• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Summary
 Introduction
 Experiment
 Discussion
 Conclusion
 Reference
 Table 1 - Composition of concentrates...
 Table 2 - Influence of amino acid...
 Table 3 - Influence of amino acid...
 Table 4 - Influence of amino acid...
 Table 5 - Influence of amino acid...
 Table 6 - Influence of amino acid...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1979-5
Title: Lysine supplementation of diets for yearling foals
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073107/00001
 Material Information
Title: Lysine supplementation of diets for yearling foals
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 4, 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ott, E. A ( Edgar A )
Asquith, Richard L
Feaster, J. P
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Foals -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Lysine in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Foals -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 4).
Statement of Responsibility: E.A. Ott, R.L. Asquith and J.P. Feaster.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July, 1979."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073107
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80561647

Table of Contents
    Summary
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Experiment
        Page 1
    Discussion
        Page 2
    Conclusion
        Page 3
    Reference
        Page 4
    Table 1 - Composition of concentrates fed in experiments I and II
        Page 5
    Table 2 - Influence of amino acid intake on daily feed and nutrient consumption Exp 1
        Page 6
    Table 3 - Influence of amino acid intake on growth and efficiency of yearling foals, Exp I
        Page 7
    Table 4 - Influence of amino acid intake on daily feed and nutrient consumption, Exp II
        Page 8
    Table 5 - Influence of amino acid intake on growth and efficiency of yearling foals, Exp II
        Page 9
    Table 6 - Influence of amino acid intake on packed cell volume and hemoglobin, Exp II
        Page 10
Full Text



V~) Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
/ Research Report AL-1979-5 Experiment Station
SJuly, 1979 Gainesville, Florida


LYSINE SUPPLEMENTATION OF DIETS FOR YEARLIN t-OAlr-------
52 HUME LIBnAY
E. A. Ott R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster
JUL 24 1979
Summary
I.F.A.S.- Univ. of Florida
Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings er ued-n-t-w-expe-"
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with 1% BW Coastal Bermudagrass hay (9.0% CP, .35% ly-
sine). In the first experiment the concentrates compared were: 1) soybean meal
(15.4% CP, .70% lysine); 2) soybean meal + .2% lysine (15.7% CP + .81% lysine)
and 3) brewers dried grains + .2% lysine (15.9% CP + .59% lysine). Concentrate
intake averaged 1,67%BW and hay intake averaged .94% BW for a total of 2.61% BW.
Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three rations were: 1) 1106, 49; 2)
1091, 54 and 3) 1077 and 42 respectively. Growth and efficiency responses for
treatments 1, 2 and 3 for the 196-day trial were: weight gains (kg) 125, 123 and
114; height gains (cm) 9.5, 9.3 and 8.1; girth gains (cm) 21.6, 19.0 and 17.0
(cm) (P<.05); length gains (cm) 14.4, 13.7 and 14.8 and feed per kg gain (kg)
15.3, 15.0 and 16.0 respectively. In the second experiment, the concentrates
provided: 1) 16.1% CP, .67% lysine; 2) 13.6% CP, .51% lysine and 3) 14.2% CP,
.64% lysine. Concentrate intake averaged 2.00% BW and hay intake averaged .91%
BW for a total of 2.91% BW. Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three ra-
tions were: 1) 1432, 59; 2) 1195, 46 and 3) 1182, 53. Growth and efficiency re-
sponses for the three treatments for 140 days were: weight gain (kg) 101, 87,
101 (P<.05); height gain (cm) 5.7, 6.0, 6.4; girth gain (cm) 14.8, 12.2, 16.3
(P<.05); length gain (cm) 10.9, 10.9, 11.9 and feed per kg gain (kg) 16.5, 17.9, 15.0
(P<.05). No significant sex affects were detected. Results suggest that at
least 1.9 g of lysine/Mcal DE is required to support maximum growth of yearling
foals.

Introduction

The growth of yearling foals is primarily dependent on energy and protein
intake. The efficiency with which protein is utilized is dependent upon protein
quality or amino acid composition (Slade et al., 1970). Lysine appears to
be the most limiting amino acid for the growing foal (Breuer and Golden, 1971;
Hintz et al., 1971 and Ott, 1976) and is therefore most likely to limit growth
of the foal when minimum levels of protein are fed. These experiments were de-
signed to establish the lysine requirements of yearling Thoroughbred and Quarter
Horse foals.

