 05
83 47
3 21
1 01


3 03

83
83
83
83


1 57

9 84


2 00
8 62


6 98

8 56
10 14



4 85
3 88
4 50


28 03
24 83
5 21
3 04
15 18
5 42
7 08
8 42

55
53
79


27 25
9 15


2 53
6 73
5 78
10 00
59 81
6 10
1 88
3 03

2 27
2 52



2 65
1 22


1835.



25 06
1 39
1 24

2 87
5 29
1 05
83 47
3 21
1 01


3 03

83
83
83
83


1 57

9 84


2 00,
8 62


6 98

8 56
26 30



4 85
3 88
4 50


28 03
24 83
5 21
3 04
15 18
5 42

7 08
8 42

55
53
79


27 25
9 15


2 53
6 73
5 78
10 00
59 81
6 10
1 88
3 03

2 27
2 52



2 65
1 22


50 12
2 78
4 098

8 39
16 96
3 90.
229 06
13 10
5 73

277 14

6 06

2 21
2 21
2 21
2 21

8 84

10 49
21 16


4 00
17 24'

21 24

26 65

17 12
87 36

104 48


21 34
19 40
18 00

58 74
56 06
49 66
10 42
9 09
30 36
10 84
14 16
16 84

2 20
1 31
2 62

6 13
54 50
18 30

72 80

7 08
18 96
11 56
20 00
119 62
'22 32
3 76
10 11
4 54
5 04

9 58

5 30
2 44


Thomas, Ann
Thompson, Julia

Thomas, John H.



Temple, John T.


317 1
290 & imps. 14

44 1
87 8


220 9
10


Villard, Adam 348 pt. 14
Commencing for the same at the southeast corner of said lot, and
nrint--oneo-we'st--100feot-tence riorth 13 feet; thence east
50 feet; thence north 7 feet; thence northeastwardly until it inter-
sects a line drawn perpendicular to the line of 10th street, 44 feet
therefrom; thence with the said perpendicular line 44 feet, to the
line of 10th street west; thence with the line of said street, 26
feet to the place of beginning.
Vallette, Mrs. 227 4 15
For 1831, $6 57.
Wormley, Mary 199 1 (sub.)
Watson, Alexander R. 214 part 6
part 7
Beginning for.the same at the distance of 80 feet from the corner of
north L and 15th streets west, running thence north on 15th
street 23 feet, thence east 50 feet, thence south 23 feet, thence
west to the beginning.
Washington, Peter G. 502 43
44
45


White, John B. 348 W. half 12


218 6
7
8


56 11
88 14


Wilson, Jonathan


Wilson, John A.

Washington Tontine Company,



















Warring, Marsham,


Sale to commence at 10 o'clock A. M.

Aug 13


south of 104 2

5 4
24
26
6 '7
8
17 13
14
28 5
6
28
31 2
10
14
15
42 1
44 8
55 1
2
15


57
east of 88



Terms cash.


sub.




















21 99

& imps.



& imps.

& imps.


& imps.




& imps.

& imps.


& imps.
26 36










& imps.






6 57

& imps.
& imps.






& imps.


& imps.










& imps.


88 3
89 3


214 11
12
20
21
22
23
220 16
17
24
25
26
252 10
11
12
282 3
4
287 10
341 5
6
7
8


1 & imps. 7

292 part 2
928 5


374 7
8
west k 9


26 36


1 04
28


59
59
69
64
58
53
2-52
2 60
1 78
1 78
1 76
3 51
3 04
3 53
58
55
5 20
59
59
59
59


17 96

15 20
3 17


8 89
7 27
53 56


18 70
1 37



9 49

5 94


4 95
21 97

2 02
3 04


4 07
4 07


24 05 20 33


6 57

1 84





2 97
2 02
18 26




2 21
1 96
2 08


19 26


1 48
1 01
14 08


8 24

1 32
1 18
1 24


2 02
2 00


14 96

90
3 26
1 20
-1 79
99
I 06
89
1 22.
91
3 42
2 18
1 06
1 41
1 11
1 51
1 19
1 35
1 86
2 53


4 0
21 9

2 0
3 0


4 0'
4 0


20 3"






