• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Experimental
 Results
 Table 1 - Composition of concentrate...
 Table 2 - Vitamin supplementation...
 Table 3 - Average daily intake...
 Table 4 - Growth, feed intake and...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1980-8
Title: B Vitamin supplementation of weanling foals
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073117/00001
 Material Information
Title: B Vitamin supplementation of weanling foals
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 2, 3 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ott, E. A ( Edgar A )
Asquith, Richard L
Feaster, J. P
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1980
 Subjects
Subject: Foals -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vitamin B in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: E.A. Ott, R.L. Asquith and J.P. Feaster.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1980."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073117
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80748887

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Composition of concentrate and hay
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Vitamin supplementation per pound of feed
        Page 3
    Table 3 - Average daily intake of nutrients
        Page 4
    Table 4 - Growth, feed intake and feed efficiency of weanling foals fed three levels of vitamins
        Page 5
Full Text


Department of Animal Science 1 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1980-8 Experiment Station
August, 1980 Gainesville, Florida


B VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTATION OF WEANLING FOALS1

E. A. Ott, R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster2


The horse has been shown to be able to synthesize large quantities of
B complex vitamins via the microbial population in the gut. For most horses
this synthesis and the vitamins found in the ingredients used in the feeds
are adequate to meet the animal's needs and no supplementation is necessary.
Young horses and performance horses may not be able to manufacture or absorb
adequate quantities of some of the B complex vitamins to meet their needs.
Stowe (1968) has shown that foals receiving purified diets without additional
B complex vitamins will respond to vitamin supplementation. No specific re-
sponses have been documented on natural diets, yet most foal diets are sup-
plemented liberally. This experiment was designed to determine whether foals
would respond to B complex vitamin supplementation and to assess the effects
of increasing vitamin supplementation to five times normal levels.


Experimental

Eighteen Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse.weanlings averaging 120 days of
age were assigned at random with sex and breed outcome groups to three exper-
imental rations.. The pelleted concentrate shown in table 1 was fed individ-
ually to appetite with the foals allowed toaccess to the feed for two, 1.5
hour feeding periods per day. Coastal bermudagrass hay was group-fed at a
rate of 1 kg/100 kg body weight (BW) per day. When not confined to the feed-
ing stall the foals had access to a sand paddock providing 53.2m2 per foal.
Foals were weighed and measured at the start of the experiment and at 14 day
intervals for 112 days. Vitamin supplementation levels for the three concen-
trates are shown in table 2. Concentrate HN-52 was supplemented with 3000
IU Vitamin A, 600 USP units Vitamin D and 3 IU Vitamin E per pound. Concen-
trate HN-53 provided a similar level of Vitamin A, D and E with a typical
addition of B complex vitamins. Concentrate HN-54 contained five times the
vitamins contained in HN-53.


Results

Average daily intakes of digestible energy (DE), crude protein (CP),
calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and supplemental vitamins by the foals during
the 112 day experiment are shown in table 3. The vitamin levels shown are
additions to the vitamins found in the natural ingredients in the concentrate
and hay. Intake by group A was in excess of NRC recommendations for all
vitamins except riboflavin and pantothenic acid. Group B was in excess of
requirements for all the vitamins and Group C received 3 to 20 times the
stated requirements.

Weight, withers height, girth, length, hip height, feed intake and
feed efficiency are shown in table 4. Data were adjusted to eliminate the


1Experiment HN-785
20tt, Animal Nutritionist, Asquith, D.V.M. and Feaster, Biochemist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science






Department of Animal Science 1 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1980-8 Experiment Station
August, 1980 Gainesville, Florida


B VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTATION OF WEANLING FOALS1

E. A. Ott, R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster2


The horse has been shown to be able to synthesize large quantities of
B complex vitamins via the microbial population in the gut. For most horses
this synthesis and the vitamins found in the ingredients used in the feeds
are adequate to meet the animal's needs and no supplementation is necessary.
Young horses and performance horses may not be able to manufacture or absorb
adequate quantities of some of the B complex vitamins to meet their needs.
Stowe (1968) has shown that foals receiving purified diets without additional
B complex vitamins will respond to vitamin supplementation. No specific re-
sponses have been documented on natural diets, yet most foal diets are sup-
plemented liberally. This experiment was designed to determine whether foals
would respond to B complex vitamin supplementation and to assess the effects
of increasing vitamin supplementation to five times normal levels.