Experiment

Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings were used in two experi-
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with Coastal Bermudagrass hay. Yearlings were fed the
concentrates individually in stalls and were offered all of the feed they would
consume in two 1.5 hr feeding periods per day. The hay was group fed at a rate
of 1% BW adjusted after each weigh day. Horses were weighed and measured at the

Data taken from experiments HN-771 and HN-783.
Professor of Animal Nutrition.
3DVM, Assoc. Professor of Equine Health.
4Professor of Biochemistry.







V~) Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
/ Research Report AL-1979-5 Experiment Station
SJuly, 1979 Gainesville, Florida


LYSINE SUPPLEMENTATION OF DIETS FOR YEARLIN t-OAlr-------
52 HUME LIBnAY
E. A. Ott R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster
JUL 24 1979
Summary
I.F.A.S.- Univ. of Florida
Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings er ued-n-t-w-expe-"
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with 1% BW Coastal Bermudagrass hay (9.0% CP, .35% ly-
sine). In the first experiment the concentrates compared were: 1) soybean meal
(15.4% CP, .70% lysine); 2) soybean meal + .2% lysine (15.7% CP + .81% lysine)
and 3) brewers dried grains + .2% lysine (15.9% CP + .59% lysine). Concentrate
intake averaged 1,67%BW and hay intake averaged .94% BW for a total of 2.61% BW.
Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three rations were: 1) 1106, 49; 2)
1091, 54 and 3) 1077 and 42 respectively. Growth and efficiency responses for
treatments 1, 2 and 3 for the 196-day trial were: weight gains (kg) 125, 123 and
114; height gains (cm) 9.5, 9.3 and 8.1; girth gains (cm) 21.6, 19.0 and 17.0
(cm) (P<.05); length gains (cm) 14.4, 13.7 and 14.8 and feed per kg gain (kg)
15.3, 15.0 and 16.0 respectively. In the second experiment, the concentrates
provided: 1) 16.1% CP, .67% lysine; 2) 13.6% CP, .51% lysine and 3) 14.2% CP,
.64% lysine. Concentrate intake averaged 2.00% BW and hay intake averaged .91%
BW for a total of 2.91% BW. Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three ra-
tions were: 1) 1432, 59; 2) 1195, 46 and 3) 1182, 53. Growth and efficiency re-
sponses for the three treatments for 140 days were: weight gain (kg) 101, 87,
101 (P<.05); height gain (cm) 5.7, 6.0, 6.4; girth gain (cm) 14.8, 12.2, 16.3
(P<.05); length gain (cm) 10.9, 10.9, 11.9 and feed per kg gain (kg) 16.5, 17.9, 15.0
(P<.05). No significant sex affects were detected. Results suggest that at
least 1.9 g of lysine/Mcal DE is required to support maximum growth of yearling
foals.

Introduction

The growth of yearling foals is primarily dependent on energy and protein
intake. The efficiency with which protein is utilized is dependent upon protein
quality or amino acid composition (Slade et al., 1970). Lysine appears to
be the most limiting amino acid for the growing foal (Breuer and Golden, 1971;
Hintz et al., 1971 and Ott, 1976) and is therefore most likely to limit growth
of the foal when minimum levels of protein are fed. These experiments were de-
signed to establish the lysine requirements of yearling Thoroughbred and Quarter
Horse foals.

Experiment

Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings were used in two experi-
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with Coastal Bermudagrass hay. Yearlings were fed the
concentrates individually in stalls and were offered all of the feed they would
consume in two 1.5 hr feeding periods per day. The hay was group fed at a rate
of 1% BW adjusted after each weigh day. Horses were weighed and measured at the

Data taken from experiments HN-771 and HN-783.
Professor of Animal Nutrition.
3DVM, Assoc. Professor of Equine Health.
4Professor of Biochemistry.







V~) Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
/ Research Report AL-1979-5 Experiment Station
SJuly, 1979 Gainesville, Florida


LYSINE SUPPLEMENTATION OF DIETS FOR YEARLIN t-OAlr-------
52 HUME LIBnAY
E. A. Ott R. L. Asquith and J. P. Feaster
JUL 24 1979
Summary
I.F.A.S.- Univ. of Florida
Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings er ued-n-t-w-expe-"
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with 1% BW Coastal Bermudagrass hay (9.0% CP, .35% ly-
sine). In the first experiment the concentrates compared were: 1) soybean meal
(15.4% CP, .70% lysine); 2) soybean meal + .2% lysine (15.7% CP + .81% lysine)
and 3) brewers dried grains + .2% lysine (15.9% CP + .59% lysine). Concentrate
intake averaged 1,67%BW and hay intake averaged .94% BW for a total of 2.61% BW.
Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three rations were: 1) 1106, 49; 2)
1091, 54 and 3) 1077 and 42 respectively. Growth and efficiency responses for
treatments 1, 2 and 3 for the 196-day trial were: weight gains (kg) 125, 123 and
114; height gains (cm) 9.5, 9.3 and 8.1; girth gains (cm) 21.6, 19.0 and 17.0
(cm) (P<.05); length gains (cm) 14.4, 13.7 and 14.8 and feed per kg gain (kg)
15.3, 15.0 and 16.0 respectively. In the second experiment, the concentrates
provided: 1) 16.1% CP, .67% lysine; 2) 13.6% CP, .51% lysine and 3) 14.2% CP,
.64% lysine. Concentrate intake averaged 2.00% BW and hay intake averaged .91%
BW for a total of 2.91% BW. Protein and lysine intake (g/day) for the three ra-
tions were: 1) 1432, 59; 2) 1195, 46 and 3) 1182, 53. Growth and efficiency re-
sponses for the three treatments for 140 days were: weight gain (kg) 101, 87,
101 (P<.05); height gain (cm) 5.7, 6.0, 6.4; girth gain (cm) 14.8, 12.2, 16.3
(P<.05); length gain (cm) 10.9, 10.9, 11.9 and feed per kg gain (kg) 16.5, 17.9, 15.0
(P<.05). No significant sex affects were detected. Results suggest that at
least 1.9 g of lysine/Mcal DE is required to support maximum growth of yearling
foals.

Introduction

The growth of yearling foals is primarily dependent on energy and protein
intake. The efficiency with which protein is utilized is dependent upon protein
quality or amino acid composition (Slade et al., 1970). Lysine appears to
be the most limiting amino acid for the growing foal (Breuer and Golden, 1971;
Hintz et al., 1971 and Ott, 1976) and is therefore most likely to limit growth
of the foal when minimum levels of protein are fed. These experiments were de-
signed to establish the lysine requirements of yearling Thoroughbred and Quarter
Horse foals.

Experiment

Forty-six Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings were used in two experi-
ments to determine the amount of lysine necessary in the concentrate to permit
maximum growth when fed with Coastal Bermudagrass hay. Yearlings were fed the
concentrates individually in stalls and were offered all of the feed they would
consume in two 1.5 hr feeding periods per day. The hay was group fed at a rate
of 1% BW adjusted after each weigh day. Horses were weighed and measured at the

Data taken from experiments HN-771 and HN-783.
Professor of Animal Nutrition.
3DVM, Assoc. Professor of Equine Health.
4Professor of Biochemistry.







-2-


start of the experiment and at 28 day intervals.

Experiment I (HN-771). Twenty-four yearlings averaging 297 days of age were
assigned at random within sex and breed outcome groups to three treatments. Con-
centrates shown in table 1 were offered to the three groups for 196 days. Coastal
Bermudagrass hay fed during the experiment contained 8.86% crude protein, .30% ly-
sine and was estimated to provide 1.98 Mcal digestible energy (NRC, 1978) (DE)/kg
on a dry matter (DM) basis. The hay contained 89.88% DM as fed.

The yearlings consumed an average of 1.67% BW of concentrate and .94% BW of
hay for a total intake of 2.61% BW. No significant differences in feed intake
were detected between sexes or for treatment groups. DE, crude protein (CP) and
CP/Mcal DE intake were similar for all three groups (table 2). Lysine intake for the
soybean meal (SBM), SBM plus lysine,and brewers dried grains (BDG) plus lysine groups
was 49, 54 and 42 g per animal per day respectively.

