• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Composition of diets
 Table 2 - Effect of dietary crude...
 Table 3 - Effect of dietary crude...
 Table 4 - Effect of dietary crude...
 Table 5 - Effects of floor space...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1983-1A
Title: Influence of floor space and dietary crude protein on the performance of finishing swine
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073145/00001
 Material Information
Title: Influence of floor space and dietary crude protein on the performance of finishing swine
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 5 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lovett, Thomas Dozier, 1959-
Coffey, M. T
Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1983
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Housing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Proteins in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: T.D. Lovett, M.T. Coffey and G.E. Combs.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1983."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073145
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 81148004

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Composition of diets
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Effect of dietary crude protein level and floor space on performance of finishing swine (trial 1)
        Page 3
    Table 3 - Effect of dietary crude protein level and floor space on performance of finishing swine (trial 2)
        Page 4
    Table 4 - Effect of dietary crude protein level and floor space on performance of finishing swine (trial 3)
        Page 4
    Table 5 - Effects of floor space and sex on average daily gain of finishing swine, by trial
        Page 5
Full Text




Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1983-1 A -1- Experiment Station
August, 1983 ---= --- Gainesville, FL


INFLUENCE OF FLOOR SPACE AND DIETARY CRUDE
PROTEIN ON THE PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE

T. D. Lovett, M. T. Coffey and G. E. Combs2


The amount of floor space and crude protein required to optimize
performance of finishing pigs is an important management consideration.
Overcrowding may stress pigs and consequently reduce performance. Studies
were designed to evaluate the relationship of floor space and dietary crude
protein during different seasons of the year.

Experimental

Three trials were conducted using a total of 374 pigs. Groups were
equalized on the basis of litter, weight and sex. All pigs were housed in.a
slotted-floor finishing barn with concrete block sides. Each pen contained an
automatic waterer and self-feeder.

Composition of the 11 and 13% crude protein diets is shown in table 1.
The experiments were a 2 x 2 factorial design. The factors were die ary
protein 11 or 13% and floor space per pig .56 (6 ft ) or .74 m (8 ft).
Average pen temperatures, measured daily, for trials 1, 2 and 3 were 27.0, 21,
and 16 C, respectively.

Data were analyzed by least squares analysis of variance for main effects
and interactions. If the interaction was significant the least square means
procedure was used to separate means.

Results and Discussion

The performance data from trials 1, 2 and 3 are summarized in tables 2, 3
and 4, respectively. In trial 1, there was a significant (P<.05) effect of
dietary crude protein (CP) and floor space on daily gain and feed efficiency.
Pigs fed 11 or 13% CP diets gained an average of .47 and .51 kg/day,
respectively. Pigs housed in pens providing .56 m /pig gained .45 kg/day, as
compared to those housed in pens with .74 m /pig that gained .53 kg/day. Pigs
consuming 13% CP required 3.87 compared to 4.26 units feed/unit gain for pigs
fed the 11% CP diet. Floor space also had a significant effect on feed
efficiency (P<.05) and daily feed consumption (P<.1). Pigs provided .74 or
.56 m /pig needed 3.92 and 4.21 units feed/unit gain, respectively. Pigs
provided more floor space consumed 2.06 kg feed/day while crowded pigs ate
1.90 kg feed/day.


Experiments 258 A, B and C.
2
Lovett, Graduate Research Assistant; Coffey, Assistant Animal Nutritionist;
and Combs, Animal Nutritionist, Department of Animal Science, Gainesville.








Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1983-1 A -1- Experiment Station
August, 1983 ---= --- Gainesville, FL


INFLUENCE OF FLOOR SPACE AND DIETARY CRUDE
PROTEIN ON THE PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE

T. D. Lovett, M. T. Coffey and G. E. Combs2


The amount of floor space and crude protein required to optimize
performance of finishing pigs is an important management consideration.
Overcrowding may stress pigs and consequently reduce performance. Studies
were designed to evaluate the relationship of floor space and dietary crude
protein during different seasons of the year.

Experimental

Three trials were conducted using a total of 374 pigs. Groups were
equalized on the basis of litter, weight and sex. All pigs were housed in.a
slotted-floor finishing barn with concrete block sides. Each pen contained an
automatic waterer and self-feeder.

Composition of the 11 and 13% crude protein diets is shown in table 1.
The experiments were a 2 x 2 factorial design. The factors were die ary
protein 11 or 13% and floor space per pig .56 (6 ft ) or .74 m (8 ft).
Average pen temperatures, measured daily, for trials 1, 2 and 3 were 27.0, 21,
and 16 C, respectively.

Data were analyzed by least squares analysis of variance for main effects
and interactions. If the interaction was significant the least square means
procedure was used to separate means.

