Group Title: Animal science mimeograph report -University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AN64-15
Title: Dried bakery product as a substitute for corn and as a source of B-vitamins for the growing-finishing pig
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072952/00001
 Material Information
Title: Dried bakery product as a substitute for corn and as a source of B-vitamins for the growing-finishing pig
Series Title: Animal science mimeograph report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
Conness, Robert Grant, 1940-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Baked products -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: H.D. Wallace, G.E. Combs and R.G. Conness.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "June, 1964."
Funding: Animal Science Department mimeograph report ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072952
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 77537390

Full Text



Animal Science Florida Agricultural
Mimeograph Report AN64-15 Experiment Station
June, 1964 Gainesville, Florida

DRIED BAKERY PRODUCT AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR CORN AND
AS A SOURCE OF B-VITAMINS FOR THE GROWING-FINISHING PIG I/

H. D. Wallace, G. E. Combs and R. G. Conness 2/


Tremendous quantities of waste bakery products are available for salvage
and potential utilization in livestock and poultry feeding. These raw waste pro-
ducts are:difficult to handle and use to advantage by the individual livestock
producer.: However, with proper processing and standardization these materials
should find application in the manufacture of commercial feeds.

The experiments herein reported were undertaken to study the application of
such feed materials in swine feeding.
Experimental

Experiment I

This experiment involved a total of 40 crossbred 'pigs (Duroc-Landrace X
Hampshire). Four males and four females were self-fed in concrete confinement
in separate pens on each of the five.rations shown in Table I.

The objectives were to study the value of dried bakery product (DBP) when
used as a gross replacement for ground yellow corn and to compare DBP with fer-
mentation residue to DBP without fermentation residue (plain). The fermentation
residue consisted of condensed grain and whey fermentation solubles.

Experiment 2

This experiment also involved a total of 40 crossbred pigs (Duroc-Landrace
X Hampshire). Two pens of five pigs each were self-fed in concrete confinement
on each of the four rations presented in Table 2.

The main objective was to determine if 30 percent of dried bakery product,
when substituted for yellow corn, would contribute adequate vitamin supplementa-
tion to meet the requirements of growing-finishing pigs.

Results and Discussion

Results of experiments I and 2 are shown respectively in Tables 3 and 4.



I/ Supported in part by a grant from International Fortrition Co., Atlanta,
Georgia.

2/ Wallace and Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Associate Animal Nutritionist, re-
spectively, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station; Conness, Graduate as-
sistant, Department of Animal Science, University of Florida. The assistance
of W. E. Collins and L. S. Taylor, Swine Herdsmen, is gratefully acknowledged.









Table I. COMPOSITION OF EXPERIMENTAL RATIONS (EXPERIMENT I) 1/


Treatment Basal 10% dried 20% dried 10% dried 20% dried
bakery product bakery product bakery product bakery product
with fermentation with fermentation plain plain
residue residue


Ground yellow corn 77.20 67.20 57.20 67.20 57.20
Dried bakery product
with fermentation residue -- 10.00 20.00 -- --
Dried bakery product (plain) --- --- --- 10.00 20.00
Soybean oilmeal (50%) 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00
Steamed bonemeal 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50
Ground limestone 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Iodized salt 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Trace minerals 2/ 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
B-vitamin supplement 3/ 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamin B12 supplement 4/ 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05
Antibiotic supplement 5/ 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00


1/ The dried bakery products
fiber.


contained approximately 9.5% crude protein, 11.0% fat and a maximum of 1.5% crude


2/ Adds in p.p.m.: manganese (29.6), iron (36.5), copper (2.5), cobalt (.83), zinc (42.0) and potassium (3.9).

Contains 2000 mg. riboflavin, 4000 mg. pantothenic acid, 9000 mg. niacin and 10,000 mg. choline chloride.per
pound.

A / Contains 20 mg. per pound.


./ Contains 10 gm. terramycin per pound.








Table 2. COMPOSITION OF EXPERIMENTAL RATIONS (EXPERIMENT 2) 1/


Treatment Basal Basal 30% dried 30% dried
(+) (-) bakery product bakery product
B-vitamins B-vitamins (+) B-vitamins (-) B-vitamins

Ground yellow corn 56.10 56.30 28.10 28.30
Dried bakery product --- --- 30.00 30.00
Soybean oilmeal (50%) 25.70 25.70 25.70 25.70
Stabilized lard 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00
Cane sugar 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00
Steamed bonemeal 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Iodized salt 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Trace minerals 2/ 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
B-vitamin supplement 5/ 0.20 --- 0.20 --
Vitamin B12 supplement 4/ 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Vitamin A and D supplement 5/ 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Antibiotic supplement 6/ 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.30

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

I/ After a feeding period of 35 days all rations were adjusted downward to an approximate level of 16% crude
protein. Fat level was equalized for all rations at this time. The same levels of dried bakery product
and other fortifications were continued throughout the experiment.

2/ Adds in p.p.m.: manganese (59.2), iron (73.0), copper (5.0), cobalt (1.66), zinc (84.0) and potassium (7.8).

3/ Contains 2000 mg. riboflavin, 4000 mg. pantothenic acid, 9000 mg. niacin and 10,000 mg. choline chloride
per pound.

