• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Experimental
 Results
 Table 1 - Concentrate formulas...
 Table 2 - Feed and nutrient intake...
 Table 3 - Growth response of yearling...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1980-12
Title: High energy concentrates for growing foals
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073121/00001
 Material Information
Title: High energy concentrates for growing foals
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 2, 2 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ott, E. A ( Edgar A )
Asquith, Richard L
Feaster, J. P
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1980
 Subjects
Subject: Foals -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: E.A. Ott, R.L. Asquith and J.P. Feaster.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "September, 1980."
Funding: Animal science research report ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073121
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80755835

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Concentrate formulas and nutrient content of concentrates and coastal Bermudagrass hay
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Feed and nutrient intake of yearling foals receiving two concentrates
        Page 3
    Table 3 - Growth response of yearling foals to low and high energy concentrates
        Page 4
Full Text


Department of Animal Science' 1 Florida Agricultur
Research Report AL-1980-12 Experiment StaLior
September, 1980 Gainesville, Flori


HIGH ENERGY CONCENTRATES FOR GROWING FOALS1

E. A. Ott, R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster2

Energy and protein intake are the major nutritional factors that influence
growth rates of young horses. Most recent studies have concentrated on protein
intake'and protein quality using fixed energy concentrations. A review of the
literature available indicates a wide variation in the energy content of con-
centrates used at various experiment stations making interpretation of results
from different stations difficult. This experiment was designed to compare
the growth response of two groups of yearling foals using our standard concen-
trate which contains 25% corn and 48.75% oats with a high energy concentrate
containing 69.75% corn and 0% oats. The high energy concentrate was calcu-
lated to provide 10% more digestible energy than the standard concentrate.


Experimental

Sixteen foals 339.25.3 days of agewere assigned at random within breed
and sex outcome groups to two treatments. The foals were housed in groups
of 4-6 in 319.2 m2 dry lot paddocks. Concentrates were offered to appetite
in individual feeding stalls for two 1.5 hr. feeding periods each day. Coastal
bermudagrass hay was group fed in the paddocks at a rate of I Ib per 100 Ib
BW. No pasture was available. Weight and body measurements were taken at
the start of the experiment and at 28 day intervals for 140 days. Feed con-
sumption was recorded daily. Formulations for the pelleted concentrates and
the nutrient content of the concentrates and the Coastal bermudagrass hay are
shown in Table 1. Two animals in group B were removed from the trial, one due
to a traumatic eye injury and the other due to a heart anomaly. Both conditions
were judged to be unrelated to the experimental variables.


Results

Concentrate intake for the two groups was the same (table 2). However,
foals receiving the high energy concentrate (B) consumed less hay than the
foals receiving the low energy concentrate. Digestible energy (DE) intake was
about 8% higher by the foals receiving the high energy concentrate but protein
intake was essentially equal. Feed consumption averaged 2.72% BW including
1.76% BW of concentrate and 0.96% BW of hay. Crude protein per Mcal DE was
45.0 g for the low energy group and 42.5 g for the high energy group. Feed
efficiency was about 9.4% better for the group receiving the high energy con-
centrate. Colts consumed 14.9% more feed than fillies and were less efficient.

Weight, height, girth, length and hip height were not significantly af-
fected by the diets (table 3). Sex differences detected at the end of the experi-
ment indicated that the colts on diet B were significantly longer than those
on diet A. Also, colts receiving diet B were significantly longer than fillies
receiving the same diet. No otherdifferences were detected indicating that


IExperiment HN-794
20tt, Animal Nutritionist, Asquith, D.V.M. and Feaster, Biochemist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science.






Department of Animal Science' 1 Florida Agricultur
Research Report AL-1980-12 Experiment StaLior
September, 1980 Gainesville, Flori


HIGH ENERGY CONCENTRATES FOR GROWING FOALS1

E. A. Ott, R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster2

Energy and protein intake are the major nutritional factors that influence
growth rates of young horses. Most recent studies have concentrated on protein
intake'and protein quality using fixed energy concentrations. A review of the
literature available indicates a wide variation in the energy content of con-
centrates used at various experiment stations making interpretation of results
from different stations difficult. This experiment was designed to compare
the growth response of two groups of yearling foals using our standard concen-
trate which contains 25% corn and 48.75% oats with a high energy concentrate
containing 69.75% corn and 0% oats. The high energy concentrate was calcu-
lated to provide 10% more digestible energy than the standard concentrate.


Experimental

Sixteen foals 339.25.3 days of agewere assigned at random within breed
and sex outcome groups to two treatments. The foals were housed in groups
of 4-6 in 319.2 m2 dry lot paddocks. Concentrates were offered to appetite
in individual feeding stalls for two 1.5 hr. feeding periods each day. Coastal
bermudagrass hay was group fed in the paddocks at a rate of I Ib per 100 Ib
BW. No pasture was available. Weight and body measurements were taken at
the start of the experiment and at 28 day intervals for 140 days. Feed con-
sumption was recorded daily. Formulations for the pelleted concentrates and
the nutrient content of the concentrates and the Coastal bermudagrass hay are
shown in Table 1. Two animals in group B were removed from the trial, one due
to a traumatic eye injury and the other due to a heart anomaly. Both conditions
were judged to be unrelated to the experimental variables.


Results

Concentrate intake for the two groups was the same (table 2). However,
foals receiving the high energy concentrate (B) consumed less hay than the
foals receiving the low energy concentrate. Digestible energy (DE) intake was
about 8% higher by the foals receiving the high energy concentrate but protein
intake was essentially equal. Feed consumption averaged 2.72% BW including
1.76% BW of concentrate and 0.96% BW of hay. Crude protein per Mcal DE was
45.0 g for the low energy group and 42.5 g for the high energy group. Feed
efficiency was about 9.4% better for the group receiving the high energy con-
centrate. Colts consumed 14.9% more feed than fillies and were less efficient.

Weight, height, girth, length and hip height were not significantly af-
fected by the diets (table 3). Sex differences detected at the end of the experi-
ment indicated that the colts on diet B were significantly longer than those
on diet A. Also, colts receiving diet B were significantly longer than fillies
receiving the same diet. No otherdifferences were detected indicating that


IExperiment HN-794
20tt, Animal Nutritionist, Asquith, D.V.M. and Feaster, Biochemist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science.






2 -

the foals on the high energy concentrate grew as well as those on the lower
energy product.

The results of this study indicate that as oats prices increase, corn
may be used as the primary energy source in pelleted concentrate for grow-
ing foals. Foals consuming such rations can be expected to grow and develop
at rates comparable to those experienced on more conventional feeding pro-
grams. The use of these high energy concentrates can be expected to provide
economic advantage in the form of reduced feed cost and lower feed intake.
It is not anticipated that this type of diet will have any detrimental effect
on the animal as long as quality feedstuffs are fed. Care should be taken
to acquaint the animal with more conventional training rations prior to send-
ing them to the trainer.








HN-794


TABLE 1. CONCENTRATE FORMULAS AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF
CONCENTRATES AND, COASTAL BERMUPDAGRASS HAY


Concentrates1
Ingredients A B Coastal
S% Bermudagrass
Hay


Corn, ground 25.0 69.75
Oats, ground 48.75 --
Wheat bran 10.0 10.0
Soybean meal 8.0 12.0
Alfalfa, dehy. 5.0 5.0
Bio Phos 1.0 1.0
Limestone, ground 1.0 1.0
Salt .5 .5
Premix, Tm and Vitamins2 .5 .5
Ca propionate .25 .25

Analyses as fed:

DM, % 87.63 87.58 86.13
DE Mcal/lb 1.30 1.47 .86
Crude protein % 13.33 13.92 7.72
Calcium .91 .84 .48
Phosphorus ..66 .58 .32

iPelleted 1/4" die
2Provided the following per lb of concentrate: manganese, 4.9 mg; iron,
18.2 mg; copper, 3.4 mg; zinc, 18.0 mg; cobalt, 0.1 mg; iodine, 0.1 mg;
Vitamin A, 3000 IU; Vitamin D, 300 IU; and Vitamin E, 6 IU.