Experimental

Eighteen Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse.weanlings averaging 120 days of
age were assigned at random with sex and breed outcome groups to three exper-
imental rations.. The pelleted concentrate shown in table 1 was fed individ-
ually to appetite with the foals allowed toaccess to the feed for two, 1.5
hour feeding periods per day. Coastal bermudagrass hay was group-fed at a
rate of 1 kg/100 kg body weight (BW) per day. When not confined to the feed-
ing stall the foals had access to a sand paddock providing 53.2m2 per foal.
Foals were weighed and measured at the start of the experiment and at 14 day
intervals for 112 days. Vitamin supplementation levels for the three concen-
trates are shown in table 2. Concentrate HN-52 was supplemented with 3000
IU Vitamin A, 600 USP units Vitamin D and 3 IU Vitamin E per pound. Concen-
trate HN-53 provided a similar level of Vitamin A, D and E with a typical
addition of B complex vitamins. Concentrate HN-54 contained five times the
vitamins contained in HN-53.


Results

Average daily intakes of digestible energy (DE), crude protein (CP),
calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and supplemental vitamins by the foals during
the 112 day experiment are shown in table 3. The vitamin levels shown are
additions to the vitamins found in the natural ingredients in the concentrate
and hay. Intake by group A was in excess of NRC recommendations for all
vitamins except riboflavin and pantothenic acid. Group B was in excess of
requirements for all the vitamins and Group C received 3 to 20 times the
stated requirements.

Weight, withers height, girth, length, hip height, feed intake and
feed efficiency are shown in table 4. Data were adjusted to eliminate the


1Experiment HN-785
20tt, Animal Nutritionist, Asquith, D.V.M. and Feaster, Biochemist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science






2 -

influence of initial size on the subsequent values. No significant differences
(P<.05) were detected between sexes or due to dietary treatments. However,
foals consuming diet C consumed 14% more feed and gained weight 20% faster
than foals on diets A and B.

Due to small numbers involved in this experiment, differences between
experimental groups were not statistically significant. The results suggest,
however, that moderately high levels of vitamin supplementation do not adverse-
ly affect intake and growth of foals. Since the high level of supplementation
resulted in apparent increases in feed intake, weight gains, girth gains,
and hip height gains, high levels in some vitamins may stimulate feed intake
and growth responses. This possibility will require further study to verify
the response and identify the vitamins responsible.







HN-785


TABLE 1. COMPOSITION OF CONCENTRATE AND HAY

Concentrate Coastal Bermudagrass
% Hay

Corn 36.25
Oats 25.50
Wheat bran 10.00
Soybean meal (44% CP) 20.00
Alfalfa, dehy 5.00
Bio phos. 1.00
Limestone, gr. 1.00
Ca propionate .25
Salt .50
TM premix .50
Vitamins +


Analyses as fed:

Dry matter, % 87.24 88.84
Dig. Energy1 Mcal/lb 1.37 .80
Crude protein, % 17.65 6.67
Crude fiber, % 9.83 32.18
Ether extract, % 2.12 1.55
Calcium, % 1.17 .32
Phosphorus, % .70 .30

ICalculated from NRC 1978.




