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Group Title: Department of Animal Science mimeograph series - University of Florida Department of Animal Science ; no. AN70-12
Title: Non-protein nitrogen for growing-finishing swine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073028/00001
 Material Information
Title: Non-protein nitrogen for growing-finishing swine
Series Title: Department of Animal Science mimeograph series
Physical Description: 2 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1970
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Nitrogen in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs and H.D. Wallace.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "May, 1970."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073028
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 79822972

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... HUME LIBRARY

',,LDepartment of AnimalScience 9 1 Florida Agricultural
Mimeograph Series No. AN70-12 ': 19 10 Experiment Station
May, 1970 Gainesville, Florida

NON-PROTEIN N1C Gr AFOl QiO6W iH:NG SWINE

G. E. Combs and H. D. Wallace-


Most reports would indicate that the ability of the pig to utilize non-protein
nitrogen (NPN) is extremely limited. However, the present and predicted world
shortage of protein requires that every possibility of alleviating this situation
continue to be researched.

This study was initiated to evaluate diammonium phosphate (Duophos2) in the
diets of growing-finishing swine.

Experimental

Sixty pigs were allotted to 6 dietary treatments from outcome groups formed
on the basis of initial weight. Pigs were housed in concrete-floored pens equipped
with self feeders and automatic waterers. During the last week of the experiment
chromic oxide was added to all diets to facilitate determination of digestion
coefficients for dry matter, ether'extract and protein. Blood samples were ob-
tained from each pig on the last day of the,'`experiment..

The dietary treatments and the composition of diets fed are 'presented in
table 1.

Results and Discussion

The data are summarized in table 2. Overall the results show that the pigs
receiving.15% protein.:gain more slowly than those given 17% protein (1.52 vs 1.71).
The gains of'pigs fed 5% NPN protein at either protein level was markedly depressed;
feed efficiency was also adversely affected at this level of NPN protein: A compari-
son of the 0% and 3% NPN protein groups showed no significant differences (P < .05)
at either level of protein.

Digestibility of dry matter was not significantly (P < .05) influenced by,
level of protein. The mean coefficient for all pigs given 17% protein was 80.8%
as compared to 81.8 for those fed the 15% protein diet. As the level of NPN
protein increased dry matter digestibility decreased. Neither ether extract nor
protein digestibility were significantly affected by protein level or by quantity.
of dietary NPN.

Blood urea nitrogen was significantly (P < -.05) higher in pigs given 17% pro-
tein. The 3 and 5% levels of NPN also increased significantly (P < .05) the blood
urea nitrogen levels.

Summary,
Sixty pigs having an initial weight of 77 pounds were fed diets containing
either 15% or 17% protein. At each of these levels diammonium phosphate contri-
buted 0, 3 or 5% NPN protein.

1/ Combs and Wallace, Animal Nutritionists, Department of Animal Science.
2/ Duophos supplied by International Minerals and Chemical Corp.








- 2 -


Pigs fed the 17% protein diets gained significantly faster than pigs given
the 15% protein diets. Both gain and feed efficiency were adversely influenced


when 5% NPN protein was present. The gains of the 0% and 3% NPN
were not significantly (P > .05) different. Digestibility of dry
with increasing levels of NPN protein whereas level or source of
influence protein or ether extract digestion.


protein groups
matter decreased
protein did not


Table 1. Treatments and Diet Composition


Protein level %
Corn-soy protein %
NPN protein %
Treatment No.


Ingredient, lb.
Corn 74.00 78.53 8
Soybean meal 20.70 14.00
Duophos 2.67
Limestone 2.00
Defluor. phos. 2.50 -
Salt .50 .50
Trace mineral .10 .10
Vitamin mix 1.20 1.20
Pro-Strep.3/ 1.00 1.00
1/ Supplied the following in ppm: Mn, 57; Fe,
2/ Provided per pound of diet: vitamin A, 1400


1
9
4
2



1
1


..45 79.00
.30 15.70
..45
;.00
- 2.50
.50 .50
.10 .10
.20 1.20
.00 1.00
70; Cu, 48; Co,
I.U., vitamin D,


83.53
9.00
2.67
2.00

.50
.10
1.20
1.00
1.6 and


86.15
4.60
4.45
2.00

.50
.10
1.20
1.00
Zn, 100.


400 I.U.; ribo-


flavin, 4.4 mg.; pantothenic acid, 10 mg.; niacin, zu mg. ana vitamln D12, umcg.
3/ Contained 5 gm. procaine penicillin and 15 gm. streptomycin/Ib.


Table 2. Performance Of Pigs Fed Diets Containing
Diammonium Phosphate As A Source of NPN
Treatment No. 1 2 3 4 5 6
NPN protein % 0 3 5 0 3 5


Av. initial wt., lb.
Av. final wt., lb.
Av. daily gain, lb.-
Av. daily feed, lb.
Av. feed/gain, lb.

Av. Digestibility %
Dry matterI-
Ether extract
Protein
Blood urea nitrogen (mg/100)2'


77.30
183.90
1.78
5.58
3.13


82.90
48.10
77.90
15


77.30
175.90
1.64
5.60
3.41


82.30
37.50
78.30
17


77.30
146.00
1.14
5.13
4.50


80.20
49.90
78.50
22


77.40
186.60
1.82
6.49
3.57


82.70
42.60
78.00
18


77.00
185.40
1.81
5.67
3.13


80.50
48.50
78.50
23


77.30
167.20
1.50
5.94
3.96


79.30
41.50
77.30
21


1/ Protein levels and NPN levels sign-. different (P < .05).
2/ Sign. affected by NPN level (P < .05)
3/ Sign, nfffocted by protein level .ad. NN level (P < .05).


I I


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