TABLE 2. FEED AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF
RECEIVING TWO CONCENTRATES


Concentrates
A B


YEARLING FOALS


Sex
C F


Grain Intake lb
Hay Intake lb
Total Intake lb
DE Grain, Mcal1
DE Hay, Mcal2
DE Intake, Mcal
CP Grain, g
CP Hay, g
CP Intake, g
Grain Intake % BW
Hay Intake % BW
Total Feed % BW


14.97
8.27
23.24
19.46
7.11
26.57
907
290
1197
1.77
.98
2.75


CP/Mcal DE 45.0
Feed/lb gain 16.26

'Ration A 1.30 Mcal/lb.
2Hay .86 Mcal/lb as-fed.


14.95
7.84
22.79
21.98
6.74
28.72
946
275
1221
1.76
.92
2.68
42.5
14.73


16.36
8.25
24.61


16.31


Ration B, 1.47 Mcal/lb as-fed.


13.56
7.86
21.42


14.68








HN-794


TABLE 1. CONCENTRATE FORMULAS AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF
CONCENTRATES AND, COASTAL BERMUPDAGRASS HAY


Concentrates1
Ingredients A B Coastal
S% Bermudagrass
Hay


Corn, ground 25.0 69.75
Oats, ground 48.75 --
Wheat bran 10.0 10.0
Soybean meal 8.0 12.0
Alfalfa, dehy. 5.0 5.0
Bio Phos 1.0 1.0
Limestone, ground 1.0 1.0
Salt .5 .5
Premix, Tm and Vitamins2 .5 .5
Ca propionate .25 .25

Analyses as fed:

DM, % 87.63 87.58 86.13
DE Mcal/lb 1.30 1.47 .86
Crude protein % 13.33 13.92 7.72
Calcium .91 .84 .48
Phosphorus ..66 .58 .32

iPelleted 1/4" die
2Provided the following per lb of concentrate: manganese, 4.9 mg; iron,
18.2 mg; copper, 3.4 mg; zinc, 18.0 mg; cobalt, 0.1 mg; iodine, 0.1 mg;
Vitamin A, 3000 IU; Vitamin D, 300 IU; and Vitamin E, 6 IU.


TABLE 2. FEED AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF
RECEIVING TWO CONCENTRATES


Concentrates
A B


YEARLING FOALS


Sex
C F


Grain Intake lb
Hay Intake lb
Total Intake lb
DE Grain, Mcal1
DE Hay, Mcal2
DE Intake, Mcal
CP Grain, g
CP Hay, g
CP Intake, g
Grain Intake % BW
Hay Intake % BW
Total Feed % BW


14.97
8.27
23.24
19.46
7.11
26.57
907
290
1197
1.77
.98
2.75


CP/Mcal DE 45.0
Feed/lb gain 16.26

'Ration A 1.30 Mcal/lb.
2Hay .86 Mcal/lb as-fed.


14.95
7.84
22.79
21.98
6.74
28.72
946
275
1221
1.76
.92
2.68
42.5
14.73


16.36
8.25
24.61


16.31


Ration B, 1.47 Mcal/lb as-fed.


13.56
7.86
21.42


14.68








HN-794


TABLE 3. GROWTH RESPONSE OF YEARLING FOALS
TO LOW AND HIGH ENERGY CONCENTRATES


Concentrates Sex
A B C F

Initial wt., lb 742.9 742.9 742.9 742.9
Final wt., lb 944.9 960.7 957.6 948.1
Weight Gain, lb 202.1 217.8 214.7 205.2
ADG, lb 1.44 1.56

Initial Height, in. 55.88 55.88 55.88 55.88
Final Height, in. 58.61 58.10 58.62 58.10
Height Gain, in. 2.74 2.23 2.74 2.22

Initial Girth, in. 61.48 61.48 61.48 61.48
Final Girth, in. 66.42 67.11 66.92 66.61
Girth Gain, in. 4.94 5.63 5.44 5.13

Initial Length, in. 56.09 56.09 56.09 56.09
Final Length, in. 59.96 60.80 60.90 59.87
Length Gain, in. 3.87 4.72 4.81 3.78

Initial Hip Height, in. 58.14 58.14 58.14 58.14
Final Hip Height, in. 60.27 60.43 60.47 60.23
Hip Height Gain, in. 2.13 2.29 2.32 2.09




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