3 2

3 7.
46




1 4,
1 0
14 0,


8 2

1 3,
I 1
12


2 0'
2 0(


14 9(

9(
3 2(
1 2(
1 71
9t
1 0(
8%

91
3 4'
2 1
1 06
1 41
1 11
1 51
1 19
1 35
1 86
2 53


SW. W. BILLION
Collector of the First and Second 1


S -IALL'S COMPLETE 1 WORKS.-Just published 0 O BOOKSELLERS AND COUNTRY
Sand this day received, for sale by F. TAYLOR, T. C[HANTS.-F. TAYLOR has this day re
The complete Phrenological works of Gall, in G volumes, thousand Comic Almanacs for the next year, (1837,)
just translated from the French edition; price $1 25 per vol. tain all the usual matter of an Almanac, and also
Also just received, additional supplies of Combe on tle Con- dred serve caricatures and two hundred jokes,
stitution of Man, Conlbe's Phrenology, Practical Phrenology, a dtichs, arrti's lc. ac. retail price only 2t
nei p f Main ],shwhich an unusually liberal deduction will be mace to
Spurzheim's Phrenology, Spurzheim's Anatomy ofthe Brain, buy for the purpose of selling again. Apply at thl
Spurzheim on Insanity. Circulating Library, immediately cast of Gadsby's H
Combe on Mental Derangement. july 25
Combo's Principles of Physiology, applied to health and the "-NTFRNAIL IMPROVEMENTS IN TII
improvement of physical and mental education. -3. TED STATES.-Just received for sale by
Spurzheim's Phrenology in connexion with the study of Phy- LOR, Mitchell's Compendium of all Canals and
siognomy. (present and prospective) throughout the Union. Als
Gall's System of Phrenology, in one volume, with many of Canada and Nova Scotia ; accompanied by a large
plates; price I dollar, able Map. The whole bound up in pocket book form
Spurzhlini's Natural Laws of Man. A variety of quite new Maps of nearly all the West
Doctor Carmichael's Memoir of Spurzheim. thern,and Northwestern States and Territories, is just
Also, a variety of works on the same subject, not enumerated infinitely more correct and valuable than hleret'
above. listed.
Geology of the United States from New Jerscyto T
The whole of which are for sale at the publisher's lowest a Geological Map eleven feet long.
prices, at the Waverly Circulating Library, immediately east For sale at the Wavorly Circulating Library, ill
of Gadsby's lihotel, aug 15 east of Gadsby's.


YEARS FOR WITICI TAXES ARE C
IN WHOSE NAME -ASSESSED.
1832. 1833. 1834.1


Squ e. L ot.
Simm ons, William (continued) 1V?2 1 85 1
12 1 23 1
13 1 23 1
14 1 03 1
15 82
16 80
19 .- 1 45 1
20 1 45 1
1,036 5 25
12 25
13 25


Smith, Amos


Snowden, Thomas


21 99





8 78
6 47
53 56


19 25
68


Winder, Levin H.


Smoot, Samuel

Small, Andrew



Smith, Henry


Swimley, Lewis 319 part 3
part 4
Beginning for the same at the southwest corner of said square 319,
running thence north with the line of 12th street west 100 feet; thence
east 25 feet; thence south 100 feet, to G street north ; thence in a line
with said streetto the beginning.
Sutherland, Thomas J.'s heirs, 253 part 5
Being the east part of said lot, fronting 31 feet 6 inches on F street
north, by the whole depth of thelot.
348 part 10
Being the east 24 feet front on E street north by 50 feet deep.


Kerr, Alexander's heirs 288 6
& imps. 458 sub. 9
For 1829, $5 16; for 1830, $5 16; for 1831, 6 92.
Water tax for 1830, $13 40.

Kuhn, Joseph L. 57 5
6
80 3


Lowe, Lloyd M. 252 12
Lambert Morris's heirs res. 10 17
Lowry, Mary 75 east 17
Leckie, Robert's heirs 84 15
Litle, Hannah's heirs 141 part 16
McCerrin, Andrew's heirs 293 part 11
Mayberry, Justinian 103 10
Miller, George 321 part 12
Being the west part of said lot, and containing 1,382 square feet.
Martin, Honore 599 4
610 16
658 8