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 Introduction and procedure
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 References














Group Title: Animal Science mimeograph report - University of Florida Department of Animal Science ; AN69-8
Title: A comparison of the palatability of fresh and frozen rabbit carcasses
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073010/00001
 Material Information
Title: A comparison of the palatability of fresh and frozen rabbit carcasses
Series Title: Animal Science mimeograph report
Physical Description: 3 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Arrington, Lewis Robert, 1919-
Palmer, A. Z
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Science
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1969
 Subjects
Subject: Rabbit meat -- Quality -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: L.R. Arrington and A.Z. Palmer.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "April, 1969."
Funding: Animal Science Department mimeograph report ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073010
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 78913931

Table of Contents
    Introduction and procedure
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 2
    Summary
        Page 3
    References
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text

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Animal Science 'F16rida Agriculturdl
Mimeograph Report No. AN 69-8 Experiment Station
April, 1969 Gainesville, Florida


A COMPARISON OF THE PALATABILITY OF FRESH AND FROZEN BBn

L. R. Arrington and A. Z. Palmeri- RA 9,
19 6.9

Rabbits sold for meat may be marketed as fresh cases /iabe
frozen when storage or shipment for long distances is require o ,rI/O
producers have indicated a price discrimination against frozen rabbi
but the reasons for and degree of price differential are not known. Some
published reports have indicated a loss in palatability (1) and a loss in
moisture and flavor (2) of frozen carcasses unless properly protected.
No research reports comparing the quality of frozen and unfrozen rabbit
have been observed.

The purpose of the present preliminary study was to compare the
tenderness, juiciness and flavor of frozen and fresh rabbit carcasses.



Procedure


Forty-four Dutch rabbits, 10 to 15 weeks of age, were slaughtered
by stunning followed by removal of the head and complete bleeding. The
skinned eviscerated carcasses were washed and chilled in ice water for
3 to 16 hours. The carcasses were randomly divided by age and sex and
one-half of each group sharp frozen and held at 0F. The remainder were
stored at 340F. Carcasses were held at these temperatures for 7 to 12
days then cooked for palatability comparisons. Frozen carcasses were
defrosted by soaking in water at room temperature for one hour before
cooking.

Two methods of cooking boiling and baking were used for each
of the frozen and unfrozen groups. Twelve frozen and 11 unfrozen car-
casses were boiled individually for 45 minutes. Ten frozen and 11
unfrozen carcasses were baked at 350 F for one hour. The methods of
cooking were recognized to be those not widely used in preparing rabbits
for eating, but were selected as those which would permit the most
accurate evaluation of palatability factors tenderness, juiciness and
flavor.

Evaluations for tenderness, juiciness and flavor were made by a
panel of 5 experienced panel members. A scale of 1 to 9 was used for
each of the three characteristics; the number 5 designated average.

SArrington, Animal Nutritionist and Palmer, Meat Scientist. The
assistance of Linda D. Standish and T. C. Beaty, Jr. is gratefully
acknowledged.









-2-


Higher numbers represented the more tender or more acceptable degrees
of juiciness and flavor. Individual values for the carcasses treated and
cooked by the various methods were averaged and statistical comparisons
made by analysis of variance.



Results and Discussion


Average scores for tenderness, juiciness and flavor are indicated
in table 1. With both methods of cooking, the frozen carcasses were
significantly less tender. Fresh carcasses which were baked were more
juicy than those frozen. When boiled, however, there were no differences
in juiciness. Flavor appeared to be better in those not frozen, but the
difference observed was not statistically significant.

Although the objective of the study was not to compare methods of
cooking, it was observed that boiling resulted in more tender meat.


1/
TABLE 1. QUALITY OF FROZEN AND UNFROZEN RABBIT CARCASSES-

No. Method of
Treatment Rabbits Cooking Tenderness Juiciness Flavor

Frozen 12 Boiled 5.8 5.0 5.7
Unfrozen 11 Boiled 6.7** 5.2 5.9


Frozen 10 Baked 5.0 4.8 5.3
Unfrozen 11 Baked 6.1** 5.4** 5.6

1/ Scale: I to 9, with higher values more tender, more juicy or more
flavorful.
** Significantly (P < 0.1) more tender or more juicy than frozen carcasses.


The data indicate that carcasses from rabbits of the age studied
(10-15 weeks) may be frozen without serious changes in quality. Although
frozen rabbit meat was less tender than fresh meat, it was not rated as
objectionably tough. For older rabbits which are less tender, the
additional toughness imparted by freezing may so reduce quality that
freezing of older carcasses could not be a recommended practice. Addi-
tional studies are needed with older rabbits.










- 3-


Summary


The palatability of frozen and unfrozen rabbits was compared using
44 Dutch rabbits. Frozen carcasses were significantly less tender than
fresh carcasses, but at the age studied (10-15 weeks) freezing did not
render them objectionable. Fresh carcasses which were baked were signi-
ficantly more juicy than those frozen, but when boiled, no differences
were observed. Flavor was not significantly affected by freezing, but
those not frozen appeared to be slightly more flavorful.




References

1. Casady, R. B, P. B. Sawin and J. Van Dam. 1966. Commercial
Rabbit Raising. Agriculture Handbook No. 309, U.S. Department
of Agriculture.

2. Templeton, George S. 1955. Domestic Rabbit Production. The
Interstate Printers and Publishers, Danville, Ill.










- 3-


Summary


The palatability of frozen and unfrozen rabbits was compared using
44 Dutch rabbits. Frozen carcasses were significantly less tender than
fresh carcasses, but at the age studied (10-15 weeks) freezing did not
render them objectionable. Fresh carcasses which were baked were signi-
ficantly more juicy than those frozen, but when boiled, no differences
were observed. Flavor was not significantly affected by freezing, but
those not frozen appeared to be slightly more flavorful.




References

1. Casady, R. B, P. B. Sawin and J. Van Dam. 1966. Commercial
Rabbit Raising. Agriculture Handbook No. 309, U.S. Department
of Agriculture.

2. Templeton, George S. 1955. Domestic Rabbit Production. The
Interstate Printers and Publishers, Danville, Ill.


































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