Group Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series - University of Florida Department of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition ; 56-1
Title: The value of two levels of aureomycin for fattening steers on high concentrate rations.
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 Material Information
Title: The value of two levels of aureomycin for fattening steers on high concentrate rations.
Series Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hentges, J. F ( James Franklin ), 1925-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: University of Florida, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1956
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Beef cattle -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaf 4).
Statement of Responsibility: J.F. Hentges ... et al..
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "January, 1956."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072858
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76942992

Full Text

Animal Husbandry Mimeograph January, 1956
Series No. 56-1


THE VALUE OF TWO LEVELS OF AUREOMYCIN FOR FATTENING STEERS ON
HIGH CONCENTRATE RATIONSI

J. F. Hentges, Jr., J. A. Black, C. A. Tucker II, and T. J. Cunha2


A recent review of antibiotic research (I) has revealed that aureomycin

can increase weight gains and efficiency of feed utilization when fed to beef

cattle on high roughage rations and to dairy calves on starter rations.

A standard feed lot ration in Florida is a high concentrate mixture of

ground snapped corn, molasses and cottonseed meal; therefore, it was of in-

terest to measure the effect of adding various levels of aureomycin to this

high concentrate ration,

The study reported herein includes two steer fattening experiments3 which

were designed to measure the effect of two levels (10 and 20 mgs. per live

hundred weight) of aureomycin (Aurofac 2A) on weight gains, efficiency of

feed utilization, carcass data and other criteria.

Experimental Procedure

Two feeding regimes were used in this study. All lots in experiment I

were given an equalized feed intake while those in experiment II were indivi-

dually fed a full feed.




I This work was supported in part by a grant from Lederle Laboratories, Pearl
River, New York,

2Hentges, Assistant Animal Husbandman; Black, Graduate Assistant; Tucker,
Graduate Assistant; and Cunha, Animal Husbandman and Head, Department of
Animal Husbandry and Nutrition.

3Acknowledgment is made to Mr. L. K. Edwards and Mr. L. K. Edwards, Jr
loaning the experimental cattle used in Experiment II.








Experiment I

Twenty-one crossbred steer calves were divided into three lots of seven

steers each and were drylot fed for 147 days. The lot treatments were as

follows: I, basal ration; II, basal / 10 mg. aureomycin per live cwt and III,

basal A 20 mg. aureomycin per live cwt. The basal ration consisted of 20

pounds cottonseed meal, 40 pounds ground snapped corn, 20 pounds citrus mo-

lasses and alfalfa hay (ad lib). Daily feed allowances for each lot were

regulated to that of the lot consuming the least.


Experiment II

Eighteen grade Aberdeen Angus short yearling steers were allotted into

three lots of six steers each and were full fed for 143 days in individual

stalls. The lot treatments were the same as in experiment I except that the

amount of aureomycin (Aurofac 2A) in the rations was kept constant throughout

the experiment at the rates of 4.6 mg. (Lot II) and 9.2 mg. (Lot III) per

pound of basal ration. The basal ration consisted of 40 pounds ground snapped

corn, 20 pounds 36% cottonseed meal, 20 pounds citrus molasses and Pangola

grass hay (ad lib),

The criteria used in each experiment were weight gains, efficiency on

feed utilization, skeletal measurements, endocrine gland weights, hemoglobin

levels, carcass grades and dressing percentages,


Results and Discussion

Experiment I

The results are summarized in Table I, There were no statistically signi-

ficant differences in any of the criteria; however, both lots of steers fed








aureomycin had a slight weight gain advantage over those steers in the control

lot. It was noted that the steers receiving 10 mg. aureomycin per live hun-

dredweight daily gained faster than the control steers during the first 35

days and they maintained this advantage throughout the experiment. The steers

receiving 20 mg. aureomycin per live hundredweight daily gained slowly the

first 21 days but gained rapidly enough during the remainder of the trial

to make the greatest total gain of the three lots. The steers receiving

aureomycin required the less feed per pound of gain than the control steers.

There was a larger increase in heart girth circumference and circumference

of cannon bone on those steers fed aureomycin. There were no statistically

significant differences between endocrine gland weights and hemoglobin

levels. There were no carcass grade differences between the treatments.


Experiment II

A summary of the results is shown in Table II. Although Lot II on the

10 mg. level had the highest rate of gain and required the least feed per

pound of gain, no statistically significant differences between tots were

observed.

Lot II on the 20 mg. level exhibited a lack of appetite during the first

week and during the last four weeks on the trial. As a result, their weight

gains were below the control lot. Lot II also exhibited a decrease in ap-

petite during the first week of the trial but recovered in a few days. Similar

observations have been reported previously by Perry, et aj, (2) and Neumann,

et al. (3),

No significant differences were observed between carcass measurements

and the other criteria.


-3-








The average aureomycin intake per live cwt. was 11.19 mg. in Lot II

and 22.58 mg. in Lot III, The highest daily intake at any point in the

trial was 11.57 mg. in Lot 11 and 25.19 mg. in Lot III.


Summary

Two steer fattening experiments were conducted to determine the effect

of two levels of aureomycin supplementation (10 and 20 mg. per live cwt.)

on weight gains, efficiency of feed utilization, carcass grades, dressing

percentage, skeletal measurements, endocrine gland weights and hemoglobin

levels.

