Group Title: Department of Animal Science mimeograph series - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; no. 63-15
Title: The value of amphotericin fed singly or in combination with other feed additives to growing-finishing swine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072935/00001
 Material Information
Title: The value of amphotericin fed singly or in combination with other feed additives to growing-finishing swine
Series Title: Department of Animal Science mimeograph series
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Combs, G. E ( George Ernest ), 1927-
O'Bannon, Robert Harold, 1938-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1963
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Antibiotics in animal nutrition -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: H.D. Wallace, G.E Combs and R.H. O'Bannon.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "April, 1963."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072935
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 77274271

Full Text


DeparTmen"'of Animal Science
Mimeograph Series No. 63-15
April, 1963


Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
Gainesville, Florida


THE VALUE OF AMPHOTERICIN FED SINGLY
OR IN COMBINATION WITH OTHER FEED
ADDITIVES TO GROWING-FINISHING SWINEI/

H. D. Wallace, G. E. Combs and R. H. O'Bannon


The fungicidal properties of amphotericin are well known and it was of interest
to obtain information on its possible application as a feed additive in swine rations.
The main objective of the experiments herein reported was to evaluate the use of
amphotericin under practical feeding situations. Of particular interest waste
in?uence that other additives such as aureomycin and high level copper might have on
the growth of toxic fungi and the control response that might be observed by feeding
amphotericin.

Experimental

Three experiments were conducted using weanling crossbred pigs. The pigs were
self-fed either in dirt lots (Experiments I and 3) or in concrete confinement (Exper-
iment 2).

Experiment I. Fifty pigs were allotted to five lots of 10 pigs each by outcome
groups which were formed on the basis of litter, sex and initial weight. The ration
treatments were as follows:

Lot I Basal

Lot 2 Basal + 50 gm. aureomycin per ton feed/ b

Lot 3 Basal + II gm. amphotericin per ton eed. ~ i )

Lot 4 Basal + 50 gm. aureomycin + II gm. amphotricin per/ton feed.

Lot 5 Basal + 50 gm. aureomycin + 45 gm. amphotfricin per ton feed.

Experiment 2. Forty pigs were allotted from outcome groups to 8 pens of 5 pigs
each. Two pens of pigs were fed on each of the following ration treatments:

Lots I and 5 Basal.

Lots 2 and 6 Basal + 150 p.p.m. copper.

Lots 3 and 7 Basal + 150 p.p.m. copper + 11 gm. amphotericin per ton feed.

Lots 4 and 8 Basal + II gm. amphotericin per ton feed.



I/ The authors are indebted to the Squibb Institute for Medical Research and Ameri-
can Cyanamid Co. for grant-in-aid support and donation of test materials.

2/ Wallace and Combs, Animal Nutritionist and Associate Animal Nutritionist, Florida
Agricultural Experirmet STation; O'Bannon, Graduate Research Assistant, Animal
Science Department. The assistance of W. E. Collins and L. S. Taylor, Swine
Herdsmen, is gratefully acknowledged.






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Experiment 3. Fifty pigs were allotted to five lots of 10 pigs each on the
baqis of outcome groups. The ration treatments were as follows:

Lot I Basal.

Lot 2 Basal + 50 gm. aureomycin per ton feed.

Lot 3 Basal + II gm. amphotericin per ton feed.

Lot 4 Basal + 50 gm. aureomycin + II gm. amphotericin per ton feed.

Lot 5 Basal + 20 gm. aureomycin + 20 gm. sulfamethazine + 10 gm. penicillin
per ton feed.

The basal rations used in the experiments are presented in Table I. The growth
data were analyzed by the analysis of variance method using Duncan's multiple range
test for determining the significance between means.

Table I. COMPOSITION OF BASAL RATIONS


Experiments
I and 2


Experiment
3


Ground yellow corn 78.35 80.35
Soybean oilmeal (50%) 19.00 17.00
Ground limestone 1.00 1.00
Steamed bonemeal 1.00 1.00
Iodized salt 0.50 0.50
Trace minerals/ 0.05 0.05
Vitamin supplement/ 0.10 0.10
100.00 100.00


I/ Adds the following
cobalt (.83), zinc


to ration (p.p.m.): manganese (29.6), iron (36.5),
(42.0) and potassium (3.9).


copper (2.5),


2/ Adds the following per pound of ration: vitamin Bl2 (4.5 mcg.), Niacin (9.0 mg.),
riboflavin (2.0 mg.), pantothenic acid (4.0 mg.) and choline chloride (9.8 mg.).


Results and Discussion


Results of Experiments I, 2 and 3 are summarized in Tables 2, 3 and 4 respect-
ively.

In Experiment I the growth-promoting effect of aureomycin was apparent during
the first seven weeks (Lot I vs. Lot 2). This difference in gain was significant
(P ".01). However for the entire feeding period the aureomycin fed singly produced
only a small non-significant improvement in gain and feed conversion and was poorer
than for the basal group. Amphotericin fed singly at the II gm. level (Lot 3) stim-
ulated a highly significant (P SOI) growth response during the first seven weeks
and this response was also significant for the entire period (P <.05). Lots 4 and 5,
which were fed combinations-of aureomycin and amphotericin, gained significantly
faster than the basal group (P .01) Increasing the level of.amphotericin from II to
45 gm. per ton of feed (Lot 4 vs. Lot 5) did not influence performance. All lots








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that received amphotericin showed an improvement in feed conversion over the basal
lot.

Experiment 2 is summarized in Table 3. The replicated lots performed similarly
so the data were combined for presentation. No significant differences in gains were
observed between the treatments. Feed conversion data were rather similar for the
various treatments with a slight advantage for all supplemented lots during the first
6 weeks of the test.

In Experiment 3 (Table 4) the only statistically significant effect on gains was
produced by the three way combination of aureomycin, sulfamethazine and penicillin
(Lot 5). Pigs in this lot gained significantly faster than all other groups. Feed
conversion over the entire feeding period was also best for Lot 5. As in Experiment
2, the amphotericin supplemented pigs did not respond. Similarly, aureomycin was
ineffective.

Summary


Three experiments, involving a total of 140 growing-finishing pigs, were con-
ducted to study the supplemental value of amphotericin singly and in combination with
certain other feed additives.

In the first experiment amphotericin produced significant improvements in gain
when fed singly or in combination with aureomycin. A level of II gm. per ton was as
effective as a level of 45 gm. Feed conversion was slightly better in the amphoter-
icin supplemented lots.

In experiments 2 and 3 amphotericin failed to elicit a performance response.

A high level of copper (150 p.p.m.) was an ineffective supplement in Experiment
2 and aureomycin was generally ineffective in all experiments. The combination of
aureomycin, sulfamethazine and penicillin produced a highly significant gain response
and also improved feed conversion.









Table 2. THE INFLUENCE OF AUREOMYCIN, AMPHOTERICIN AND COMBINATIONS
OF AUREOMYCIN AND AMPHOTERICIN ON PIG PERFORMANCE (Exporiment I)


Lot Numbers I .2 3 4 5
Treatments Basal Basal + 50 gm. Basal + II gm. Basal + 50 gm. Basal + 50 gm.
aureomycin amphotericin aureomycin aureomycin
and II gm. and 45 gm.
amphotericin amphotericin


Number of pigs 10 10 10 10 10
Av. initial wt., lb. 51.3 51.3 51.2 51.2 51.1
Av. final wt., lb. 194.4 198.6 207.9 212.0 210.0
Daily gain, lb.
First 7 weeks 1.38 1.55 1.57 1.66 1.54
Entire period 1.57 1.61 1.72 1.77 1.75
Feed per lb. gain, lb.
First 7 weeks 2.80 2.61 2.74 2.68 2.59
Entire period 3.17 3.27 3.05 2.91 2.95
Days on test 91 91 91 91 91


Summary of statistical analysis of gains
First 7 weeks
Lot I vs. Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5 (P <.01)
Entire period
Lot I vs. Lot 3 (P <.05)
Lot I vs. Lots 4 and 5 (P <.01)
Lot 2 vs. Lots 4 and 5 (P <.05)











Table 3. THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH LEVEL COPPER AND AMPHOTERICIN
ON PIG PERFORMANCE (Experiment 2)!/



Lot Numbers I and 5 2 and 6 3 and 7 4 and 8
Treatments Basal Basal + 150 Basal + 150 Basal + 11
p.p.m. copper p.p.m. copper gm. amphotericin
+ II gm. ampho- per ton feed
tericin per ton feed


Number of pigs 10 10 10 10
Av. initial wt., Ib. 40.7 40.6 40.7 40.6
Av. final wt., lb. 196.5 195.3 1.92.1 196.2
Daily gain, lb.
First 6 weeks 1.33 1.37 1.34 1.33
Entire period 1.66 1.65 1.62 1.63
Feed per lb. gain, Ib.
First 6 weeks 2.85 2.81 2.74 2.72
Entire period 3.10 3.21 3.10 3.12
Total days on test 95 95 95 95


I/ Copper source CuSO4 5H20.










Table 4. THE INFLUENCE OF AUREOMYCIN, AMPHOTERICIN, AUREOMYCIN AND
AMPHOTERICIN IN COMBINATION, AND AUREOMYCIN, SULFAMETWHZINE AND
PENICILLIN IN COMBINATION ON PIG PERFORMANCE (Experiment 3)


Lot Numbers I 2 3 4 5
Treatments Basal Basal + 50 gm. Basal + II gm. Basal + 50 gm. Basal + 20 gm.
aureomycin amphotericin aureomycin aureomycin
per ton of feed per ton of feed + 1 gm. + 20 gm.
amphotericin sulfamethazine
per ton of feed + 10 gm. peni-
cillin per ton
of feed

Number of pigs 10 10 10 10 10
Av. initial wt., Ib. 59.8 56.8 57.2 57.6 57.7
Av. final wt., lb. 197.6 196.1 196.3 201.4 213.6
Daily gain, lb.
First 4 weeks 1.56 1.54 1.50 1.56 1.79
Entire period 1.79 1.81 1.81 1.87 2.02
Feed per lb. gain, Ib.
First 4 weeks 2.81 2.88 2.64 2.79 2.67
Entire period 3.37 3.48 3.36 3.35 3.24
Days on test 77 77 77 77 77


Summary of statistical analysis of gains
First 4 weeks:
Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 vs. Lot 5 (P <.01).
Entire period:
Lots 1, 2 and 3 vs. Lot 5 (P <.01)
Lot 4 vs. Lot 5 (P <.01)




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