• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Experimental
 Summary
 Table 1 - Diet composition, %
 Table 2 - Analysis of amino acid...
 Table 3 - Effect of corn type on...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1984-4
Title: Comparison of the value of feeding "tropical corn" with commercial yellow corn in grower-finisher diets
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073155/00001
 Material Information
Title: Comparison of the value of feeding "tropical corn" with commercial yellow corn in grower-finisher diets
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 5 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Williams, A. C
Coffey, M. T
Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1984
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Corn as feed -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: A.C. Williams, M.T. Coffey and G.E. Combs.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "May, 1984."
General Note: Pages numbered 17-21.
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073155
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 82160579

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 17 (MULTIPLE)
    Summary
        Page 18
    Table 1 - Diet composition, %
        Page 19
    Table 2 - Analysis of amino acid content in diets, %
        Page 20
    Table 3 - Effect of corn type on the performance of growing-finishing swine
        Page 21
Full Text






Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1984-4 -17- Experiment Station
May, 1984 Gainesville, FL

COMPARISON OF THE VALUE OF FEEDING "TROPICAL CORN"
WITH COMMERICAL YELLOW CORN IN GROWER-FINISHER DIETS1

A. C. Williams, M. T. Coffey and G. E. Combs2


Florida is recognized as a grain deficient area which dictates that
swine producers purchase shipped in corn to ensure an adequate feed
supply. Consequently, transportation costs result in high corn prices and
narrow profit margins. Corn varieties that are better suited to Florida's
climate are becoming available. The term "tropical corn" is applied to
several varieties being used to follow vegetable planting in Central and
South Florida. A study was conducted to compare the feeding value of
"tropical corn" with that of standard commercial yellow corn for
growing-finishing swine.

Experimental

A trial was conducted using 36 crossbred pigs (26 kg). Six pigs were
allotted to each pen on the basis of weight, litter and sex. There were
three replicate pens per treatment. Treatments consisted of corn-soy
grower and finisher diets using either standard commerical yellow corn (1)
or Pioneer 304-C "tropical corn" (2). Pigs were fed a 16% crude protein
grower diet (table 1) to 56.5 kg body weight, followed by the finisher
diet containing 15% crude protein. Laboratory analysis of the corn
sources are presented in table 2. All pigs were housed in a semi-enclosed
grower-finisher barn with concrete floored pens. Feed and water were
provided ad libitum. Weight gains and feed consumption were determined on
a biweekly basis. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance. Least
squares means were used to examine significant interactions.

Results and Discussion

There was a significant (P<.05) treatment x sex effect on average
daily gain (table 3). In treatment 1 males grew faster (P<.05) than
females (.83 vs .74 kg/day). In contrast, there was no difference in the
growth of males and females fed treatment 2 ("tropical corn"). Females
fed treatment 2 gained faster than females fed treatment 1 (.85 vs .74
kg/day). Feeding "tropical corn" resulted in increased (P<.05) feed
intake and decreased (P<.05) feed efficiency (table 3).

The increase in feed intake and decreased efficiency may have been due
to a lower energy content of diets formulated with "tropical corn" as


1Experiment 288.

2Williams, Graduate Research Assistant; Coffey, Assistant Animal
Nutritionist and Combs, Animal Nutritionist, Animal Science Department,
Gainesville.








-18-


shown by laboratory analysis (3.03% in tropical vs 3.91% in control).
Analysis indicated similar protein and~amino acid content of diets
formulated with tropical and commercial yellow corn (table 2). The
increased feed consumption resulted in increased protein intake by pigs
fed "tropical corn". It is well known that female pigs have a higher
dietary protein requirement than males. The increased consumption of
feed and therefore, protein may account for the faster gains of females
fed treatment 2. There was no increase in the growth of males fed
"tropical corn" indicating that dietary protein was adequate.

The data indicated that "tropical corn" supported gains that were
similar to those of pigs consuming commerical yellow corn. Feed intake
was increased by 15% and 12% more feed was required per unit of gain.
This suggested a lower energy content of diets formulated with
"tropical corn". These results indicated that diets formulated using
"tropical corn" have a feeding value of slightly less than diets
formulated with commerical yellow corn.

Summary

Thirty-six crossbred pigs were used to examine the feeding value of
"tropical corn" (Pioneer 304-C) in growing-finishing diets of pigs.
Six pigs (26 kg) were allotted to each pen on the basis of weight, sex
and litter origin. Substitution of commercial yellow corn with
"tropical corn" resulted in a significant (P<.05) treatment x sex
effect on average daily gains. Female pigs fed "tropical corn" grew
faster than females fed commercial yellow corn. Feeding "tropical
corn" resulted in increased feed intake (P<.05) and decreased (P<.05)
feed efficiency. The increase in feed intake and decreased efficiency
may have been due to a lower energy content of diets formulated with
"tropical corn".







-19-


TABLE 1. DIET COMPOSITION, %



Ingredient


Grain source 74.80
Soybean meal (48%) 22.00
)ynafos (IMCC) 1.70
Limestone 0.80
lodized salt 0.25
Trace minerals (CCC)b 0.10
Vitamin premix (UF)c 0.10
ASP-250 0.25


aTreatment 1 utilized ground yellow corn (IFN 4-02-935). Treatment
2 utilized "tropical corn" (Pioneer 304-C).

bSupplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained
20% zinc, 10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, and
12% calcium.

cContained 13,200 mg riboflavin, 44,000 mg niacin, 26,400 mg panto-
thenic acid, 176,000 mg choline chloride, 22,000 mcg vitamin B12,
5,500,000 IU vitamin A, 880,000 IU vitamin D3 and 22,000 IU vitamin
E per kilogram of premix.







-20-


TABLE 2. ANALYSIS OF AMINO ACID CONTENT IN DIETS, %



Treatment

Amino Acid 1 2


Aspartic 1.39 1.32
Glutamic Acid 2.78 2.93
Histidine 0.44 0.46
Serine 0.83 0.83
Arginine 1.07 1.05
Glycine 0.66 0.62
Threonine 0.67 0.63
Alanine 0.93 0.99
Tyrosine 0.58 0.60
Methionine 0.29 0.26
Valine 0.49 0.78
Phenylalanine 0.80 0.84
Isoleucine 0.65 0.69
Leucine 1.45 1.54
Lysine 0.83 0.80


aTreatment 1 utilized commercial yellow corn. Treatment 2 utilized
"tropical corn" (Pioneer 304-C).







-21-


TABLE 3. EFFECT OF CORN TYPE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF GROWING-FINISHING
SWINE



Treatments

Item 1 2


Initial weight, kg 25.75 26.00
Final weight, kg 91.90 95.35
Daily gain, kgc 0.79 0.82
Daily feed, kgd 2.36 2.71
Feed/gain, kgd 2.99 3.34


aLeast squares means.

bTreatment 1 utilized commerical yellow corn. Treatment 2 utilized
"tropical corn" (Pioneer 304-C).

CTreatment x sex effect (P<.05).

dTreatment effect (P<.05).




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs