• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Composition of diets
 Table 2 - Performance of pigs fed...
 Table 3 - Performance of pigs fed...
 Table 4 - Performance of pigs fed...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1979-2
Title: Influence of dietary protein on compensatory growth of growing-finishing swine
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073104/00001
 Material Information
Title: Influence of dietary protein on compensatory growth of growing-finishing swine
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 5 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
McNutt, Steven Douglas, 1954-
Copelin, Johnny Landon
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Proteins in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs, S.D. McNutt and J.L. Copelin.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "April, 1979."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073104
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80559781

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Composition of diets
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Performance of pigs fed diets containing 12, 14 and 16 percent protein (grower period)
        Page 3
    Table 3 - Performance of pigs fed diets containing 12, 14 and 16 percent protein (finisher period)
        Page 4
    Table 4 - Performance of pigs fed diets containing 12, 14 and 16 percent protein (grower-finisher periods)
        Page 5
Full Text


Department of Animal Science 1 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-2 Experiment Station
S April, 1979 Gaine e, Florida

7q-2 HUMELia
INFLUENCE OF DIETARY PROTEIN ON COMPENSATORY t
GROWTH OF GROWING-FINISHING SWINE1

G. E. Combs, S. D. McNutt and J. L. Copelin VS of i


Several factors, including those of economic origin, often result in
swine being fed diets in which the nutrient content is less than recommended.

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of varying the
dietary protein level during the growing-finishing period on compensatory
growth.

Experimental

Growing period. One hundred and eight crossbred pigs averaging 77 pounds
body weight were allotted on the basis of initial weight, litter and sexto
three treatment groups; six pens containing six pigs each were used with
each of the groups. Treatments consisted of dietary protein levels of 12,
14 and 16 percent protein.

Finishing period. After six weeks on the grower diets, the average body
weight for all pens was 150.2 pounds. At this time, two pens from each of
the growing period treatments were fed diets containing either 12, 14 or 16
percent protein until market weight of 206.5 pounds.

All pigs were housed in concrete-floored pens equipped with automatic
watering devices and self-feeders.

Diet composition is presented in table 1.

Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in tables 2, 3 and 4.

During the grower period, 77 to 150 pounds body weight, pigs given the
diet containing 12 percent protein gained more slowly and less efficiently
(P<.05) than those fed 14 or 16 percent dietary protein. The protein re-
quirement for pigs in this weight range as recommended by the National Re-
search Council is approximately 14 percent. Consequently, the reduction in
performance by pigs in the present study was not unexpected but does clearly
demonstrate the relationship between adequate levels of dietary protein and
maximum performance.

The ability of the pig to exhibit compensatory growth when changed from
a diet inadequate in protein to one adequate in protein is illustrated by the


1Experiment 257.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist; McNutt, Graduate Assistant and Copelin, Assistant
Animal Nutritionist, Department of Animal Science.






Department of Animal Science 1 Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-2 Experiment Station
S April, 1979 Gaine e, Florida

7q-2 HUMELia
INFLUENCE OF DIETARY PROTEIN ON COMPENSATORY t
GROWTH OF GROWING-FINISHING SWINE1

G. E. Combs, S. D. McNutt and J. L. Copelin VS of i


Several factors, including those of economic origin, often result in
swine being fed diets in which the nutrient content is less than recommended.

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of varying the
dietary protein level during the growing-finishing period on compensatory
growth.

Experimental

Growing period. One hundred and eight crossbred pigs averaging 77 pounds
body weight were allotted on the basis of initial weight, litter and sexto
three treatment groups; six pens containing six pigs each were used with
each of the groups. Treatments consisted of dietary protein levels of 12,
14 and 16 percent protein.

Finishing period. After six weeks on the grower diets, the average body
weight for all pens was 150.2 pounds. At this time, two pens from each of
the growing period treatments were fed diets containing either 12, 14 or 16
percent protein until market weight of 206.5 pounds.

All pigs were housed in concrete-floored pens equipped with automatic
watering devices and self-feeders.

Diet composition is presented in table 1.

Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in tables 2, 3 and 4.

During the grower period, 77 to 150 pounds body weight, pigs given the
diet containing 12 percent protein gained more slowly and less efficiently
(P<.05) than those fed 14 or 16 percent dietary protein. The protein re-
quirement for pigs in this weight range as recommended by the National Re-
search Council is approximately 14 percent. Consequently, the reduction in
performance by pigs in the present study was not unexpected but does clearly
demonstrate the relationship between adequate levels of dietary protein and
maximum performance.

The ability of the pig to exhibit compensatory growth when changed from
a diet inadequate in protein to one adequate in protein is illustrated by the


1Experiment 257.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist; McNutt, Graduate Assistant and Copelin, Assistant
Animal Nutritionist, Department of Animal Science.







-2-


performance data during the finisher period. The groups fed 12 percent protein
during the grower period then changed to either 14 or 16 percent protein during
the finisher period gained faster than any of the other treatment groups.
This difference in daily gain was significant (P<.05) between pigs on treat-
ment 2 and those on treatments 7 and 9. Feed efficiency was also significantly
(P<.05) affected by dietary protein level; in general, the most rapid gaining
groups were the most efficient.

Performance data for the entire period (77 to 206 Ib) show that daily
gain was not significantly (P<.05) affected by dietary treatment. However, it
is evident that the groups given 12 percent protein during both periods gained
considerably less than the other treatment groups. This group was also the
most inefficient in feed conversion. Feed efficiencies for the groups on the
12-12 and 12-14 regimes were significantly (P<.05) different from the remaining
treatments. Pigs finished on 16 percent protein were the most efficient treat-
ment within each group.

Summary

One hundred and eight crossbred pigs having an initial average weight of
77 pounds were fed fortified corn-soybean diets containing 12, 14 or 16 percent
protein during all or part of the grower-finisher periods. During the grower
period, the pigs given 12 percent dietary protein gained more slowly and less
efficiently than those fed 14 or 16 percent protein. The groups initially
fed 12 percent protein and changed to either 14 or 16 percent protein during
the finisher period gained faster than other treatments whereas those con-
tinued on the 12 percent diet maintained their comparatively poor performance.
This increase in daily gain demonstrates the ability of the pig to exhibit
compensatory growth which may be advantageous under certain economic situations.






- 3-


Table 1. Composition of Diets


% Protein 12 14 16

Gr. yellow corn 88.75 84.00 78.75
Soybean meal 8.25 13.00 18.25
Dynafos 1.60 1.60 1.60
Limestone 1.00 1.00 1.00
Iodized salt 0.20 0.20 0.20
Trace minerals (CCCP1 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamix premix (UF) 0.10 0.10 0.10

Total 100.00 100.00 100.00


1Supplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained 20% zinc,
10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, 0.1% cobalt and 2% calcium.
2Contained 6,000 mg riboflavin, 20,000 mg niacin, 12,000 mg pantothenic acid,
80,000 mg choline chloride, 10,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU vitamin A,
400,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 10,000 IU vitamin E per lb of premix.


Table 2. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing 12,
Percent Protein (Grower Period)


14 and 16


Protein % 12 14 16

Number of pigs 36 36 36
Days on test 42 42 42
Avg. initial weight, lb 77.10 77.00 77.00
Avg. final weight, lb 144.60 152.40 153.70
Avg. daily gain, lb 1.611 1.80 1.83
Avg. daily feed, Ib 5.50 5.47 5.35
Avg. feed/gain, lb 3.421 3.04 2.93


1Significantly different from 14 and 16 percent protein (P<.05).






- 3-


Table 1. Composition of Diets


% Protein 12 14 16

Gr. yellow corn 88.75 84.00 78.75
Soybean meal 8.25 13.00 18.25
Dynafos 1.60 1.60 1.60
Limestone 1.00 1.00 1.00
Iodized salt 0.20 0.20 0.20
Trace minerals (CCCP1 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamix premix (UF) 0.10 0.10 0.10

Total 100.00 100.00 100.00


1Supplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained 20% zinc,
10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, 0.1% cobalt and 2% calcium.
2Contained 6,000 mg riboflavin, 20,000 mg niacin, 12,000 mg pantothenic acid,
80,000 mg choline chloride, 10,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU vitamin A,
400,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 10,000 IU vitamin E per lb of premix.


Table 2. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing 12,
Percent Protein (Grower Period)


14 and 16


Protein % 12 14 16

Number of pigs 36 36 36
Days on test 42 42 42
Avg. initial weight, lb 77.10 77.00 77.00
Avg. final weight, lb 144.60 152.40 153.70
Avg. daily gain, lb 1.611 1.80 1.83
Avg. daily feed, Ib 5.50 5.47 5.35
Avg. feed/gain, lb 3.421 3.04 2.93


1Significantly different from 14 and 16 percent protein (P<.05).
















Table 3. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing 12, 14 and 16 Percent Protein (Finisher Period)



Protein % (Grower) 12 14 16

Protein % (Finisher) 12 14 16 12 14 16 12 14 16
Treatment number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Number of pigs 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
Days on test 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42
Avg. initial weight, lb 145.50 144.70 143.50 151.55 152.40 153.40 153.30 153.50 154.10
Avg. final weight, lb 198.50 207.20 204.50 207.20 210.40 213.90 204.90 206.30 205.60
Avg. daily gain, IbI 1.52 1.78 1.75 1.59 1.66 1.73 1.47 1.51 1.47
Avg. daily feed, lb 5.72 6.13 5.67 6.06 5.95 5.90 6.00 5.74 5.51
Avg. feed/gain, lb2 3.77 3.43 3.25 3.83 3.59 3.42 3.62 3.82 3.80


1Treatments 7 and 9 significantly less than treatment 2 (P<.05).
2Treatment 3 significantly less than other treatments (P<.05).
Treatments 2 and 6 significantly less than treatments 1, 4, 7, 8 and 9 (P<.05).
Treatments 5 and 7 significantly less than treatments 4, 8 and 9 (P<.05).















Table 4. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing 12, 14 and 16 Percent Protein (Grower-Finisher Periods)



Protein % (Grower) 12 14 16

Protein % (Finisher) 12 14 16 12 14 16 12 14 16
Treatment number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Number of pigs 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
Days on test 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84
Avg. initial weight, lb 76.90 77.20 77.10 76.90 76.90 77.10 77 76.9 77.10
Avg. final weight, lb 198.50 207.20 204.50 207.20 210.40 213.85 204.90 206.25 205.60
Avg. daily gain, lb1 1.58 1.69 1.66 1.70 1.73 1.78 1.66 1.68 1.67
Avg. daily feed, lb 5.57 5.84 5.55 5.74 5.72 5.64 5.67 5.57 5.37
Avg. feed/gain, lb2 3.53 3.46 3.35 3.39 3.31 3.18 3.42 3.33 3.22


1Differences non-significant (P<.05).
2Treatments 1 and 2 significantly different from
Treatments 6 and 9 significantly different from


other treatments (P<.05).
treatments 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8 (P<.05).




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