Weight gains by the two groups of yearlings receiving the SBM based concentrates
were similar throughout the experiment (Figure 1). Gains by the yearlings receiving
the BDG concentrate were less (P<.05) than the other two rations at the end of the
3rd and 4th 28 day periods. Although the differences were still apparent at the end
of the trial, differences were not significant (table 3). No differences in height
or length due to treatments were detected. Girth gains of the yearling's receiving
the BDG concentrate was less (P<.05) than the girth gains of those receiving the SBM.

Experiment II. Twenty-two yearlings averaging 327 days of age were assigned at
random within sex and breed outcome groups to three treatments. Concentrates shown
in table 1 were offered to the three groups for 140 days. Coastal Bermudagrass hay
fed during the experiment contained 9.26% CP, .36% lysine and was estimated to pro-
vide 1.98 Mcal DE/kg (NRC,1978) on a DM basis. The hay contained 89.24% DM as fed.

Concentrate intake averaged 1.99% BW and hay intake averaged .92% BW for a total
of 2.91% BW. No significant differences in feed intake were detected between sexes
or for treatment groups. DE intake was similar for HR-49 and HR-50 diets but was
somewhat lower for the HR-51 diet. Since HR-50 and HR-51 were formulated to provide
less protein than HR-49 they resulted in less protein intake in terms of both total
intake, CP/Mcal DE and CP/kg BW. Lysine intake on the HR-49, HR-50 and HR-51 rations
were 59, 46 and 53 g per head per day respectively.

The low protein diet without supplemental lysine (HR-50) resulted in significantly
less (P<.05) weight gain than either the higher protein diet or the low protein diet
with added lysine. Girth gains were similarly affected with the low protein diet re-
sulting in significantly less (P<.05) gain than the low protein diet with added lysine.
The other two diets were not different. Height, length and feed intake were not sig-
nificantly different for the three diets; however, the yearlings on the low protein
diet without lysine were less efficient (P<.05). No differences in blood Hb or PCV
values were detected.

Discussion

The National Research Council recommends 45 to 48 g of crude protein per Meal DE
and 49 to 52 Kcal DE daily for yearling foals (NRC, 1978). However, protein renuire-
ments depend upon protein quality (Slade et al., 1970; Breuer and Golden, 1971)
and Ott et al., 1979) and lysine appears to be the most limiting amino acid. Previous
research has suggested that Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse yearlings require 28-40 g
of lysine per day (Ott et al., 1979).











In experiment I DE intake was 65-67 Kcal/kg BW and protein intake was 3.0 g/
kg BW or 43.4 to 45.2 g/Mcal DE. This DE and CP intake is above that recommended
by NRC and should have permitted maximum growth. Lysine intakes of 49 and 54 g/day or
1.92 and 2.20 g/Mcal DE resulted in comparable growth but 42 g of lysine or 1.76 g/
Meal DE resulted in slower growth. In experiment II yearlings consuming 3.1 g CP/kg
BW or 42.7 g CP/Mcal DE grew at rates that were comparable to yearlings consuming 3.7
g CP/kg BW or 46.8 g/Mcal DE when the lysine content of the diet was 1.91 g/Mcal DE
but did not grow at comparable rates when the lysine content was only 1.59 g/Mcal DE.
The results of these two experiments and calculations from previous studies conducted
at this station (Ott et al., 1979) indicate that in the presence of adequate lysine
the CP needs of the yearling are reduced. Data suggests that diets for yearling foals
should provide at least 1.9 g lysine/Mcal DE for maximum growth.


Conclusion

Yearling foals receiving good quality Coastal Bermudagrass hay will grow at maxi-
mum rates if they have access to adequate quantities of a concentrate providing at
least 12.5% crude protein and .60% lysine on an as fed basis. Soybean meal based con-
centrates containing 12.5% crude protein will need at least .1% lysine added. Concen-
trates based on soybean meal that contains 14% protein or more will provide adequate
lysine without supplementation.






-4-


References


Breuer. L.H. and D.L. Golden 1971. Lysine requirement of the immature equine
J. Animal Sci. 33:227

Hintz, H.F., H.F. Schryver and J.E. Lowe 1971. Comparison of a blend of milk
products and linseed meal as protein supplements for young growing horses.
J. Animal Sci. 33:1274

NRC. 1978. Nutrient Requirements of Domestic Animals, No. 6. Nutrient Require-
ments of Horses (4th Rev. Ed.). National Academy of Sciences National
Research Council. Washington D.C.

