Group Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series - University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; 54-5
Title: A comparison of chlorotetracyline (aureomycin) and tetracycline (achromycin) as growth stimulants for the pig
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072842/00001
 Material Information
Title: A comparison of chlorotetracyline (aureomycin) and tetracycline (achromycin) as growth stimulants for the pig
Series Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series
Physical Description: 6 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
McMillan, Fillmore A., 1928-
McKigney, John I
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: Agricultural Experiment Station, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1954
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaf 6).
Statement of Responsibility: by H.D. Wallace, F.A. McMillan and J. McKigney.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July, 1954."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072842
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76919841

Full Text



AUG 10 1954

Animal Husbandry Mimeograph July, 1995
Series No. 54-5


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIIA
AGRICULTURAL EXPLRflENT STATION
WILLARD M. FIFIELL, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA






A COMPARISON OF CILOROTETRACYLIfTE
(AUREOMYCIN) PNE TETRACYCLINE
(ACHROIYClIN) AS GROWTH_ STIMU-
LANTS FOR THE PIG1

by

H. D. Wallace, F. A. NcMillan and J. McKigney
Department of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition

Several antibiotics have been shown to improve the growth rate of

young swine (2). Chlorotetracyline is one of the most effective. Tetra-

cyline has hot been throughly tested in this respect. It represents the

basic chemical structure in the antibiotic series which includes chloro-

tetracycline and oxytetra cycline (Terramycin). Tetracycline appears

to have a wide bacterial spectrum as do its two analogues; however, pre-

liminary investigations in human therapy have indicated a lower inci-


1. This work was supported in part by a grant from Lederle Laboratories,
Pearl River, New York.

2. Wallace, Associate Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion, McMillan and McKigney, Graduate Assistants, Department of Ani-
mal Husbandry and Nutrition. The technical assistance of W. E.
Collins, C. E. Haines, and L. Gillespie is gratifully acknowledged.












dence of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea with tetracycline than has been

observed with either chlorotetrocycline or oxytetracycline (1). In

view of these observations with the human it seemed worthwhile to evalu-

ate the compound as an ingredient for swine rations.

The purpose of this experiment was to compare the growth promoting

value of crude aureomycin (90 percent crystalline aureomycin-HCl), auro-

fac 2-A (a supplement containing 3,6 grams of aureomycin-HC1 per pound

with citrus meal as the carrier material), and tetracycline-HCl.


Experimental


Thirty two pigs averaging about 85 pounds initially were divided

into four experimental groups according to weight, breed, litter and pre-

vious dietary history. The animals consisted of purebred Durocs, pure-

bred Hampshires, and Spotted Poland Chine x Duroc crossbreds. They

had been raised at the University Swine farm and were in good thrifty

condition at the start of the test. The pigs had been fed on concrete

pens since weaning at 56 days of age. Each lot of eight pigs was al-

lowed a 1/6 acre plot of oats and sweet yellow lupine pasture. The

pasture had previously been grazed heavily and was quite short at the

start of the test. At no time during the experiment was there abun-

dant forage available. However, by the conclusion of the test the pas-

ture was beginning to get ahead of the pigs indicating that they had

not been restricted in this respect. The pigs were fed by means of

self feeders and water was provided in automatic waterers.
.2-












The basal ration consisted of the following ingredients and con-

tained l4.5 percent crude protein.
Ground Yellow Corn 82.0

Soybean Oilmeal 16,0

Ground Limestone 1.0

Steamed Bonemeal 0.5

Salt-Trace Mineral 0.53
100*03

The salt-trace mineral mixture was composed of 50 Ibs. iodized salt, 921

gi. MnSO0, 398 gm. FeSO, 125 gm. CuSO4, and 10 gm. C0003. Lederle Forta-

feed 2-49C was added at a level of two lbs, per ton of feed. The Forta-

feed contained not less than 2000 mg, of riboflavin, 4000 mg. of panto-

thenic acid, 9000 mg. of niacin, 10,000 mg, of choline chloride and 60. ig.

of folic acid per pound. The antibiotic supplements were added on an

antibiotic equivalent basis which provided 10 gm. of antibiotic per ton

of feed in each of lots 2, 3 and .4

The experiment was initiated on January 26, 1954. The animals were

removed from the test individually as they reached a weight of approxi-

mately 195 pounds,

Results and Discussion


Results of the experiment are shown in Table 1. Analysis of the

growth data indicated no statistically significant differences. Never-

theless, all lots that received antibiotic performed some better than the


-3-









Table 1. The Effect of Chlorotetracycline and Tetracycline on the Growth of the Pig.


Baaal + Chloro-
tetracyline
(crude aureoryy-


Basal + Chloro-
tetracycline
(aurofac-2-A)


Basal + Tetra-
cycline


Y cin)
Lot Number 1 2 3 4


No. of pigs

Av. Initial wt.
Ibs.

Av. Final wt.
lbs,

Av. Gain per
pig lbs.

Av. Daily
gain, lbs.
and standard
error

Av. Daily feed
consumed, lbs.

Feed per 100 lbs
gain

Av. days on
test


8


84.7


195.6


110.9


1.95

!0.12


8


85.3


192.8


107.5

1&85

.0.11


4.67


382.5


57.8


366.3


7 .1


7*


89.7


190.4


100.7


0.01

'.0.13


8


84.5


197.2-


112.7


1.90

to.06


4.21


328.8


58.9


3.68


321.1


0 .3


;0ne pig died on the 27th
determined.


day with acute respiratory symptoms.


Exact cause was not


Basal,


4.62


-58*


57.1 5o.3


--












control group. The two lots which received chlorotetracyline out per-

formed, by a small margin, the lot which received tetracycline, This

difference could well have been due to chance alone, or to differences

in pasture consumption in the different lots. Antibiotic supplementation

improved feed efficiency considerably in all cases.

Summary


Thirty two pigs, weighing an average of 85 pounds initially, were

used to test the supplemental value of chlorotetracyline (2 sources) and

tetracycline. The experiment was conducted on oats-sweet lupine pasture

where total pasture intake could not be measured or controlled)under these

conditions, antibiotics did not significantly influence the rate of gain

but did improve feed efficiency.

Under the conditions of this trial there was no evidence obtained

which indicated tetracycline to be superior to chlorotetracyline as a

feed ingredient for growing-fattening swine.












REFERENCES


1. Welch, H. 1954. Editorial An Appraisal of Tetracycline. Anti-
biotics and Chemotherapy 4: 375-379.

2. Braude, R., H. D. Wallace and T. J. Cunha, 1953. The Value of Anti-
biotics in the Nutrition of Swine: A Review. Antibiotics and Chemo-
therapy 3: 271w291.


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