Group Title: Animal Science Department mimeograph report - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; AN64-6
Title: Monosodium glutamate in pig starter rations
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072941/00001
 Material Information
Title: Monosodium glutamate in pig starter rations
Series Title: Animal Science Department mimeograph report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1963
 Subjects
Subject: Piglets -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. Combs ... et al..
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July, 1963."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072941
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 77520665

Full Text




Animal Science Department Florida Agricultural
Mimeograph Report AN64-6 Experimbnt Station
Gainesville, Florida
July, 1963


MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE IN PIG STARTER RATIONS

G. E. Combs, T. H. Berry, H. D. Wallace and R. C. Crum, Jr. 1/


During recent years numerous feed ingredients and flavoring compounds
have been usedoo enhance the palatability and consumption of pig starter
rations. Included among supplements of this type are sugar, lard and tallow,
dried skim milk, saccharin and several flavoring agents. Since the relative
cost of the natural feed ingredients and the artificial flavoring agents
usually favors the latter, trials need to be conducted to test the effective-
ness of new agents when they become available.

The present study was designed to investigate the ability of monosodium
glutamate (MSG) to stimulate feed consumption when added to starter rations.

Experimental

Six trials were conducted with young pigs fed rations containing sev-
eral levels of MSG. All pigs were housed in enclosed concrete floor pens
and self-fed ad libitum. The composition of the basal ration is-presented
in Table I.

Trial I Fourteen sows and their litters were penned individually. At
one week of age each litter was given access to creep rations (Basal I) con-
taining 0 percent MSG and a ration containing either 0.1, 0.3 or 0.5 percent
MSG. Each of the litters had access to the rations until they reached an age
of 5 weeks.

Trial 2 The same rations (Basal I) and levels of MSG used in trial I
were fed in trial 2. Management of the sows and litters for the first 4
weeks of this trial was similar to that of trial I. At 4 weeks of age the
pigs were weaned and were then continued on their respective ration treat-
ments until 6 weeks of age.

Trial 3 Thirty pigs weaned at 2 weeks of age were given access to the
following ration treatments:



I/ Combs, Berry, Wallace and Crum, Associate Animal Nutritionist,
Research Assistant, Ar:imal Nutriti rnist and Research Assistant, re-
spectiveiy, Department of Animal Science. The assistance of W. E.
Collins and L. S. Taylor, Swine Hardsman is gratefully acknowledged.

This study was supported in part by materials and funds supplied
by Commercial Solvents Corp.















enhance palatability to an extent similar to that of dried skim milk.

The results of the trial are presented in Table 4. The gains of all
treatment groups were similar. Feed consumption was similar for treatments
I and 2 and the slightly increased quantity of feed consumed by pigs on treat-
ment 3 probably may be attributed largely to the larger amount of feeder space
available.

A breakdown of the feed consumption by treatments shows that with the
dried skim milk ration (treatment I) MSG increased consumption 38% and with
the soybean meal ration (treatment 2) consumption was increased 286% by the
addition of MSG. When all rations were offered (treatment 3), the pigs pre-
ferred the ration containing dried skim milk to those without dried skim milk
regardless of the presence or absence of MSG. However, it is evident that
with the soybean meal ration MSG markedly enhanced palatability. The average
consumption increase of all MSG containing rations was about 52%.

Trial 4 The total feed consumption by the 10 litters that had access
to the soybean meal ration supplemented with .3% MSG, the dried skim milk
ration and the commercially prepared starter was 183, 439 and 307 pounds re-
spectively. These data tend to confirm those of trial 3 in that the pigs
showed a decided preference for the ration containing dried skim milk over
the soybean meal ration supplemented with .3% MSG.

Trials 5 and 6 The results of these trials are summarized in Tables 5
and 6. There were no significant differences among treatments for rate of
gain, efficiency of gain or feed consumption in either of the two trials.
Apparently pigs, if given a choice, prefer rations containing MSG as was
shown in trials 1, 2 and 3 but if not offered a choice feed consumption and
rate of gain are similar for pigs fed rations with or without MSG.

The average daily consumption for the first two weeks of trial 5 with
treatments 1-6 were: .23, .25, .33, .24, .32 and .19 respectively. From
the standpoint of ration palatability these first two weeks are the most
important and although a small advantage was shown for the presence of MSG
with treatments 3 and 5 this initial advantage was not present when the trial
was terminated.

Summary

Six trials were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of supplementing
pig starter and grower rations with monosodium glutamate (MSG).

In all but one instance MSG at the level of .3% proved as effective as
.5% in enhancing palatability.

When pigs were offered a choice of rations with and without MSG, the
addition of MSG to rations containing dried skin milk did not consistently
increase ration consumption. However, when added to rations containing soy-
bean meal as the sole source of supplementary protein, MSG markedly and con-
sistently enhanced palatability.