The highest rates of gain and the most efficient utilization of feed

was observed at the 10 mg. level; however, the differences were too small

to be statistically significant.

All steers fed aureomycin exhibited a depression of appetite during the

first two weeks.

No significant differences were observed in carcass grades, dressing

percentages, skeletal measurements, endocrine gland weights and hemoglobin

levels.

References

I. Cunha, T. J. 1955. Antibiotics for swine, beef cattle, sheep and dairy
cattle. Address given at International Conference on the use of Anti-
biotics.

2. Neumann, A. L., R. R. Snapp and L. S. Gall. 1954. The longtime effect
of feeding aureomycin to fattening beef cattle with bacteriological data.
J. An. Sci. 10, 1058. (Abstract).

3. Perry, T. W. and W. M. Beeson. 1954. Aureomycin for growing and fat-
tening beef cattle. J. An. Sci, 13, 3.






100 cc. -4-
An, Husb.
Exp. Sta,







TABLE 1


SUW3MARY OF FEEDING AURECMYCIN


Lot Number 1 2 3
Basal plus Basal plus
Rations Compared Basal 10 mg. aure- 20 mg.aure-
omycin/cwt. omycin/cwt.

Number of steers per lot 7 7 7
Days on experiment 147 147 147
Av. initial weight, lb. 361.18 359.90 360.09
Av. final weight, lb. 660.28 663.57 666.19
Av. total gain per steer, lb. 299.10 303.67 306.10
Av. daily gain, lb. 2.03 2.07 2.08
Av. daily concentrate ration, lb. 9.90 9.90 9.90
Cottonseed meal (36%) 2.00 2.00 2.00
Ground snapped corn 6.32 6.32 6.32
Citrus molasses 1.58 1.58 1.58
Av. daily hay consumption, lb. 4.83 4.82 4.83
Feed required per cwt. gain, lb. 723.80 712.60 703.20
Concentrates 486.40 479.20 470.90
Roughages 237.40 233.40 232.30
Feed cost per cwt. gain, dollars 17.82 17.90 18.00
Av. dressing per cent (warm) 1 59.04 58.03 58.08
Carcass grades, Federal2
Choice 1
Good 5 3 4
Commercial 1 2 3
Utility 1 1
Av. numerical carcass score3 8.71 8.57 9.14
Skeletal measurements
Av. increase of ht. at withers, in. 5.79 4.29 5.29
Av. increase of heart girth, in, 11.86 13.36 12.00
Av. increase of cannon bone, in. .98 1.39 1.21


1Average dressing percentage = warm carcass weight
shrunk live weight


x 100


2Carcass grades based on U.S.D.A. standards. Grades
Good, Commercial, and Utility.


are Prime, Choice,


3Numerical scores were placed upon thirds of grades as follows: Average
Prime, 16; Low Prime, 15; High Choice, 14; Average Choice, 13; Low
Choice, 12; High Good, 11; Average Good, 10; Low Good, 9; High Commer-
cial, 8; Average Commercial, 7; Low Commercial, 6; and Utility, 5.





An. Husb. Exp. Sta.
100 Copies









TABLE 2


SUMMARY OF FEEDING AUREOMYCIN


Lot Number 1 2 3
4.6 mg. aure* 9.2 mu.aure-
Rations Compared Basal omycin per omycin per
lb. of Basal lb. of Basal

Number of steers per lot 6 6 6
Days on experiment 140 140 140
Av. initial weight, lb. 470 462.5 465.5
Av. final weight, lb. 770 772.5 750.0
Av. total gain per steer, lb. 300 310.0 285.0
Av. daily gain, lb. 2.12 2.19 2.01
Av. daily concentrate ration, lb. 14.96 15.01 14.91
Cottonseed meal (36%) 3.74 3.75 3.72
Ground snapped corn 7.48 7.51 7.47
Citrus molasses 3.74 3.75 3.72
Av. daily hay consumption, lb. 4.64 4.88 4.08
Feed required per cwt. gain, lb. 932.00 914.00 947.00
Concentrates 713.00 690.00 743.00
Roughage 219.00 224.00 204.00
Feed cost per cwt. gain, dollars 22.37 22.40 23.72
Av, dressing per cent (warm)1 60.5 60.9 61.5
Carcass grades, Federal2
Choice 2 2 2
Good 4 4 4
Av. numerical carcass score3 11.16 11 11
Skeletal measurements
Av. increase of ht. at withers, in. 3.70 3.50 3440
Av, increase of heart girth, in. 12.90 13.30 12.70
Av. increase of cannon bone, in. .91 .95 1.00


1Average dressing percentage = Warm carcass weight x 100
shrunk live weight


2Carcass grades based on U.S.D.A. standards. Grades
Good, Commercial, and Utility.


are Prime, Choice,


3Numerical scores were placed upon thirds of grades as follows; Average
Prime, 16; Low Prime, 15; High Choice, 14; Average Choice, 13; Low
Choice, 12; High Good, 11; Average Good, 10; Low Good, 9; High Comner-
cial, 8; Average Commercial, 7; Low Commercial, 6; and Utility, 5.






An. Husb. Exp. Sta.
100 Copies




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