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 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Diet composition (%)
 Table 2 - Amino acid composition...
 Table 3 - Performance of growing-finishing...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report ;, AL-1977-3
Title: Replacement of soybean meal with sesame meal in growing-finishing swine diets
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073094/00001
 Material Information
Title: Replacement of soybean meal with sesame meal in growing-finishing swine diets
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 2, 2 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bryant, Kenneth Lee, 1951-
Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sesame   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: K.L. Bryant, G.E. Combs and H.D. Wallace.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1977."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073094
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50672645

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Diet composition (%)
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Amino acid composition of protein supplements (mg amino acid/100 mg sample)
        Page 4
    Table 3 - Performance of growing-finishing pigs fed varying levels of sesame meal
        Page 4
Full Text



Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1977-3 Experiment.Station
S August, 1977 Gaine W T a

/ ^ LIt3'ARl,
REPLACEMENT OF SOYBEAN MEAL WITH SESAME MEAL
IN GROWING-FINISHING SWINE DIETS1 '

K. L. Bryant2, G. E. Combs and H. D. Walla3A .


When harvested and processed properly, sesame meal provides a sat factor a
protein supplement for use in livestocks feeds. When used as a protein supple-
ment for swine diets based on cereal grains, sesame meal is usually blended
with other protein sources such as soybean meal or fish meal. The low lysine
level in sesame meal prevents it from totally replacing soybean meal in corn-
soybean meal diets. It has been estimated that sesame meal can replace up to
10 percent of the soybean meal in a 16 percent protein corn-soybean meal diet
for growing-finishing swine.

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of replacing soybean meal
with varying amounts of sesame meal in growing-finishing swine diets.

Experimental

Forty-eight crossbred pigs averaging 102 lbs. were randomly allotted to
eight pens. Two pens were assigned to each of the four following dietary treat-
ments;

1. 0 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
2. 25 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
3. 50 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
4. 75 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.

Composition of the dietary treatments is presented in table 1. Amino acid
composition of the protein supplements is presented in table 2. All pigs were
self-fed in concrete-floored pens with water provided by automatic watering de-
vices. All pigs were weighed and feed consumption recorded at 14 day intervals
throughout the 56 day trial. Data were analyzed by the analysis of variance
procedure.

Results and Discussion

A summary of the performance data is presented in table 3.

No significant difference (P<.05) was observed for any of the criteria
evaluated. In general, the pigs receiving 0 (0%) sesame meal as a protein
supplement had the best performance. They grew 7% faster and were 13% more
efficient than those pigs receiving 25, 50 or 75% of their protein supplement as
sesame meal. The sesame meal diets were slightly lower in crude protein (table 1);


1Data taken from Swine Unit Experiment No. 245.
2Bryant, graduate student; present address: 109 Plantation Rd., Blacksburg, VA 24060.
3Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Wallace, Chairman, Animal Science Department.







Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Research Report AL-1977-3 Experiment.Station
S August, 1977 Gaine W T a

/ ^ LIt3'ARl,
REPLACEMENT OF SOYBEAN MEAL WITH SESAME MEAL
IN GROWING-FINISHING SWINE DIETS1 '

K. L. Bryant2, G. E. Combs and H. D. Walla3A .


When harvested and processed properly, sesame meal provides a sat factor a
protein supplement for use in livestocks feeds. When used as a protein supple-
ment for swine diets based on cereal grains, sesame meal is usually blended
with other protein sources such as soybean meal or fish meal. The low lysine
level in sesame meal prevents it from totally replacing soybean meal in corn-
soybean meal diets. It has been estimated that sesame meal can replace up to
10 percent of the soybean meal in a 16 percent protein corn-soybean meal diet
for growing-finishing swine.

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of replacing soybean meal
with varying amounts of sesame meal in growing-finishing swine diets.

Experimental

Forty-eight crossbred pigs averaging 102 lbs. were randomly allotted to
eight pens. Two pens were assigned to each of the four following dietary treat-
ments;

1. 0 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
2. 25 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
3. 50 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.
4. 75 percent of protein supplement as sesame meal.

Composition of the dietary treatments is presented in table 1. Amino acid
composition of the protein supplements is presented in table 2. All pigs were
self-fed in concrete-floored pens with water provided by automatic watering de-
vices. All pigs were weighed and feed consumption recorded at 14 day intervals
throughout the 56 day trial. Data were analyzed by the analysis of variance
procedure.

Results and Discussion

A summary of the performance data is presented in table 3.

No significant difference (P<.05) was observed for any of the criteria
evaluated. In general, the pigs receiving 0 (0%) sesame meal as a protein
supplement had the best performance. They grew 7% faster and were 13% more
efficient than those pigs receiving 25, 50 or 75% of their protein supplement as
sesame meal. The sesame meal diets were slightly lower in crude protein (table 1);


1Data taken from Swine Unit Experiment No. 245.
2Bryant, graduate student; present address: 109 Plantation Rd., Blacksburg, VA 24060.
3Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Wallace, Chairman, Animal Science Department.







