• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Experiment
 Results and discussion
 Table 1 - Analyses of alyce clover...
 Table 2 - Apparent digestion coefficients...
 Table 3 - Digestible nutrient content...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1979-1
Title: Digestibility of Coastal bermudagrass and Alyce clover hays by horses
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073103/00001
 Material Information
Title: Digestibility of Coastal bermudagrass and Alyce clover hays by horses
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ott, E. A ( Edgar A )
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Horses -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Hay   ( lcsh )
Clover   ( lcsh )
Bermuda grass   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: E.A. Ott.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "January, 1979."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073103
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80559259

Table of Contents
    Experiment
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Analyses of alyce clover and coastal Bermudagrass hays
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Apparent digestion coefficients for alyce clover and coastal Bermudagrass hays by horses
        Page 3
    Table 3 - Digestible nutrient content of alyce clover and coastal Bermudagrass hays
        Page 4
Full Text


Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-1 Experiment station
January, 1979 Gainesvill ,/Elbrida

DIGESTIBILITY OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS AND ALYCE CLOVER HAYS Y HORSES

E. A. Ott2

Most horses in Florida must be fed hay during a portion of the yea'cRig
quality hay suitable for horses is difficult to produce in the state and cota-/o
erable quantities of northern hay, alfalfa, clover and mixed hays, are shipped'--
in. Transportation and marketing costs make this hay very expensive and more
economical alternatives are constantly sought.

Many farms have found that high quality, locally produced hay is acceptable
to the horse and can satisfactorily replace northern hay if properly supplemented.
The two hays most readily available in N. Central Florida are Coastal Bermudagrass
and Alyce Clover. Coastal Bermudagrass is a summer perennial which will provide
2 to 4 cuttings per year if properly fertilized and the weather cooperates. Alyce
Clover is a summer legume that is frequently planted in June or July after water-
melon or other fruits or vegetables. It normally provides only one cutting, usu-
ally in September or October. This experiment was designed to compare the
digestibility of Coastal Bermudagrass and Alyce Clover hays by horses.

Experiment

Four Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse type geldings averaging 441 kg were used
in a single reversal trial to determine the digestibility of selected samples of
Coastal Bermudagrass and Alyce Clover hays. Both hays were grown in north-
central Florida and were judged by analyses (table 1) and appearance to be typical
of the hays produced in that area. Considerable variation in the nutrient content
of both species can occur due to maturity, soil fertility, moisture levels and
harvesting conditions. Factors which influence nutrient content may also influ-
ence nutrient availability.

The experiment was conducted in two 28-day periods each of which included a
21-day preliminary period and a 7-day collection period. Only the last 5 days of
the collection period were used for analyses. During the first period, horses A
and B were fed Alyce Clover hay and horses C and D were fed Coastal Bermudagrass
hay. During the second period, the hays were switched. Hay was fed at a rate of
2.0% BW/day in two equal feedings. The horses were housed in individual open dry
lot paddocks providing726 sq. ft. of space per animal including 186 sq. ft. of
covered area. During the collection period the horses were confined to individ-
ual metabolism crates. The horses were removed from the crates and walked via a
mechanical walker for two 30-minute periods each day.

Results and Discussion

Analyses results shown in table 1 revealed that the Alyce Clover hay



'Data taken from Experiment HN-782.
2Department of Animal Science.






Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1979-1 Experiment station
January, 1979 Gainesvill ,/Elbrida

DIGESTIBILITY OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS AND ALYCE CLOVER HAYS Y HORSES

E. A. Ott2

Most horses in Florida must be fed hay during a portion of the yea'cRig
quality hay suitable for horses is difficult to produce in the state and cota-/o
erable quantities of northern hay, alfalfa, clover and mixed hays, are shipped'--
in. Transportation and marketing costs make this hay very expensive and more
economical alternatives are constantly sought.

Many farms have found that high quality, locally produced hay is acceptable
to the horse and can satisfactorily replace northern hay if properly supplemented.
The two hays most readily available in N. Central Florida are Coastal Bermudagrass
and Alyce Clover. Coastal Bermudagrass is a summer perennial which will provide
2 to 4 cuttings per year if properly fertilized and the weather cooperates. Alyce
Clover is a summer legume that is frequently planted in June or July after water-
melon or other fruits or vegetables. It normally provides only one cutting, usu-
ally in September or October. This experiment was designed to compare the
digestibility of Coastal Bermudagrass and Alyce Clover hays by horses.

Experiment

Four Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse type geldings averaging 441 kg were used
in a single reversal trial to determine the digestibility of selected samples of
Coastal Bermudagrass and Alyce Clover hays. Both hays were grown in north-
central Florida and were judged by analyses (table 1) and appearance to be typical
of the hays produced in that area. Considerable variation in the nutrient content
of both species can occur due to maturity, soil fertility, moisture levels and
harvesting conditions. Factors which influence nutrient content may also influ-
ence nutrient availability.

