• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Flooring in each nursery...
 Table 2 - Average age, number and...
 Table 3 - Average age, number and...
 Table 4 - Average daily gain, final...
 Table 5 - Expected longevity and...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1979-7
Title: Evaluation of the percentage survival and rate of gain of weanling pigs maintained on varied nursery floor materials
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073109/00001
 Material Information
Title: Evaluation of the percentage survival and rate of gain of weanling pigs maintained on varied nursery floor materials
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McNutt, Steven Douglas, 1954-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Piglets -- Housing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: S.D. McNutt ... et al..
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1979."
General Note: Pages numbered 14-17.
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073109
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80563502

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 14
    Results and discussion
        Page 14
    Summary
        Page 15
    Table 1 - Flooring in each nursery section
        Page 15
    Table 2 - Average age, number and percentage survivability of pigs entering nursery A sections
        Page 16
    Table 3 - Average age, number and percentage survivability of pigs entering nursery B sections
        Page 16
    Table 4 - Average daily gain, final age and final weight of pigs from birth until leaving the nursery phase
        Page 17
    Table 5 - Expected longevity and cost per square foot of nursery flooring materials
        Page 17
Full Text


Department of Animal Science 14 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-7 Experiment Station
August, 1979 Gainesville, Florida



EVALUATION OF THE PERCENTAGE SURVIVAL AND RATE OF GAIN OF WEANLING
PIGS MAINTAINED ON VARIED NURSERY FLOOR MATERIALS1

S. D. McNutt, K. L. Durrance, J. L. Copelin and G. E. Combs2


Major considerations involved in the evaluation of a flooring material to
use in a nursery facility include: (1) initial cost, (2) expected longevity and
(3) the performance of the pigs. The purpose of this study was to examine the
performance of weanling pigs maintained on either aluminum slats, concrete slats
or expanded metal.

Experimental

Thirty-two months of production records made available by the High Lean
Pork Producers (HLPP) commercial swine operation located in Jacksonville Beach,
Florida provided the data analyzed in this report. The HLPP operation main-
tains approximately 850 sows and markets about 13,000 finished hogs each year.

The four nursery facilities used by the operation are totally confined
with wall fans providing forced ventilation. Each nursery is divided into two
sections, A and B. At weaning, pigs are moved from the farrowing barn to the
nursery A section and remain for.approximately 28 days at which time they are
moved to the nursery B section. After another 26 days in the nursery B section,
pigs are transferred to the growing-finishing barns.

The type of flooring present in each section of the four barns is shown
in table 1.

From the production records available, the average percentage survival
achieved in each section of each nursery barn was determined. The average
daily gain of the pigs raised in each barn from birth until being transferred
out of the nursery B sections was also analyzed.

Results and Discussion

The average age of the pigs entering each nursery section, the number of
pigs studied and the percentage survival achieved is shown in tables 2 and 3.

The average daily gains of pigs from birth until being transferred out of
the nurseries is presented in table 4.

The comparison of the percentage survivability in the four nursery A. facil-
ities (table 2) showed that the survivability of those pigs kept on the expanded


IThis study was partially supported by a grant generously provided by Mr. J. E.
Davis, High Lean Pork Producers, Jacksonville Beach, Florida.
2McNutt, Graduate Assistant; Durrance, Extension Swine Specialist; Copelin,
Assistant Animal Nutritionist and Combs, Animal Nutritionist.






Department of Animal Science 14 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-7 Experiment Station
August, 1979 Gainesville, Florida



EVALUATION OF THE PERCENTAGE SURVIVAL AND RATE OF GAIN OF WEANLING
PIGS MAINTAINED ON VARIED NURSERY FLOOR MATERIALS1

S. D. McNutt, K. L. Durrance, J. L. Copelin and G. E. Combs2


Major considerations involved in the evaluation of a flooring material to
use in a nursery facility include: (1) initial cost, (2) expected longevity and
(3) the performance of the pigs. The purpose of this study was to examine the
performance of weanling pigs maintained on either aluminum slats, concrete slats
or expanded metal.