-2 -


however, the pigs receiving the sesame meal diets consumed 8% more feed than
the pigs receiving no sesame meal. This difference in feed consumption made
the total daily crude protein consumption of the soybean and sesame groups
approximately equal. Table 2 shows that there were differences in the protein
quality (amino acid composition) of the two protein supplements and that in
comparison to soybean meal, sesame meal is very low in both lysine and methi-
onine which are two of the most important essential amino acids.

The reduced performance of the pigs receiving the sesame meal diets, in
this trial, is probably due to the poor amino acid composition of the sesame meal.
For maximum performance of growing-finishing pigs fed cereal grain based diets,
soybean meal should be used. However, the relative cost of the two meals should
determine the extent to which sesame meal could be economically used. Certainly,
the cost of sesame meal would have to be less than that of soybean meal to com-
pensate for the expected decrease in performance

Summary

Forty-eight crossbred pigs weighing approximately 102 Ibs. were used to
evaluate the effect of replacing 0, 25, 50 and 75% of soybean meal with sesame
meal in the diets of growing-finishing pigs.

No significant treatment difference was observed on average daily gain and
feed efficiency. However, the pigs receiving no sesame meal had 7% higher daily
gains and 13% better feed efficiency than the pigs receiving 25, 50 or 75% of
the protein supplement as sesame meal.















Table 1. Diet Composition (%)


Treatments


Ingredient 1 2 3 4

Ground Corn (9%) 82.00 82.00 82.00 82.00
Soybean Oilmeal (49%) 15.00 11.25 7.50 3.75
Sesame Oilmeal (41%) 0.00 3.75 7.50 11.25
Dynafos 1.70 1.70 1.70 1.70
Limestone 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80
Iodized Salt 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25
Trace Minerals (CCC)1 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamin Premix (UF) 2 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
Tylan Sulfa 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10


100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00


Calculated

Protein, (%) 14.73 14.43 14.13 13.83
Calcium, (%) 0.73 0.73 0.73 0.73
Phosphorus, (%) 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65


IGenerously supplied by Calcium Carbonate Co., Quincy, Illinois. Contains:
20% zinc, 10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, 0.10% cobalt,
and 2% calcium.

2Contains 6,000 mg riboflavin; 20,000 mg niacin; 12,000 mg pantothenic acid;
80,000 mg choline chloride; 10,000 mcg Vitamin BI2; 2,500,000 I. U. Vitamin A;
400,000 I.C.U. Vitamin D3; 10,000 IU Vitamin E and 3,860 mg of Vitamin K per
pound premix.













Table 2. Amino acid composition of protein supplements*
(mg amino acid/100 mg sample)


Amino acid Soybean Meal Sesame Meal

Threonine 1.91 1.53
Valine 2.70 2.13
Methionine 0.67 0.25
Isoleucine 2.81 2.51
Leucine 3.82 3.06
Phenylalanine 2.47 2.07
Lysine 3.26 1.44
Histidine 1.24 1.55
Arginine 3.60 7.37

*Includes only essential amino acids for the pig with the exception of tryptophan.











Table 3. Performance of growing-finishing pigs fed
varying levels of sesame meal.



% protein supplement as sesame meal
Criteria 0 25 50 75

No. of pigs 12 12 12 12
Av. initial wt., Ib 102.00 102.20 102.10 102.10
Av. final wt., lb 217.40 211.35 208.90 207.35
Av. daily gain, lb 2.06 1.95 1.90 1.88
Av. daily feed consumption, lb 5.99 6.35 6.57 6.24
Av. feed/gain, Ib 2.91 3.26 3.44 3.32













Table 2. Amino acid composition of protein supplements*
(mg amino acid/100 mg sample)


Amino acid Soybean Meal Sesame Meal

Threonine 1.91 1.53
Valine 2.70 2.13
Methionine 0.67 0.25
Isoleucine 2.81 2.51
Leucine 3.82 3.06
Phenylalanine 2.47 2.07
Lysine 3.26 1.44
Histidine 1.24 1.55
Arginine 3.60 7.37

*Includes only essential amino acids for the pig with the exception of tryptophan.











Table 3. Performance of growing-finishing pigs fed
varying levels of sesame meal.



% protein supplement as sesame meal
Criteria 0 25 50 75

No. of pigs 12 12 12 12
Av. initial wt., Ib 102.00 102.20 102.10 102.10
Av. final wt., lb 217.40 211.35 208.90 207.35
Av. daily gain, lb 2.06 1.95 1.90 1.88
Av. daily feed consumption, lb 5.99 6.35 6.57 6.24
Av. feed/gain, Ib 2.91 3.26 3.44 3.32




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