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Group Title: Department of Animal Science research report - Universtiy of Florida Department of Animal Science ; AL-1976-3
Title: Grain sorghums in starter and grower diets
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073082/00001
 Material Information
Title: Grain sorghums in starter and grower diets
Series Title: Department of Animal Science research report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sorghum as feed -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs and H.D. Wallace.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1976."
Funding: Animal science research report (University of Florida. Dept. of Animal Science) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073082
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50685548

Table of Contents
    Grain sorghums in starter and grower diets
        Page 1
        Experimental
            Page 1
        Results and discussion
            Page 2
        Summary
            Page 2
    List of Tables
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text



/ Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
S Research Report AL-1976-3 Experiment Station
August, 1976 Gainesville, Florida


GRAIN SORGHUMS IN STARTER AND GROWER DIETS1

G. E. Combs and H. D. Wallace2 ".. ... r ,

The use of several varieties of Florida grown sorghum grainsT n9s. ter and
growing-finishing diets is reported in previous Research Reports3. However,
since the response has been shown to vary between bird resistant (BR) and non-
bird resistant (NBR) varieties as well as within BR and NBR varieties 0th6seMVes,
additional studies are needed to more clearly define their comparative feeding
value.

These experiments were conducted to compare several varieties of BR and NBR
grain sorghums and corn as energy sources in swine diets.

Experimental

Experiment 1 Thirty-six early weaned pigs having an average initial weight
of 21 pounds were allotted according to weight and litter into three treatment
groups of 12 pigs each.

Experiment 2 Seventy-two pigs weaned at approximately 3 weeks of age were
divided according to weight and sex into three treatment groups of 24 pigs each.

In both experiments the pigs were housed in expanded metal cages equipped
with automatic watering devices and self feeders. Pigs in experiment two were
moved to partially enclosed concrete-floored pens for the growing phase of the
experiment.

The dietary treatments and composition of the diets are presented in Table 1.




1 Experiment 226A and 226B.
2 Combs and Wallace, Animal Nutritionists.
3 ARC Mimeo Rept. SW 1972-3, Animal Science Research Reports 1974-2 and 1975-8.



This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$114 85 or .11e cents per copy to inform county agricul-
tural directors, ranchers and growers of research results
in swine management and nutrition.


Department of Animal Science
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences







/ Department of Animal Science Florida Agricultural
S Research Report AL-1976-3 Experiment Station
August, 1976 Gainesville, Florida


GRAIN SORGHUMS IN STARTER AND GROWER DIETS1

G. E. Combs and H. D. Wallace2 ".. ... r ,

The use of several varieties of Florida grown sorghum grainsT n9s. ter and
growing-finishing diets is reported in previous Research Reports3. However,
since the response has been shown to vary between bird resistant (BR) and non-
bird resistant (NBR) varieties as well as within BR and NBR varieties 0th6seMVes,
additional studies are needed to more clearly define their comparative feeding
value.

These experiments were conducted to compare several varieties of BR and NBR
grain sorghums and corn as energy sources in swine diets.

Experimental

Experiment 1 Thirty-six early weaned pigs having an average initial weight
of 21 pounds were allotted according to weight and litter into three treatment
groups of 12 pigs each.

Experiment 2 Seventy-two pigs weaned at approximately 3 weeks of age were
divided according to weight and sex into three treatment groups of 24 pigs each.

In both experiments the pigs were housed in expanded metal cages equipped
with automatic watering devices and self feeders. Pigs in experiment two were
moved to partially enclosed concrete-floored pens for the growing phase of the
experiment.

The dietary treatments and composition of the diets are presented in Table 1.




1 Experiment 226A and 226B.
2 Combs and Wallace, Animal Nutritionists.
3 ARC Mimeo Rept. SW 1972-3, Animal Science Research Reports 1974-2 and 1975-8.



This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$114 85 or .11e cents per copy to inform county agricul-
tural directors, ranchers and growers of research results
in swine management and nutrition.


Department of Animal Science
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences







-2-


Results and Discussion

The performance data for experiments 1 and 2 are summarized in Tables 2
and 3, respectively.

In experiment 1, pigs fed the diet containing corn gained significantly
faster (P < .01) than the groups fed either BR or NBR sorghum. Feed efficiency
was comparable for all treatment groups with the corn group showing only a
4 percent advantage over the sorghum groups. Rate and efficiency of gain was
essentially the same for pigs fed either BR or NBR sorghum. In agreement with a
previous report (Res. Rept. AL-1975-8) performance was not influenced by the
tannic acid content of the sorghums. The BR sorghum had a tannic acid equivalent
of 1.7 as compared to 0.3 for the NBR variety.

In experiment 2, no significant differences were observed among treatments
in daily gain or feed efficiency. The daily gains at the end of the starter
phase (56 days on test) were 0.87, 0.87 and 0.84 lbs for the corn, NBR and BR
treatments, respectively. The similarity of these gain data when contrasted to
that of experiment 1 indicates that considerable difference exists in the feeding
value of sorghum varieties.

Summary

Two experiments involving 108 early weaned pigs were conducted to compare
corn, BR and NBR sorghum varieties as the major source of energy in starter and
grower diets. In experiment 1,pigs fed the starter diet containing corn gained
faster (P < .01) than the pigs receiving Funk BR 79 or McNair NBR 652. No differ-
ence was found between pigs fed the two sorghum diets. Feed efficiency was
comparable for all treatment groups. Pigs in experiment 2 fed diets containing
either corn, Funk NBR G522 or Funk BR G516 gained at similar rates and efficiencies.
Tannic acid was not highly correlated with performance.







-2-


Results and Discussion

The performance data for experiments 1 and 2 are summarized in Tables 2
and 3, respectively.

In experiment 1, pigs fed the diet containing corn gained significantly
faster (P < .01) than the groups fed either BR or NBR sorghum. Feed efficiency
was comparable for all treatment groups with the corn group showing only a
4 percent advantage over the sorghum groups. Rate and efficiency of gain was
essentially the same for pigs fed either BR or NBR sorghum. In agreement with a
previous report (Res. Rept. AL-1975-8) performance was not influenced by the
tannic acid content of the sorghums. The BR sorghum had a tannic acid equivalent
of 1.7 as compared to 0.3 for the NBR variety.

In experiment 2, no significant differences were observed among treatments
in daily gain or feed efficiency. The daily gains at the end of the starter
phase (56 days on test) were 0.87, 0.87 and 0.84 lbs for the corn, NBR and BR
treatments, respectively. The similarity of these gain data when contrasted to
that of experiment 1 indicates that considerable difference exists in the feeding
value of sorghum varieties.

Summary

Two experiments involving 108 early weaned pigs were conducted to compare
corn, BR and NBR sorghum varieties as the major source of energy in starter and
grower diets. In experiment 1,pigs fed the starter diet containing corn gained
faster (P < .01) than the pigs receiving Funk BR 79 or McNair NBR 652. No differ-
ence was found between pigs fed the two sorghum diets. Feed efficiency was
comparable for all treatment groups. Pigs in experiment 2 fed diets containing
either corn, Funk NBR G522 or Funk BR G516 gained at similar rates and efficiencies.
Tannic acid was not highly correlated with performance.







-3-


Table 1. Treatments and Diet Composition

Experiment 1 Experiment 21
Treatments Corn BR NBR Corn NBR BR.
79 652 G522 G516

Yellow corn 69.00 69.00 -
Sorghum 73.25 74.05 68.55 68.55
Soybean meal 24.55 20.30 19.50 24.55 25.00 25.00
Salt 0.50 6.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Bio-phos 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.60
Limestone 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90
Trace minerals2 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamin mix (UF)3 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Aureo SP-250 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25
Stabilized lard 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

Dietary protein, % 17.6 17.9 17.9 18.0 18.0 18.0
Sorghum protein, % 11.0 11.4 8.3 8.3
Tannic acid equivalent, % 1.7 0.3 1.7
Brand-Hybrid Funk McNair Funk Funk

1 After 8 weeks, diets changed to contain 15% protein. ASP-250 and lard with-
drawn and vitamin mix reduced to 0.05.
2 Calcium Carbonate Co., Quincy, Illinois; contains 20% zinc, 10% iron, 5.5%
manganese, 1.1% copper, 0.15% iodine, 0.10% cobalt and 2% calcium.
3 Contains 6,000 mg riboflavin; 20,000 mg niacin; 12,000 mg pantothenic acid;
80,000 mg choline chloride; 10,000 mcg vitamin B12; 2,500,000 I.U. vitamin A;
4,000 I.C.U. vitamin D3 and 10,000 I.U. vitamin E per pound of premix.


Table 2. Performance of Pigs Fed Starter Diets
Containing Corn or BR and NBR Sorghum
(Experiment 1)

Treatment Corn BR NBR
79 652

Number of pigs 12 12 12
Days on test 42 42 42
Av. initial weight, lb. 21.00 21.05 21.00
Av. final weight, lb. 55.75 52.85 51.75
Av. daily gain, lb. 1.24** 1.14 1.10
Av. daily feed, lb. 2.57 2.45 2.40
Av. feed/gain, lb. 2.09 2.16 2.18

** Significantly (P < .01) different.







4 -


Table 3. Comparative Performance of Pigs Fed Starter
and Grower Diets Containing Corn, BR and
NBR Sorghum (Experiment 2)

Treatment Corn NBR BR
G522 G516

Number of pigs 24 24 24
Days on test 71 71 71
Av. initial weight, lb. 16.57 16.50 16.55
Av. final weight, lb. 104.60 103.53 100.96
Av. daily gain, lb. 1.24 1.23 1.19
Av. daily feed, lb. 2.84 2.92 2.78
Av. feed/gain, lb. 2.30 2.38 2.33




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