• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Experimental
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Tables














Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report ; AL-1976-12
Title: Confinement vs pasture and other factors affecting growth and blood components in lambs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073091/00001
 Material Information
Title: Confinement vs pasture and other factors affecting growth and blood components in lambs
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 2, 3 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Loggins, P. E., 1921-
Franke, D. E ( Donald Edward ), 1937-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Sheep -- Housing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sheep -- Breeding -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Lambs -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: P.E. Loggins and D.E. Franke.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "November, 1976."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073091
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 80547547

Table of Contents
    Experimental
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 1
    Summary
        Page 2
    Tables
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text




Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
6'4 Research Report AL-1976-12 Experiment Station
November, 1976 Gainesville, Florida


CONFINEMENT VS PASTURE AND OTHER FACTORS AFFECTING
GROWTH AND BLOOD COMPONENTS IN LAMBS1

P. E. Loggins2 and D. E. Franke3


The objective of this report is to present growth and blood component data
of lambs reared either on pasture with normal exposure to internal parasites or
in confinement under worm-free conditions. Responses of interest include birth,
60-day and 120-day lamb body weights and hemoglobin concentration and packed cell
volume (PCV) at 120 days.

Experimental

Confinement and pasture reared lambs from the 1970, 1971 and 1975 lamb crops
were included in this study. Rambouillet and Florida Native ewes which had been
bred and normally managed under pasture conditions were raniffmly-as&ied to either
pasture or confinement systems of management just prior to a crTh Qe
facility would accommodate only about one-third of the tot ewe ke r- Vi
more lambs reared on pasture than in confinement. The pas ure system involved ewe
grazing common bermudagrass pasture that was known to be h avilyp tamt n ted with
H. contortus larvae. Ewes in confinement were maintained 'n concre'f oW7 that
were washed daily. Confinement reared lambs were found to be free of H. contortu
throughout the preweaning and postweaning period. Sampli 4~ ecal material in
the pasture lambs revealed an average of 4,650 H. contort pe moAifJ tg
a moderate level of infection. Ewes in both management groups wer a a
the same level of supplemental feeding throughout the preweaning period and had
ad libitum access to bermudagrass hay (long or as pellets). When the lambs were
weaned at an average age of about 60 days, ewes in confinement were returned to
pasture. Lambs in both management systems were given ad libitum access to creep
feed after about two weeks of age. Lambs in confinement and on pasture were main-
tained in their respective management systems after weaning with ad libitum levels
of concentrate feeding and bermudagrass pellets.

Lamb weights were taken at birth, 60 and 120 days. Blood samples were taken
at 120 days on all lambs to measure hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and PCV values.

Results and Discussion

Data from 322 lambs born in three years were used in this study. Least squares
analysis of variance mean squares and significance levels for factors influencing
birth, 60- and 120-day weight and 120-day hemoglobin concentration and PCV are shown
in table 1. Least squares means for main effects and certain first-order interactions
are presented in tables 2 and 3.


1Hatch Project AL-01313.
2Professor of Animal Science.
3Associate Professor of Animal Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana.








Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
6'4 Research Report AL-1976-12 Experiment Station
November, 1976 Gainesville, Florida


CONFINEMENT VS PASTURE AND OTHER FACTORS AFFECTING
GROWTH AND BLOOD COMPONENTS IN LAMBS1

P. E. Loggins2 and D. E. Franke3


The objective of this report is to present growth and blood component data
of lambs reared either on pasture with normal exposure to internal parasites or
in confinement under worm-free conditions. Responses of interest include birth,
60-day and 120-day lamb body weights and hemoglobin concentration and packed cell
volume (PCV) at 120 days.

Experimental

Confinement and pasture reared lambs from the 1970, 1971 and 1975 lamb crops
were included in this study. Rambouillet and Florida Native ewes which had been
bred and normally managed under pasture conditions were raniffmly-as&ied to either
pasture or confinement systems of management just prior to a crTh Qe
facility would accommodate only about one-third of the tot ewe ke r- Vi
more lambs reared on pasture than in confinement. The pas ure system involved ewe
grazing common bermudagrass pasture that was known to be h avilyp tamt n ted with
H. contortus larvae. Ewes in confinement were maintained 'n concre'f oW7 that
were washed daily. Confinement reared lambs were found to be free of H. contortu
throughout the preweaning and postweaning period. Sampli 4~ ecal material in
the pasture lambs revealed an average of 4,650 H. contort pe moAifJ tg
a moderate level of infection. Ewes in both management groups wer a a
the same level of supplemental feeding throughout the preweaning period and had
ad libitum access to bermudagrass hay (long or as pellets). When the lambs were
weaned at an average age of about 60 days, ewes in confinement were returned to
pasture. Lambs in both management systems were given ad libitum access to creep
feed after about two weeks of age. Lambs in confinement and on pasture were main-
tained in their respective management systems after weaning with ad libitum levels
of concentrate feeding and bermudagrass pellets.

Lamb weights were taken at birth, 60 and 120 days. Blood samples were taken
at 120 days on all lambs to measure hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and PCV values.

