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 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Composition of diet
 Table 2 - Pig performance during...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1980-3
Title: Influence of pen size and number of pigs per pen on performance of young swine
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073112/00001
 Material Information
Title: Influence of pen size and number of pigs per pen on performance of young swine
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 3 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Copelin, Johnny Landon
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1980
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Housing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs and J.L. Copelin.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "May, 1980."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073112
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80734862

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Composition of diet
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Pig performance during 28 day experimental period (March-April)
        Page 3
Full Text



Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1980-3 Experiment Station
May, 1980 Gainesville, Florida



INFLUENCE OF PEN SIZE AND NUMBER OF PIGS PER PEN
ON PERFORMANCE OF YOUNG SWINE1


G. E. Combs and J. L. Copelin2


The amount of space required for optimal pig performance is an important
factor in planning-management considerations. Too few pigs per pen may adversely
affect return on building investment while overcrowding may stress pigs to the
extent of reducing performance.

This study is the first of several experiments which were designed to
evaluate the relationship of pen size, number of pigs per pen and season of
year on performance.


Experimental

One hundred eighty pigs averaging 22.8 pounds were allotted on the basis
of initial weight, litter and sex to four treatment groups. Three replicates
were used with each group. All pigs were housed in an enclosed nursery equipped
with elevated pens having expanded metal floors and wire mesh sides. Each pen
contained an automatic waterer and self-feeder.

The treatments were as follows:

Treatment 1 2 sq. ft. per pig and 12 pigs per pen.
Treatment 2 2 sq. ft. per pig and 24 pigs per pen.
Treatment 3 3 sq. ft. per pig and 8 pigs per pen.
Treatment 4 3 sq. ft. per pig and 16 pigs per pen.

The composition of the 18 percent protein diet is presented in table 1.


Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in table 2.

The daily gains of pigs given floor space of 2 sq. ft. per pig were
significantly (P<.05) less than those allowed 3 sq. ft. per pig. Daily gains
were not affected by the number of pigs per pen within either of the sq. ft.
areas.

Feed required per unit gain was not significantly (P<.05) affected by either
the sq. ft. allowance or the number of pigs per pen.


1Experiment 263.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Copelin, Assistant Animal Nutritionist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science.







Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1980-3 Experiment Station
May, 1980 Gainesville, Florida



INFLUENCE OF PEN SIZE AND NUMBER OF PIGS PER PEN
ON PERFORMANCE OF YOUNG SWINE1


G. E. Combs and J. L. Copelin2


The amount of space required for optimal pig performance is an important
factor in planning-management considerations. Too few pigs per pen may adversely
affect return on building investment while overcrowding may stress pigs to the
extent of reducing performance.

This study is the first of several experiments which were designed to
evaluate the relationship of pen size, number of pigs per pen and season of
year on performance.


Experimental

One hundred eighty pigs averaging 22.8 pounds were allotted on the basis
of initial weight, litter and sex to four treatment groups. Three replicates
were used with each group. All pigs were housed in an enclosed nursery equipped
with elevated pens having expanded metal floors and wire mesh sides. Each pen
contained an automatic waterer and self-feeder.

The treatments were as follows:

Treatment 1 2 sq. ft. per pig and 12 pigs per pen.
Treatment 2 2 sq. ft. per pig and 24 pigs per pen.
Treatment 3 3 sq. ft. per pig and 8 pigs per pen.
Treatment 4 3 sq. ft. per pig and 16 pigs per pen.

The composition of the 18 percent protein diet is presented in table 1.


Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in table 2.

The daily gains of pigs given floor space of 2 sq. ft. per pig were
significantly (P<.05) less than those allowed 3 sq. ft. per pig. Daily gains
were not affected by the number of pigs per pen within either of the sq. ft.
areas.

Feed required per unit gain was not significantly (P<.05) affected by either
the sq. ft. allowance or the number of pigs per pen.


1Experiment 263.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Copelin, Assistant Animal Nutritionist, Depart-
ment of Animal Science.







-2 -


Based on the gain data from this experiment, pigs from 22 to 58 pounds
body weight did not perform satisfactorily when given 2 sq. ft. of floor
space per pig and at animal densities of 12 or 24 pigs per pen. It should be
emphasized that the design of these pens is similar to that of a single flat
deck which provides a drier, cleaner, warmer pen and in general a more
sanitary environment than many conventional floor type nursery pens. Con-
sequently, a further decrease in gain may be experienced with different pen
designs at these same sq. ft. and animal density allowances.


SUMMARY

One hundred and eighty pigs averaging 22.8 pounds were used to determine
the influence of floor space (sq. ft./pig) and animal density (pigs/pen) on
rate and efficiency of gain. Pigs given 3 sq. ft. per pig at densities of 8
or 16 pigs per pen gained significantly (P<.05) faster than pigs allowed 2
sq. ft. per pig at densities of 12 or 24 pigs per pen. Feed efficiency was
not significantly (P<.05) affected by treatments.







-3-


TABLE 1. COMPOSITION OF DIET


Ingredient Ibs

Ground yellow corn 71.80
Soybean meal 25.00
Iodized salt 0.25
Dyna-Phos 1.70
Ground limestone 0.80
Trace minerals1 0.10
Vitamin mix (UF)2 0.10
Aureo SP-250 0.25

Total 100.00


1Supplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained 20%
zinc, 10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, andl2% calcium.
2Contained 6,000 mg riboflavin, 20,000 mg niacin, 12,000 mg pantothenic
acid, 80,000 mg choline chloride, 10,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU
vitamin A, 400,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 10,000 IU vitamin E per lb of
premix.







TABLE 2. PIG PERFORMANCE DURING 28 DAY EXPERIMENTAL PERIOD (MARCH-APRIL)



Sq. ft./pig 2 3
Pigs/pen 12 24 8 16

Avg. initial weight, lb 22.60 22.30 22.90 23.40
Avg. final weight, lb 54.30 55.30 58.30 57.90
Avg. daily gain, Ib1 1.13 1.17 1.26 1.23
Avg. daily feed, lb 2.06 2.08 2.28 2.20
Avg. feed/gain, lb 1.83 1.75 1.81 1.79
Total no. pigs 36 72 24 48


1pigs given 2 sq. ft. significantly (P<.05) less than those given 3 sq.
ft. Sq. ft. and pigs/pen interaction significant (P<.05).







-3-


TABLE 1. COMPOSITION OF DIET


Ingredient Ibs

Ground yellow corn 71.80
Soybean meal 25.00
Iodized salt 0.25
Dyna-Phos 1.70
Ground limestone 0.80
Trace minerals1 0.10
Vitamin mix (UF)2 0.10
Aureo SP-250 0.25

Total 100.00


1Supplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained 20%
zinc, 10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, andl2% calcium.
2Contained 6,000 mg riboflavin, 20,000 mg niacin, 12,000 mg pantothenic
acid, 80,000 mg choline chloride, 10,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU
vitamin A, 400,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 10,000 IU vitamin E per lb of
premix.







TABLE 2. PIG PERFORMANCE DURING 28 DAY EXPERIMENTAL PERIOD (MARCH-APRIL)



Sq. ft./pig 2 3
Pigs/pen 12 24 8 16

Avg. initial weight, lb 22.60 22.30 22.90 23.40
Avg. final weight, lb 54.30 55.30 58.30 57.90
Avg. daily gain, Ib1 1.13 1.17 1.26 1.23
Avg. daily feed, lb 2.06 2.08 2.28 2.20
Avg. feed/gain, lb 1.83 1.75 1.81 1.79
Total no. pigs 36 72 24 48


1pigs given 2 sq. ft. significantly (P<.05) less than those given 3 sq.
ft. Sq. ft. and pigs/pen interaction significant (P<.05).




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