HN-785

TABLE 2. VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTATION PER POUND OF FEED

Group A B C
Concentrate HN-52 HN-53 HN-54
Vitamin A IU 3000 3125 15625
Vitamin D USP 600 659 3295
Vitamin E IU 3 3.1 15.1
Riboflavin mg --- 4.4 22
d-pantothenic acid mg ---- 5.3 26.5
Niacin mg --- 13.2 66
Choline mg --- 76.0 380
Vitamin B12 ug -- 13 65
Thiamin mg -2.6 13
Folic acid mg -.-- 1.3 6.5
Pyridoxine mg --- 1.3 6.5







HN-785


TABLE 1. COMPOSITION OF CONCENTRATE AND HAY

Concentrate Coastal Bermudagrass
% Hay

Corn 36.25
Oats 25.50
Wheat bran 10.00
Soybean meal (44% CP) 20.00
Alfalfa, dehy 5.00
Bio phos. 1.00
Limestone, gr. 1.00
Ca propionate .25
Salt .50
TM premix .50
Vitamins +


Analyses as fed:

Dry matter, % 87.24 88.84
Dig. Energy1 Mcal/lb 1.37 .80
Crude protein, % 17.65 6.67
Crude fiber, % 9.83 32.18
Ether extract, % 2.12 1.55
Calcium, % 1.17 .32
Phosphorus, % .70 .30

ICalculated from NRC 1978.




HN-785

TABLE 2. VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTATION PER POUND OF FEED

Group A B C
Concentrate HN-52 HN-53 HN-54
Vitamin A IU 3000 3125 15625
Vitamin D USP 600 659 3295
Vitamin E IU 3 3.1 15.1
Riboflavin mg --- 4.4 22
d-pantothenic acid mg ---- 5.3 26.5
Niacin mg --- 13.2 66
Choline mg --- 76.0 380
Vitamin B12 ug -- 13 65
Thiamin mg -2.6 13
Folic acid mg -.-- 1.3 6.5
Pyridoxine mg --- 1.3 6.5




















TABLE 3. AVERAGE DAILY INTAKE OF NUTRIENTS

Group A B C

Dig. Energy, Mcal 16.09 15.49 18.57
Crude Protein, g 858 825 1004
Calcium, g 54 52 64
Phosphorus, g 35 34 41

Supplemental Vitamins1

Vitamin A, IU 26,280 26,281 265.,937
Vitamin D, USP 5256 5542 34,993
Vitamin E, IU 26 26 160
Riboflavin, mg -- 37 233
d-Pantothenic acid, mg 45 281
Niacin, mg 111 701
Choline, mg -639 4036
Vitamin B12 ug 109 690
Thiamin, mg 22 138
Folic acid, mg 11 69
Pyridoxine, mg 11 69


in the natural ingredients in the feeds.


1Does not include vitamins contained











IN-785


TABLE 4. GROWTH, FEED INTAKE AND FEED EFFICIENCY OF WEANLING
FOALS FED THREE LEVELS OF VITAMINS


Sex Group
Colts Fillies A B C

Eight, lbs
Initial 437.2 437.2 437.2 437.2 437.2
Final 630.2 632.9 622.2 616.7 655.8
Gain 193.0 195.7 185.0 179.5 218.6

eight, in.
Initial 49.4 49.4 49.4 49.4 49.4
Final 53.2 53.3 53.5 53.2 i53.2
Gain 3.9 4.0 4.1 3.8 3.8

;irth, in.
Initial 49.9 49.9 49.9 49.9 49.9
Final 56.6 56.8 56.5 56.2 57.4
Gain 6.7 6.9 6.6 6.3 7.5

length, in.
Initial 46.5 46.5 46.5 46.5 46.5
Final 52.0 52.5 52.8 51.8 52.2
Gain 5.5 6.0 6.3 5.3 5.7

lip Height, in.
Initial 51.0 51.0 51.0 51.0 51.0
Final 55.3 55.6 55.3 55.2 55.9
Gain 4.3 4.7 4.3 4.3 4.9

Entake, Ibs.
Grain 9.16 9.16- 8.76 8.41 10.62
Hay 5.03 5.03 5.11 4.96 5.02
Total 14.19 14.39 13.87 13.37 15.64


8.52 8.44


__ __


'/G 8.32


8.51 8.30




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