Ott, E.A., R.L. Asquith, J.P. Feaster and F.G. Martin 1979. Influence of pro-
tein level and quality on the growth and development of yearling foals.
J. Animal Science (in press)

Slade, L.M., D.W. Robinson and K.E. Casey 1970. Nitrogen metabolism in non-
ruminent herbivores. I. The influence of nonprotein nitrogen and pro-
tein quality on the nitrogen retention of adults mares. J. Animal Sci.
30:753











Table 1. Composition of concentrates fed in experiments I and II


Ingredients
Corn, gr.
Oats, pulverized
Brewers dried grains
Soybean meal
Wheat bran
AlfalfaI dehy
BioPhos
Limestone, gr
Salt
Calcium propionate
Vitamin and mineral premix2
L-Lysine3


Internal Ret. No.
4-02-985
4-03-309
5-02-141
5-04-604
4-05-190
1-00-023


HR-42
40.75
30.00

11.00
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50


Sex
HR-43
40.55
30.00

11.00
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50
.20


HR-44
48.55
15.00
18.00
-----
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50
.20


Concentrate
HR-49
41.75
31.00

9.00
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50


Analyses
Dry matter, % 87.38 87.63 87.68 87.87 88.24 88.27
Lysine, %4 .70 .81 .59 .67 .51 .64
Digestible energy, Mcal/kg4;5 3.41 3.40 3.35 3.41 3.41 3.40
Crude protein, % 15.36 15.71 15.94 16.10 13.56 14.20


'International Minerals and Chemical Corp., Mundelei
2Premix provided the following per kilogram of diet:
cobalt, 0.2 mg; iodine, 0.2 mg; Vitamin A, 6600 IU;
3L-Lysine monohydrochloride 98%, Merck Chemical Div.
4Dry matter basis.
SCalculated from NRC 1978.


n, IL 60060.
manganese, llmg; iron, 40 mg; copper, 7 mg; zinc, 40 mg;
Vitamin D, 660 USP; Vitamin E, 13 IU.
,Merck and Co., Inc., Rahway, N.J. 07065.


HR-50
44.75
34.00

3.00
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50


HR-51
44.60
34.00

3.00
10.00
5.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.25
.50
.15










Table 2. Influence of amino acid intake on daily
feed and nutrient consumption Exp I


Item

Number of animals
Grain intake, % BW2
Hay intake, % BW2
Total intake, % BW2


Sex
F C
15 9
1.64 1.71
.92 .96
2.56 2.67


HR-42
8
1.70
.92
2.62


Concentrate
HR-43
8
1.68
.96
2.65


Grain intake, kg/day2 5.96 6.23 6.34 6.03 5.92
Hay intake, kg/day2 3.33 3.52 3.45 3.44 3.38
Total intake, kg/day2 9.29 9.76 9.79 9.47 9.30



Grain DE, Mcal3 17.67 18.47 18.89 17.97 17.39
Hay DE, Meal3 5.92 6.26 6.14 6.12 6.02
Total DE, Meal3 23.59 24.73 25.03 24.09 23.41
DE/kg BW, Kcal 65.0 67.8 67.0 67.3 64.9



Grain CP, g 818 855 834 819 810
Hay CP, g 265 280 272 272 267
Total CP, g 1083 1135 1106 1091 1077
CP/Mcal DE, g 45.9 45.9 44.2 45.3 46.0
CP/kg BW 2.98 3.11 2.96 3.05 2.99



Grain lysine, g 37 38 39 43 31
Hay lysine, g 9 9 10 10 10
Total lysine, g 46 47 49 54 42
Lysine/Mcal 1.95 1.90 1.96 2.24 1.79


1
Adjusted means.
As fed.
3Calculated from NRC 1978.


HR-44
8
1.64
.94
2.58








Table 3. Influence of amino acid intake on growth
and efficiency of yearling foals Exp I


Sex Ration
F C A B C
Initial weight, kg 300.4 307.3 311.3 296.5 303.6
Final weight, kg 426.0 422.6 436.1 419.4 417.3
Weight gain, kg 125.6 115.3 124.8 122.9 113.7