Experimental

Thirty-two months of production records made available by the High Lean
Pork Producers (HLPP) commercial swine operation located in Jacksonville Beach,
Florida provided the data analyzed in this report. The HLPP operation main-
tains approximately 850 sows and markets about 13,000 finished hogs each year.

The four nursery facilities used by the operation are totally confined
with wall fans providing forced ventilation. Each nursery is divided into two
sections, A and B. At weaning, pigs are moved from the farrowing barn to the
nursery A section and remain for.approximately 28 days at which time they are
moved to the nursery B section. After another 26 days in the nursery B section,
pigs are transferred to the growing-finishing barns.

The type of flooring present in each section of the four barns is shown
in table 1.

From the production records available, the average percentage survival
achieved in each section of each nursery barn was determined. The average
daily gain of the pigs raised in each barn from birth until being transferred
out of the nursery B sections was also analyzed.

Results and Discussion

The average age of the pigs entering each nursery section, the number of
pigs studied and the percentage survival achieved is shown in tables 2 and 3.

The average daily gains of pigs from birth until being transferred out of
the nurseries is presented in table 4.

The comparison of the percentage survivability in the four nursery A. facil-
ities (table 2) showed that the survivability of those pigs kept on the expanded


IThis study was partially supported by a grant generously provided by Mr. J. E.
Davis, High Lean Pork Producers, Jacksonville Beach, Florida.
2McNutt, Graduate Assistant; Durrance, Extension Swine Specialist; Copelin,
Assistant Animal Nutritionist and Combs, Animal Nutritionist.







- 15 -


metal flooring of barn 4 was significantly (P<.05) higher than that achieved
in the other barns. However, since the pigs raised in barn 1 were also kept
on expanded metal, it is difficult to attribute the increased survival of the
pigs in barn 4 to the type of flooring material used. A possible explanation
is that barn 4 was newly constructed at the beginning of this study. The
potential for bacterial build-up in this barn would therefore be reduced when
compared to the other three older nurseries.

The percentage survivability of the pigs in the nursery B sections
(table 3) and the average daily gain of the pigs from birth through the nursery
phase (table 4) were not significantly affected (P<.05) by the type of flooring.

The data examined in this report would suggest that when evaluating alumi-
num slats, expanded metal and concrete slats as potential flooring materials to
be used in a nursery facility, the emphasis should be placed on the cost and
durability of the materials as pig performance was comparable with each flooring
material. Based upon the estimates for longevity and present cost of each
flooring material (table 5), either concrete or aluminum slats would appear to
be more economical than the less durable metal.

Summary

The production records of a large North Florida commercial swine operation
were analyzed to compare the performance of weanling pigs reared on either '
aluminum slats, concrete slats or expanded metal. The survivability and rate
of gain from birth through the nursery phase of the pigs studied was not shown
to be significantly (P<.05) superior for any of the three floor types examined.


Table 1. Flooring in Each Nursery Section


Flooring Material
Nursery
Barn Section A Section B

1 Expanded metal Expanded metala
2 Aluminum slats Aluminum slats
3 Aluminum slats Aluminum slats
4 Expanded metal Concrete slats


aGalvanized.







- 15 -


metal flooring of barn 4 was significantly (P<.05) higher than that achieved
in the other barns. However, since the pigs raised in barn 1 were also kept
on expanded metal, it is difficult to attribute the increased survival of the
pigs in barn 4 to the type of flooring material used. A possible explanation
is that barn 4 was newly constructed at the beginning of this study. The
potential for bacterial build-up in this barn would therefore be reduced when
compared to the other three older nurseries.

The percentage survivability of the pigs in the nursery B sections
(table 3) and the average daily gain of the pigs from birth through the nursery
phase (table 4) were not significantly affected (P<.05) by the type of flooring.

The data examined in this report would suggest that when evaluating alumi-
num slats, expanded metal and concrete slats as potential flooring materials to
be used in a nursery facility, the emphasis should be placed on the cost and
durability of the materials as pig performance was comparable with each flooring
material. Based upon the estimates for longevity and present cost of each
flooring material (table 5), either concrete or aluminum slats would appear to
be more economical than the less durable metal.

