Group Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series - University of Florida Department of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition ; 55-9
Title: Various forms of penicillin as antibiotic supplements for growing-fattening swine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072852/00001
 Material Information
Title: Various forms of penicillin as antibiotic supplements for growing-fattening swine
Series Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Gillespie, Larry, 1925-
Haines, C. E
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: University of Florida, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1955
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Health -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaf 4).
Statement of Responsibility: H.D. Wallace, L. Gillespie and C.E. Haines.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "October, 1955."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072852
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76941616

Full Text








Animal Husbandry Mimeograph October, 1955
Series No. 55-9


VARIOUS FORMS OF PENICILLIN AS
ANTIBIOTIC SUPPLEMENTS FOR GROWING-FATTENING SWINE1

H. D. Wallace, L. Gillespie and C. E. Haines2


Procaine penicillin has been used effectively in the rations of growing-

fattening swine at several experiment stations (1). However, in studies at

the Florida Station the antibiotic has always failed to improve growth rate.

This may be explained by differences in the bacterial populations encountered.

Also, it has been suggested that the stability of procaine penicillin may not

be adequate for the warm yearly climate encountered here. However, this last

point does not seem too logical since our feeds have been mixed regularly and

not held for periods of more than two weeks.

This experiment was undertaken to determine if other forms of penicillin

would effectively stimulate the growth rate of growing-fattening swine fed

in drylot.

Experimental

Forty weanling Duroc pigs were divided into five experimental lots of

eight each according to weight, sex, litter and previous treatment. The pigs

were self fed in concrete pens which were cleaned and washed daily. The

basal ration is presented in Table 1.


1This study was supported in part by a grant-in-aid from Eli Lilly and Co.,
Indianapolis, Indiana.
2Wallace, Associate Animal Husbandmin, Gillespie and Haines, Graduate Assist-
ants, Department of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition. The technical assistance
of W. E. Collins, Swine Herdsman, is gratefully acknowledged.












Table 1. BASAL RATION1


Ground yellow corn 79.00
Soybean oilmeal 19.00
Ground limestone 1.00
Steamed bonemeal .50
Trace mineralized salt2 .53
100.03

1. Vitamin fortifications included 2,000 I.U.
of vitamin A per lb. of feed, and 20 mg.
B12, 4 gm. riboflavin, 8 gm. pantothenic
acid, 18 gm. niacin and 20 gm. choline
chloride per ton of feed.

2. The trace mineralized salt was composed of:
iodized salt (50 lb,) MnS04O H20 (921 gm.),
FeS04 H20 (398 gim.), CuS04 o (125 gm.),
coco3 (10 gm.) and ZnSo4 Hg2 (350 gm.)


The experiment was started on May 14, 1955 and was terminated after eight

weeks.

The experimental treatments and a summary of the results are given in

Table 2. All forms of penicillin were added at a rate of 2.5 mg. per lb. of

feed.

Results and Discussion

There were no significant differences between growth rate of the control

pigs (Lot 1) and those that received the various forms of the antibiotic.

Daily feed consumption was similar for all lots except Lot 4 which received

the dipenicillin V. Pigs in this lot ate about one quarter of a pound of feed

less per day per head. However, they gained well and the lower feed intake

was reflected in better feed conversion for this lot of pigs. Feed conversion

was quite good for all lots of pigs and with the exception of Lot 4 was not

affected greatly by the addition of penicillin.


-2-









Table 2. Summary of Results


Lot Number 1 2 3 4 5
Experimental Basal Ration Basal ration Basal ration Basal ration
Variation Basal Ration / procaine / penicillin V / dipenicillin V / potassium
penicillin (crystalline penicillin V
acid)l


Number of pigs
Av. initial wt. Ibs.
Av. final wt. lbs.
Av. daily gain, Ibs.
SAv. daily feed
consumption, Ibs.
Feed required per
lb. gain, Ibs.
Days on test


8
33.9
115.6
1.46


8
33.6
117.1
1.49

4.26

2.88
56


2.91
56


8
33.9
113.1
1.42

4.24

3.00
56


33.8
14i.3
1.1A

4.oo

2,78
56


33.8
118.7
1.52


2.95
56


Penicillin V has been developed
for oral usage.


by Eli Lilly and Compaay in an attempt to produce an acid stable penid.clin


2 One pig removed from experiment after L wks. because of unthriftinesse








Summary

This experiment tends to confirm previous results at this Station on the

use of penicillin for swine. Either the organism population is not covered

by the bacterial spectrum of this antibiotic or it was not fed at the optimum

level. However, 2.5 mg. of penicillin per pound of feed has elicited significant

growth responses at other stations.




Literature Cited

1. Braude, R., H. D. Wallace and T. J. Cunha. 1953. The Value of Antibiotics
in the Nutrition of Swine: A Review. Antibiotics and Chemotherapy. 3:
271 291.
































An. Husb.
100 cc -4.
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