Initial height, cm 136.7 138.2 138.2 136.9 137.2
Final height, cm 146.4 146.5 147.7 146.2 145.3
Height gain, cm 9.7 8.3 9.5 9.3 8.1



Initial girth, cm 149.6 151.1 151.1 149.9 150.1
Final girth, cm 169.3 169.8 172.7 168.9 167.1
Girth gain, cm 19.7 18.7 21.6b 19.0bc 17.0c



Initial length, cm 136.7 137.4 137.8 136.1 137.2
Final length, cm 152.4 150.3 152.3 149.8 152.1
Length gain, cm 15.7 12.9 14.5 13.7 14.9
Feed/gain 14.5 16.6 15.3 15.0 16.0


adjustedd means.
aComparable means with unlike superscripts are


different (P<.05).









Table 4. Influence of amino acid intake on daily
feed and nutrient consumption Exp II


Sex Ration
F C HR-49 HR-50 HR-51
Number of animals 11 12 7 7 8
Grain intake, %BW2 1.97 2.02 2.06 2.02 1.89
Hay intake, % BW2 .91 .92 .92 .94 .90
Total intake, % BW2 2.88 2.94 2.98 2.96 2.79



Grain intake, kg/day2 7.68 7.51 8.04 7.54 7.20
Hay intake, kg/day2 3.57 3.44 3.61 3.51 3.41
Total intake, kg/day2 11.25 10.95 11.65 11.05 10.61



Grain DE Mcal3 23.0 22.5 24.1 22.6 21.6
Hay DE Mcal3 6.4 6.2 6.5 6.3 6.1
Total DE Meal 29.4 28.7 30.6 28.9 27.7
DE/kg BW, kcal 75.3 77.0 78.4 77.4 72.8



Grain CP, g 1083 1059 1134 905 900
Hay CP, g 295 284 298 290 282
Total CP, g 1378 1343 1432 1195 1182
CP/Mcal DE 46.9 46.8 46.8 41.3 42.7
CP/kg BW 3.52 3.61 3.7 3.2 3.1



Grain lysine, g 41 40 47 35 42
Hay lysine, g 11 11 12 11 11
Total lysine, g 52 51 59 46 53
Lysine/Mcal DE, g 1.78 1.78 1.93 1.59 1.91


'Adjusted means.
2As fed.
3Calculated from NRC 1978.








Table 5. Influence of amino acid intake on growth and


efficiency of yearling foals Exp II


Sex
F C A


Initial weight, kg
Final weight, kg
Weight gain, kg
Gain/day, kg


340
441*
101*
.72


327
418
91


340
441
101a


Ration
B
330
417
87b


C
330
431
101a
.72


Initial height, cm 142.3 139.9 142.7 141.1 139.5
Final height, cm 147.9 146.4 148.4 147.1 145.9
Height gain, cm 5.6 6.5 5.7 6.0 6.4



Initial girth, cm 156.7 153.9 157.3 154.7 154.0
Final girth, cm 172.0* 167.5 172.1 166.9 170.3
Girth gain, cm 15.3 13.6 14.8ab 12.2a 16.3



Initial length, cm 142.5 139.3 141.8 140.9 140.0
Final length, cm 154.0* 150.3 152.7 151.8 151.9
Length gain, cm 11.5 11.0 10.9 10.9 11.9



Grain intake, kg 1075 1051 1126 1055 1008
Hay intake, kg 500 482 505 491 478
Total intake, kg 1575 1533 1631 1546 1486
Feed/gain 15.8 17.0 16.5ab 17.9a 15.0b



'Adjusted means.
abComparable values with unlike superscripts are different (P<.05).
*Comparable values are different (P<.05).

















Table 6. Influence of amino acid intake on packed
cell volume and hemoglobin Exp II


Sex Ration
F C A B C
Packed cell volume
Initial, % 32.7 32.9 33.0 32.9 32.5
Middle, % 34.0 34.6 35.0 32.0 35.6
Final, % 33.3 32.0 33.4 31.7 32.8


Hemoglobin
Initial, g/100ml
Middle, g/100ml
Final, g/100ml


12.7
12.2
12.4


12.9
13.1
12.0


13.1
13.3
12.6


12.1
12.1
11.8


12.2
13.3
12.1




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