Group Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series - UF Agricultural Experiment Station ; no. 54-3
Title: Prepressed solvent extracted cottonseed meal as a source of protein for the weanling pig
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072840/00001
 Material Information
Title: Prepressed solvent extracted cottonseed meal as a source of protein for the weanling pig
Series Title: Animal husbandry mimeograph series
Physical Description: 5 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wallace, H. D ( Harold Dean )
Gillespie, Larry, 1925-
McKigney, John I
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida -- Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Publisher: Agricultural Experiment Station, Dept. of Animal Husbandry and Nutrition
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1954
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by H.D. Wallace, John McKigney and Larry Gillespie.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "January, 1954."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072840
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 76911563

Full Text





Animal Husbandry Mimeograph January, 1959
Series No.-'-S/i-,7

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
WILLARD M. FIFIELD, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PREPRESSED SOLVENT EXTRACTED COTTONSEED I1EAL
AS A SOURCE OF PROTEIN FOR THE WEANLING PIG

by

H. D. WALLACE, JOHN MCKIGNEY and LARRY GILLESPIE


This study was designed to compare the feeding value of prepressed

solvent cottonseed meal to that of solvent extracted soybean oil meal

for weanling pigs fed in dry lot. In view of recent experimental data

indicating that 14 percent crude protein was adequate for such animals

when fed corn-soybean oil meal rations, it was further desired to de-

termine if such a level of protein was optimum when cottonseed meal

replaced the soybean oil meal. In addition, the supplementary value

of DSC (distiller's solubles concentrate), a by-product of the produc-

tion of Monosodium Glutamate from wheat gluten, was determined. This

product was obtained from the Huron Milling Company of Chicago. The

amino acid analysis indicated possible value as a supplementary source

of lysine. A final objective was to determine the value of adding a

high level of aureomycin (60 gms/ton) to the corn-cottonseed meal ration.

The study consisted of two trials as shown in Table 1. The two experi-

ments were the same except that the cottonseed meal was from different

mills. The meal used in Experiment I was obtained from Sherman, Texas

(Lab. No. 0-3748) and that of the second experiment came from the Dothan

Oil Meal Company at Dothan, Alabama. The meal from the Dothan Mill









contained 2.20 percent acidulated cottonseed soapstock. Both meals

analyzed 0.04 percent free gossypol.


Experimental


Sixty purebred Duroc and Durox x Hampshire pigs served as the

experimental animals. They were carefully allotted to the various

experimental groups according to live weight, breed, and litter.

The pigs were maintained in concrete pens which were scrubbed and

washed down daily. All rations were fed ad libitum in self feeders.

In addition to corn and soybean oil meal or cottonseed oil meal,

all rations contained 1 percent limestone, 0.5 percent steamed bone-

meal and 0.53 percent of a trace mineralized salt mixture. The trace

mineral mixture included iodine, copper, iron, manganese, and cobalt.

Aureomycin in the form of Aurofac 2-A was added to all rations at a

level of 20 gms. per ton of feed. Ration No. 4 contained three times

this amount. Lederle Fortafeed 2-49C was added to all rations at a

level of two pounds per ton of feed. The Fortafeed contributed niacin,

riboflavin, pantothenic acid and choline.


Results and Discussion


Results of the experiments, which covered a period of nine weeks,

are presented in Table 1. In both experiments, the corn-soybean meal

control ration containing 14 percent protein produced better results

than any of the rations containing cottonseed meal. Distiller's

solubles concentrate (DSC) and a high level of aureomycin were in-

effective supplements. In the first experiment the higher level of

protein (Lot 5 vs Lot 2) appeared to be less satisfactory than the








TABLE I
REPRESSED SOLVENT EXTRACTED COTTONSEED MEAL AS A
PROTEIN SUPPLEMENT FOR PIGS FED IN DRYLOT
(5 pigs per lot in each experiment)


Experiment I


Lot 1 Corn SBOM
(14% protein)

Lot 2 Corn CSM
(14% protein)

Lot 3 Corn CSM + DSC
(14% protein)


Lot 4 Corn
high
(14%


- CSM + DSC and
level aureomycin
protein)


Initial
Weight

35.0


35.2


35.2


35.0


Daily
Gain

1.14


1.03


0.81*-


0.90


Feed per
cwt. Gain


311


347


Lot 5 Corn CSM
(20% protein)

Lot 6 Corn CSM + DSC
(20% protein)


35.0


35.1


0.50o:- 433


1.00


339


* 2 mild cases of dermatitis

*8 3 severe cases, 1 mild case


-3-


Initial
Weight


Feed per
cwt. Gain


277


330


338


Daily
Gain

1.62


1.02


0.98


1.08


46.1


46.0



44.0
46.1


1.32


1.30


46.0


329


363









lower protein ration. The complicating effect of dermatitis in Experi-

ment I may explain this difference. In the second experiment, however,

the high protein cottonseed meal ration promoted decidedly better growth

than did the low protein rations. This experiment was not complicated

with dermatitis.


Dermatitis


Studies during the past four years have indicated a rather high

incidence of dermatitis among young pigs fed corn-cottonseed meals in

dry lot. The syndrome is not peculiar to corn-cottonseed meal rations

alone, since it has been observed many times on corn-peanut meal and

corn-sunflower seed meal rations, and in a very few instances on corn-

soybean oil meal rations. The disturbance is characterized by thick

scabby incrustations which usually appear first on the feet and progress

upward to belly, hams, ears, and sides. In very severe cases, the entire

body is covered. The disease is benign. There is little irritation and

rubbing is seldom observed. Body temperatures remain normal. Appetites

are reduced but the animals continue to eat some. Spontaneous recovery

is usually the rule with no change in diet necessary. Recovery can be

speeded greatly by turning animals out to pasture. The disease has not

been observed in pasture reared animals.

Histopathological studies have shown no apparent disturbances in

the tissue of the heart, liver, kidney, spleen, and muscle. Skin sec-

tions have revealed a tremendous thickening of the cornified epithelium

with rows and masses of nuclei scattered throughout.

Blood studies have shown no clear differences in hemoglobin, red

blood cell count, white blood cell count, blood calcium, or blood









phosphorus between afflicted animals and normal animals. All indica-

tions are that the problem is nutritional in nature, but the fact that

it is very difficult to produce the disease experimentally casts some

doubt on this interpretation.


Summary


Studies involving the dry lot feeding of weanling pigs indicated

that soybean oil meal was a more satisfactory protein supplement than

prepressed low gossypol cottonseed meal. The addition of a distiller's

solubles concentrate or a high level of aureomycin failed to improve

growth of pigs fed the cottonseed meal. The first experiment was com-

plicated by dermatitis but in the second experiment a 20 percent protein

cottonseed meal ration promoted faster gains than did a 14 percent ration.


IEW/ar
Animal Husbandry
200 copies




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