Results and Discussion

Data from 322 lambs born in three years were used in this study. Least squares
analysis of variance mean squares and significance levels for factors influencing
birth, 60- and 120-day weight and 120-day hemoglobin concentration and PCV are shown
in table 1. Least squares means for main effects and certain first-order interactions
are presented in tables 2 and 3.


1Hatch Project AL-01313.
2Professor of Animal Science.
3Associate Professor of Animal Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana.





-2-


Birth weight. Sex of lamb, type of birth and ewe age significantly influenced
birth weight (P < .05 or P < .01). Ram lambs were heavier than ewe lambs by .3 lb
(136 g) and single-born lambs were heavier than twin-born lambs by 1.4 lb (636 g).
Birth weights of lambs increased as ewe age increased up to 4 years of age. Breed
and Hb type of lamb did not significantly influence birth weights. Because ewes
were randomly assigned to a management system at lambing, birth weights would be
independent of management system.

60- and 120-day weight. The effects of sex, type of birth and ewe age were
significant (P < .05 or P < .01) on expression of 60- and 120-day weight. Manage-
ment had a highly significant influence (P < .01) on 60- and 120-day weight. Year
x management and type of birth x management were significant interaction effects in-
fluencing 60-day weight but not 120-day weight. Ram lambs were heavier by 2.3 and
4.4 lbs (1.0 and 2.0 kg), respectively, and single born lambs were heavier by 7.9
and 9.0 Ibs (3.6 and 4.1 kg), respectively, at 60- and 120-days. Lambs reared in
confinement weighed 3.9 and 8.8 lbs (1.7 and 4.0 kg) more than contemporary pasture
reared lambs at 60-and 120-days, respectively. Twins reared in confinement weighed
6.2 and 11.3 lbs (2.8 and 5.1 kg) more than pasture reared twins at 60- and 120-
days, respectively. Singles reared in confinement were also heavier than their
contemporary pasture reared singles. These data suggest that twin lambs reared in
confinement are less stressed than those in pasture and therefore would respond
with a greater growth rate. Periodic monitoring of parasite levels in the confined
lambs indicated that internal parasite infection was negative. Data collected on
similar pasture conditions as the pasture reared lambs in this study showed the
lambs were infected with H. contortus.

Hb concentration and PCV. Year, type of birth, Hb type, breed and management
significantly influenced Hb concentration at 120 days (P < .05 or P < .01). Year
x management was the only significant interaction (P < .01). Type of birth, Hb
type, breed and management were main effects significantly influencing PCV (P< .05
or P < .01) as did sex x management (P < .01). Lambs that are considered stronger
and more tolerable to stress had higher Hb concentration and PCV. This generally
includes male, single-born and adapted (Florida Native) lambs.

Summary

Three hundred and twenty-two lambs of Rambouillet or Florida Native breeding
born in 1970, 1971 or 1975 were reared either on pasture with normal exposure to
Haemonchus contortus or in confinement under worm-free conditions. Lambs that were
born and reared as singles, or were of the male sex or that were from mature ewes
were heavier at birth, 60- and 120-days (P < .05 or P < .01) than their contem-
poraries. Lambs reared in confinement were heavier at 60- and 120-days than lambs
reared on pasture even though both had access to ad libitum levels of supplemental
nutrition. Lambs reared in confinement had significantly higher hemoglobin con-
centration levels and PCVvalues suggesting that pasture reared lambs suffered from
parasite infection (primarily H. contortus). Data suggest that lamb growth rate
can be increased by intensive management of the ewes during the nursing period and
protecting lambs from internal parasite infection to market weight. Twins reared
as twins possibly are aided more by confinement than single-born.










TABLE 1. LEAST SQUARES ANALYSIS OF.VARIANCE FOR FACTORS INFLUENCING LAMB GROWTH AND BLOOD TRAITS1



Birth weight 60-day weight 120-day weight 120-day Hb concentration 120-day PCV
Factor df MS df MS MS MS df MS


Year (Y) 2 2.2 2 197* 147 53.5** 1 21.7
Sex (S) 1 6.7* 1 195* 1024** .1 1 4.5
Type of birth (T) 1 77.8** 1 1917** 2466** 9.7* 1 82.1*
Hb type (H) 2 3.2 2 29 9 24.5** 2 154.8**
Breed (B) 1 0.7 1 49 56 7.9* 1 60.7*
Ewe Age (E) 2 37.4** 2 310** 308* .8 2 25.4
Management (M) 1 428** 2094** 56.9** 1 161.7**
Y x M 2 345** 185 29.9** 1 40.3
S x T 1 12 16 2.7
SxM 1 184.9**
Tx M 1 156* 206 6.2 1 9.3
Lamb age (Linear) 1 1977** 1505** 11.9** 1 70.2*
Residual 312 1.1 306 28 63 1.7 227 12.9



* P < .05.
** P < .01.
1Degrees of freedom for 120-day weight and 120-day Hb concentration are the same as for 60-day weight.




