Group Title: Animal husbandry and nutrition mimeograph series - UF Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition ; no. 60-1
Title: Arsenosobenzene as a feed additive for growing-finishing pigs
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072886/00001
 Material Information
Title: Arsenosobenzene as a feed additive for growing-finishing pigs
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McCabe, George Evans, 1931-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1959
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July - 1959."
Funding: Animal husbandry and nutrition mimeograph series - UF Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition ; no. 60-1
Statement of Responsibility: G.E. McCcabe, Jr. ... et al..
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072886
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76967627

Full Text

60




Animal usbandry and Nutrition Florida Agricultural
Mime g ph Series No. 60-1 Experiment Station
Gainesville, Florida
July 1959

ARSENOSOBENZENE AS A FEED ADDITIVE
FOR GROWING-FINISHING PIGS L/

McCabe, G. E. Jr., H. D. Wallace, G. E. Combs, Jr.,
and J. M. Vandepopuliere 2/


Certain organic arsenicals have been used successfully as growth
promotants and disease control agents in swine feeds. Arsanilic acid,
and 3-nitro- 4-hyroxyphenyl arsonic acid have been studied extensively
and are pr.senii accopled as useful feed additives. Part of the value
of these arset ica!s sees to be related to the fact that they destroy
certain harmful organisms which antibiotics do not control, such as
histomonads, coccidia, and spirochetes.

The purpose of the work reported in this paper was to determine the
influence of arsenosobenzene on the feedlot performance of swine.


Experimental Procedure

Experiment I Twenty young pigs of mixed breeding were removed
from their dams at two weeks of age and divided into 4 similar groups
of 5 pigs each according to weight and litter. Two groups of pigs
were fed in concrete floored pens on each of the following dietary
treatments:
I- Basal ration
2- Basal ration + 19 gm. arsenosobenzene per ton




/ Arsenosobenzene is sold under the trade name of Arzene by American
Cyanamid Co. Arzene contains approximately 19 gm. arsenosobenzene
per pound.

SMcCabe and Vandepopuliere, Research Assistants; Wallace and Combs,
Associate and Assistant Animal Husbandmen respectively, Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station. The assistance of W. E. Collins
and L. S. Taylor, Swine Herdsmen, is gratefully acknowledged.











-2-


The composition of the basal ration is presented in Table 1. The
experiment was initiated on November 8, 1958 and was terminated on
January 20, 1959.

Experiment 2 Twenty-seven'unthrifty weanling Duroc pigs were
used in this test. They were divided into 3 similar groups of 5 pigs
each end 3 similar groups of 4 pigs each according to weight, litter
and thriftiness'. One group of 5 pigs and 'Igroup of 4 pigs were fed
in concrete floored pens on each of the following dietary treatments:

I- Basal ration + 60 gm, chlortetracycline per .ton

2? Basal ration + 19 gm. arsenosobenzene per ton

3- Basal ration + 60 gm'. chlortetracycline and 19 gm. arsenoso-
benzene per ton

The composition of the basal ration is presented in Table 2. The ex-
periment was initiated on August 8, 1958 and was terminated on October
22, 1959.

Table 1. Composition of Basal Ration
(Experiment 1)


Ground yellow corn
Soybean oilmeal (44%)
Cane sugar
Dried skimmilk
Lard
Tankage (60%)
Ground limestone
Steamed bonemeal
Iodized salt
Trace mineral mix L/
Vitamin.premix 2/


First. 28 days
22.15
9.00
22.25
40.00
3.00 .


1.00
0.50
0.10
2.00
100.00


Final 14 days
76.70
15.00



4.00
0.70
1.00
0.50
0.10
2.00
100.00


Supplied the following in the ration in ppm: Mn,
Cu, 5; Co, 1.7; K, 7.8; and Zn, 25.


60; Fe, 73;


Contributed the following per lb. ration: Vit. A, 1500 IU; Vit.
D, 990 IU; riboflavin, 5'mg.; calcium-pantothenate, 8-mg.; niacin,
2.5 mg.; choline chloride, 500 mg.; folic acid, 5 mg.; Vit. B12,
15 mcg.; thiamine, 3 mg.; and pyridoxine, 2.0 mg.









-3-


Table 2. Composition
(Experiments 2,


of Basal Rations
3 and 4) 1/


Ground yellow corn
Soybean oilmeal (44%)
Ground limestone
Steamed bonemeal
Iodized salt
Trace mineral mix 2
Vitamin supplement 2/
Antibiotic supplement A


To 125 lb.
Body Weight
77.0
20.3
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.1
0.1
0.1

100.1


After 125 Ib.
body weight
84.3
13,0
1,0
1.0
0.5
0.1
0.1
0.1

100.1


SNo antibiotic supplement included in Experiment 2
2/ Supplied the following in the ration in ppm: Mn,
Co, 1.7; K, 7.8; and Zn, 25.


60; Fe, 73; Cu, 5;


SContains 2000 mg. riboflavin; 4000 mg. pantothenic acid; 9000 mg.
niacin and 10,000 mg. choline chloride per lb.
SContains 10 gm. chlortetracycline per Ib.


Experiment 3. Thirty weanling pigs of mixed breeding were divided
into two similar groups of 15 pigs each according to weight and litter
and fed according to the following dietary treatments:

I- Basal ration

2- Basal ration + 19 gm. arsenosobenzene per ton

The composition of the basal ration is presented in Table 2. The ex-
periment was conducted on millet pasture with each group of 15 pigs
allowed one acre of it. Forage was abundant throughout the experiment.

Experiment 4. Forty-eight weanling pigs of mixed breeding were
divided according to weight and litter into 12 groups of 4 pigs each.
Four groups (16 pigs) were fed in concrete floored pens on each of the
following dietary treatments:

I- Basal ration

2- Basal ration + 19 gm. arsenosobenzene per ton


3- Basal ration + 38 gm. arsenosobenzene per ton


_ _.____













The basal ration.is presented in Table22,.

ln"all experiments the pigs were fed complete mixed dry meal
rations by self-feeders. Automatic waterers provided fresh water at
all times.

Results and Discussion

A summary of the performance of the pigs fed in the four experiments
is presented in Table 3.

Experiment I. Pigs that received arsenosobenzene gained faster than
the control pigs but the difference was not statistically significant.
This group also consumed more feed and converted it to gain slightly more
efficiently... Arsenosobenzene was not.effective in-controlling nutritional
scours which were encountered .during the first week of the experiment.

Experiment 2. 'In this experiment pigs fed 60 gm. chlortetracycline
(group I) or pigs fed 60 gm. chlortetracycline and 19 gm. arsenosoenzene
(group 3) gained faster than pigs fed only arsenc;3obenzene (group 2).
These differences in gains approached significance at the 5% leave! of
probably ity. T'oere was no additive effect observed when both chiortetra-
cycline and arsenr.sobenzene were fed (group I v3. grcup 3). Although no
negative control group (minus, both ,r.senosobenzoi;e and chlortetracycline)
was fed in this experiment it appears that the chiortetracyc!ine was
stimulating growth while arsenosobenzene was ineffective. The groups
fed chlortetracycline consumed more feed than the group getting only
arsenosobonzene, Differences in efficiency of feed conversion among the
three dietary treatments were small and insignificant.

Experiment 3. Differences between control and arsenosobenzene-fed
pigs vzere slight and insignifi'cant'for"gain, daily feed intake and feed
conversion.

Experiment:4. Pigs performed almost identically on 0, 19, and 38 gn
of arsenosobonzene.per-ton of feed indicating that the arsenical was
without effect.












Table 3. Summary of Feedlot Performance of Pigs Fed Asenosobenzene


Experiment Number I 2 3 4
Group Number I 2 1 2 3 I 2 I 2 3

Arsenosobenzene added to
feed, gm. per ton 0 19 0 .19 19 0 19 0 19 38

Chlortetracycline in feed
gm. per ton i/ 0 0 60 0 60 20 20 20 20 20

No. pigs per treatment 10 10 9 9 9 15 15 16 16 16
Av. initial wt., Ibs. 8.9 8.9 21.9 22.0 22.1 42.8 42.7 47.1 48.1 47.3
Av. final wt., lb. 19.1 20.0 100.7 92.9 101.3 217.7 220.0 194.8 194.8 194.8
Av. daily gain, lb. 0.54 0.63 1.33 1.19 1.32 1.54 1.52 1.54 1.56 1.53
Av. daily feed, lb. 1.14 1.25 3.32 2.90 3.18 5.15 5.24 4.92 4.98 4.91
Feed per lb. gain, Ib. 2.11 1.98 2.63 2.57 2.55 3.36 3.45 3.23 3.20 3.20
Days on test 42 42 60 60 60 114 117 97 95 96


Includes chlortetracycline added as such (Experiment 2) and chlortetracycline provided in basal
ration by antibiotic supplement (Experiments 3 and 4).


-5-











- 6 --


:' Summary


in a series of 4 experiments involving a total of 125 pigs, the
value of arsenosobenzene as a feed additive was tested.

The Individual experiments were conducted under varying conditions
and employed pigs of different ages and states of health as summarized
below:

Experiment I. Two week old thrifty early weaned pigs fed on
concrete.

Experiment 2. Eight week old unthrifty pigs fed on concrete.

Experiment Nine week old thrifty pigs fed on millet pasture.

'Experiment 4. Nine week old,thrifty pigs fed on concrete.

The results as measured by gains and feed conversion indicated
that arsenosobenzene was an ineffective growth stimulant. Levels of
19 and 38 gm.i per ton of feed, which were the levels tested, seemed
to have no noticeable effect on ration acceptability and produced no
evidence of toxicity.


















An. Husb.
vh/ 6/15/59




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