Group Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series - University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; 55-1
Title: An unidentified growth factor for the pig
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072844/00001
 Material Information
Title: An unidentified growth factor for the pig
Series Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Haines, C. E
McKigney, John I
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: Agricultural Experiment Station, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1954
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by H.D. Wallace, C.E. Haines and J. McKigney.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "August, 1954."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072844
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76925040

Full Text


MAR 17 1955


Animal Husbandry Wineograph August, 1954
Series No. 55-1


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
WILLARD M. FIFIELD, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

AN UNIDENTIFIED GROWTH FACTOR
FOR THE PIG 1
By

H. D. WALLACE, C. E. HAINES AND J. MCKIGNEY2
Department of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition


A search is constantly underway to discover new and unidentified

growth factors. A product known as P.F.P. (Pfizer Fermentation Pro-

duct) has recently been observed to contain unidentified growth

activity. A sample of this material was obtained and an experiment

conducted to determine its value for the weanling pig fed under dry

lot conditions. A typical analysis of the material containing the

unidentified factor is as follows:





1 This work was supported in part by a grant from Chas. Pfizer

and Co., Brooklyn, New York.
2 Wallace, Associate Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment

Station, Haines and McKigney, Graduate Assistants, Department of

Animal Husbandry and Nutrition. The technical assistance of W. E.

Collins, F. A. McMillan and L. Gillespie is gratefully acknowledged.






-2-


Table 1

ANALYSES OF P.F.P.
(Pfizer Fermentation Product)

Percent

Crude protein 20.9
Crude fat 4.8
Crude fiber 4.2
Ash 48.5
Calcium 0.78
Phosphate 10.2


Vitamins
B12
Riboflavin
Calcium Pantothenic Acid
Niacin
Antibiotic
Terramycin


0.22
17,0
31.0
140.0

370.0


Experimental

A total of 24 purebred Duroc and Hampshire pigs were used in

the experiment. Two groups of four pigs each were fed on each of

three experimental rations. The animals were carefully allotted

according to weight, breed, litter, and previous history. They had

been raised at the University swine farm and were inavery thrifty

condition at the start of the test. They were about 9 weeks old

when the experiment started and averaged approximately 50 pounds.

The animals were self-fed on concrete floored pens which were washed

daily.









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The basal ration consisted of the following ingredients and con-

tained approximately 15 percent of crude protein.

Ground yellow corn 80.0
Soybean oilmeal 18.0
Limestone 1.0
Steamed bonemeal 0.5
Salt-trace mineral 0.53
100.03
The salt trace mineral mixture was composed of 50 lbs. iodized salt,

921 gmn. MnSo4, 398 gn. FeSO4, 125 gm. CuSO4 and 10 gm. C0C03* The

following levels of B-vitamins were added per 100 pounds of feed: 1 gn.

thiamine, 230 mg. riboflavin, 2.33 gm. niacin, 1 gm. pantothenic acid,

375 mg. pyridorine, 19.4 gm. choline chloride, 22.7 nagE folic acid, and

1.0 mg. vitamin B120

Results and Discussion

Results of the experiment are summarized in Table 2. Pigs fed the

basal ration (Lots 1 and 4) gained 1.50 pounds per day and required

352.7 pounds of feed per 100 pounds gain. When 10 gms. of terramycin

was added (Lots 2 and 5) gains were increased 11.3 percent and feed

utilization was improved 4.6 percent. The further addition of an un-

identified growth factor material (Pfizer Fermentation Product) at a

level of 2 percent resulted in 26.6 percent improvement in growth

rate over the controls and 18.3 percent improvement over the groups

supplemented with terramycin alone (Lots 2 and 5). Gains of the pigs
fed the basal ration were not only slower than the other groups but

were also considerably less uniform. This was very pronounced in







Table 2. The results of feeding a material containing an "unidentified growth factor" to weanling pigs.



Date Compiled By Group By Treatment
I
SI 1 1 I
Lot Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 and 4 2 and 5 t 3 and 6
1 t t I I I I
Rations 1 A B C C A B IC C
I I I t I
Initial No. of Pigs 4 4 4 i 4 1 4 4 8 t 8 t 8
I I t It i
Final No. of Pigs 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 t 8 I 8
SI I I I t I I t
Ave. Initial Wt. (Ib) 52.0 52.3 52.0 U 46.8 47.0 47.3 49.4 49.6 r 49.6
!I I I t I
Ave. Final Wt. (Ib) t 160.3 173.8 195.0 154.8 166.5 177.3 157.5 170.1 186.1
I I I I I I I ft t
Ave. Daily Gain (Ib) 1.50 1.69 1.99 1 1.50 1 1.66 1.81 1.50 1 1.67 t 1.90
t I t I I I I T I
and standard error t' 0.20 +0.04 0.10 10.06 I 10.10 +0.06 1 0.10 t -.05 o0.06
SI I I I I It
Ave. Daily Feed Cons. (Ib) 5.21 5.85 7.16 5.39 5.44 6.09 5.30 5.65 t 6.62
I t t t I I t
Feed/100 Ibs. Gain (Ib) 346.4 346.6 1 360.3 359.0 328.0 337.3 352.7 337.3 349.5
t I I I I I I
Days on Test 72 72 1 72 1 72 1 72 1 72 1 72 t 72 t 72


1 Ration A = Basal Ration

Ration B = Basal Ration 4 10 gms. of Crystalline Terramycin per ton of feed

Ration C = Basal Ration 4 10 gms. of Crystalline Terramycin and 40 Ibs. of unidentified feed material per ton of feed

* Difference from control group (Lots 1 and 4) significant at 5% level,ISD = .28








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Lot 1 (See standard error, Table 1). Feed efficiency was improved

by the addition of terramycin but was not greatly affected by the

further addition of the unidentified factor supplement. The fact that

pigs in the latter group averaged considerably heavier at the conclusion

of the trial, would in itself, tend to adversely effect feed utili-

zation for this group. Feed intake was markedly increased by the

addition of terramycin and an even greater increase was noted when

the unidentified factor supplement was fed. The high consumption of

the latter ration was one of the striking observations of the experiment.

The unidentified factor supplement appeared to have a very beneficial

effect on appetite.

In view of the residual terramycin present in the P.F.P. (Table 1),

there is the possibility that this added terramycin was responsible

for the growth stimulation. However, researchers at Chas. Pfizer and

Co. have rather conclusively eliminated this possibility as indicated

in personal communication with the senior author.


Summary
The addition of terramycin to a corn-soybean oilmeal ration im-

proved gains, feed consumption, and feed utilization.

The addition of both terramycin and an unidentified growth factor

supplement resulted in 26.6 percent increase in gains over the controls

and 18.3 percent increase over animals supplemented with terramycin

alone. The unidentified growth factor supplement had a pronounced favor-

able effect on appetite.

These data tend to substantiate the existence of an unidentified

growth factor for the pig in the material studied.
i onal Husbandry
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