The experiment was conducted in two 28-day periods each of which included a
21-day preliminary period and a 7-day collection period. Only the last 5 days of
the collection period were used for analyses. During the first period, horses A
and B were fed Alyce Clover hay and horses C and D were fed Coastal Bermudagrass
hay. During the second period, the hays were switched. Hay was fed at a rate of
2.0% BW/day in two equal feedings. The horses were housed in individual open dry
lot paddocks providing726 sq. ft. of space per animal including 186 sq. ft. of
covered area. During the collection period the horses were confined to individ-
ual metabolism crates. The horses were removed from the crates and walked via a
mechanical walker for two 30-minute periods each day.

Results and Discussion

Analyses results shown in table 1 revealed that the Alyce Clover hay



'Data taken from Experiment HN-782.
2Department of Animal Science.






-2-


contained more protein, fiber and calcium but less nitrogen free extract (NFE)
than the Coastal Bermudagrass hay. The analyses of both hays are typical of
those determined in our laboratory during the past four years, but are higher
in both protein and fiber than the average values reported by the Florida
Forage Testing Program for 1967 to 1976.

Hay intake averaged 1.9 kg/100 kg BW/day. 'This provided adequate nutri-
ent intake to maintain the horses and resulted in an average gain of 7.2 kg
(range 2.3 to 11.4 kg) over the duration of the 56-day experiment. Both hays
appeared to be readily accepted and a satisfactory source of nutrients for
the horses.

Apparent digestion coefficients for the two hays are shown in table 2.
Horses digested a larger portion of the dry matter (P<.05), protein (P<.01),
fat (P<.01), NFE (P<.01) and energy (P<.01) from the Alyce Clover than from
the Coastal Bermudagrass. The ash content of Coastal Bermudagrass was digested
with a greater efficiency than the ash from Alyce Clover. There was no differ-
ence in crude fiber (CF), calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) digestion and ab-
sorption.

The digestible nutrient content of a forage can be calculated by multi-
plying the digestion coefficient times the nutrient content of the forage.
The Alyce Clover hay contained twice as much digestible protein and 15% more
digestible energy than the Coastal Bermudagrass hay (table 3).

If Coastal Bermudagrass hay costs 4(/lb and a 12% CP (70% dig.) grain
ration costs 8c/lb the nutrients in Alyce Clover hay are worth about 7.15c/lb
or 1.78 times the price of the Coastal Bermudagrass hay. Therefore, if Alyce
Clover hay can be purchased for less than 1.78 times the price of Coastal
Bermudagrass it is a good buy. Alyce Clover hay is a locally produced legume
hay which offers the horseman a good alternative to alfalfa and the clovers
produced in the north and west part of the country. The use of legume hays
will permit the horseman to use lower protein grain rations which provide an
added economic incentive.








Table 1. Analyses of Alyce Clover and Coastal Bermudagrass Haysa


Alyce Clover
Coastal Bermudagrass


Dry
matter
%
90.0
90.2


aDry matter basis.
NFE = nitrogen free extract.


Table 2. Apparent


Digestion Coefficients for Alyce Clover and Coastal
Bermudagrass Hays by Horses


Dry Crude Crude
Hay matter protein Fat fiber Ash NFE Energy Ca P
% % % % % % Mcal/kg % %

Alyce Clover 55.2a 67.0c 42.9C 44.3 -3.6a 73.3c 54.5c 47.2 23.1
Coastal Bermudagrass 49.4b 48.8d 17.8d 47.1 35.2b 53.8d 47.2d 33.4 30.1

abMeans with unlike superscripts in the same colun are different (P<.05).
CdMeans with unlike superscripts in the same column are different (P<.01).


Crude
protein
%
13.1
8.9


Fat
%
2.6
1.8


Crude
fiber
%
43.6
36.8


Ash


4.7
4.5


NFEb
%

36.0
48.1


Energy
Mcal/kg
4.44
4.44








Table 1. Analyses of Alyce Clover and Coastal Bermudagrass Haysa


Alyce Clover
Coastal Bermudagrass


Dry
matter
%
90.0
90.2


aDry matter basis.
NFE = nitrogen free extract.


Table 2. Apparent


Digestion Coefficients for Alyce Clover and Coastal
Bermudagrass Hays by Horses


Dry Crude Crude
Hay matter protein Fat fiber Ash NFE Energy Ca P
% % % % % % Mcal/kg % %

Alyce Clover 55.2a 67.0c 42.9C 44.3 -3.6a 73.3c 54.5c 47.2 23.1
Coastal Bermudagrass 49.4b 48.8d 17.8d 47.1 35.2b 53.8d 47.2d 33.4 30.1

abMeans with unlike superscripts in the same colun are different (P<.05).
CdMeans with unlike superscripts in the same column are different (P<.01).


Crude
protein
%
13.1
8.9


Fat
%
2.6
1.8


Crude
fiber
%
43.6
36.8


Ash


4.7
4.5


NFEb
%

36.0
48.1


Energy
Mcal/kg
4.44
4.44




















Table 3. Digestible Nutrient Content of Alyce Clover and Coastal Beymudagrass Haysa



Hay Protein Fat Fiber Ash NFE Energy Ca P TDN
% % % % % Mcal/kg % % %
Alyce Clover 8.8 1.1 19.3 26.4 2.42 .39 .10 57.0

Coastal Bermudagrass 4.3 .3 17.3 1.6 25.9 2.10 .23 .13 48.2 l


aDry matter basis.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs