Group Title: Animal Science Department mimeograph report - University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AN65-1
Title: Dried bakery product as a replacement for dried skim milk in starter rations
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072954/00001
 Material Information
Title: Dried bakery product as a replacement for dried skim milk in starter rations
Series Title: Animal Science Department mimeograph report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Berry, Thomas Hart, 1934-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Baked products -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs, H.D. Wallace and T.H. Berry.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July, 1964."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072954
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 77537928

Full Text



Animal Science Department Florida Agricultural
Mimeograph Report AN65-1 Experiment Station
Gainesville, Florida
July 1964

DRIED BAKERY PRODUCT AS A REPLACEMENT
FOR DRIED SKIM MILK IN STARTER RATIONS

G. E. Combs, H. D. Wallace and T. H. Berry ./


Previous investigations have shown that dried bakery product can satis-
factorily constitute as much as 30 percent of the ration for growing-finishing
swine (Fla. Mimeo. Report AN64-15). It, therefore, appeared desirous to ascer-
tain the value of this product for young pigs. Since the initial rate and
efficiency of gain is usually improved by the addition of 10 to 20 percent dried
skim milk, this product is often included in commercially available pig starter
ration. However, the relatively high cost of dried skim milk has resulted in a
continual search for a substitute product which would permit as satisfactory per-
formance but be less costly.

The following study was designed to investigate the feasibility of substi-
tuting dried bakery product (DBP) for dried skim milk (DSM) in pig starter rations.


Experimental

Seventy-five pigs weaned at two weeks of age were allotted on the basis of
weight and litter to five treatment groups of fifteen pigs each. All groups
were self-fed ad libitum for 42 days in concrete floor pens; water was provided
in automatic waterers.

The composition of the rations fed are presented in table I. The protein,
fat and sugar content was equalized for all rations.

Results

A summary of the performance data is presented in table 2. The daily gain
figures clearly indicate the pigs which received 20 percent DBP or 20 percent
DSM responded in a similar fashion. Pigs fed the rations containing 5, 10 or
15 percent DBP also gained approximately the same as those pigs fed 20 percent
of either DBP or DSM.





I/ Combs, Associate Animal Nutritionist; Wallace, Animal Nutritionist; and
Berry, Research Assistant, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. The
assistance of L. S. Taylor, Swine Herdsman, is gratefully acknowledged.

The study was partially supported by funds and materials from International
Fortrition Co., Inc., Atlanta, Ga.







-2-


With the exception of treatment 2 the data indicated a stepwise increase in
feed consumption with increasing levels of DBP. This resulted in slightly de-
creased feed efficiencies as the percentage of DBP increased.

Based on current feed prices the cost of the ingredients (excluding mineral,
vitamin and antibiotic supplements) used in formulating the 20 percent DBP and
DSM rations was $4.30 and $7.36 cwt., respectively. The lower ration cost coupled
with the performance data indicates that DBP may satisfactorily replace 20 percent
of the DSM in pig starter rations.


Summary

Seventy-five early weaned pigs were used to investigate the feasibility of
substituting 0, 5, 10, 15 or 20 percent of dried bakery product for equal amounts
of dried skim milk.

Although feed required per pound of gain was slightly increased with increasing
levels of dried bakery product the daily gain and feed cost data support the sub-
stitution of 20 percent dried bakery product for dried skim milk.








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Table 1. Composition of Rations ./



Treatment No. 2 3 4 5
Dried bakery product % 0 5 10 15 20
Dried skim milk % 20 15 10 5 0


Ingredients. lb.
Ground yellow corn 51.40 49.49 48.08 45.74 43.94
Dried bakery product 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00
Dried skim milk 20.00 15.00 10.00 5.0 0.00O
Soybean meal 12.00 14.80 17.60 20.40 23.20
Fat 3.30 2.86 2.37 1.91 1.36
Sugar (cane) 10.00 9.55 9.10 3.65 8.20
Defluorinated phosphate 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Salt .50 .50 .50 .50 .50
Trace minerals .10 .10 .10 .10 .10
Vitamin supplement 2/ .30 .30 .30 .30 .30
Vitamin B12 supplement 3/ .10 .10 .10 .10 .10
Aureo-SP-250 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30

Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00


J/ Protein, fat and sugar equalized for all rations
2/ Contained 2,000 mg. riboflavin; 4,000 mg. pantothenic acid; 9,000
and 10,000 mg. choline chloride per pound.
3/ Contained 9 mg. vitamin B12 per pound.


mg. niacin


Cost of major ingredients: ground yellow corn, $3.00 cwt; dried bakery
product, $3.00 cwt; dried skim milk $18.30 cwt; soybean meal (50%), $5.27 cwt;
stabilized fat, $6.37 cwt; and cane sugar, $13.25 cwt.







-4-


Table 2. Response of Early Weaned Pigs to
Various Levels of Dried Bakery Product and Dried Skim Milk


Treatment no. I 2 3 4 5
DBP % 0 5 10 15 20
DSM % 20 15 10 5 0


Replication I
Av. init. wt., lb. 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0
Av. final wt., lb. 53.4 51.0 50.8 46.4 49.6
Av. daily gain, lb. 1.03 .97 .97 .86 .94
Av. daily feed, lb. 1.82 1.74 1.87 1.57 1.83
Feed/lb. gain, Ib. 1.76 1.78 1.93 1.81 1.94

Replication 2
Av. init. wt., lb. 11.2 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.0
Av. final wt., Ib. 47.0 51.8 49.6 48.8 52.6
Av. daily gain, lb. .85 .96 .91 .89 .99
Av. daily feed, lb. 1.66 1.89 1.80 1.85 2.05
Feed/lb. gain, lb. 1.95 1.95 1.96 2.07 2.07

Replication 3
Av. init. wt., lb. 10.0 9.7 9.3 9.6 9.6
Av. final wt., lb. 43.4 38.4 43.4 46.0 44.4
Av. daily gain, lb. .79 .68 .81 .86 .82
Av. daily feed, Ib. 1.50 1.28 1.60 1.70 1.63
Feed/lb. gain, lb. 1.89 1.88 1.98 1.96 1.97

Av. Replication
1, 2. and 3
Av. init. wt., lb. 10.4 TO.3 10.1 10.2 10.2
Av. Final wt., Ib. 47.9 47.0 47.9 47.7 48.9
Av. daily gain, lb. .89 .87 .89 .87 .91
Av. daily feed, lb. 1.66 1.63 1.75 1.70 1.83
Feed/lb. gain, Ib. 1.86 1.87 1.95 1.94 1.99





GEC:gem
7/23/64
1000 copies




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