Results and Discussion

The performance data from trials 1, 2 and 3 are summarized in tables 2, 3
and 4, respectively. In trial 1, there was a significant (P<.05) effect of
dietary crude protein (CP) and floor space on daily gain and feed efficiency.
Pigs fed 11 or 13% CP diets gained an average of .47 and .51 kg/day,
respectively. Pigs housed in pens providing .56 m /pig gained .45 kg/day, as
compared to those housed in pens with .74 m /pig that gained .53 kg/day. Pigs
consuming 13% CP required 3.87 compared to 4.26 units feed/unit gain for pigs
fed the 11% CP diet. Floor space also had a significant effect on feed
efficiency (P<.05) and daily feed consumption (P<.1). Pigs provided .74 or
.56 m /pig needed 3.92 and 4.21 units feed/unit gain, respectively. Pigs
provided more floor space consumed 2.06 kg feed/day while crowded pigs ate
1.90 kg feed/day.


Experiments 258 A, B and C.
2
Lovett, Graduate Research Assistant; Coffey, Assistant Animal Nutritionist;
and Combs, Animal Nutritionist, Department of Animal Science, Gainesville.






-2-

In trial 2, the significant (P<.05) effects of dietary protein and floor
space on daily gain were similar to those found in trial 1. Pigs fed 13 or
11% CP diets gained .67 and .63 kg/day, respectively. Rigs given .74 m /pig
floor space gained .68 kg/day while pigs provided .56 m /pig gained .61
kg/day. There was no significant (P<.05) difference among treatment groups in
feed/gain or daily feed consumption.

In trial 3, there were significant (P<.05) dietary crude protein and
floor space effects on average daily gain. Pigs fed 13% CP gained .65 kg/day
compared to .56 kg/day for pigs consuming 11% CP diets. Pigs provided .74
m /pig outgained pigs given .56 m /pig, .64 kg/day to .58 kg/day,respectively.
Floor space2significantly (P<.05) affected daily feed consumption as pigs
given2.74 m /pig floor space consumed 2.56 kg feed/day while pigs housed with
.56 m /pig floor space ate 2.35 kg feed/day. Dietary protein had a
significant (P<.05) effect on feed/gain. Pigs fed 13% CP required only 3.76
units feed/unit of gain, but pigs fed 11% CP required 4.36 units feed/unit of
gain.

In trials 1 and 2, there was a significant (P<.05) interaction of floor
space x sex (table 5). In trial 1 barrows significantly (P<.05) outgained
gilts when each was provided .56 m /pig.2 There was no difference in daily
gain of barrows and gilts provided .74 m /pig. In trial 2, there was no
difference (P<.05) between daily gain of barrows and gilts when provided .56
m /pig of floor space. However, when .74 m /pig space was provided barrows
significantly (P<.05) outgained gilts. There was no effect2of floor space on
the growth rate of gilts. In contrast, barrows given .74 m /pig significantly
(P<.05) outperformed barrows provided less floor space. In trial 3, the floor
space x sex interaction was not significant. These data indicate that under
warm conditions, when average pen temperatures were 27 C (trial 1), the daily
gain of gilts but not barrows was significantly reduced under the stress of
less floor space. During cooler weather, when average pen temperatures fell
to 21 C (trial 2), only barrows were able to benefit from increased floor
space. In trial 3, when weather was even cooler and average pen temperatures
were 16 C, both barrows and gilts showed a response to increased floor space.
These data suggest that at least .74 m /pig of floor space is required during
warmer periods to prevent depressed performance of finishing gilts.

Summary

Three trials involving 374 pigs were conducted to evaluate the effects of
floor space and dietary crude protein during different seasons on finishing
swine performance. Two levels of crude protein (11 or 13%) and two areas of
floor space (.56 or..74 m /pig) were the main factors evaluated. There was a
positive response to increased dietary protein and increased floor space in
all trials. There was a significant (P<.05) floor space x sex interaction in
trials 1 and 2 when pen temperatures averaged 27 and 21 C, respectively. In a
third trial during cooler temperatures (16 C), the sex x floor space
interaction was not significant. Both barrows as well as gilts showed a
response to increased floor space. Therefore, under cooler conditions, both
sexes were able to benefit from additional floor area.










Table 1. COMPOSITION OF DIETS


Dietary Protein, %
Ingredient 11 13


Ground yellow corn 91.50 86.50
Soybean meal 5.70 10.70
Iodized salt 0.20 0.20
Dynafos 1.70 1.70
Ground limestone 0.80 0.80
Trace minerals 0.05 0.05
Vitamin mix (UF) 0.05 0.05


aSupplied by Calcium Carbonate Company,
10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper,
calcium.


Quincy, IL.
10% cobalt,


Contained 20% zinc
.15% iodine and 12%


bContained 13,200 mg riboflavin, 44,000 mg niacin, 26,400 mg pantothenic
acid,176,000 mg choline chloride, 22,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU
vitamin A, 880,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 22,000 IU vitamin E and 22,000 mg
vitamin K3 per kg of supplement.


TABLE 2. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR
SPACE ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 1)a

Crude Protein, % 11 13
Floor Space, m /pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item
Initial weight, kg 61.9 60.8 61.5 60.8
Final weight, gc,d 94.4 97.1 95.2 101.8
Daily gain, kg' .44 .50 .46 .56
Daily feed, k 1.96 2.04 1.85 2.07
Feed/gain, kg 4.41 4.12 4.02 3.71


aLeast squares means.
Significant linear effect due to crude protein level (P<.05).

cSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.001).

Significant floor space x sex interaction (P<.05).

eSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.1).










Table 1. COMPOSITION OF DIETS


Dietary Protein, %
Ingredient 11 13


Ground yellow corn 91.50 86.50
Soybean meal 5.70 10.70
Iodized salt 0.20 0.20
Dynafos 1.70 1.70
Ground limestone 0.80 0.80
Trace minerals 0.05 0.05
Vitamin mix (UF) 0.05 0.05


aSupplied by Calcium Carbonate Company,
10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper,
calcium.


Quincy, IL.
10% cobalt,


Contained 20% zinc
.15% iodine and 12%


bContained 13,200 mg riboflavin, 44,000 mg niacin, 26,400 mg pantothenic
acid,176,000 mg choline chloride, 22,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU
vitamin A, 880,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 22,000 IU vitamin E and 22,000 mg
vitamin K3 per kg of supplement.


TABLE 2. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR
SPACE ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 1)a

Crude Protein, % 11 13
Floor Space, m /pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item
Initial weight, kg 61.9 60.8 61.5 60.8
Final weight, gc,d 94.4 97.1 95.2 101.8
Daily gain, kg' .44 .50 .46 .56
Daily feed, k 1.96 2.04 1.85 2.07
Feed/gain, kg 4.41 4.12 4.02 3.71


aLeast squares means.
Significant linear effect due to crude protein level (P<.05).

cSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.001).

Significant floor space x sex interaction (P<.05).

eSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.1).








TABLE 3. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR SPACE
ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 2)


Crude Protein, % 11 13
Floor Space, m2/pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item

Initial weight, kg 56.7 56.7 56.7 56.7
Final weight, gcd 90.8 95.3 93.8 98.1
Daily gain, kg .58 .67 .64 .70
Daily feed, kg 2.35 2.63 2.47 2.53
Feed/gain 4.01 3.98 3.90 3.58

aLeast squares means.
significant linear effect due to crude protein (P<.05).

CSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.05).

Significant floor space x sex interaction (P<.05).


TABLE 4. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR SPACE
ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 3)


Crude Protein,2% 11 13
Floor Space, m /pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item

Initial weight, kg 59.7 59.4 59.2 59.5
Final weight, Igc,d 92.7 95.0 97.1 102.1
Daily gain, kg .54 .58 .62 .69
Daily feec, kg 2.36 2.53 2.34 2.59
Feed/gain 4.36 4.35 3.80 3.71

aLeast squares means.

Significant linear effect due to crude protein (P<.05).
cSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.05).

Significant linear effect due to sex (P<.01).








TABLE 3. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR SPACE
ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 2)


Crude Protein, % 11 13
Floor Space, m2/pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item

Initial weight, kg 56.7 56.7 56.7 56.7
Final weight, gcd 90.8 95.3 93.8 98.1
Daily gain, kg .58 .67 .64 .70
Daily feed, kg 2.35 2.63 2.47 2.53
Feed/gain 4.01 3.98 3.90 3.58

aLeast squares means.
significant linear effect due to crude protein (P<.05).

CSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.05).

Significant floor space x sex interaction (P<.05).


TABLE 4. EFFECT OF DIETARY CRUDE PROTEIN LEVEL AND FLOOR SPACE
ON PERFORMANCE OF FINISHING SWINE (TRIAL 3)


Crude Protein,2% 11 13
Floor Space, m /pig .56 .74 .56 .74

Item

Initial weight, kg 59.7 59.4 59.2 59.5
Final weight, Igc,d 92.7 95.0 97.1 102.1
Daily gain, kg .54 .58 .62 .69
Daily feec, kg 2.36 2.53 2.34 2.59
Feed/gain 4.36 4.35 3.80 3.71

aLeast squares means.

Significant linear effect due to crude protein (P<.05).
cSignificant linear effect due to floor space (P<.05).

Significant linear effect due to sex (P<.01).









TABLE 5.. EFFECTS OF FLOOR SPACE AND SEX ON AgERAGE DAILY GAIN
OF FINISHING SWINE, BY TRIAL

Floor space, m2/pig
Trial Temp, C Sex .56 4

1 27 Barrgw .49 .54
Gilt .44 .56

2 21 Barrowd .65 .80b
Gilt .63 .63

3 16 Barrwd .63 .68b
Gilt .58 .64


aLeast squares means

bcMeans that appear
(P<.05) different.
Significant (P<.05)


averaged across dietary protein level.

in the same column within a trial are significantly


floor space effect.




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