-4-


Pigs that were offered the choice of a fortified corn-soybean meal ration
supplemented with MSG or a ration containing 20, dried skim milk without added
MSG consumed considerably more of the latter.

In the instances where a choice of rations was not offered daily gain and
feed consumption was similar for pigs fed rations with and without MSG.

Table I. COMPOSITION OF BASAL RATIONS


Ingredi ent


Basal I


Basal II


Basal III


Ground yellow corn 54.30 56.10 45.80,
Dried skim milk 20.00 25.70 20.00
Soybean meal 8.50 -- 16.00
Sugar 10.00 10.00 2/ 10.00
Tallow 3.00 3.00 3.00
Bonemeal 1.00 2.00 2.00
Salt .50 .50 .50
Trace minerals .10 .10 .10
Vitamin and antibiotic premix 1/ 2.60 2.60 2.60
Total .100.00 100.00 100.00
I/ Contributed the following per pound of ration, Vitamin A, 2000 1.U.; vita-
min D. 400 I.U.; riboflavin 4 mg.; pantothenic acid, 8 mg.; niacin 17 mg.;
choline chloide 200 mg.; vitamin B12 10 mcg. and antibiotic 30 mg.

,/ In trials 5 and 6 ten Ibs. of corn replaced the sugar.

Table 2. FEED CONSUMED BY PIGS IN TRIAL I
Litter No. No. Pigs in Litter Feed Consumed. Ibs.
O. MSG 0.1% MSG
1 8 7.4 5.7
2 6 10.3 3.0
3 II 6.2 7.5
4 8 16.0 19.5
5 9 3.5 18.5
Total 42 43.4 54.2
Feed consumed/pig 1.0 1.3

0% MSG 0.3% MSG
6 12 6.3 12.1
7 8 11.3 10.1
8 10 11.5 14.1
9 9 9.3 12.8
10 II 26.1 31.4
Total 50 64.5 80.5
Feed consumed/pig 1.3 1.6

0g MSG 0.5% MSG
II II 9.3 10.5
12 5 0.8 8.1
13 8 5.2 7.7
14 10 10.0 11.9
Total 34 25.3 38.2
Feed consumed/pig 0.7 1.2










Table 3. FEED CONSUMPTION OF PIGS IN TRIAL 2


tiL ter No.


iP s i n l i ffer


13
I I
10
9
12


-... eed Consumed Ibs.
SG 0. % MSG
18.5 53.4
80.4 .37.0
62.1 81.3
71.1 65.4
88.2 79.8


Tota I
Feed consumed/pig


S53


10
7
I1
13
1 1


Tota I
Feed consumed/pig


II 1
12
13
14

Total
A-nn, n/r. nA


52



10
II
7
II


323.3 3
5.9,


316.9
5.8


0.3% MSG
96.3
29.5
62.9
71.8
94.7


0% MSG
27.3
17.0
32.7
-64.8
70.8

212.6
4.1

O0 NSG
25.5
81.1
24.5
59.2


190.3
4a ....


355.2
6.8


0.5% MSG
75.2
104.7
46.1
92.0

318.0
-. 8.1


r UO MI Ij -II I S '.4 -- -

Table 4. PERFORMANCE DATA OF PIGS IN TRIAL 3 _

Treatment No. I 2 3
Ration Treatment DSM SBM DSM
+
SBM

No. pigs 10 10 10
Av. initial weight, lb. 7.8 7.8 7.8
Av. final weight, lb. 21.1 21.1 23.3
Av. daily gain, lb. .38 .38 .43
Feed/lb. gain, Ib. 2.50 2.69 2.72

Av. daily feed, lb.
Total .95 '1.02 1.17
+ MSG .55 .81 (DSM) .30
MSG .40 .21 (DSM) .51
+ MSG (SBM) .23
MSG (SBM) .13


I-- t NI








-6-


..___._.- Table 5. SUMMARY OF TRIAL 5

Ration __ Basa.Jl 11 Basal II without sugar
MSG % 0 .3 .5 0 .3 .5
Treatment No, I 2 3 4 5 6

Av. initial wt. 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9
Av. final wt. 39.6 36.3 37.1 37.4 38.5 36.5
Av, daily gain .71 .63 .65 .65 .68 .63
Av. daily feed 1.38 1.30 1.31 1.28 1.35 1.21
Feed/lb. gain 1.94 2.08 2.04 1.98 1.99 1.91





Table 6. PERFORMANCE OF PIGS IN TRIAL 6

Ration Basal II Basal 11 without sugar
MSG % 0 .3 .5 0 .3 .5
Treatment No. I 2 3 4 5 6

Av. initial wt. 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.1
Av. final wt. 28.5 25.3 27.2 28.7 27.1 26.2
Av. daily gain .52 .44 .49 .53 .49 .46
Av. daily feed .98 .97 .88 .92 1.00 1.01
Feed/lb. gain 1.88 2.20 1.80 1.74 2.04 2.20


GEC/hw
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