LAft.D L. LH b A' SCIUAKE MEANS AUK 1AUL'0UKb PiNVLULWINU JlNi 1JKLi WtlrHAl:, OU-JI Wi,.nii, LU-JAl WL.Lin.,
120-Hb CONCENTRATION AND 120-DAY PCV1'2


Birth 60-day 120-day 120-day 120-day
Factor No. weight weight weight Hb concentration No. PCV
lbs. (kg.) lbs. (kg.) lbs. (kg.) g/100 ml %


Year
1970
1971
1975


113
128
81


Sex
Male
Female


types of Birth
Single
Twin


ib Type


Breed
Rambouillet
Florida Native


Ewe Age
2


132
89
101


26
296


80
76
166


7.0 (3.2)


7.2 (3.3)
6.9 (3.1)
6.9 (3.1)


7.2 (3.3)
6.9 (3.1)


7.7 (3.5)
6.3 (2.9)


6.9 (3.1)
6.8 (3.1)
7.2 (3.3)


6.9 (3.1)
7.1 (3.2)


6.3 (2.9)
7.1 (3.2)
7.6 (3.4)


Management
Pasture
Confinement


27.4 (12.4)


29.2
27.1
26.0


(13.2)
(12.3)
(11.8)


28.6 (13.0)
26.3 (11.9).


31.4 (14.2)
23.5 (10.6)


27.6
26.8
27.9


(12.5)
(12.2)
(12.7)


28.2 (12.8)
26.7 (12.1)


25.2
28.3
28.8


(11.4)
(12.8)
(13.1)


25.5 (11.6)
29.4 (13.3)


47.2 (21.4)


45.7
47.2
48.7


(20.7)
(21.4)
(22.1)


49.9 (22.6)
44.5 (20.2)


51.7 (23.4)
42.7 (19.4)


47.1
46.9
47.6


(21.4)
(21.3)
(21.6)


48.0 (21.8)
46.4 (20.6)


44.9
48.1
48.5


(20.4)
(21.8)
(22.0)


42.8 (19.4)
51.6 (23.4)


as for birth weight.
and .8 to 1.7 Ibs.,


10.7 .2


10.3
11.7
10.3


11.7 .2
10.8 .2


11.0 .1
10.5 .3


11.3
10.3
10.7


32.7 .5


32.4
33.1
-


32.6 .5
32.9 .6


33.7 .4
31.8 .7


113
128



117
124


210
31


106
51
84


26
215


47
68
126


174
67


31.8 .8
33.6 + .4


32.1
32.7
33.4


31.4 .7
34.1 .6


34.3
31.4
32.5


10.4 .3
11.1 .1


10.6
10.8
10.8


1Number of lambs represented in 60-day weight, 120-day weight, and 120-day Hb concentration is same
2Standard errors for birth weight, 60-day weight and 120-day weight range from .1 to .2, .05 to 1.2
respectively.


10.0 + .2
11.5 + .2








TABLE 3. LEAST SQUARES MEANS FOR IMPORTANT INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FACTORS INFLUENCING LAMB GROWTH
AND BLOOD TRAITS1



Interaction No. 60-day weight 120-day weight 120-day Hb concentration 120-day PCV

lbs. (kg) lbs. (kg) g/100 ml %
Year x management
1970 Pasture 87 25.2 (11.4) 42.7 (19.4) 10.2 .3 31.4 .7
1970 Confinement 26 33.2 (15.1) 48.8 (22.1) 10.4 .3 33.2 .8
1971 Pasture 87 27.2 (12.3) 43.3 (19.6) 11.1 .3 31.2 .7
1971 Confinement 41 27.0 (12.2) 51.2 (23.2) 12.3 .3 35.0 .7
1975 Pasture 34 24.0 (10.9) 42.6 (19.3) 8.9 .3
1975 Confinement 47 28.0 (12.7) 54.8 (24.8) 11.7 .3

Sex x Type of Birth
Male Single 136 32.8 (14.9) 54.7 (24.8) 11.2 .2
Male Twin 22 24.4 (11.1) 45.1 (20.5) 10.3 .3
Female Single 141 29.9 (13.6) 48.7 (22.1) 10.9 .2
Female Twin 23 22.6 (10.3) 40.3 (18.3) 10.6 .3

Sex x Management
Male Pasture 83 32.2 .7
Male Confinement 34 32.9 + .7
Female Pasture 91 30.4 .7
Female Confinement 33 35.3 .8

Type of Birth x Management
Single Pasture 195 30.5 (13.8) 48.6 (22.0) 10.5 .2 32.6 .5
Single Confinement 82 32.2 (14.6) 54.7 (24.8) 11.5 .2 34.7 .6
Twin Pasture 13 20.4 ( 9.3) 37.1 (16.8) 9.5 .4 30.1 1.1
Twin Confinement 32 26.6 (12.1) 48.4 (21.9) 11.4 .3 33.5 .8


1Standard errors for 60- and 120-day.weight range from .7 to 1.3 and 1.0 to 2.0 lbs., respectively.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs