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 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Table 1 - Composition of diets
 Table 2 - Performance of pigs fed...
 Table 3 - Performance of pigs fed...
 Table 4 - Performance as influenced...














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AL-1977-2
Title: Protein levels for starter, grower and finisher swine diets
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073093/00001
 Material Information
Title: Protein levels for starter, grower and finisher swine diets
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Copelin, Johnny Landon
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs, H.D. Wallace and J.L. Copelin.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1977."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073093
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50672845

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Table 1 - Composition of diets
        Page 3
    Table 2 - Performance of pigs fed diets containing varying levels of protein (Period 1)
        Page 4
    Table 3 - Performance of pigs fed diets containing varying levels of protein (Period 2)
        Page 5
    Table 4 - Performance as influenced by initial and final dietary protein levels
        Page 6
Full Text


Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
V Research Report AL-1977-2 Experiment Station
August, 1977 Gainesville, Florida

r I Ir, ,,.
PROTEIN LEVELS FOR STARTER, GROWER AND FINISHER SWINE

G. E. Combs, H. D. Wallace and J. L. Copeli2
Ocr 1 1977
The NRC3 recommends that starter-grower diets contain 8 and 16 percent
protein respectively and that during the finishing sta es th ytein level be
reduced to 14-13 percent. Previous studies at Florida in general sQW6 rf fn f
these recommendations for finishing swine.

To gain further insight into the problem of protein nutrition during several
stages of the pig's life cycle, the present study was initiated.

Experimental

Period 1. Ninety pigs weaned at three weeks of age were allotted on the
basis of initial weight and sex to five treatment groups of eighteen pigs each.
Treatments consisted of dietary protein levels of 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 percent
protein. Three pens containing six pigs each were fed at each protein level.
During this phase, all pigs were housed for nine weeks in wire cages equipped
with automatic watering devices and self-feeders.

Period 2. Treatments during this portion of the study consisted of dietary
protein levels of 15, 13 and 11 percent. Treatment groups were formed by placing
the three pens fed at each starter protein level on either 15, 13 or 11 percent
protein diets. All pigs were housed in concrete-floored pens equipped with
automatic watering devices and self-feeders.

The diet composition for both phases of this study are presented in table 1.

Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in tables 2, 3 and 4.

During period 1, the pigs fed diets containing 15 and 16 percent protein
gained significantly (P<.05) slower than those given diets containing 17, 18 or
19 percent protein. Feed efficiency was not significantly (P<.05) different
among the treatment groups but inspection of the results show that the 15 per-
cent groups were less efficient than the remaining treatment groups. Data pre-
sented in table 2 also show that daily gain was not influenced by sex: The
average for all male pigs during this initial period was 1.29 Ibs. as compared
to 1.25 lbs. for females.



1Experiment 232A.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist, Wallace, Chairman, Animal Science Department and
Copelin, Assistant Animal Nutritionist.
3NRC Nutrient Requirements of Swine, 7th edition, 1973.
4Animal Science Research Report AN 69-5.






Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
V Research Report AL-1977-2 Experiment Station
August, 1977 Gainesville, Florida

r I Ir, ,,.
PROTEIN LEVELS FOR STARTER, GROWER AND FINISHER SWINE

G. E. Combs, H. D. Wallace and J. L. Copeli2
Ocr 1 1977
The NRC3 recommends that starter-grower diets contain 8 and 16 percent
protein respectively and that during the finishing sta es th ytein level be
reduced to 14-13 percent. Previous studies at Florida in general sQW6 rf fn f
these recommendations for finishing swine.

To gain further insight into the problem of protein nutrition during several
stages of the pig's life cycle, the present study was initiated.

Experimental

Period 1. Ninety pigs weaned at three weeks of age were allotted on the
basis of initial weight and sex to five treatment groups of eighteen pigs each.
Treatments consisted of dietary protein levels of 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 percent
protein. Three pens containing six pigs each were fed at each protein level.
During this phase, all pigs were housed for nine weeks in wire cages equipped
with automatic watering devices and self-feeders.

Period 2. Treatments during this portion of the study consisted of dietary
protein levels of 15, 13 and 11 percent. Treatment groups were formed by placing
the three pens fed at each starter protein level on either 15, 13 or 11 percent
protein diets. All pigs were housed in concrete-floored pens equipped with
automatic watering devices and self-feeders.

The diet composition for both phases of this study are presented in table 1.

Results and Discussion

The performance data are summarized in tables 2, 3 and 4.

During period 1, the pigs fed diets containing 15 and 16 percent protein
gained significantly (P<.05) slower than those given diets containing 17, 18 or
19 percent protein. Feed efficiency was not significantly (P<.05) different
among the treatment groups but inspection of the results show that the 15 per-
cent groups were less efficient than the remaining treatment groups. Data pre-
sented in table 2 also show that daily gain was not influenced by sex: The
average for all male pigs during this initial period was 1.29 Ibs. as compared
to 1.25 lbs. for females.



1Experiment 232A.
2Combs, Animal Nutritionist, Wallace, Chairman, Animal Science Department and
Copelin, Assistant Animal Nutritionist.
3NRC Nutrient Requirements of Swine, 7th edition, 1973.
4Animal Science Research Report AN 69-5.







-2-


Daily gains during the finishing phase (Period 2) did not differ signifi-
cantly (P<.05). However,- it would appear from the data presented (table 3),
that both daily gain and feed efficiency of pigs given the 11 percent protein
diet were adversely affected. As was anticipated, the males gained signifi-
cantly (P<.01) faster than females (1.74 vs 1.61) during this period.

Table 4 presents by pens the gain and feed efficiency performance in terms
of initial and final protein levels. A comparison of 11 percent protein with
13 and 15 percent shows that in four of the five groups (re 15-16-17-18-19),
the shift to 11 percent during the finishing stage resulted in decreased daily
gain and increased feed required per unit gain. The exception was pigs fed the
16 percent diet initially. A comparison of the 13 and 15 percent groups showed
no trend for either gain or feed performance.

Summary

Ninety early weaned pigs having an average initial weight of 15.2 lbs. were
fed diets containing 15, 16, 17, 18 or 19 percent protein. After a 70 day
feeding period, groups from each of initial protein treatments were finished on
diets containing 15, 13 or 11 percent protein.

During the starter-grower phase (Period 1), diets containing 15 or 16 per-
cent protein produced significantly (P<.05) slower gains than either 17, 18 or
19 percent protein. A minimum of 17 percent protein is therefore suggested for
starter diets. During the finishing phase (Period 2), level of dietary protein
(11-13-15) did not significantly influence (P<.05) rate or efficiency of gain
but both parameters were decreased with groups fed the 11 percent protein diet.
Males and females gained at a comparable rate during Period 1 but a signifi-
cantly (P<.01) faster rate of gain was found with males during the finishing
period.






-3-


Table 1. Composition of Diets.


Item Protein %


Period 1 15 16 17 18 19

Gr. yellow corn 79.77 77.30 74.83 72.36 69.89
Soybean meal 16.78 19.25 21.72 24.19 26.66
Salt 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Bio-Phos. 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.60
Gr. limestone 0.90 0.90 0.90 0;90 0.90
Trace minerals (CCC)1 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vit. mix (UF)2 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Aureo SP-250 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25



Period 2 11 13 15

Gr. yellow corn 89.00 84.50 80.02
Soybean meal 7.80 12.30 16.78
Salt 0.50 0.50 0.50
Bio-Phos. 1.60 1.60 1.60
Gr. limestone 0.90 0.90 0.90
Trace minerals (CCC)1 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vit. mix (UF)2 0.10 0.10 0.10



1Supplied by Calcium Carbonate Company, Quincy, Illinois. Contained 20% zinc,
10% iron, 5.5% manganese, 1.1% coppper, 0.15% iodine, 0.1% cobalt and 2% calcium.
2Contained 6,000 mg riboflavin, 20,000 mg niacin, 12,000 mg pantothenic acid,
80,000 mg choline chloride, 10,000 mcg vitamin B12, 2,500,000 IU vitamin A,
400,000 ICU vitamin D3 and 10,000 IU vitamin E per lb. of premix.







-4-


Table 2. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing
Varying Levels of Protein (Period 1).




Dietary
Protein % 15 16 17 18 19


Period 1

Number of pigs 18 18 18 18 18

Number of pens 3 3 3 3- 3

Days on test 63 63 63 63 63

Av. initial weight, Ibs. 15.20 15.20 15.20 15.20 15.20

Av. final weight, lbs. 87.30 91.00 98.40 97.80 100.50

Av. daily gain, lbs. 1.15a 1.20a 1.32 1.31 1.35

Av. daily feed, lbs. 2.77 2.73 2.92 2.94 3.04

Av. feed/gain, Ibs. 2.42 2.27 2.21 2.24 2.24



protein levels 15 and 16 significantly (P<.05) less than 17, 18 and 19.

---------------------------------------------- --------------------


Av. Daily Gain, lbs.

Males 1.13 1.23 1.34 1.33 1.43

Females 1.16 1.18 1.31 1.30 1.28







-5-


Table 3. Performance of Pigs Fed Diets Containing
Varying Levels of Protein (Period 2).




Dietary
Protein % 15 13 11


Period 2

Number of pigs 30 30 30

Number of pens 5 5 5

Days on test 70 70 70

Av. initial weight, lbs. 93.90 95.40 95.74

Av. final weight, lbs. 212.70 214.80 209.20

Av. daily gain, lbs. 1.70 1.71 1.62

Av. daily feed, lbs. 5.56 5.54 5.62

Av. feed/gain, Ibs. 3.27 3.25 3.47

----------------------------------------------------------------------


Av. Daily Gain, lbs.

Malesa 1.71 1.73 1.77

Females 1.68 1.69 1.47




aMales significantly (P<.01) higher than females.
















Table 4. Performance As Influenced By Initial and Final Dietary Protein Levels.


Protein %


Initial

Final


Av. Daily
Gain, lbs.


15

15 13 11





1.58 1.74 1.46


16

15 13 : 11





1.69 1.58 1.81


17

15 13 11





1.80 1.74 1.52


18

15 13 11





1.70 1.75 1.63


19

15 13 11





1.72 1.72 1.68


3.08 3.31 3.29 3.34 3.34 3.54


Av.
Feed/Gain
lbs.


3.23 3.06 3.48


3.39 3.30 3.36 3.33 3.22 3.70




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