./ Contains 20+ mg. per pound.

./ Contains 181,600 I.U. of vitamin A and 40,860 I.U. of vitamin D per pound.


6/ Contains 10 gm. aureomycin per pound.







Table 3. DRIED BAKERY PRODUCTS AS A REPLACEMENT FOR CORN
OF THE GROWING-FINISHING PIG (EXPERIMENT 1)


IN THE RATION


Treatment Basal 10% dried 20% dried 10% dried 20% dried
bakery product bakery product bakery product bakery product
with fermentation with fermentation plain plain
residue residue


Number pigs
Initial .wt., lb.
Final wt., lb.
Daily gain, Ib.
Feed perl.b. gain,


Number pigs
Initial wt., lb.
Final wt., lb.
Daily gain, lb.
Feed per lb. gain,


4
40.3
162.0
1.87
2.82


4
40.0
145.0
1.62
2.89


4
40.3
153.8
1.75
2.89


4
39.8
147.5
1.66
2.98


(Males)
4
39.8
149.5
1.69
2.67


(Females)
4
39.5
138.5
1.52
2.73


4
40.0
151.5
1.72
2.73


4
39.5
147.8
1.67
2.89


4
39.8
152.8
1.74
2.86


4
40.0
162.8.
1.89
2.57


Number pigs
Initial wt., .lb.,
Final wt., lb.
Daily gain, lb.
Feed per lb. gain, lb.


(All pigs combined)


40.2
153.5
1.75
2.86


40.1
150.7
.1.71
2.94


39.7
144.0
1.61
2.70


39.8
149.7
1.70
2.81


8
39.9
157.8
1.82
2.72


-- --------~---










Table 4. DRIED BAKERY PRODUCT (DBP) AS A REPLACEMENT FOR CORN AND AS A
SOURCE OF B-COMPLEX VITAMINS FOR THE YOUNG GROWING PIG


Treatment Basal Basal 30% DBP 30% DBP
(+) (-) (+) (-)
B-vitamins B-vitamins 8-vitamins B-vitamins


Number pigs
Initial wt., Ib.
Final wt., Ib.
Daily gain, lb.
Feed per Ib. gain,


Number pigs
Initial wt., Ib.
Final wt., lb.
Daily gain, lb.
Feed per Ib. gain,


Number pigs
Initial wt., lb.
Final wt., lb.
Daily gain, lb.
Feed per Ib. gain, Ib.


5
13.0
152.0
1.35
2.57


5
13.2
152.0
1.35
2.48


10
13.1
152.0
I.35
2.53


(Replicate I)
5
13.2
122.2
1.05
2.79

(Replicate 2)
5
13.3
125.0
1.08
2.59


(Replicates combined)
10'
13.2
123.6
1.07
2.69


5
13.0
152.8
1.36
2.36


5
13.2
156.8
1.39
2.44


5
13.2
113.2
0.97
2.88


5
13.3
128.0
1.11
2.54


13.1
154.8
1.37
2.40


13.2
120.6
1.04
2.71




-6-


Experiment I

Pigs responded well to the inclusion of dried bakery product in the feed.
Feed consumption remained at about the same level and gains and feed conversion
wre not significantly influenced. Pigs fed the ration containing 20% dried
bakery product with fermentation residue gained somewhat slower than other groups.
However, most of this was due to the poor performance of one pig and, therefore,
is likely unrelated to ration. In overall performance, the pigs fed the dried
bakery product without fermentation residue (plain) were superior to those fed
dried bakery product with fermentation residue. This again was probably due to
chance variation resulting from the small numbers of animals involved. In an
overall appraisal of the experiment, it appears that dried bakery product will
substitute for ground yellow corn on a.pound for pound basis up to at least 20% of
the ration with little influence on animal performance. A consistent effect on
feed conversion was not observed in this experiment.

Experiment 2

It is clearly evident from results of this experiment that dried bakery
product fed at a level of 30 percent in the ration did not provide the needed
B-vitamin fortification. There was a marked difference in both gains and feed
conversion favoring the pigs which were supplemented with B-complex vitamins, ir-
regardless of whether dried bakery product was included in the ration. The de-
sign of the feeding trial does not permit ascertaining which of the vitamins
specifically were deficient. It is likely that inadequate pantothenic acid,
niacin and riboflavin were all limiting performance of the pigs.

Gains of pigs fed 30% dried bakery product as a replacement for corn were
almost identical to gains of control pigs. Feed conversion tended to favor the
ration containing 30% dried bakery product when adequate vitamins were supplied.
However, when the rations were not supplemented with B-vitamins the dried bakery
product did not improve feed conversion.

Summary

Two experiments, involving a total'of eighty growing pigs were conducted to
study the potential application of dried bakery product to swine feeding.

Dried bakery product replaced corn at 10, 20 and 30% of the ration with no
marked change in the overall performance of pigs. With an adequately vitamin
fortified ration, the 30% level of replacement also induced a marked improvement
in feed conversion.

It was determined that the dried bakery product would not alleviate the need
for B-vitamin fortification.







HDW:hjw
1000 copies
6/22/64




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