Summary

The production records of a large North Florida commercial swine operation
were analyzed to compare the performance of weanling pigs reared on either '
aluminum slats, concrete slats or expanded metal. The survivability and rate
of gain from birth through the nursery phase of the pigs studied was not shown
to be significantly (P<.05) superior for any of the three floor types examined.


Table 1. Flooring in Each Nursery Section


Flooring Material
Nursery
Barn Section A Section B

1 Expanded metal Expanded metala
2 Aluminum slats Aluminum slats
3 Aluminum slats Aluminum slats
4 Expanded metal Concrete slats


aGalvanized.






- 16 -


Table 2. Average Age, Number and Percentage Survivability
of Pigs Entering Nursery A Sections


Nursery Average Age Total Number %
Barn Entering (days) Entering Survival


1 23.19 2.30 7383 95.75 .03b
2 22.44 2.78 6945 94.78 .04b
3 23.67 2.94 6648 96.05 .04b
4 23.00 2.75 8530 97.47 .02a


a,bMeans with similar superscripts are not significantly different (P<.05).












Table 3. Average Age, Number and Percentage Survivability
of Pigs Entering Nursery B Sections


Nursery Average Age Total Number %
Barn Entering (days) Entering Survivala


1 50.99 6.43 6806 99.45 .01
2 50.58 4.36 6299 99.57 .01
3 51.09 5.63 6081 99.48 .01
4 53.14 4.92 8317 99.55 .00

aNo significantdifferencebetween means (P<.05).
No significant difference between means (P<.05).






- 16 -


Table 2. Average Age, Number and Percentage Survivability
of Pigs Entering Nursery A Sections


Nursery Average Age Total Number %
Barn Entering (days) Entering Survival


1 23.19 2.30 7383 95.75 .03b
2 22.44 2.78 6945 94.78 .04b
3 23.67 2.94 6648 96.05 .04b
4 23.00 2.75 8530 97.47 .02a


a,bMeans with similar superscripts are not significantly different (P<.05).












Table 3. Average Age, Number and Percentage Survivability
of Pigs Entering Nursery B Sections


Nursery Average Age Total Number %
Barn Entering (days) Entering Survivala


1 50.99 6.43 6806 99.45 .01
2 50.58 4.36 6299 99.57 .01
3 51.09 5.63 6081 99.48 .01
4 53.14 4.92 8317 99.55 .00

aNo significantdifferencebetween means (P<.05).
No significant difference between means (P<.05).







- 17 -


Table 4. Average Daily Gain, Final Age and Final Weight of Pigs
from Birth Until Leaving the Nursery Phase



Nursery Average Daily Average Final Average Final
Barn Gain (Ib)a Age (days) Weight (lb)


1 .72 .11 77.70 6.44 58.49 10.41
2 .70 .11 79.31 8.16 57.83 12.81
3 .70 .09 80.04 7.10 58.82 10.93
4 .68 .09 79.43 8.10 57.45 11.13


aNo significant difference between means (P<.05).











Table 5. Expected Longevity and Cost Per Square Foot of
Nursery Flooring Materials



Expected Estimated
Flooring Material Life (years)b Cost/ft2 (dollars)

Concrete slats 10 2.50
Aluminum slats 10 2.90
Expanded metal 5 2.60


Galvanized.
Data taken from Florida Swine Production Guide II.







- 17 -


Table 4. Average Daily Gain, Final Age and Final Weight of Pigs
from Birth Until Leaving the Nursery Phase



Nursery Average Daily Average Final Average Final
Barn Gain (Ib)a Age (days) Weight (lb)


1 .72 .11 77.70 6.44 58.49 10.41
2 .70 .11 79.31 8.16 57.83 12.81
3 .70 .09 80.04 7.10 58.82 10.93
4 .68 .09 79.43 8.10 57.45 11.13


aNo significant difference between means (P<.05).











Table 5. Expected Longevity and Cost Per Square Foot of
Nursery Flooring Materials



Expected Estimated
Flooring Material Life (years)b Cost/ft2 (dollars)

Concrete slats 10 2.50
Aluminum slats 10 2.90
Expanded metal 5 2.60


Galvanized.
Data taken from Florida Swine Production Guide II.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs