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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00052
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: July 1, 1988
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00052

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main: Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main: News
        Page 7
    Main: Habitat
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Fishing
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Swimming
        Page 12
    Main: Power Boats
        Page 13
    Main: Marine Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Main: Sailing
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Main: Cruising
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Main: The Main Brace
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Main: Diving
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text













































Towers should not be faulted


by Bryan Brooks

When that ship crashed up onto Molly Wilmot's back-
yard in November 1984, divers in Broward County didn't
know it, but their fortunes had changed. Thanks to a group
of dedicated county employees and hard working local div-
ers, we have a rich selection of wrecks to dive on, wrecks
that gather fish and beautiful coral life. The ship that blew
up onto Molly Wilmot's estate of course is the world famous
Mercedes I.
The Broward County artificial reef project is under the
auspices of the Environmental Quality Control Board. A
group in that unit called the Beach Erosion District does
the nuts and bolts of putting the program together.
Steve Somerville, from the Beach Erosion section, is a
man on the spot. Balancing alight rope between divers,
fishermen and environmentalists,.he skillfully manages to
keep everyone but the most 'out in space' happy. In the
past three years, using allotted monies and gifts from well
to do philanthropists, many unsightly derelict tugs and
-freighters have been dropped into the waters off Bro-
ward County.
For example: the money for the Rebel, which lies in 110
of water, came from an interested citizen who wished to
remain anonymous. The money for the Jay Scutti came from
a gentleman who purchased the boat for the county and
named the wreck after his son, who had been killed in an au-
tomobile accident. His son was an ardent diver. This was
his way of remembering him, as Mr. Scutti lives on Fort
Lauderdale's north beach, close to where the wreck was
been dropped.
Somerville says the government monies come from the
Florida Boating Improvement Program. This is not money
taxed extra, but monies already collected when boaters
register their boats in the State of Florida.
Steve says that when the fishermen's wrecks are
dropped they generally are able to raise enough money for
matching state funds: Those wrecks are dropped in deep-.
er waters around 200 feet The wrecks intended for div-
ers are dropped in the 100 foot range. Divers usually come
up with the manpower to clean the. derelicts so that they
may be safely dropped. Prominent among the divers who
give their time and sweat are members of the South Flori-
da Divers club.
Having dived all the wrecks dropped by the county, I
find them safe and enjoyable. They range from intermedi-
ate to advanced dives. When unfortunate incidents, such as
.the diver who died while diving the Tenneco Towers some
weeks ago, happen, investigation usually, if not always,
show that it was the individual diver who made the mistake,
not the artificial reef. As an instructor I have always won-


-' .-




.~.


-:
~.A -. .*-;


dered at what point is the individual responsible for his or
her own actions? During training, perspective divers are
exposed to information that clearly tells them to dive at
their level of experience, and don't go further without ad-
vanced training and proper supervision. Diving at night in
current, leaving no one on the boat, and doing a completely
incorrect dive profile, does not make the TennecoTowers
at fault, only the divers, who, through their own free will,
made that kind of a dive.
Being an old Florida cracker, I find another benefit with
the wrecks. Using the wrecks to dive on, many divers who
don't know anything about neutral buoyancy, will stay off
the reefs and keep from breaking all of the coral by grovel-
ing around. Letting them crawl all over the wrecks, kicking
up silt and destroying some of the life on it, doesn't do the
wrecks any good, but it helps keep the coral reef colonies
off Fort Lauderdale alive and kicking.


July '88

Volume 5 Issue 4


South Florida's

Nautical Newspaper

Divers worldwide are descending upon south
Florida as a jumping-off spot as the SCUBA
season gets underway and Teri Cheney's cover
illustration plays on that theme.
A complete updated listing of Broward
County's Artificial Reef sites with Loran
coordinates can be found on page 22

And Bryan Brooks follows up his piece last
month with a column on the Tenneco Towers
offshore. Dive to page 1
The Pond Apple Slough along the South
Fork of New River is in the news.again on page 8
The water supplies to Lake Okeechobee
and the Everglades are feared threatened.
Craig Lustgarten has filed a reporton page 8
Alligators are in their active season and an
educational program on these misunderstood
Florida natives is planned for July. Read more on
page 8
The Metropolitan South Florida Fishing
Tournament (MET) results are in on page 10
And a $25,000 dolphin tournament
benefitting kidney dialysis programs is planned
again this July. Turn to page 11
Hear the music underwater at Looe Key and
Spread page 23
A proposed loss on beach parking has a
Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner concerned.
See page 7
For those who can't go to the beach there's a
summer reading guide for boaters on page 21
A local team placed well in the 1988 World
1000 catamaran race. Find a story and results
M0 page 17
James Sullivan examines Saint Elmo's Fire
this month on page 9
Frank Papy is up the St. John's River this
issue with a dispatch on page 18

Closer to home, escape to Deerfield Island
by boat on page 21
S Read about sharks' unexpected Immune
abilities on page 9

Seattle .is celebrating its houseboat
community this fall. Details on page 19
Ft. Lauderdale's Marine Advisory Board is
studying what to do with the city's largely
unenforced residential dock rental prohibition
page 7

The USO is storming Fort Lauderdale's beach
come this fall. See page 7





page 14
t~y1|IbIN"






2 WoatrfrontNews July 1988 WATERFRONT NUWS


Editor's Log


A new 33-slip marina Is being proposed for the south
side ofCoral Bay off the Intracoastal Waterway just north
of Sunrise Blvd. in Fort Lauderdale, according to Attor-
ney William R. Leonard, marina construction consultant Ron
Stroud and Terry E. Kiltzkie of the Army Corps of Engi-
neers. Called Sunrise Bay Harbor, the new development
would share the bay with Coral Ridge Yacht Club to the
north :. -.
French sailor Philippe Poupbn aboard a-60-trimaran
trimmed more than six days off his old record time in win-


ning the Carlsberg Single-Handed Transatlantic Yacht
Race arriving in Newport, Rhode Island from Plymouth,
England in June. Poupon's nearest rivals, including America
Mike Steggall were about 200 miles out when the French-
man finished his 3000-mile, 10-day 9-hour 15-minute 9-
second crossing. .
While Riverside Park residents continue to squabble
on the streets over road closings, across New River in the i
Tarpon River area neighbors are slowly coming towards a
consensus on their traffic plan on paper in "town meet-


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:Miamin
529-0000
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Jackson Marine
1915 S.W. 21st Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale
792-4906

Florida Battery
520 W. Broward Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
764-6911

Lauderdale Battery &
Electric Co.
301 S.W. 25th St.
Ft. Lauderdale
525-5557

Sallorman
350 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale
522-6716

Marine & General


RPMDiesel
2555 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale.
587-1620

Pompano Beach -
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701 S. Federal Hwy.
Pompano Beach
946-1450

Rybovich Boat Works
4210 N. Dixie Hwy.
.West Palm Beach
407-844-4331

Cruising Gear
2751 S.W. 27th Ave.
Miami
854-7600

Langers Marine
520 West Ave.
Miami Beach
672-2227


SRepower Systems
'801 S.E. 3rd St.,
D ania
925-6302
925-6303 .
Thunder Boat Marina
2051 Griffin Rd.
Ft. Lauderdale
963-2660

Power House Marine CorF
476 N.W. 128th St. Rd.
Miami
685-5786
800-330-3477

R. B. Grove
261 S.W. 6th St.
Miami
854-5420


LB. Harvey
152 S.W. 8th St.
Miami
856-1583
856-1370 FAX
Mack Shaw Sallmakers
100 S.W. 15th St.
Ft. Lauderdale_
Broward: 522-6767
Miami: 944-5858

Lanier Racing
1340 Stirling Rd.
Dania
922-1967

Compleat Marine
1800 N.E. 151st St.
N. Miami, FL 33162
948-6056


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Ft. Lauderdale
524-3600


Wholesale only:
Battery, 500 S.W. 21st Tr. A-104, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
(305) 587-3523


ings". Proponents of urban planner Oscar NeWman's "po-
rosity" theories favor the closing of Southwest Seventh
Street west of Fourth Avenue to curb cut-through traffic
to and from downtown Fort Lauderdale. Many long time
residents of Tarpon River and condominium owners of Riv-
er Reach prefer to leave Seventh Street open fearing "in-
temal porosity".and a lack of emergency access into the
neighborhood. Tarpon River residents may be voting on the
two alternatives this fall. They will also be considering zon-
-ing changes to protect the area from outside developers
and an encroaching downtown. SailboatBend is moving.
along with its own zoning and traffic plans for their water-
front neighborhood. Riverside Park's test period for their
barricades should end in July and Master Plan supporters
and those favoring alternatives will have to decide what to
do on a permanent basis. In the meantime, Tarpon River
and Sailboat Bend members are finalizing plans to renovate
the Seventh Avenue Bridge over New River in a joint neigh-
bodrhood effort.


While ground-breaking ceremonies for the waterfront
,Performing Arts Center on New River in Fort Lauderedale
were being held last May, members of the Broward County
Archaeological Society were doing theirown digging be-
hind the temporary ceremonial stage. They haveuncov-
ered a pre-historic Indian encampment on this New
River Site. Excavating an east-west and north-south
trench a growing number of interesting artifacts have
been recovered, said Tom Brethemton of thesociety.
A cylindrical bone bead, a 10 centimeter long bone pin,
two bone pin fragments, pottery sheds, hundreds of shark
vertebrae and small shark teeth (many of them drilled) and
more than one hundred unique conch shell tools were found
in the the trench under at least 40 to 50 centimeters of fill
following the natural slope to the river bank. No Indian re-
mains were discovered or disturbed.
Construction of the theatre has essentially halted any
further work on site, said society president Ann Murray.
However, the group has recovered enough to hopefully do a
Thorough study, believed Brethernton, He said, teams '6
,volunteers are being organized to monitotrthe construction
site in case anything else is uncovered while pilings are be-
ing placed and utility lines and pipls trenched. '



A proposed tunnel at 17th Street Causeway and the;
Intracoastal Waterway in Fort Lauderdale is being criti-.
cized by State and Federal Highway officials. Congress-
man Clay Shaw is still fighting for itin Washington. Let his
office know what the area waterfront community thinks of
the tunnel plan by calling his local office at 522-1800.


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Fort Lauderdale EAST
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Waterfront News July 1988


/1we


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311 S.W. 24th Street SR 84
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
(305) 522-7998


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2230 Broadway (U.S. 1)
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4 waterfront News July 1988 L Lettrs


Editor:
Viking Express Bahamian Princess passengers
stranded in Freeport. After reading the June issue of Wa-
terfront News regarding the "bullet boat to the Bahamas"
we feelwe have to express our opinion on how the passen-
gers were treated on May 13, 1988. Many of us were
stranded inFreeport, Grand Bahama Island because the
Viking Express Bahama Princess ship was confiscated by
the Bahamian authorities. We were supposed to return the
afternoon of the 13th but weretold at the checking gate,
after a long wait, that the ship was not going to return to
Port Everglades. We were told that Ifwe hurried we could
purchase return fare on another ship going to Miami,
Florida. This fare had to be paid by each of us, which was
an unexpected amount of money to be spent None of the
crew members were at the checking office to explain the
problem to their passengers. We would think that someone
representing the company would have had the decency to
explain the situation to those of us who were stranded in
Freeport. We know at least 20 passengers had to pay the
extra fee to return to Florida. After arriving at the Port
of Miami we had to board a bus to return to Port Ever-
glades where our cars were parked. We did not arrive
home in Ft Lauderdale until 2 a.m. So far no one from the
Viking Express had talked to any of the passengers that
evening of the 13th. In our opinion this iS a very unbusiness
like way of operating. Our added expense for the day was
S$1,16.00 plus much inconvenience. We have called Viking Ex-
press at least 10 times, since this happened, for a refund
but have still not received one. This may be listed as a "bul-
let boat to the Bahamas" but problems like we had should
be corrected promptly and courteously and not be forgot-
ten about Disgusted & discouraged passengers,of the
"bullet boat."
Joy &NormanJuius
Fort Lauderdale

Editor's note: John Simpson, whb wrote the article in
question, queried Mr. AlIHunter of Viking Express about
-the Julius' situation. Hunter told Simpson: (A) the reason.
no one from Viking'was at the dock in the Bahamas to ad-
vise the passengers of Bahamian Princess status was be-
cause the Viking personnel in Freeport were attemptingto,
resolve the issue and didn't anticipate being unable to sail
the boat back to the U.S. that same evening;
(B) Bahamian Princess did run again: Memorial Day
weekend but hasn't since due to bad weather; (C) Viking
Express is in the process of an"major reorganization;" (D)
he claimed that many refunds have been mailed out to pas-
sengers and was surprised the Julius had not received
their check. Hunt said the person to talk to at Viking Ex-
press about refunds is "Miss Agosto" at 760-4550.



Editor:
Last year 102 people died in boating accidents within
the State of Florida. By June 1, the fatality tally for 1988
had already reached 57.
Many of these accidents and deaths can be prevented.
To tell you how, the City of Fort Lauderdale Department
of Docks and Waterways is sponsoring Safe Boating '88
this summer. In conjunction with the first day of summer on
June 20, they will be distributing free safe boating bro-
chures at all municipal boat ramps, marinas, and dockage
locations in Fort Lauderdale.
Learn how to ejoy the water safely and help us re-
duce the number of senseless boating, accidents and
deaths. Pick up your free brochure today, or call 761 -
5423 and we'll mail you one right away.
Safe Boating '88 is for all South Florida.

James Hart, Supervisor
Ft. Lauderdale Department of
Docks & Waterways


Isu

To the:



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WATERFRONT NEWS
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Editor:, '
Jt is my understanding that the Ark Royal with only the
crew on board was boarded by members of the U.S. Coast
Guard last month while it was in International waters and
that a small trace (less than 1/10th of an ounce) of mari-
juana was found in the crew's quarters.
The Captain and crew were operating under a firm
written policy of the Ark Royal and the Tomima Corpora-
tion, owner of the vessel, which forbids possession or use
of illegal substances on board the yacht. No charges have
been brought by the U.S. Coast Guard or Customs agents
against the Captain or crew and they have been released.
Both the corporation and myself strongly support Gov-
emnment efforts ithalting drug trafficking. But, the sei-
Szure of this vessel for the apparent individual actions of a
crew member against the stated policy of the corporation
and the vessel for minute traces makes no sense. This type
action presents an unreasonable danger to all boat owners
for the isolated actions of passengers and crew.
The vessel has been released as of 12:30 p.m. EDT. A,
nominal administrative charge of $1,600.00 was lodged
against the vessel. Cooperation from the Government
agencies is appreciated for the speedy release of the Ark
Royal.
As the result of an internal investigation, a decision has
been made tb discharge the Captain and two crew mem-
bers of the Ark Royal for an apparent lack of judgment
concerning the policies of the corporation and the yacht.
Michael Rogerson, president
Tomima Corporation
Irvine,California

Editor's note: As reported in the.June issue of Water-
front News, the Reagan administration abandoned the
more controversial elements of its 'zero tolerance" policy,
saying the Coast Guard and Customs Service will no longer
seize boats like Mr. Rogerson's ArkRoyal- on the high seas
merely because they carry small amounts of illegal drugs.
The govemmentissued new guidelines stating vessels
outside the 12-mile limit will be confiscated only when there
is evidence they are being used to import narcotics into the
country. Any amount of drugs will still be grounds for sei-
zure inside U.S. waters, even a marijuana seed.
"We thought we had an agreement on how to proceed,
but when we got out into the field... we ran into some
problems," said Admiral Paul Yost, commandant of the
SCoast Guard, acknowledging they had applied the old poli-
cy in cases that went beyond the limits of the law as local
marine law enforcement officials observed in last month's
article.
Now, seizing vessels outside the territorial limit, where
U.S. laws do not apply is not authorized for possession
alone, according to the revised.guidelines. Where small
quantities of drugs are found on boats on the high seas,
Coast Guard boarding parties must now look for evidence
drug smuggling rather than immediate personal consump-
tion by passengers On a boat. Inspectors are considering
whether the drugs are concealed, whether the boat is
headed for the United States, whether the passengers
and crew exhibit "an uncooperative attitude or deceptive
behavior" and whether the drug amounts involved "exceed
what is probable for personal consumption."
Also, the Coast Guard must consider whether the boat
owner "knew...or could have known" the drugs were
aboard, according to these less than zero tolerance" poli-
cies issued at the end of May.
: U.S. Representative E. Clay Shaw (R-Ft Lauderdale)
and retiring U.S. District Attorney Leon Kellner agreed
at a June "town meeting"in Fort Lauderdale that the revi-
sions to the policy made it better. They support going af-
ter the "demand side" of the drug problem equation. Shaw
suggested that the Navy should get involved with enforce-
ment. His office is setting up meetings between local boat-
ersand the Coast Guard.


Please mail the Waterfront News to:
Name
Address
City
State
Zip Code
Phone ( )
Comments:


)DRESS CHANGE


-9450 for more information.


& KEEP ABOARD


Make checks payable to:
WATERFRONT NEWS


POSSESSION of DRUGS


On Board This VemV I.











Editor:
In a reaction to the growing fear of seizure of boats un-
der the "Zero Tolerance" program being carried out by
federal agencies, Licensed Charterboat Captains are put-
ting out the word thatthey will not tolerate illegal drugs
on board which could lead to loss of the vessel.
Inthis controversial policy the Coast Guard has confis-
cated many small boats for minor residue or marijuana
seeds. In most cases, the Captain or operator of the boat
has no connection with, or knowledge of, the drugs. He is
just the Operator of a public conveyance.
Spearheaded by the American Professional Captain's
Association, a program of information and education is be-
ing conducted. One of the means being used in this effort,
is a sign posted prominently on board the vessel indicating
to all passengers that illegal drugs will not be tolerated.
It is felt that the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Customs
wilt recognize the acceptance of responsibility by the Cap-
tain to cooperate in their efforts to restrict the use of
drugs. It should also minimize the unfair seizures of vessels
whose Captains had no knowledge of drug possession by
passengers.
American Professional Captain's Assock
S. Fort Lauderdale


Editor:
Your publishing of so much in support of National Safe
Boating Week went a long way in making recreational boat-
ers in South Florida well aware that it was time to think of
safety. Considering the washput given to the second week-
end'we:still did a great job in covenpg the ramps for Cour-
tesy Manne Examiinations.
Naturally, the weather will not take anything away from
the excellent response being reported by all planned class-
Ses for Boating Safety Courses.-
Again, many thanks for all you have done to push the Na-
tional Safe Boating Week ahead with the boaters of this
area.
Bud Saltzman, Chairperson
National Safe BoatingWeek
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Div III
Florida


Volume 5 issue 4 July 1988.
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc. 1988
ISSN $756-0038
N ate- frot




1224 S.W. 1st AVENUE
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33315
PHONE (305) 524-9450
PUBLISHED BY ZIEGLER PUBLISHING CO., INC.
Editor John Ziegler
Cover Illustrator: TeriCheney
Illustrators: Brandy Spearman,Laur
Cahill, Bob Barrientos, Julie
Gepfrich
Advertising Ken Simkin (Ft. Lauderdale)
Specialists: Kelly Kiddoo (S. Brow. & Dade)
Cy Malone (N. Brow. & P.B.)
Reporters: Remy Mackoswki (At argue)
Craig Lusgarten (North)
Jennifer Heit (South)
Robbi Belanger (Entertainment)
Proofreader: Mary Smith
Photographers: Greg Dellinger, Ray Isard
Carriers: Bud Alcott, Scott Moore, Darin
Gleichmann, Jeff Prosje, Swen
Neufeldt, Matt Moore, Todd
Clarke, John Metzger, Charles
Metzger, Steven Bunker, Rich-
ard Sutcliffe Bernie Cohen,
Dennis Pearson, Brian Harff
Joan Rusie Scott Wright
The WATERFRONT NEWS welcomes stories,art ano pnotos. THE
WATERFRONT NEWS Is not responsible for unsolicited contribu-
tlons, lost or damaged photo material. The WATERFRONT NEWS-
retains first rights only. Advertising rates are available upon request.
To subscribe see coupon on this page.


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'~'rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrlrrr~rrirsrrrrr






Letters


Waterfront News July 1988 5


Readers:
In the recent Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat Show's pro-
gram and again in the May 1988 Marine Industries Associa-
tion of South Florida newsletter there were references
made to a certain rWaterfront Publishing Inc."
WaterfrontNews is absolutely not affiliated with this
"Waterfront Publishing." We are concerned that some of
you could become "confused" and/or misled.
SThe only'connections between Waterfront News and
"Waterfront Publishing" are: (1) Waterfront News' cur-
rent editor John Ziegler was the founding editor of 'Wa-
terfront Publishing" (then called Yacht Master's) first
periodical back in 1983 and 1984 since then (2) Water-
front News and "Waterfront Publishing's" Broward and
later Dade County monthlies have been direct competitors.
WaterfontNews is in fact published and copyrighted by
Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc. (as ISSN 8756-0038) in the
United States Library of Congress. It is circulated in
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties.
Readers, Waterfront News' name and reputation are at
stake. You have supported us with subscriptions, letters
to the editor and the largest collection of local marine clas-
sified and display ads in the area. We need your continued
support and vigilance. Again you need to be aware that
"Waterfront Publishing" (a.k.a.: Yacht Master's, Water-
front Publications, New River Times and Biscayne Bay
Times) is not the WaterfrontNews!
Board of Directors
Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
d/b/a Waterfront News
Fort Lauderdale



Letters
c/o Waterfront News
1224 S.W. 1st Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315


Question:
I have a large boat that really thunders when I rev' it up.
It has two large V-8's in it with straight through exhausts.
It's a really fast boat but a noisy one. I love it and the macho
sounds it puts out; but, my neighbors and friends say it
wakes them at night if I come in late or leave early. Will I
lose power and speed if I install mufflers? Any advice?
Sal
Answer:
I can sympathize with your neighbors as I too live on the
waterfront. These high speed powerboats really drown
out speech, T.V. sets and rattle windows especially when
speeding on the Intracoastal Waterway.
There is a solution. Mufflers of different types can
shut down most of the exhaust noise. For speed and power
a cut-out can be installed for ocean running where the roar
will not disturb people living along the Intracoastal. Speed,
poser and noise should be a no-no wherever they can be dan-
gerous nuisance.
I love a fast boat, too, but they should be opened up
outside where they can be fun. Al

Q-
My batteries are never fully charged lately. They are
not more than year old deep cycle marine batteries. I can
not find a short. Even when I turn off my battery switches
they lose power.
Albert
A-
You just gave me the best clue to your problem. The
only power drain on your boat when you turn off your bat-
teries are the bilge pump and automatic switch that acti-
vates it. They are almost always wired directly to the bat-
teries because they must be able to pump out the boat in
case of rain or leaks even if the switches are off. If the
switch is on the automatic, the pumps are running draining
the batteries. If the pump is jammed or frozen, the batter-
ies will run down. I would check my bilge pump circuits for
any malfunctions in the pump or switch. Check your bilge
for excessive water holding the automatic switch open.
Al


I heard about new engines that are coming out with 16
valves or 4 valves per cylinder. They are fast light engines
in racing cars and maybe for boats, eventually. What good
or what do,more valves do? Most engines have one intake
and one exhaust valve per cylinder.
Sylvia
A-


More valves per cylinder mean more fuel can enter and
more fuel means more power and speed. More exhaust
valves let the burnt gases out faster and the engine can op-
erate cleaner, cooler and more efficiently. Engines are be-
ing made better all the time.


I just had a plug blow out of my engine. My fault as, I
must have left it loose. Now, the threads are gone in the
head. I don't feel like buying a new head, with all the extra
work to install one. Any kind of a quick fix? I can do until I
can fix it right.
Rose
A-
Well, there are a lot of things that can be done. You can
install a helicoil, which puts a new thread in the old socket
You can use a thread chaser if there is any thread left. Or
you can recut new threads for an insert or oversize plug.
Extreme care must be taken that no metal dust or filings
fall into the engine. A powerful vacuum is used while any
work is done on the head.
A]


IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH
YOUR BOAT, WRITE TO:
"BIG AL"
c/o Waterfront News
1224 S.W. 1st Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
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WaterfrontNew July 1988


F- ---------
Editor
[This is in reference to the "Oil on North Fork" item in
June's Log.]
Last fall, the Ft. Lauderdale City Commission agreed
with Commissioner Jim Naugle's suggestion that an oil sep-
arator should be installed in the stormwater outfall line
from the Public Works Compound [into Argyle Canal off
the North Fork New River.]
Staff proceeded with the expectation, that a pre-
treatment structure could be constructed for $30,000 to
$40,000. Knowing that DER and EPA were developing
rules for pretreatment of stormwater runoff before it en-
ters open waters, we contacted DER to determine what
design criteria would control if we attempted to obtain a
permit to retrofit an existing storm drainage system.
We were advised that there are no current pretreat-
ment requirements for situations such as the Public Works
Compound and that we should follow existing design crite-
ria used to obtain permits from DER for new develop-
ments. That criteria requires construction of a structure
that will handle runoff from a ten year frequency rainstorm
of fifteen minutes duration. Volume-wise, this translates
to a structure that can handle over 500,000 gallons.
We contacted a company that prefabricates oil: separa-
tors commonly used in the industry. With their $110,000
quote for the internal mechanism of a separator, we de-
rived an estimate of $300,000 plus to construct a rein-
forced concrete vault and install the prefabricated separ-
ators in Southwest 14th Avenue that would satisfy
current permit requirements of DER.
Believing this to be considerably more than the Commis-
sion was expecting, we began exploring other, less costly
options to prevent oil slick problems in the Argyle Canal-
caused by the Public Works Compound,
Coincidentally, 'we were workingwith Broward County
Environmental Quality Control Board to obtain an operat-
ing permitforthe Public Works Compound.,Various opera-
tional changes and improved housekeeping procedures have
been or will be made under this operating permit which will
also mitigate possibility of oil slick problems iri.the Argyle
Canal.
Additionally,we took note of South Rorida Water Man-
agement District's Technical Publication No. 87-5, dated
December, 1987. In the executive summary, the following is
noted: "Water quality research indicates that the initial


Letters


Oil on the North Fork


half inch of stormwater runoff known as the 'first flush'
carries the highest concentration of surface pollutants oc-
curring during a storm event. It has been found that most
of these pollutants are substantially removed as the storm-
water flows over or percolates through unsaturated soil.
Exfiltration trenches are commonly used in commercial de-
velopments to retain the 'first flush' of stormwater run-
off. The retained water is allowed to percolate through
the trench gravel into the surrounding soil as a means of im-
proving the quality of water."
We believe construction of exfiltration interceptor
trenches from the existing catch basins in the Public
Works Compound, possibly in conjunction with raising the
catch basin inlets one-half to three-quarters of an inch
above the surrounding pavement, will be the most cost-
effective approach to handling the 'first flush' of runoff
from the compound. We are investigating the possibility of
using a floating oil spill containment boom, such as those
used at the Port. When oily water escapes the Compound
through the storm drainage system, it would be contained
by the boom. It.could then be "blotted" up with sorbent
blankets designed for such purpose. This approach offers
several advantages as a starting point, so we are recom-
mending it to get a handle on the situation and better de-
termine how much further we need to go in the longer term.
Advantages are: (a) uniqueness of this location as a re-
search model. DER and EPA will eventually issues rules re-
quiring permitting of all our storm outfalls and pretreat-
ment at some. As far as City-owned facilities go, because
of the number of vehicles at the Public Works Compound,
we can obtain information to guide us to compliance with

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the new rules for our remaining facilities. Since we own the
land adjoining the outfall end of the storm system and are
at the site on a regular basis, we can monitor and record
frequency of oily water emitting from the outfall. Nominal-
ly, this will furnish us data to design an optimal pretreat-
nient structure for the Compound. It will also help us bet-
ter quantify City responsibilities under more stringent
DER and EPA regulations; (b) ready availability of the
floating boom and sorbent materials. We will borrow boom
material from the Port to get started. We already have an
inventory of sorbent materials for emergency cleanup
measures.
(c) It will allow additional time to obtain and evaluate
new DER/EPA requirements and ensure that the design of
any structure we construct will be sufficient to meet the
new criteria.
Unless Commission objects, we will proceed to imple-
ment this plan as soon as possible.
Richard Brossard
Director of Public Works
Ft. Lauderdale
Editor's note: Public Works Director Richard Brossard's
plan was approved by the Fort Lauderdale Commission in
June.

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News Waterfront News July 1988


Loss of beach parking draws concern


by Craig Lustgarten
Under a beach revitalization plan passed recently by the
Fort Lauderdale City Commission, State Road A1A will be
turned into two northbound lanes with widened pedestrian
.- bound traffic will be rerouted through Birch Road from
Bay Shore to Bahia Mar. The expected cost of the project
is $7.5 million dollars, with the financing coming from a
voter approved bond issue.
S In the process of turning A1A into a one-way pairing
-with Birch Road, however, approximately 260 parking
spaces will be lost, including the controversial removal of
metered parking along the beach between Seabreeze
Boulevard and Bayshore Drive.
City Commissioner Jim Naugle, the only commissioner t
vote against the Strip Revitalization plan, says that 437


USO hits the beach
The USO is moving into beach front facilities once occu-
pied by the Fort Lauderdale Art Institute on East Las Olas
just westof A1A, according to Jeanie Seubert, a program
specialist with the not-for-profit organization. "Dedicated
to the morale and recreational needs of military personnel,"
said Seubert, the new 3250-square-foot on the ground
floor of the OceansideiHoliday Inn will include: phone banks,
lockers, showers, a lounge and multi-purpose room, library,
information center and administrative offices.
The USO, which receives no federal money, is funded by
local donations, not just cash but also in-kind contributions
of services and merchandise, and most importantly volun-
teer manpower, In fact, this newest USO center among the
other 175 scattered throughout the world will have only
one paid staff member, Seubert went on with the bulk the
help coming from volunteers when the Fort Lauderdale fa-
cility opens in the fall. From the waterfront community
Seubert hopes to get support from'local dive, fishing and
sailing clubs, the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Power Squadron,
Navy League and individuals who want to provide recrea-
>;tion opportunities for servicemen and women passing
through the area.
"A USO center takes on the characteristics of the com-
munity," observes Seubert. "it provides the community an
experience with the human side of our armed forces." She
Scan be reached at the new offices byiphoning'463-8421,
extension 105.

Around the same time the USO Center will be opening
up, the local Navy League will be celebrating Navy Appre-
ciation Week (October 8-15), reported Dr. Art Haggis
and Bud Brown, both with the Fort Lauderdale group.

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spaces will be lost or unfunded because the City has no
funding available to build a parking garage to compensate
for lost parking spaces oh or near the beach.
Naugle says the City is playing mathematical games with
the parking situation and he is unwilling to count an imagin-
ary parking garage into the figures until the City comes up
with the financing.
Under an alternate plan proposed by Naugle, metered
parking would have been left on the beach along with a
somewhat smaller pedestrian sidewalk until enough money
was collected from the meters to buy replacement parking
lots in various areas. Metered parking currently brings in
close to $250,000 in yearly revenue for the City.
Commissioner Naugle stated, "Because of the 437
space deficit projected under the City consultant's plan, I
will be fighting over the next two years to ensure that as
many of those spaces as possible will be replaced."


Residential dock

rental ban studied
The Fort Lauderdale City Marine Advisory Board
(MAB) is putting together a committee to study the prac-
tice of single-family homeowners renting their dock space
in the city. Dockage rental is "specifically prohibited in
residential areas zoned R-1 and R-1-A," declares Chapter
11, Section 20, Paragraph (e) of the Code for the City of
Fort Lauderdale. The MAB wants this committee made up
of fellow board members and members of waterfront
neighborhood civic associations to determine whether the
city should enforce or repeal their dockage rental prohi-
bition. Committee chairman Robert Balzer was directed
to report back to the MAB within six months on this issue
which in the words of one board member, is "tearing neigh-
borhoods apart."


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da's mainland. It is expected to create only slight traffic
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A spokesperson for the Marathon office of the Florida
Department of Transportation (DOT), which is supervis-
ing contractors on the bridge repair project, predicted
"only temporary, sporadic one-lane restrictions" will af-
fect normal traffic when work began during the first week
of June.
Most of the repair work is being done under the span,
but some restrictive one'laning will occur occasionally dur-
ing daylight hours at brief intervals. Most one-laning, how-
ever is slated at night.
Work under the $249,900 contract is scheduled on
weekdays only, with no weekend or holiday operations, ac-
cording to Kevin Baker, assistant program manager.
Baker added that DOT officials had met with Monroe
County Tourist Development Council memberswho had re-
quested that the repairs would not interfere with heavy
tourism traffic patterns.
'We anticipate the repair activities on the Seven-Mile
Bridge will result in only minimal delays and will not serious-
ly impact traffic between Marqthon and the Lower Keys
and Key West." said Baker.


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8 Waterfront News July 1988 Habitat


Pond Apple Slough to. be monitored


by Joanne Ford
The Broward County Environmental Quality Board has
announced a plan to monitor the Pond Apple Slough, the
largest remaining remnant of fresh water wetlands along
the New River.
In order to mitigate the environmental impact of high-
way construction through the area, DOT purchased the
11T-acre Pond Apple Slough and three other tracts totall-
ing 106 acres. The slough will be turned over to Broward
County in 1990, when the Parks and Recreation Division
will assume management
The plan grew out of the need to understand the hy-
draulic behavior and water chemistry of the slough in view
of extensive development in the area, according to Victor
Howard, the county's Pollution ControlOfficer. "Manage-
ment decisions for the slough can only be effective if there
is an understanding of the system's behavior."
This effort seeks to answer basic questions about wa-

Lake Threatened
byCraigLustgarten
Congressman E. Clay Shaw (R-ft. Lauderdale) and
others ate yoried about the effects that nutrients from
sugar cane crops and dairy farming are having on the water
quality and wildlife in Lake Ockeechobee and the Ever-
glades.
Currently the water supply intakes of the Lake have a
foul taste and bad odor because of excessive algae growth
in the lake caused mainly by the runoff of phosphorous from
dairy and beef cattle operations as well as the sugar cane
industry..
Brad Jones, an environmentalist with the South Florida
Water Management District, said that three possible solu-
-tions are currently being implemented or considered to
solve'the dairy farming problem. They include fencing off
the cattle from the waterways, building artificial shade ar-
eas, and constructing treatment lagoons for the waste
products.
Jones stated, "We are actively putting into place im-
provements to limit phosphorous inputs this is an ongoing
cooperative effort between the State and the dairy farm-
ers."
Congressman Shawboted that not only is there a prob-
lem with the diary farmers,'but there has been a problem
with the sugar cane growers in the south end of the Lake
who are contributing enormous amounts of nutrients which
are flowing into canals and into the Everglades, which in
turnis resulting in the destructionrof sawgrasses and a
loss of 90 percent of the wading birds from the area.
According to Shaw, the questions that must be an-
swered are how severe is the damage to the Lake, and what
effect will salt intrusion into the area's water wells have on
the drinking supply?
Shaw related, "The Lake is a very important part of
the ecosystem that we are totally dependent upon we
need to look at how much more abuse the system can take
and how much growth it can support."
The Congressman added that he has gotten a bill
passed which will have a computer model made of the situa-
tion in the various waterways of South Florida.
Brad Jones warned that at the present rate of phos-
phorous growth, the Lake could enter into a "hypertroph-
ic" or excessively nutrient enriched state, which would
cause economic changes that would harm game fishing and
reduce the Lake's economic value. Lake Okeechobee is cur-
.rently ecologically productive.

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ter flow in the area of the slough: What are the sources of
fresh waterto the slough? Is there sufficient fresh water
to maintain the biological integrity of the fresh water
swamp?
The Pond Apple Slough is composed primarily of pond
apple, cypress, maple and bay trees covering about 111
acres adjacent to a.59-acre sawgrass marsh. It borders
the South Fork of the New River on the east and south and
a newly constructed segment of 1-595 on the north. The
slough contains an unusual diversity of plants, fish and
wildlife, according to Mike Nichols of EQCB. "There is reg-
ulatory and community concern for the health of the
swamp, due to development in the watershed of the area."
Land development can change the flow of water in the
area. If the freshwater flow is reduced this may cause un-
desirable changes in the kind of plants and animals that in-
habit the slough which may impact a number of threatened
or endangered species.
The EQCB will fund the establishment of tidal stations,
Groundwater recording stations, and chloride sampling lo-
cations, all of which will be set up bythe United States Ge-
ological Survey (USGS). "Although our staff will have
some involvement in the monitoring, the USGS has the ex-
pertise to establish these sites," said Howard. "The money
contributed by this agency $22,000 will come from
our pollution recovery fund rather than from ad valorem
taxes." The maintenance of the system for next fiscal year
is expected to amount to $28,000, which will be split even-
ly between USGS and EQCB.
The three tidal stations, which will record tidal activity
continuously to determine patterns, will be battery-
operated. Eight groundwater recording stations (wells)
will record fluctuating groundwater levels and will be used
to determine groundwater flow in and out of the slough.
Chloride sampling at an unspecified number of locations will
aid in the determination of salinity levels throughout the
area. Department of Transportation (DOT) surveyors will
determine mean sea level (elevation) data and bench marks.
Installation of the system is expected to begin this month
and be completed by mid-August.


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Alligators, crocodiles

and butterflies
The most misunderstood reptiles in south. Florida, alli-
gators and crocodiles will be the subject of Broward Coun-
ty Urban Wildlife Specialist Frank Mazzotti's educational
luncheon program, Wednesday, July 13th, at Fern Forest
Nature Center in Pompano Beach. Mazzotti's discussion on-
the natural history of these members of the crocodilian
family will begin at 11:00 a.m. and cover research being
done on the biology of the animals, and how their life and
population is directly related to the function of this area's
wetlands.
"The National History of Alligators and Crocodiles in
Florida"is the third of seven luncheons in the Broward
County's Parks and Recreation Naturalist Series. Each
program about south Florida's history, flora and fauna will
be held in the air conditioned assembly hall at Fern Forest
NJature'Center, 201" Lyons Road South Pompano Beach.
Participants are urged to bring a bag lunch and chat with
the naturalists afterwards. Coffee and iced tea will be .
provided.
Other programs include:
"Plume Hunting' with historical author Stuart Mclver
on June 29th;
Ferns of South Florida" with Judy Sulser, natural-
ist, Broward County Parks and Recreation on July 6th;
Historian Patsy West's 'Seminoles inBroward Coun-
ty: The Pine Island Legacy," July 20th;
On July 27th, former Delray Beach Naturalist Linda
White will discuss "Beautiful Beguiling Butterflies;"
*'Fern Forest Its Historic Relationship to Cypress
Creek" with Gil MacAdams, naturalist and West Lake Co-
ordinator, on August 3rd;
and, The Tortoise Burrow'with Fem Forest natural-
ist Lisa Miller on August 10th.
As the human population of Florida increases, the con-
flict between man and wildlife for limited resources will
continue.This naturalist luncheon series may help humans
comprehend the complex ecosystem they are disrupting in
south Florida. It could save lives human and other animals.
For reservations call 975-7085.

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Habitat waterfront News Jul T988 9


Sharks surprise scientists


by Jack McClintock
Dr. Churchill McKinney studies sharks--their immune
systems, to be precise-but it isn't sharks she's interested
in. It is the human immune system, which AIDS attacks, and
where cancer can be fought
"In the sixties, the impression came about that sharks
were not susceptible to viruses and didn't get tumors,"
says McKinney, a research associate professor of microbi-
ology and immunology at the University of Miami School of
Medicine.
That raised hopes, and led to research on their immune
systems. It turned out not to be so-many tumors have been
documented in sharks, and we now believe it's just hard to
observe them at sea, where the sick hide or get eaten. But
the research that began for those mistaken reasons is
starting to bear fruit."
In her own work, she has discovered that the shark's im-
mune system has unexpected capacities, which could lead to
better understanding of how fish fight disease. This would
mak&for more efficient farming of catfish, trout and
other fish. It could help us understand how the human
immune system developed and someday result in "better
success in manipulating the human immune system."
Scientists study the immune responses of primitive ani-
mals for several reasons, McKinney says. "The most practi-
cal in this case is as an aid to fish farming. Research has.
been directed toward answering questions such as, 'How
can a fish be immunized against disease?' Since fish are
cold-blooded, how does alteration in environmental temper-
ature affect susceptibility to disease, and can immuniza-
tion and temperature be manipulated to prevent disease?'
The immune response of fish is important for another
reason. The extremely complex, exquisitely controlled im-
mune system of man did not appear all at once, but evolved
over time to become a formidable protective barrier
against disease. Scientists study the immune responses of
primitive animals to determine the natural history of the
system. One scientist linked the evolution of the immune
system to the development of the automobile. If man has
the Rolls Royce model, then fish are still attempting to
drive around in the Model T. By studying the immune sys-
tem of fish, some of the facets of immune function can be
Viewed without the extreme complexity which developed
later."
But why sharks?
S Sharks, a very successful species, appeared more than
100 million years ago and occupy a unique position in evolu-


tion. They lack bone marrow, where cells of the immune sys-
tem are generated in man. Yet they are capable of immune
responses. They can make antibodies and reject grafts,
hallmarks of the two major protective systems of mammali-
an immunity-the lymphocytes and macrophages.
"Lymphocytes ensure that reactions are directed
against foreign invaders, not self tissues," McKinney says.
"They are the generals of the system. In man, lymphocytes
are responsible for directing the protection against all dis-
ease, and they have the ability to remember each encoun-
ter. This ability endows protection following immunization.
'The macrophages also participate in fighting infection
but they lack both the ability to identify and to remember
their confrontation with particular organisms. In man, the
macrophage frequently responds to directions given by
lymphocytes. They could be considered the foot-soldiers of
the system."
The unexpected results of McKinney's work suggest
that the shark macrophage may be able to distinguish be-
tween the shark's own cells and cells from other animals.
"Sharks rely heavily on the macrophage for protection,"
she says. "These cells have the ability to engulf and de-
stroy microorganisms, and under certain circumstances,
the ability to kill other cells. In the shark, macrophages car-
ry out many of the same functions as they do in man."
Most studies of man's immune system's ability to distin-
guish between self and non-self havefocused on the lym-
phocyte, which is'well known for its role in killing foreign
cells, as in rejecting grafts. The ability of the human ma-
crophage to make this distinction has not been extensively
explored.
'What I hope to study is the ability of the shark macro-
phageto distinguish self from non-self. The system is so
complex in the human, it's not easily experimented on there.
I hope that the shark system will provide a means to study
macrophage recognition of foreign cells without the over-
whelming influence of lymphocytes seen in humans," she
says.


Saint Elmo's Fire

by James E. Sullivan
St. Elmo's Fire, which has no fire, is a luminous dis-
charge of electricity from pointed objects such as
masts,yardarms, steeples; and even human hair where
there is a considerable difference in the electrical charge
between the object and the air.
St. Elmo's Fire was regarded with dread by supersti-
tious seamen. It was believed at one time that if the light
from St Elmo's Fire fell upon a man's face, he would die
within 24 hours. Few of the older sailors would dare to look
directly at the phenomenon when it appeared. This odd be-
lief was thought to be.connected with the sightings of the
Flying Dutchman. The name St. Elmo is believed to be, a
corruption of St. Erasmus, a patron saint of Mediterrane-
anseamen.
The Fire does effect electronic navigation receivers.
Noise originating from the outside of a radio receiver.may
be either man-made or natural. Natural noise is caused by
the discharge of static electricity in the atmosphere. An
extreme example is a thunderstorm. Natural noise may also
be caused by a splitting of water droplets which strike the
sails of a vessel, one part of the droplet acquiring a posi-
tive charge and the other negative charge. These charges
gather at points or ridges of the conducting surface and
discharge into the atmosphere creating streams of white-
yellow lights that appear to be fire.
St. Elmo's Fire can also be seen propelling from the
wings of a aircraft. Back in the 50's I was navigating a C-
74 from Mobile, Alabama to Wheelus AFB, Libya. Refuel-
ing at Kindley Bermuda we departed for Lajes in the
Azores. Just passed the point of no return we flew into a
heavy frontal system. For the first time I saw St. Elmo's
Fire leaping from the wing static cords. When I placed my
face into the rubber hood of the APS-9 (Loran A) we were
struck by lightning. The cathode tube flashed white and
died. With over 6000 hours logged in commercial, bomber,
and transport aircraft this was the first and only time I
had been struck by lightning. I had been told that lightning
could not strike an aircraft in flight, but I had also been
told that released reserve officers would not be called
back to active duty.
At Lajes we found a hole the size of a pie pan in the tail
of the C-74 it was easily patched and by replacing a fuse
in the Philco loran it was back on the line.
"When radio receivers are peppered with static,
there'll be lightning and thunder and weather aquatic:'
Selah. .


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10. Waterfront News July 1988


Fishing


MET decides Master Anglers


The Metropolitan South Florida Fishing Tournament
(MET) in May announced the winners of the 53rd touma-
ment's most prestigious series of awards- the.Master An-
gler Awards. The winning anglers were to-have been hon-
ored at the MET's annual Awards Banquet to be held June
28,1988 at the world famous Rod & Reel Club of Miami
Beach.
Rick Gunion of Miami was named Resident Men's Master
Angler. Rick was guided, for the most part, by Captain
Ken Harris of Key West, but also fished with Captain
Ralph Delph of Key West, Captain Skip Bradeen of Islamo-
rada, Captain Brett Dudas of Miami and Captain Bill Cur-
tis also of Miami. In addition, Gunion was awarded the In-
shore Flats Master Award.His top fish included a 109-
pound tarpon entered in the 12--Pound Division, a 38-
pound sailfish (Hall of Fame entry) entered in the 8-Pound
Division, and a 214-pound Shark entered in the Plug Divi-
sion. Gunion faced a tough field of competitors which in-
c luded Mark Zequerira. Jr; of Hialeah, and Forrest Young
of Marathon.
Mark Allen of Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota was
named Non-Resident Men's Master Angler.He also received
the Men's Non-Resident Bluewater Offshore Master An-
gler Award. Allen was guided by Key West Captain's Rob-
ert Trosset, Greg Sherertz and JoseWejebe. His top fish
included a 62-pound 12-ounce sailfish entered in the 20-
Pound Division, a 100-pound eight-ounce tarpon entered in
the Plug Division and a 29-pound eight-ounce black fin
,tuna, winner of the, Fly Division and a 38-pound eight-ounce
amberjack, winner of the Spinning Division.
Mrs. William B. DuVal of Richmond Virginia was named
Non-Resident Women's Master Angler. Mrs. DuVal was
guided in part by Captain Tom Pierce of Key West. Her
top fish was a 30-pound kingfish entered in the Spinning
Division. ,
Thirteen-year old Gregory Earle of Ft. Lauderdale FL,
guided by his father Captain Rick Earle, won the Resident
Junior Men's Master Angler Award, the Resident Junior
Men's Blue Water Offshore Master Angler Award and the
Resident Junior Men's Inshore Flats Master Angler Award.
His top catches included a 139-pound jewfish, winner of
the 20-Pound Division, a 38-pound 8-ounce amberjack en-
tered in the Plug Division, a 135-pound shark entered in
the Spinning Division and a 23-pound 8-ounce jack, winner
of the Junior Division. ,
Rob Fordyce of Miami received the Men's Non-Guided
Master Angler Award, for his exceptional catches without
the services of a professional captain or guide. Rob's top
catches included a 52-pound eight-ounce sailfish, winner of


Sthe 8-Pound Division, a 110-pound tarpon entered in the
Plug Division and an 8-pound bonefish entered in the Fly Di-
Svision.
Jonathon Day of Miami, reigning Jr. Men's Non-Guided
Master Angler successfully defended his title and was
again named this year's Junior Men's Non-Guided Master
Angler. His top catches included a 50-pound kingfish, win-
' ner of the 8-Pound Division, an 84-pound amberjack, win-
ner of the Plug Division, a 25-pound 4-ounce black fin tuna
entered in the Fly Division and a 32-pound permit entered
in the Junior Division,
'Forrest Young of Marathon received the Resident Men's
Blue Water Offshore Master Angler Award. His top
catches included a 99-pound 8-ounce amberjack entered in
the Unlimited Division, a 188-pound mako shark, winner of
the 20-Pound Division and a 33-pound permit entered in
the 8-Pound Division.
Michael Biffel of Downingtown, Pennsylvania was
awarded the Men's Non-Resident Inshore Flats Master
Award. His top fish was a 222-pound shark, winner of the
Plug Division.
Jack Zitt of Ft. Lauderdale was this years winner of
the Bass Master Award. His top fish included a 7-pound 5-
ounce bass entered in the Unlimited Division, an 8-pound


Tampa angler wins

West Toho contest
Douglas Moon Sr. of Tampa, Florida, won his third
Bassing America Grand National Tournament this season.
The two-day double point tournament was held June 11th
and 12th on West Toho, Moon managed a two-day total of
20 pounds, 6 ounces. Moon's other wins came on Toho, Feb-
ruary 28th, and Lake Okeechobee, May 29th.
Steven Biko of Chuluota placed second and claimed big
bass honors for the tournament Biko's stringer weighed-in
at 19 pounds, 6 ounces, and his largest bass tipped the
scales at 6 pounds, 8 ounces. Third place went to Sonny
Byran of Sefner, Florida, with 15 pounds, 5 ounces. Rick
Davidson, also of Sefner, placed fourth with 14 pounds, 1
ounce. In fifth place was Doug Moon Jr, with 13 pounds, 7
ounces.
The final tournament in the Florida region will be the
two-day region final held August 6th and 7th on Okeecho-
bee. Registration will be Friday, August 5th between
4:00 and 6:30 pm at the Ted Carpet Inn, Moore Haven.
There will be a mandatory 7:00 pm safety briefing and
partners pairing.


12-ounce bass entered in the 20-Pound Division, a 5-pound
15-ounce bass entered in the 12-Pound Division, 3-pound
9-ounce bass entered in the 8-Pound Division, a 5-pound 1-
ounce bass entered in the Plug Division and a 7-pound 2-
ounce bass entered in the Spinning Division.
Eight-year old Richelle Knudsen of Islamorada, guided
by her father Captain Ken Knudsen and Captain's David
Purdo and Vinnie Biondoletti also of Islamorada, was for
the second year in a row presented with the Pee Wee
Grand Champion Award for the most first place fish en-
tered in the Pee Wee Division (6). Richelle's top fish in-
cluded a 161-pound tarpon (a new MET record), a 26-
pound 10-ounce permit, a 7-pound 7-ounce mackerel, a 10-
pound 7-ounce bonefish, an 18-pound 6-ounce black fin tuna
and a 58-pound 10-ounce amberjack. To keep her title Ri-
chelle had to face a very tough competitor- ten-year old
Heidi Mason of Miami. Heidi's top fish included 35-pound 4-
ounce kingfish, 46-pound 4-ounce sailfish and a 10-pound
8-ounce snapper.


'Fishing on the Island"
Deerfield Island Park (a Broward County Parks and
Recreation Division Regional Park) located in the Intra-
coastal Waterway at Hillsboro Boulevard, starts it's free
July-August-September Fishing Contest from 9AM-
12noon on Sunday, July 3.
The contest, for ages 6-14, gives awards at the end of
the three-month, three-event competition for the largest
single catch, and the largest total catch. Cane poles and
bait are provided free. The remaining quarterly competi-
tion is scheduled on August 21 and September 18.
Free boat transportation will be provided from the
dock of the Riverview Restaurant from 9-9:30AM. Reser-
vations are required call 428-5474, Mon-Fri, between
8AM and 4 PM
Deerfield Island
June 5, 1988'
(Trophy) Longest Single Catch---Martin Vaughn Age:
14
Boca R. Middle School 12" snapper caught May 8th
(Trophy) Longest Catch--Craig Fuller Age: 8 Deer-
field Bch Elem. School 36" caught April and May
(Ribbons) First Place "Age" Group Total Catch "6"
years/Sean Augenstein "7" years/Jason Kirk "8" years./
Craig Fuller "9" years/Kyle Crawford "10" years/Derek
Vaugh "12" years/Desiree Portalatin "13"-years/Martin
Vaughn "14" years/Eddie Getierrez
(Trophy) Sportsmanship-Casey Fuller


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Fishing WateofontNews Jy 1 19


2nd Annual "Catch

A Cure" Tournament
set for September
by Barbara Singer
Fishing enthusiasts can ready their rods and reels and
prepare to hit the high seas for the "Catch a Cure" Fish-
ing Tournament, scheduled for September 23-25, 1988 at
Miami Beach Marina, 300 Alton Road. The toumament, now
in its second year, benefits the Diabetes Research Insti-
tute at the University of Miami School of Medicine.
This family oriented, deep water ard bay fishing event
features cash prizes, trophies and evening festivities.
Over $8,500 and trophies will be awarded to top anglers
in the Overall Winner classifications and for the heaviest
fish in several categories in the Challenge Fish Division. In
addition there will be trophies for the family accumulating
the highest number of points and the top finishers in the-
Junior Division.
Entry fee for this two-day fishing event is $50.00 for
adults and $25.00 for children 6 to 14 and senior citizens.
Foradditional information and registration forms call
(305) 477-3437, or Toll Free in Florida, 1-800-330-
3437.

$25,000 tournament to

benefit dialysis fund
A one-day "fun" tournament offers a lot of cash and
prizes in July. The Fourth Annual $25,000 Dolphin Tourna-
ment kicks things off with a party for participants Satur-
day, July 9th, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Shirttail Charlie's Re-
staurant on New River in Fort Lauderdale. On Sunday the
S10th anglers will be fishing for sailfish, marlin, wahoo and
tuna along with dolphin. A $25,000 prize will be awarded
to the competitor who lands an International Game Fishing
Association all-tackle world record dolphin (Coryphaena
hippurus).
Check-out time is from 8 to 9 a.m. Sunday from Port
Everglades Inlet. All boats must have visual checkout with a
pre-designated stake boat. At the end of the day, all lines
must be in by 3:30 p.m. with a weigh-in at Riverfront Mari-
na (on New River just west of the FEC railroad bridge) be-
Stween 4:30-5:30 p.m. A cookout, awards party and fund
\ raising auction will start next door at Shirttail Charlie's at
6 p.m.
The tournament will benefit the North Broward Neph-
rology Patient's Fund for those on kidney dialysis therapy.
A $40 per angler donation will entitle each contestant with
a t-shirt, visor and dinner at the cookout following the
tournament. .


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Two-person team
Bass Fishing results
Quiet Waters Park, Deerfield Beach
June 11, 1988
S1st Place Team: Bill McCauley* (Deerfield Beach) and
Robert King (Tamarac), 10 pounds 12 ounces, $200.
2nd Place Team: Dave Chapman (Deerfield Beach)
and Bobby Taylor (Pompano Beach); 7 Ib., 4 oz.; $150.
3rd Place Team: Ron Dhaveloose (Ft Lauderdale) and
Claude Sauevel (Pompano Beach), 5 Ib., $75.
*McCauley also $50 for the best catch, a 6-pound 2-
ounce bass.
Park manager Bob Newland reported that 58 competi-
tors fished from 29 boats at Quiet Waters raising $605
for the Alzheimers Daycare Center of Deerfield Beach: He
said these bass tournaments are held quarterly at the park
with the next one planned for September.


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Boynton Beach

Kiwanis results
June 11 &12,1988
Grand Prize Winner: Joe Dabrowski, Lake Park, 64
points, $5000.
Top Dolphin: Joe Dancin, Boca Raton, 33 pounds.
Top Kingfish: Mark Brisson, Boynton Beach, 50 Ib.
*Top Wahoo: Bruce Moore, Boyton Beach, 33 pounds.
Top Catch for Lady Angler: Diane Poirier, Fort Lau-
. derdale, 29 Ib. dolphin.
'*Junior Angler Award: Richard Moore, Boynton Beach,
33 lb. wahoo.
Approximately 300 anglers aboard 85 boats raised
$8,000 to 10;000 ftrthe Boynton Beach Artificial Reef
Program and the Kiwanis Club,
This was the 8th Annual Kiwanisfishing Tournament


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12 Waterfront News July 1988


Swimming


Swimming flume built with '84 Olympic's profits


COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO.-The $2.1 million Inter-
national Center for Aquatic Research and the U.S. Swim-
ming Flume will be dedicated at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday,
May 14, at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado
Springs. The 6,500-square foot building will be completed
in early June.
The flume cost $1.025 million and is the first major ex-
penditure from the revenue generated at the 1984 Olym-
pic Games in Los Angeles. That money is to be used in the
long range development of America's Olympic athletes. The
flume was paid for with three consecutive grants from the


U.S. Olympic Foundation.
The flume weighs 62.5 tons and will hold 60,000 gallons
of water. The apparatus will develop a current of water
that can vary in speed from zero to 2.5 meters per second.
It will also feature a pressure chamber that can vary alti-
tude effect in the flume from sea level to 7,000 feet
The flume has three underwater viewing windows, one
on each side and one on the bottom. Cameras can be set up
at each window to video tape a swimmer's stroke. The tape
can then be digitized on computer and a propulsion chart of
the stroke is generated.


State lifeguard tournament August 22


by Jack Yuken
Lifeguards representing beach patrols from both
coasts of Florida will compete at the Florida Beach Patrol
-Chiefs Association's 4th Annual State Lifeguard Touma-
ment at Haulover Beach in Dade County on August 22,
1988.
The tournament will challenge lifeguards from through-
out the state to compete in six events that test actual
ocean rescue skills in use daily on Florida beaches.
"Our tournament is unique," said Florida Beach Patrol
Chiefs Association President Bill Terry. "All six of our
events are designed to utilize techniques and procedures


used by every Florida Ocean'Lifeguard during rescue situa-
tions."
Events include a one mile doubles row, one person res-
cue,-paddle board rescue, line pull rescue, beach run relay,
and ocean medley relay.
-Admission is free. Events begin at 4pm. The public is
cordially invited to attend.
Founded in 1983, the Florida Beach Patrol Chiefs Asso-
ciations, goals are to act as a statewide clearinghouse of
information concerning beach safety, the ocean environ-
ment, and marine topics while working.to upgrade the pro-
fessional standards of Florida lifeguarding.


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The National Swimming Foundation also granted
$600,000 to build the International Center for Aquatic
Research. Included in the building's non-flume space are
two stories of scientific operations. A running treadmill is
available along with a special room for video tape analysis.
More than $525,000 in laboratory equipment will also
be featured in the building. Abbott Laboratories of Ab-
bott, Ill., donated a $250,000 blood chemistry analyzer
and Morgan Instruments of Boston, Mass., contributed a
$65,Q00 cardiopulmonary analyzer. There will also be
$200,000 in analysis equipment, computer software, com-
puters and physiological testing equipment in the building.



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Power Boats Waterfront News July 1988 13


67.9 nautical speed record set for Miami-Nassau-Miami


by John Crouse
Miami, Fl- Real estate developer Tom Gentry of Hono-
lulu, Hawaii, driving with his new bridge at his elbow, cov-
ered more distance faster than any powerboater in histo-
ry, June 3rd, when he and his 110' English designed and
built 11,460 hp Eagle established a new nautical record for
the 362.3 statute miles from Miami to Nassau, Bahamas
and return.
With the giant aluminum deep vee hull's uniquely ar-
ranged twin 3480 hp German MTU diesels and center
mounted 4500 hp American made Lycoming turbine engines
working in perfect unison, Gentry averaged a record 67.9
mph for the distance, successfully launching the first leg
of an ambitious three part record series.
After a day's delay because of a weather front moving
in from Cuba, the Eagle and its nine man and one woman
crew left Miami's sea buoy at dawn, to give the world's
largest speedboat its first battle test.
Other than a ten minute slow-up when the turbine engine
temporarily flamed out when the Eagle did a steep turn off


Nassau's Paradise Island and caused an oil flow sensor to
shut it off, the trip over 3-5' seas was hailed a classic suc-
cess, taking a record 5 hours and 20 minutes.
On the way back to Miami Gentry chatted with TV star
Don Johnson at his mobile home on a Camadian movie set, on
Eagle's Comsat satellite telephone. Johnson was to have
run with him on Friday, but prohibitive six figure insurance
rates, killed the ideal! Hotel man Bill.Marriott, an avid off-
shore powerboat racing fan, also had to cancel out at the
last minute due to business obligations.
The previous powerboat record from Miami to Nassau
and return was set in last year's Miami-Nassau-Miami Sea-
race by Miami boatbuilder Ted Theodoli in his own make 63'
diesel powered Magnum Maltese Magnum which took
6:10.30 and averaged 58.7 mph using twin 1825 hp Italian
CRM diesels.
Crew aboard the Eagle which was designed by Eng-
land's Peter Birkett, was Gentry, his new bride Diane, son
Norman, navigator Jeff Brown, project co-ordinator John
Connor, MTU diesel engine specialist Eckhard Rastig, boat


company executive Gus Anastasi, and Journalists John-
Crouse (Powerboat), Bill Sisson (Soundings), and Dan
Pusateri (Boating).
Round 2 of the most ambitious program ever attempt-
ed by an offshore racer, Gentry and his sea monster will
attempt to break the two year old Miami-New York record
of 19:31.20 set in 1985 by Columbian George Morales in
the 46' four-engined English Cougar catamaran Maggie's
Special.
Current plans call for a Wednesday or Thursday for the
1257 mile trip which the Gentry may trim to under 1100
miles by going non-stop.
If successful on that leg, Gentry will point his state of
the art sea machine eastward sometime in mid-June for the
grand finale of his June assault by sea, heading out from
New York Harbor's Ambrose light for England's Bishop's
Rock lighthouse, 3386 miles away to break the 1986 mark
of 3 days. 8 hours, and 31 minutes set by English airline
and record tycoon Richard Branson in his 72' MTU diesel
powered monohull Challenger II.


Ft. Myers-Offshore Powerboat Regatta results
by Bob Black driver of High Roller who was also assessed a three mir
FORT MYERS BEACH, FL May 24--Perfect weather penalty for an illegal start. However, in this case, the p
test jury upheld the Chief Referee's decision knocking i
conditions led to high speeds and a race accident-free day Rollerfrom first to second place.:The beneficiary of
of powerboat racing at the Southwest Florida/Allen decision was Feli Serralles ne o
Group'Offshore 150 Saturday. he race started at Fort decision was felix Serralles in Miss Don 0 Rum who
yroupOs hore 150 Saturday. The race tainted at Fort ished 12 seconds behind Akoury but was awarded first
Myers Beach and continued neaft Sanibel andEstemo s-f ter the three minutes was adcedon. Both boats avera
lands, offering a great view fr the tens of thousands of over91 miles per hour. Marathon winner Milton Lipschul
spectators on the beaches, their boats and roof tops. Lip-Ship took third in the Pro-Stock class.
The crowd was treated to an extremely close finish in The calm waters of Cape Coral helped every class
the Open class as Bob Kaiser in Swiftsure Motor Yachts the exception of the Superboats. All four entries exp
nipped the father/son team of John and J.D. D'Elia by a enced engine troubles despite waves under one foot
mere five seconds. It was Kaiser's second close victory in
as many races-he edged out Canada Homes Challenge by
16 seconds in the National Circuit opener in Marathon, FL 792-9458- Don 791-4846 Joyce Mik
onrApril 30. The Canadian boat, with LorneLeibel at the Davie, FL33314 Ft. Lauderdale, FL33312
helm, was also in contention here as he and throttleman BobBoats Registrations
Idoni finished a minute behind the D'Elia's Special Edition AUTO TAGS Duplicate Tes Rernewans
All three Open boats averaged over 96 miles per hour on Mobile Homes Trailers
the calm but curvy course. & TITLES Mo torHomes Motorcycles
Despite crossing the finish line first Kaiser's victory & BOATS *Notary Public Out of State
was taken away from him for several hours when he was is- Transfer
sued a three minute penalty-forjumping,the start. An ap- : .. 523-1352- Ken 581-5233
peal was entered and the protest jury overruled the Chief 1954 N.W. 9th Avenue Southland Shopping Cent
Referee's decision giving the victory back to Kaiser and (Powerline) 1021 State Road 84
throttleman Errol Lanier. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33311 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
A similar appeal was filed by Pro-Stock's Tom Akoury, Hollywood 989-4464 6 locations to serve you
U U


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UNIVERSAL







14 waterfrontNews July 1988 Marine Community

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wedi
T .. o he tide table datum i
at the Andrews Aveni:
adjusted for other loIcal
S_ Adjustments to Tide Tal
corner of this calendar
information
July 88 inle1
aterfrovt
*Slg l,. Boca Inlet .....:
Gultrem Sallin Club Bn to Ft. Laud. R call Deerfield Beach
S Swm Club, through August6 MissionBay, Boca Raton. b. ag*e e k Hillsboro Inletg .i
Call488-2001. In the Tide Tables in blue NOTEi the Bahia Mar.... n
*Muslc: Champloif, 9pm-12:30 m, PlerTop, Per66 times are military and the tide heights are inrt Everlades
Marina, Ft Laud. Feet above or below "mean low tide". A figure Port Everglades
above the time indicates a high tide whereas i"r Dania Cut Off.
HIGH +2.5' +2.5' 1224 Southwest 1st Avenue figure below is a low tide. Call 524-9450 for more Davie Bridge...
TIME 0525*1115*1748*2342 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315 information about the tide tables Haulover Inlet
LOW. -0.5' -0.6' Phone: (305) 524-9450 Government Cut
3 4 .6
SMoon In Equator South Florida BC
U.S. Independence Day 7:30 p.m., Hollywa
Marine Council, 5:30-7:30 p.m., call for Call 923-0654.
Beach Blues July 4th Weekend, SeaFair, Dade County location at 856-0206. Summer Naturalis
*Deerfield Island Fishing Tournament Dania. Call Save the Sea Turtle Foundation at Loose Tuesday Win'dsurfing, South Florida", t
Series, through September 18th. Call 563-2200. Spm-dusk,South Beach, Fort Lauderdale. Call Center, Pompano B
428-5474 Independence Windsurfing Race, 473-0238. Course: Biololgt
Riverside Park Civic Association, 4p.m. Jupiter.Call 407-744-8340. -: Course: Aquaculture, 6:30-9:30 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.,No%
Riverside Park pavilion, Ft. Lauderdale. *4h ofJuly at Miami Yacht Club,2 p.m. 10 Mondays through September 12th, Nova Center, Dania. Call,
Swimming Camp, through July 9th, Mission p.m. Call 377-9877. University Oceanographic Center's Institute of Palm Beach Co
Bay Aquatic Training Center, Boca Raton. Call Regatta Time in Abaco: The Green Turtle Cup Marine and Coastal Studies. Call 920-1909. County.Call 286-01
488-2001. Race. Call 800-432-5034. U.S. Olympic Yachtin Trials, through July Boating courses
R.J. Mia Wreck Dive, noon, call the South Music: Pops by the Bay, evening, Miami Marine 16th; Newport, R.I.; San Diego, Cal.; Lighthouse Poft
Florida SCUBA Dive club 925-7877. Stadium. Marblehead, Mass. 922-5043. i
HIGH +2.3' +2.1 +2.2' +1.6' +2.1' +2.0' +20
TIME 0004*0637*1222*1858 0056*0729*1323*1953 0149*0827*1424*2052 0244*0
LOW -0.3' -0.5' -0.3' -0.3' -0.3' -0.1'
'10 11 12 Moon farthest north of Equator 13 Sa Explored
$25,000 Dolphin Tournament, weigh-in Gulfstream Sailing Club meeting, 8 p.m., p.m., 800 So. Fed
0Lauderdale Isles Yacht Club, Ft. Laud. Calla
4:30-5:30 p.m., Riverfront Marina, New River, Whdbey island Rae Week, through July Lauderdale Isles Yacht Club, Ft.Laud. Call Call 942-8500.
Ft. Lauderdale. Call 463-3480.Race Week, through July 523-1762. Sum NaturO
SSummer Novice Fun Cruiser Race Series, 17, Washington. Call 703-9337. Hollywood Yacht Club dinner meeting, Call and Corcodles
call Guifstream Sailing Club at 523-1762. *Marine Sector Broward Sheriff's Possee, for time and location at 474-3710. Center, PompanB.o
Port Everglades Rowing Club, 1 p.m., 7:30. p.m., Zeley Hanger, Ft Lauderdale Bassmasters, 7:30 p.m., Victoria Station, Broward SheU
Holland Park boathouse, Hollywood. Call Executive Airport. Call 739-7666. Dadeland Mall. Call 665-7795. Pompano Beach RI
761-7640. Day Camp, 7:30 a.m.,-5:30 p.m., Salvation Underwater Photography Society, 7:30 SAIL club, 733C
Steamship Historical Society, for time and Army, 844 W. Broward Blvd.; Ft. Laud. Call pm, Golden Glades Howard Johnson, North Miami Room, Ft. LaUd. Ct
location call 271-1527. 524-6995. Through August 12th. Beach, Call 722-6603. SouthtFloridaF
Swimming Camp, through July 16, Mission Boating courses in: Ft. Laud. call 463-0034, i Port Everglades Rowing Club meeting, 7 p.m., Hollywood VFW'
Bay Aquatic Training Center, Boca Raton. Call Hallandale 454-9944, Lake Worth 848-0756, p.m., Nathaniel's New River Tavern, Ft. Laud. Antique & Classlc
488-2001. Pompano Beach 781-1265. Call 761-7640. Isles Yacht Club, Ft..La
HIGH +1.8' +2.0' +1+2.0 +2.0' +1.8' +2.0' +1
0104*0636*1319*1931 0157*0730*1410*2022 0247*0817*1456*2106 0332*09(
TIME +0.2' -0.4' +0.2' -0.4' +0.2' -0.4' -0.1'
LOW

17 1 8 Moon .. pe1 9 M-oon---I,.no 20Iqutoo--

Miami Riven
SFlorida Yacht Center Assoclatlon, 7:30 pm. SeaFair 5:30 pm, location
Dania. Call 525-0831.
CAt-44 Salling Club, 7:30 p.m., Pierce St. Annex, Ft. Summer Naturalls:
*Pl Hbor Sur s A n,* Blue Madli Toumament, through July 22nd, Bimini. Laud. Call 755-3965. in Broward Count
PLein Harbor Survivors Association, 3 p.m., Amecan Sallboat Bend Civic Association, 7:30 p.m., Bethel River Oaks Civic Association, 7:30 pm, 11 a.m., Fern Fore
Legion Hall, 171 SW St., Pompano Beach.Call Church, SW11 Ave., at 2 St. Call462-5159. Westminister Church, 1100 Sw 21 st, Ft. Laud. Beach. Call 975-70
SBiscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association race #7. Bcayne'ay Yacht Racing association, cruising Call 524-8610 *Palm BeachC
Call the Coral Reef Yacht Club at 444-4571. race #7. CalBoating Courses in: Hollywood call 961-4147, North Palm Beac
Lower Ialamorada Dive, call DIGA at 235-5069. Boating Courses in: Hollywood call-961-4147,
Longltude 80 FunCupforwindsufng, Melbourne. Call Boating Courses. Danla 462-6981, Ft. Laud. Plantation 739-7666, Deerfield Beach *Sea Explorer Sh
407-773-1720. 463-0034, Hallandale 454-9944, Lake Worth 479-0946, Ft. Lauderdale 525-4461 and 800 So., Federalt
SSwim Camp, through July 23rd, Mission Bay, Boca 848-0756 Pmpano Beach781-1265 463-0034. 942-8500.
Raton. Call488-2001. 848-0756, Pompano Beach 781-1265. 463-0034. 942-8500.
HIGH .+1.7' +1.9' +1.7' +1.8' +1.6' +1.7'
TIME 0610*1152*1818 0014*0647*1232*1858 0051*0726*1316*1940 0128*08q
LOW +0.1' 0.0' +0.1' +0.1'0.0.1' +0.2' +0.

24s 25: 26 Moon farthest south of Equltor 27
SEcologically Zoned: People and places of
South Florida Historical Museum, 101 W. Flagler Deerfeld Island Pi
Swim Camp, through July 30, Mission Bay, St., Miami, through July 29. Loose Tuesday Wndsurlng, 5 pm-dusk South Beach, Sea Eplo S
Boca Raton. Call 488-2001. Waterfront Property Owners Association, Ft Laud. Call 473-0238. Federal Hwy., Pompap
Gulfstream Sailing Club Ocean Fleet 7:30 pm, Nathaniel's New River Tavern, Ft. *Steamship Historical Soclely,8pm, call 533-5114 for *SummerNaturall*
Single-handed Race, Round-the-Buoys, 11 am, Laud. Call 462-4629. location. am, Fern Forest Na
call 583-9505 Pompano Marine Advisory Board, 2 pm, 1201 NE Summer DayCamp, 9 am-5 pm, (M-F) through August 975-7085.
SJazz, 1-5 pm, Cafe 66, Pier 66 Marina, Fort Ave., call 786-4106 or785-1447. 19th, for nearest Broward County Park site call usc: Blly Prest
Lauderdale, with more live entertainment7-11 Boating courses in: Palm Beach call 563-PARK. Exchange, Cra
pm. 848-0756, Lake Worth 832-9902, Pompano Boating courses in: Deerfield Beach call Boating Courses
SNarcotics Anonymous, 11 am, 971 So. Dixie Beach 781-1265, Ft. Lauderdale 463-0034 and 4790946, Ft. Lauderdale 462-4497, Lighthouse Pt.
Hwy., Pompano Beach, call 476-9297 Hallandale 454-9944. Plantation 739-7666,Hollywood 961-4147. 391-3600.
HIGH +1,6' +1.8' +1.7' +1.9' +1.8' +2.1' "*+21
TIME 0443*1131808 0011*0542"1230*1845 0109*0641*13251938 0202*07
-0.1' +0.5' -0.2' +0.3' -0,3' +0.2'
LOW
aWme: AIIUrW F Avenue trndge over New Hiver at j ean low water utlngm savings i iii


*\








alendar & Tide Tables NeJuy 1988 15

esday Thursday Friday Saturday
based on the New River 1pegee
liased on the New River Regatta Time in Abaco: Treasure Cay Trophy 4 in pergee
SBridge. Data can be Race, Abaco, Bahamas. Call 800-432-5034. Broward Coinry Swim Meet, Pine Crest
ile" in the low right hand Hillsboro net Sailing Club July 4h Cruse, School, Ft. Lauderdale. Call 492-4173.
Call 524-9450 for more through July 4th, to Freeport or Elliot Key. Call Regatta Time in Abaco: 4th Annual Sallorman
S579-6955. Olympics, Treasure Cay. Call 800-432-5034.
TIME ADJUSTIWENTS TO TIDE TABLE Gulfstream Sailing Club Summer Cruise to Tarpon Tide Tournament,Boca Grande Pass.
the Bahamas and Florida Keys, through July Call 813-964-2232.
Hit h Low 17th. Call 922-9989. Exhibit Audubon/The South Florida Prints,
+ V0 Minutes ........... .......... +17 Pensacola International Billfish Tournament, through September 25th, Historical Museum of
through July 2nd, Pensacola Big Game Club. Call South Florida, Miami.
..*.................. +1 ................... ...... ..... +11 904-456-6666. Suncoast Offshore Gran Prix in Sarasota,
..................... -3 .......... ..... ..... ...... .... -50 Music: Herble Mann, through July 2nd, through July 4th, Call 813-388-4411.
.................. ..2 .................................-18 Musicians Exchange, near Riverwalk, Ft. .Cozumel Dive trip, through July 8th call DIGA
....... .. .... ...4 ............ ............ .. -62 Lauderdale Dive Club at 235-5069.
...................... +4 ..................................+28
.. ........... +4J ............................... .... +40 HIGH +2.1' +2.3' +2.2'
+33 ................................. +39 TIME. 0452*1033*1711*2315 0544*1126*1804
M :34 OW -0.2' -0.7' -0.3' -0.6'
i (Miami) ..... .. ... ................................... -56 LOWV -0.2' -0.7' -0.3' -0.6'
Last quarter Moon nty Marine 8 Age Group Invitational Swim Meet Mission
BKIDivers Club meeting, Broward County Marine Advisory Bay Aquatic Center, Boca Raton. Call
od Beach Howard Johnson. Committee, 2 p.m., Secret Woods Nature 488-2001. Through July 10.
Center, New River, Ft. Lauderdale. Call *. Broward Archaeological Society, 8 p.m., *$25,000 Dolphin Tournament kickoff party, 5
LUincheon Series: "Ferns of 357-8124. County Commission Meeting Room, 4th Floor, p.m., Shirttail Charlies, Ft. Lauderdale. Call
1 am., Fern Forest Nature Fort Lauderdale Marine Advisory Board, 7 Governmental Center, 100 So. Andrews Ave., 463-3480.
each, Call 975-7085. p.m. City Hall. Ft. Lauderdale. Call 749-0851. Music: Pops by the Bay, evening with Florida
cat Indicator Organisms, Eastern Shores Yacht Club, 7:30 p.m., Seaside Stretch 'n' Stroll, 8-10 a.m., Birch PhilaonOrchestra, MamiMin Stadim.
University Oceanographic Winston Towers Marina, Miami Beach. Call State Park, Ft. Lauderdale. Call 761-5383. Call, ami marine 5iu
920-1909- 932-0720. Stranahan House Friday Social, 6-8:30 Call 561 h 2
Iiuty Swim Meet, Martin Course; Marine Chemistry, 6:30-9:30 p.m., p.m., New River, Ft. Lauderdale. Call Gulfstream Sailing Club Summer Sunfish
33Nova University Oceanographic Center, Dania. 524-4736 series #2, 11:30 a.m., Independence Bay Lake.
Sin: Boca Raton 391-3600, Call 920-1909. Music: Kenny Rankin,8:30 p.m., through July West Pal Bech Drift Div, noon call
it 971-0648, Hollywood DIGA Dive Club meeting, 8:15p.m., 113 9th Musicians Exchange, Riverwalk, Ft. South FloridSCU Divers Club t 292.
/ Ave and Quail Roost Rd., Miami. Call 235-5069. Lauderdale. South Florda SCUBA Divers Club at 972-1292.
+2.0' +1.9' +1.9' +1.8' +1.9' +1.8' +2.0'
126*1528*2155 0340*1026*1634*2300 0440*1126*1736 0003*0540*1224*1836
1.3' 0.0' -0.3' +0.1' -0.3' +0.2' -0,3'
Nw Moon 14 15 16
ihlp #25.9 meeting, 7:30
eai.Hwy., Pompano Beach.
Hlllsboro Inlet Sailing Club meeting, 8 p.m.,
lLuncheon Series: Alligators SeaGarden Resort, A1A, Pompano Beach. Cal 564-5730.
International Yachtsmen Association, 7:30 p.m.,
11~ asit. Fern Forest Nature Lauderdale Isles Yacht Club. Call 920-3555. 1 Miami Summer Boat Show, 7-11 p.m., through July Dolphin Only Tournament, weigh-in at Lauderdale
each. Call 975-7085 Council of American Master Mariners luncheon 20th, Miami Beach Convention Center Madna & Lighthouse Point Marina. Call 772-2754.
Club. mergtlgi 7:30 p.m., meeting, noocall for location at 943-2038 Miami Yacht Club meeing,8 p.m.; call 377-9877. Hilkbor lInltSalling Club Ten Races, Quiet Waters ^
e'.entrr.Calt 942-5985 Fort Laude lalieBot Club, 8 p.m. 800 NE 21st St, Boal Flotilla from Pompano Beach to Bimlml call Park.
p., eria e e WiltonManors CaH 792-2169. 942-8500 American Merchant MArine Veterans meeting, 1
., onference Marine Task Force of the Ft. Laud. Chamber of *St Petersburg Yacht Clubs Fleet Captains Cruie, call p.m., Marine Engineers Complex, 2 W. Dixie Hwy.,Dania,
ill 491&3327. Commerce, 11:30 a.m., 208 SE 3rd Ave. 813-822-3873 through July 17th. Call 925-5869.
latseAnglers meeting, 7:30 U.S. Olympic Rowing Team Trials, through Region 4 State Swimming Champidnships, through Music: Pops by the Bay, Miami Marine Stadiim. Call
ialP: Call 565-3374. July 17th, Mission Bay, Boca Raton. 392-5443.
at Society, 8 p.m. Lauderdale August 15th, Seattle, Washington and Hanover, Music: Angela Bofil, through July 16th, Musicians *Navy SeaBees Veterans luncheon, 1700 N. Federal
ud.Call 581-8823 New Hampshire. Exchange, Riverwalk, Ft Laud. Hwy., Ft. Laud. Call 781-4237.

8' +2.0' +1.8' +2.0' +1.8' +2.0' +1.8' +1.9'
14*1540*2147 0414*0948*1622*2227 0454*1030*1700*2302 0533*1110*1740*2339
-0.3' +0.1'" -0.3' +0.1' -0.2' +0.1' -0.1'

21* Ft. Laud. Boardsalling Association, 7:3022 23
p.m., Riverside Hotel, Las Olas Blvd, Ft. Laud.
Calf 473-0238.
Navy League, 6:30 pm, Lighthouse Point First Quarter Moon;
Ioordinating Committee, Yacht Club. Call 785-2216.
all 856-0206. DIGA Dive Club meeting, 8:15 pm, 113 Ave Ultimate Yacht Race series, through July Gulfstream Summer Sunfish Series #3, 11:30
A;uncheon Series: Seminoles at Quail Roost Rd., Miami, Call 235-5069 30, San Francisco. (Televised on NBC, August am, independenceBay ake. Call 523-1762.
#lThe Pine Island Legacy, Jacksonville Kingfish Tournament.Write: 7, 4-5 pm.) One-day Senior Swim Meet, Hall of Fame
st Nature Center, Pompano P.O. Box #4, Atlantic Beach, FL 32233, Stranahan House Friday Social, 6-8:30 pm, Pool y Ft. Laud. call a o 764-4822
35 through July 22. New River, Ft. Laud. Call 524-4738. F. Lud.wn, Sall 7ff64-42.
nty Swim Meet,11 & over, Theatre: Dead Wrong, 8 pm, through August Music: Roy Buchanan, 8:15 pm, through July Regatta BDow sland Bafsin, Txs. Call
Call 626-8021. 7, Off Broadway, Wilton Manors, 23, Musicians Exchange, Riverwalk, Ft. Laud. 51i2-937-6193
i #258-meeting, 7:30 p.m., Boating courses in: Hollywood call 961-4147, Seaside Stretch 'n' Stroll, 8-19 am, Birch *Music: The Future 9:4pm-2:30 am, Cafe
Iwy., Pompano Beach. Call Ft. Lauderdale 463-0034, Plantation' State Park. Call 761-5383. 66, Pier66 Marina Ft. Laud
739-7666, Lake Worth 848-0756 Broward County Event Hotline: 765-4468., er Mana, t. Lau
+1.6' +1.6' +1.6' +1.6' +1.6' +1.6' +1.7'
7*1402*2024 0207*0852*1455*2115 0255*0940*1549*2209 0346*1034*1651*2308
1' +0.3' +0.1' +0.5' 0.0' +0.5' 0.0' +0.5'

S f28 29 Full Moon 30 Moon In perigee
28 29 ,,,,o. 30 "oo"'",'","

lk Nature Walk, 8-8:30 am to 11 Port Everglades Propeller Club, 7 pm, for location ca
522-1182.
9258 meeting, 7:30 pm, 800 So. Ft. Laud. Boat Club, 7 pm, for location call 431-7239
Beach. Call 942-8500. Eastern Shores Yacht Club, 7:30 pm, Winsto
'Luncheon Series Butterflies, 11 Towers Marina, Miami Beach. Cal 932-0720. ulfstream Sailing Club Ft. Laud. to Bimlnl Race,
re Center, Pompano Beach. al Marine Council, 7:30 am, 147 Miracle Mile, Cora call 583-9505. Cat Island Regatta, through August 1, Nw eight,
Gables. Call 856-0206. Music: McCoy Tyner, through July 30, 8:30-10;30 Cat Island, Bahamas. Call 1-800-32-SPORT.
;8:30 pm & 10:30 p, Musicians Tarpon River Civic Association, 7:45 pm, Calva pm,Muslclans Exchange, Riverwalk Ft. Laud. Junior Nationals swim meet, through August 3,
't Laud. Church, 706 SW 6 St, Ft. Laud. Call 763-6760. 1988 American Fishing Tackle Manufacturers Justus High School Orlando. Ca11764-4822.
in: Hollywood call 922-5043. Boating courses courses in: Hollywood cl Association Show, Las Vegas (NEV) ConventionCenter, Parot Jungle tri Dad County, call 392-1492
through July 31st Music: Dion, 7 & 10.30 pm, Sunrise Musical theatre.
971-0648, Boca Raton 961-4147, Ft. Lauderdale 463-0034, Pompan Music:he Future"9:40 pm-1:30 am, Cafe 66, Per 66 Music: Chuc Cantalamaa, 1-Spm, Pier 66 Marina
Beach 946-7594, Plantation 739-7666. Marina, Ft Laud. Poolside Bar, Ft. laud.
,0' +2.4' +2.2' +2.4' +2.3' +2.5' ,+2.4' 2.5'
,0*1421*2030 0255*0835*1514*2120 0345*0929*1606*2206 0435*1021*1656+2254



-0.5' 0.0' -0.5' I 0.0' -0.6' -0.4' -0.7'
__x | ;


* Broward County Event Hotline 765-4468.







16 wterront News Jul 1988 Sailing


New Race organized to break transatlantic sailing record


by Patricia Secrist.
MONTVALE, N.J. -- Sponsors of The BOC Challenge
Single-Handed Round-the-World Race have announced the
details of a new transatlantic race in 1991.
The BOC Transatlantic Challenge will enable yachts
participating in the round-the-world race to compete

U.S. Olympic yachting
Olympic Trials: 470 (M&W)/Flying, Dutchman, July 5-
16, Fort Adams State Park, Newport R.I.
Sailboard/Tornado, July 5-16, Fort Adams State
Park, Newport, R.I.
Soling/Star, July 5-16, San Diego Yacht Club,'San
Diego, Calif.
Finn, July 5-15, Eastern Yacht Club, Marblehead, Mass.:
Team Leader: Andrew T. Kostanecki, New Cannan,
Conn.


against each other across the North Atlantic and to at-
tempt to break the monohull record for a crossing from
Ambrose Light Tower (New York) to the Lizard (office
southwest coast of Great Britian).
The BOC Round-the World Race will end in Newport
around early May 1991. A feeder sprint race from New-
port, Rhode Island, to Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, will
then start on Sunday, May 26. The BOC Transatlantic
Challenge will begin a few days later and end at Plymouth.
The boats pmay be sailed single-handed or crewed in the
transatlantic event. Other monohull yachts may also be in-
vited to participate in the race. All competitors will be
provided with a satellite tracking system.
"For some it will be a fun race, perhaps an opportunity
to involve sponsors or friends aS crew," said Nigel Rowe of
The BOC.Group. "For others it will be a serious attempt
at the record. With this in mind, we may delay the start
from Atlantic Highlands by a day or two if a forecast


change in the Weather would give competitors a better
shot at the record."

The excitement and drama of one of the world's most
demanding yacht'races -- the single-handed Round-the-
World Challenge -- has been captured in the video film
"Around Alone The BOC Challenge 1986-87."
Starting in Newport, Rhode Island, the film introduces
the men who will attempt to meet the Challenge as they
prepare for the first leg to Capetown. From there to Syd-
ney and around Cape Horn to Rio the camera follows their
trials and triumphs as they race back to the finish line in
Newport.
The film chronicles the action of this 27,000-mile race
around the globe with on-board footage and includes full
tactical details of each leg as explained by race director
Robin Knox-Johnston. The stereo music track for the 53-
minute video was specially composed forthe film by Malcom
Ironton.


1988 Seoul Olympics Yachting venue
Date Time Event
Sep. 20 (Tue.) 13:30-17:30 First Race
Sep. 21 (Wed.) 13:30-17:30 Second Race
Sep. 22 (Thu.) 13:30-17:30 Third Race
en 9.3 (Fri 1.3:3-17:n0 Fourth Race


OU .. ,,.)
Sep. 24 (Sat.)
Sep. 25 (Sun.)
Sep. 26 (Mon.)
Sep. 27 (Tue.)
Sep. 28 (Wed.)


Reserve day
Reserve day
13:30-17:30
13:30-17:30
13:30-17:30
13:30-17:30


BUWATE BAT


Fifth Race
Sixth Race
Finals


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Sailing


Wated nt News July 1988


17


Virginia Beach, VA Pounding surf and Northeasterly
winds of 30-35 miles per hour at Kitty Hawk, NC forced
cancellation of the final leg of the 1988 World 1000 multi-
hull sail race. The race, which runs from Ft. Lauderdale
through 12 checkpoints to Virginia Beach, was scheduled
to conclude in Virginia Beach May 28th. When asked his
reason for cancellation of the 61.8 mile leg, Race Director
Al Estheridge responded, "It's too dangerous to send the
sailors out, and the safety of the sailors is paramount in
this race." Overall times from the previous leg, Cape Hat-
teras to Kitty Hawk, were considered final times to de-
termine winners in each class. In the Open Class, Team Aus-
tralia took first position with a leg time of 7 hrs., 39
minutes, 51 seconds, and an overall time of 83:17:03. esta-
blishing a new Ft. Lauderdale-to-Checkpoint record. The
old record, held by Randy Smyth of Team Sandwich Island
in 1985, was 94:09:06. Team Bliss (Rick Bliss and Steve
Tartagliano) took first in the Modified Production Class,
with a leg time of 7:34:51 and an overall of 88:39:22.
Team Australia and Team Bliss were the only boats to fin-
ish the Hatteras-Kitty Hawk leg.
Placing second in the.Open Class was Team Domino's
Pizza, sailed by Roy Seaman of Malibu and Gary Miller of
Grass Valley, Calif. Team Domino's trailed the Aussies by
2:25:38 overall. In third was Team USSR, overall time
89:14:12; fourth, Team G-Force, with 93:17:51; fifth,
Team Rudee's Restaurant, 96:11:52; sixth, Team Splash
Down with 96:51:14; Team Saginaw Tilt-Wheel in seventh
with 96:53:23; Team Carolina in eighth with.98:06:06,
and Team Jacksonville in ninth place at 106:44:26.
In the Modified Production Class;,Team Loctite held
second place with an overall time of 101:18:49, and Team
Kitty Hawk Sports-Starbus with 104:40:22 placed
third.
The 1988 World 1000:was exceptional in that 12 of the
13 starting boats would have sailed the final leg. (In 1987,
only six of the 16 starting boat finished the race). Team
Winning Edge Concept, sailed by Laurent Gaudillat and
Gary Taylor of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. was forced to with-
draw after doing irreparable damage to their boat be-
tween Myrtle Beach, S.C. and Wrightsville Beach, N.C.
However, the most difficult leg proved to be the 81.4
miles from Atlantic Beach to Cape Hatteras, N.C. Only
Team USSR, Team Bliss and Team Loctite finished the leg
,of 1? boqat.s rating. Team Australia's Tqrnado broke up.
completely just off the Core Banks and sailors lan Bash-


ford and Rod Waterhouse were picked up by fishermen and
spent the night at a fish camp on Core Island. Their ground
crew, meanwhile, arranged for a Nacra 5.8 to be delivered
overnight from Virginia Beach so that they could sail the
next leg. Teams Carolina, G-Force and Splash Down elect-
ed to beach just north of the launch checkpoint and spent
the night in Beaufort, N.C. Team Rudee's lost its second
mast of the race and was trailered to the next checkpoint;
Team Kitty Hawk Sports-Starbus was damaged in a colli-
sion with Team Splash Down during launch and trailered
up; Team Domino s Pizza lost it rudders and beached for
the night on Portsmouth Island; Team Jacksonville was de-
masted on the Core Banks, and Team Saginaw beached
with mechanical problems, also on the Core Banks. With NE
winds at 15-20, Team USSR managed to complete trie leg
in 11 hours, 4 minutes and 51 seconds. When asked how he
felt, a grinning skipper Vladimir Kostrov replied, Not
bad -- I would like about ten drams of vodka right now.
Myrtle Beach to Wrightsville Beach was not without its
casualties, as well. In addition to the withdrawal of Team
Winning Edge, Team Rudee's Restaurant was demasted at
Cape Fear and towed in by the Coast Guard. Hans Geissler
of Team G-Force suffered severely bruised ribs when he
lost his grip and slipped into a shroud; the boat also cap-
sized 8-9 miles south of the Cape. Fred Holseberg of Team
Jacksonville was hit in the face by the block while jibing,
breaking his nose in two places and requiring 18 stitches to
repair. He was unable to Sail the rest of the race and was
replaced by alternate Scott McCorkle.
Lighter, faster boats and seasoned sailors made the
1988 World 1000 a much closer competition than in years
past The lead in the open class changed hands four times,
with Team Australia and Team Domino's sometimes as close
as five and a half minutes in overall time. (Both Rod Water-
house and Roy Seaman were going for their third win, an
honor bestowed only upon the race's founder, Michael Wor-
rell.) Four of the 11 leg records were broken, sometimes
by as many as 12 of the 13 boats.
The World 1000 will turn professional next year, offer-
ing a $20,000 purse for first place and cash prizes for
second through fifth place boats. Eligibility will be at the
discretion of the Director, and a sailor from previous com-
petition must have completed the race from Ft Lauderdale
to Isle of Palms, S.C. to qualify. All 13 boats from this
,yearipassed the Isle of Palmscheckpoint, and many have
vowed to return in 1989.


Final finish for World 1000
Kitty Hawk, North Carolina
May 28, 1988
SOpen Class final standings
1st) Team Australia, 83 hours, 17 minutes, 3 seconds;
2nd) Team Domino's Pizza, 85:42:41;
3rd) Team U.S.S.R., 89:14:12;
4th) Team G-Force, 93:17:51;
5th) Team Rudee's, 96:11:56;
6th) Team Splash Down, 96:51:14;
7th) Team Saginaw, 96:53:23;
8th) Team Carolina, 98:06:06;
9th) Team Jacksonville, 106:44
* Modified Class
1st) Team Bliss, 88:39:22;
2nd) Team Loctite (Florida), 101:18:49;
3rd) Kitty Hawk, 104:40:22.


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Cruising


18 Waterfront News July 1988


Schooner on the St. Johns


by Capt. Frank Papy
It was around the beginning of November and I was do-
ing a delivery of the Ben GuZn a 49-foot top mast schooner
for a wealthy owner who liked old wooden boats and kept
her in tip top shape. We had come down on the outside
around Cape Hatteras and had gotten in some heavy weath-
er. We rode the good winds as far as we could then ducked
into Jacksonville for some sail repairs and to pick up some
more grog. -
I called the owner, Mr. Parker, to give him a report on
our progress knowing he had been worried about the
weather like it was and, to my surprise, he said he and his
family would like to join us for a sentimental trip down the
St. Johns River. My crew and I were getting paid by the
day so that was swell with us. We got the top mast
stepped down at the boatyard to allow for the one low
bridge, 45 feet, along the river and rented a 15-foot jolly
boat with a 40 horsepower motor.
S We picked up the Parkers and were on our way, 150
miles down river to Sandford. The first day we had a fair
breeze sowe raised the sails as best we could with her top-
mast out, It was quite a trip sailing through the,port with
its commercial activity and under the shadow of Jackson-
ville's evergrowing skyline. The river is quite wide and we
made it underfull sail all the way down to Green Cove
Springs; with some day light left
We dropped the hook, loaded the,Parkers up in the jolly
boat and took a tour of the old Navy Base where all of the
confiscated drug boats are stored. There must have been
150 of all types some with bullet holes in them: Wow! If
those boats could talk I bet they would have some wild tales
to tell.
After a beautiful starlight night at anchor we arose to
a 15 knot N-NE wind and headed out again under full sail
for Ptaka, our next port down the fascinating St Johns
River. We anchored at a nice little spot called Murphy's
Cove for lunch and I sent the mate ashore to make arrange-
mentsfor an easy berth at the Holiday Inn Marina. It was a
good thing we called ahead as it seems that they were mak-
ing a movie in the area called "Brenda Star" with Brook
Shields and the'marina was quite crowded. They said they
would save a slip for us.
We arrived about 5:30 p.m. The Parkers went ashore
to get a hotel room and entertained some guests. We had a
great seafood dinner at the restaurant and met some of
the film crew. They had been on location for about two
weeks downriver and gave us some good tips on places to
visit. One of the spots known by the locals as Salt Springs
had great fishing guide hired by the Parkers by the name
of Strangler Jack, A hell of a name for a fishing guide and
I don't think anybody ever asked him how he got the name.
He really liked the old Ben-Gun; and said he sailed on her
sister ship when he was a boy.
The river narrows up south of Platka and you really have
to be alert for the barge traffic. Headed south they are
loaded and draw eight to nine feet of waterand must stay
in the middle of the channel. Headed north they are empty
Sand high out of the water so with a tug on the.stem it gives
them limited visibility. With this hazard in mind, I put the
Cook on the V.H.F. radio, checking on the traffic about
every half hour. And, wodildi you know, we passed tug
and barge right at Buzzard's Point, one of the narrowest
parts of the river. Thanks to radio contact, all went
smooth. That night our next spot was a place calledSalt
Cove.
With a nice south breeze, Strangler Jack, our fishing
guide took the Parkers up Salt Creek for some fishing and
exploring. A local boater stopped by to warn us about tar-
get practice on the east side of Lake George. It seems
Navy planes use it for target practice and they were


scheduled to do so the next day. We thanked them and said
God willing, we will be gone by tomorrow. Just about dark
the Parkers arrived from their trip up Salt Creek. It had
been very successful so that night we had a fantastic din-
ner of blackened fish, rice and lots of rum. Around one
o'clock in the morning the wind started blowing up so we
pulled the hook and went behind Dratin Island. Lake
George is about 10 miles long but it can get pretty rough in
30 knots of wind.
The next morning we crossed Lake George and motored
down to Lake Dexter, anchored and the Parkers did some
more fishing: After trit weheaded back up river to dock
for the night at Hall's Marina at Astor, Florida. That's
where we were scheduled to drop'off ourfishing guide.
The facilities are limited for large vessels like the Ben-
Gun but we managed to squeeze her in. Here we.had a fan-
tastic meal of fresh water crabs and gator tail. They said
they hadn't had a boat that big in the marina for years and I
guess everybody from the bar and restaurant came down
to the old Ben-Gun for a look.After another long nightof
singing and story-telling, the next morning we were on our
way to Hontoon Island State Park. There was lots of tra.
ffic on the river. Strangler Jack had gotten off and we
had picked up a new passenger. It seems that bye-and-bye
Mr. Parker had employed Strangler's niece. She played the
guitar and.sings folk songs about the river, alligators and
all the characters up and down the shores.
It was nice to have live music while motoring along the
river but this put everybody on deck which made visibility
hell. The river really gets narrow here and with the music
and the girls we attracted lots of attention. All the boat-
ing traffic wanted to come by for a closer look. That af-
ternoon we tied up at the Hontoon Restaurant and Marina,
using the jolly boat as a tug.
One of the people on the dock helping us get the Ben-
Gun into her slip was an old character that called himself
"Steamboat'. He was about eighty years old and the Park-
ers invited him on board for drinks. He said he used to
work on the river boats that carried supplies up and down
the St. Johns. He told us a lot of interesting history about
the river ano said he would give us a tour of the park but he
couldn't run the boat. So the next morning I loaded up the
jolly boat vwth the Parkers, Steamboat, our guitar player,
a very lamre umbrella and a handsome picnic lunch. We made
a trip all through the dead river, Mud Creek, Blue Spring
Rue, Indian Hill those are just afew of the ones I can-re-
member. What an adventure. The birds and wildlife were
fantastic. Manatee swam around the boat. We landed and
explored a giant Indian mound. Piloting the jolly boat down
those narrow creeks overgrown with large cypress, I felt
U- U


like Humphrey Bogart on the African Queen. We stopped
and had a picnic lunch under some giant trees that looked
like banyan trees.Sometimes we wouldn't see another boat
for an hour. This is truly a wilderness. It took two days and
we still didn't see it all.
Like all fancy rich people with nothing to do, the park-
ers were running behind schedule; so, we said good-bye to
SStrangler Jack's niece. We will miss her music, and Steam-
boat, with his old stories and wild tales about the river,
and headed down to Sandford. It's a short run but for a
big boat like Ben-Gun there are three bridges right in a
row just before you get into Lake Monroe an opening rail-
road and highway bridge and a fixed highway 'bridge.
There was quite a bit of current but we made it okay.
Lake Monroe is a good sized lake so we raised the sails
reaching up and down until dusk. Then we pulled into the
Monroe Harbor Marina, a very nice large full service marina,
to drop off the Parkers to catch theirjet to the big city.
S I will say one thing in all my sailing of many an ocean and
river, the St. Johns will remain one of the most fascinat-
ing. It leaves your memory with an impression that when you
think of the river you get this feeling when you try to put it
into words something gets lost
Captain Frank M. Papy,
Author of Cruising Guide to the Florida Keys,
I lives on Fox Island near
Ridgeland, South Carolina


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Cruising waterfrontNewsJuly 1988 19



Seattle's houseboat community tour


byJoann Biondi
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live on.a
houseboat? No lawn to mow, leaves to sweep or garage to
keep clean. Well now's your chance to find out. Each fall
several of Seattle's houseboat live-aboards let curious
landlubbers discover the joys and romance of their whimsi-
cal abodes by opening their homes to the public in their
very own houseboat tour.
Traipsing through the nautical neighborhoods is not just
a glimpse at their eccentric lifestyle, buta chance to wit-
ness some of Seattle's history, pageantry and prosperous
present
Of all the houseboats areas in America, Seattle's laby-
rinth of bays, inlets and harbors have meant home to one of
-the oldest, most established, houseboat communities in the
country. While not as famous as its sister in Sausilito,
Seattle's.houseboat community has become one of its city's
most desirable neighborhoods. Far from the gbod-old-days
when live-aboards pragmatically fished through their toi-
lettes, today's houseboats range from rustic; bricked fire-
place cabins to modem Plexi-glass palaces.
There are about 460 houseboats in the Seattle area,
mostly in Lake Union and Portage Bay. Clustered along the
capillary-like docks, their salty uniqueness radiates. Shar-
ing the immediacy of houseboat'living vulnerability to
winds, gentle rocking and the constant adjustments to
tides, Seattle's houseboat live-aboards are the product of
a city where urban architecture and the natural environ-
ment have remained in working harmony.
But the history of Seattle's houseboats have been both


colorful and stormy. Back in the 1870's hundreds of fami-
lies built cabins atop water resistant cedar logs and called
them home. In 1909, the Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition
brought travelers from around the world to Seattle and
dozens more were built, many becoming floating clubs, tea-
rooms, gambling dens, bordellos and bootlegging booths.
In 1917, there were 2,500 houseboats in the Seattle
area but during the Depression they began to wane and by
the 1950's, landlubbers grew suspicious of their nautical
neighbors and the battle of the houseboat owners began.
Soon after, city ordinances declaring them unsanitary due
to lack of sewage and garbage disposal relegated them to
a trailer park image of ghetto, waterfront living.
for Seattle's houseboat community, survival meant they
had to.unite as one not easy for people who's lives are tied
to rampant individuality.
In 1962; Seattle's Floating Homes Association was
formed and began negotiating for houseboat owners'
rights. In 1963, all of the 540 existing houseboats agreed
to install the plumbing necessary to hook up to the city's
public sewer system. The transition took five years and in
the process about 100 houseboats were rendered obso-
lete.
The Bohemian image is long gone. Today boat slips in
- the area are sold in the price range of $30-80,000 de-
pending on their view and it is not unusual to see house-
boats with $2-300,000 price tags. All are issued a King
county houseboat number and all must comply with strict.
-building, sewage and zoning laws. Owners pay personal
property taxes on their boats and real estate taxes
through mortgage fees. Since zoning laws allows only for


those 460 licensed houseboats, opportunities to bring new
houseboats into the area are slim.
Having recently achieved up-scale status, Seattle's
houseboat community is now respected and often envied.
Trendy,'gangplank neighborhoods like Mallard Cove and
Roanoke Reef, where New England blues and grays are
choice, are filled with chic houseboats with stained glass
windows, sunken tubs and Franklin stoves. One thing is cer-
tain, their boats are their homes.
"I figure I've got two heavens," said Phil Webber, a
Seattle photographer and Lake Union live-aboard. "One up
there... and one on my houseboat" Yes, some more space
would be nice admits Webber, but the tranquility is more
important.
Each September, Webber and fellow members of the
Floating Homes Association of Seattle open their "homes"
for a day in a fund-raising, public tour. For $10 apiece,
people from all over the West coast come to browse
through the boats and marvel at the maze of serendipity.
'They get on board thinking that you're going to have
horns growing out of your head and weird furniture or
something," said Webber.
A few years ago, members of the Floating Homes Asso-
ciation got together and published their own cookbook -
The Seattle Houseboaters Gourmet Scrapbook of Recipes
and tall tales. Recipes for Dockamole, Muddy Lake Choco-
late Sauce and Houseboat Halibut celebrate the protocol
and rituals of life on the docks. Crawdads, caught with sa-
lami on a string, are a favorite.
For information on the September 18th houseboat tour
call the Seattle Floating Homes Association at: (206) 325-
1132 during business hours.


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anchorages. Diving
spots, fishing
grounds, marinas.
Things to do & see
T~i ICI664t.8 from the Keys to
Tarpon Springs on
the West Coast.
Send $14.95 Plus $2.00 Postage To Frank Papy, Box
263, Route 1, Rldgeland, SC 29936 (803) 726-3962.
Name
Address
City State Zip
Dealer Inquiries Welcome







20 waterfontNews Jul1988 The Main Brace



The Block of ice


byA.S. Baumgartner
I would never have found the bar at the.end of the road
if I hadn't.run aground.lt was lucky, my joining the yacht
club.
I hadn't meant to join, but the city's docks were caving
in and threatening to take the little sloop with them. Re-
pairs were empty promises.
Sailors get desperate at time like that. Twelve-foot
Kelly, who'was Irish and a liar, explained how he could save
the situation. He said it would be cheap. That was the tell-
ing blow.
So the boat went where Kelly had assured me there was
room. Cheap it was, but a disaster. There were intermina-
ble meetings presided over by those who felt each problem
must be held up to the light and gnawed at until its bones
were seen and tasted. There were dress codes, dinners,
races, committees...I was slowly going mad.
I hadn't meant to leave, the day I left. I set sail south
and somehow kept on going. Miami sank behind until orily
building tops poked out of the water.
I felt free then. I breathed clean air and was content.
It was late when I saw what looked like a harbor along
the shore. I steered for it, found thechannel markersiand
ran hard aground. I swore. The little sloop needs four feet
of water beneath her hull and South Florida's a shallow
place.
I worked off with the motions born of habit and much
sweat. As the boat broke free and the.bow swung, I saw
the other channel markers. They were little more than
weatherered sticks and led toward a mangrove.
Down in the Florida Keys there are hidden harbors. You
take your chances there and. took mine. Wind was in the
sails and so I sailed the narrow channel like a white ghost in
a deep green tunnel.
It was a tumbled scatter of a place I found with a small
bar at the end of a twisting road. The docks looked sturdy
and safe. A crinkled man eyed me as I slowly slid over
smooth water.
"Sailed in," it was a judgment.
I nooded. He pointed toward a vacant stretch of dock.
The rates were posted on the bait house wall. I tied up and
paid Dockmaster a month's worth. He was a silent man. His

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thumb pointed toward the bar. I accepted the suggestion.
I-entered and blinked in dimness that grew silent.l nod/
ded at scattered tables and the people at them and the
few souls around the'wooden bar that sat crookedly on the
smooth-worn concrete floor. It was not a fancy place. It
smelled of smoke and beer and hot salt air.
-Ifound a barstool and asked the tall man behind the bar
for a beer. The brand didn't matter, I said, as long as it
was cool.
"It's warm," he said.
"I'll take it warm then."
Warm was a fair description, still it was cooler than I
was, so I drank it and asked for another.
"It's warmer than the first."
Now I am not by nature reckless, however, a thirsty man
cannot afford to be trifled with for people get the wrong
impression if you let them.
"Good," I said and laughed. "The first one wasn't boiled
long enough to suit me."
- He scowled and brought it. It will not swear that it was
steaming. It could have been trick of the light.
"There's a fifty pound of ice in the freezer out back.
Cost you one buck and fifty," came a voice from behind me.
"Got a glass big enough to hold It?" I asked'bef6re I saw
the man.
He filled his chair and overlapped it and none of it was
fat. His face was as unforgiving as a coral reef and he
barely had a neck.
"I got the. glass. You think you can pick it up?" he
scowled and I thought I was a dead man sure, unless that
straining chair gave out and maybe killed him when it fell.
"I never thought of such a thing. You lift it and I'll drink
it."
The blue-eyed lady at his table snickered.
"Miss Bobby," there was mild reproof in his tone. He
turned to her. She merely shrugged and made a face and
laughed again.
I was not feelingwelcome when I turned back toward the


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bar. Dockmaster had sent me where strangers were un-
wanted.
A chair scraped and I tensed, but it was only someone
heading for the door. I sipped the awful beer and felt self-
pity. Tomorrow I'd demand my money, sail back to where I
didn't want to go and be done with this place. To hell with
it. I didn't need this.
The block of ice slammed down beside me on the bar.
Six quarters followed it.
"Dammit Big!" The bartender snarled. "You'll bust the
bar!"
"It's been busted before. I did it and you helped."
The blue-eyed lady broke out laughing.
"I'm Harry," the bartender said. "And half of what Big
tells you is a lie."
"You watch it," Big countered.
"Watch yourself. There's no glass that's big enough to
hold that ice."
"To hell with you then," Big picked up the ice and took it
back to his table.
"Come sit here, Sailor," he called across the room. "A
man that serves bad beer and insults is no fit company."
Laughter ran through the bar and I joined in as I sat
down in a vacant chair.
I was soon surrounded and the next beer was cold
- enough to freeze my fillings.
That night we warmed our souls around a block of ice. I
think we danced and I know I sang but I can't remember
what the words were.
The bar at the end of the road was no small place that
night. It grew wider with each laugh and the telling of each
tale and the hoisting of each drink until it burst its walls
and spilled across the darkness and made it bright.
And I was in that bright place where I belonged.
Editor's note:
A.S. Baumgartner is a local free-lance writer who also
is Action Line Editor of the Miami Herald.


HEADACHES,
The two main types of headaches are. the
mild recurring variety and the migraine. Each
year more than half a billion dollars are
spent on over-the-counter headache
remedies as one out of eight Americans
suffer from headaches, two thirds of these
are women. Medication may give temporary
relief of pain only to re-occur if the
underlying cause is not removed.
Although both types can be brought on by
the stress of daily living, allergic reactions to
certain foods, and muscle spasm-the
i underlying cause is usually nerve pressure
Dr. Jerry Johnson, B.S.D.C. In the neck.
This nerve pressure results from the loss of normal joint motion of
one or more of the neck vertebrae. The neck was designed to allow
for the maximum freedom of movement and support of the head and
to provide a channel for the flow of nerve impulses from the brain,
the central computer.As the entire flow of nerve impulses to run the
body's many organ systems and muscles must flow through the
neck,-we find that Its optimal, functioning is most important.
There are seven bones or vertebrae in the neck with joints
between them to allow for the following movements: forward and
backward bending, right and left twisting, and right and left
side-bending.
Among the causes of loss of normal joint motion are auto
accidents, stomach sleeping, incorrect pillow usage, sports injuries,
and arthritis. ,
A specific motion analysis exam of the vertebral joints of the neck
will reveal which joints are locked and must be un-locked by gentle
treatment to allow free movement, thereby removing the cause of
nerve pressure. When the neck functions freely as nature designed.
It, there can be no build-up of nerve pressure that is felt as a
headache. Dr. J.D. Johnson.
JOHNSON CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
1509 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
ForAppt. Call: 564-9999


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The M ain Brace" WaterfrontNewsJuly 1988 21



Summer reading Po
Lauderdale
for bters Waterfront Property
for boaters ; \ Owners:Association
Fr Lauea e P r Cuisine Yachtin Guide
by Julie Nance & M.J. Swift :' to B iuda
Fort Lauderdale Waterfront Property Owners .. '.toBe
Association Cuisine
collected by FLWPOA
illustrated. 110 pp. Ft. Lauderdale:
Fundcraft Publishing, Inc. $14.95

Cruising Guide to the Florida Keys '
by Capt. Frank Papy
illustrated. 240 pp. Ft. Lauderdale: i
self-published. $14.95. M *

Yachting Guide to Bermuda
edited by Jane and Edward Harris
illustrated. 144 pp. Bermuda:
The Bermuda Maritime Museum Press-$14.95.


The Fort Lauderdale Waterfront Property Owners
Cuisine rates high on the list of "organization" genre of
cookbooks and deserves a place in everyone's recipe collec-
tion. In addition to a great variety of palatable recipes
that actually work, Cuisine contains many helpful tips and
suggestions.
A recent Sunday dinner started with a fresh tomato
salad, topped with Walter Aubrect's recipe for Dorothy's
Dill Dip (found on page four). Next came Joanne Beck-
er's Baked Ham (page 27), served with Geri Kahn's
Brocccoli Noodle Ring with cheese sauce (page 39) and
her delicious Pecan Corn Muffins (page 46). completed an
excellent, easily prepared dinner.
To pick up this collection of waterfront treasures call
467-8343.
***
SAnother nautical treasure, Captain Frank Papy, has re-
worked his gem Cruising Guide to the Florida Keys for a-
sixth time. Starting in Fort Lauderdale, Papy takes the
reader south past Miami and Biscayne.Bay to Key Largo,
Upper Matecumbe Key, Vaca Key and west on to Bahia
Honda, Key West and beyondto the Marquesas and Dry
Tortugas. "
Laced with detailed charts, satellite photos and Millard
Wells' and Cy DeCosse's watercolors and illustrations,
Captain Papy's narrative reveals channels, anchorages,
places to go and things to see. The reader senses a voice of
local knowledge and confident authority of a legendary
skipper rising from the words of this tale teller, Frank
Papy.
Found at most book and marine stores throughout Flori-
da and the Keys,this edition of Cruising Guide to the Fori-

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da Keys updates the books Papy has been'putting out
since 1977. ..
The Bermuda Maritime Museum has just announced pub-
lication of the brand new Yachting Guide to Bermuda.
The guide will sell in the United States for $14.95, and
all publisher's profits from it will go towards benefitting
the museum.
The Yachting Guide to Bermuda is the only current
guide to cruising Bermuda waters, and it is aimed squarely
at yachtsmen from North America who plan to cruise to
Bermuda. The guide should be especially useful to those
cruising or racing to Bermuda for the first time, with sec-
tions on planning a passage to Bermuda, timing, charts,
weather, stores and much more.


As successor to the original Yachtsman's Guide:to the
Bermuda Islands first published in 1977, the new guide re-
tains most of the original information, all completely updat-
ed and revised. Also included are many color photographs
and more than 20 detailed color sketch charts of Bermuda
harbors and anchorages.
The 144-page Bermuda Yachting Guide also contains
detailed information on many other.topics of interest to vi-
siting yachtsmen: customs and immigration requirements,
firearms aboard, fishing regulations, yacht clubs, and
more.
The guide is available at Fort Lauderdale's Bluewater
Books & Charts, the exclusive North American distributor
of the text.


Escape by boat to Deerfield


Sby Sam Biondolillo
Deerfield Beach Deerfield Island Park (a Broward
County Parks and Recreation Division Regional Park) lo-
cated in the Intracoastal Waterway at Hillsboro Boulevard
offers Broward's residents a unique opportunity to "es-
cape to an island" for a few hours...freel
Visitors to the densely wooded Island alone or in a
group, can enjoy a leisurely scenic walkon the Park's 1500'
boardwalk Mangrove Trail along 8.5 acres of red, white,
and black mangrove; or the Coquina Trail with a lookout
point over the Intracoastal. The Park, a state refuge for
the endangered Gopher Tortoise, is a nesting place for
many small animals as well as a roosting and feeding place
for both migratory and native sea birds. Its facilities also
include a children's playground, a picnic shelter, picnic
tables and grills, volleyball and horseshoes, soda vending
machines (bring your own lunch) and a free, 10-slip marina
for the boating public.
The Park, open for 8 AM-sundown year-round, offers a
free boat ride to the Island's Marina, located a few 100
yards from the dock of the Riverview Restaurant, at 8:30


AM on Wednesday and Saturday mornings, returning by
11AM. No reservations are required. The Park also offers,
by reservations, free guided weekday nature walks for
school classes and other groups; and youth site camping,
with its own canoe landing area, for non-profit organiza-
tions.
Special programs and events are offered regularly at
the Park "Show and Tell", a free lecture and demonstra-
tion on the care and feeding of park animals, is scheduled
on the first Wednesday of each month from 11AM to 1PM.
A monthly fishing tournament (prizes awarded quarterly)
for children ages 6-14 is scheduled from 9AM-12 noon on
Sunday, July 3, August 21 and September 18. Other
monthly Special Events are currently being planned for
July-September.
Resident Park Manager Ken Ketelhut suggests famil-
iarizing yourself with the Island with an in-depth guided
two-hour Wednesday morning nature walk, then returning
for a longer picnic in conjunction with a Special program or
event. For further information on one of Broward County
Parks and Recreation Division's most unique parks simply
call Janice Andrews at 428-5474.


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I







22 Waterfront News July 1988 Diving

Board county's Artificial Reef Program

Broward County's Artificial Reef Program


The first volume of Coastal Loran Coordinates, a com-
prehensive listing of reefs, rocks, ports and other sites
compiled, is available in some book, tackle and dive shops.
Put together by Rod and Susie Stebbins, the book cov-
ers the U.S. East Coast and Gulf of Mexico. It lists over
3,800 Loran C coordinates for finding 859 reefs and
wrecks, 671 rocks and ledges, 316 ports and safe havens,
2,165 passes and 2,008 fishing holes. Each site is listed by
state, county, depth of water, latitude and longitude along
with Loran C time differentials.
More than 700 scuba dives were made to verify loca-
tions.
BERRY PATCH Depth: 65' Loran C: 14281.1,
62088.5 A 65' steel tug, built in 1940, was sunk on Aug
15, 1987. Also at this location is a 40' steel boat hull.
BILL BOYD REEF Depth: 265' Loran C: 14265.8,
62102.4 This Dutch freighter was sunk on July 18, 1986.
BUDDY MERRITT REEF Depth: 414' Loran C:
14275.5, 62089.8 This 70' steel barge with welded su-
perstructure was sunk on Dec 17,1987.
CALCOS EXPRESS Depth: 240' Loran C: 14271.8.
62096.2 A 188" Dutch freighter sunk on Nov 12,1985.
CHEVRON TANKS (Rodeo) Depth: 170' Loran C:
14271.3, 62097.1 39 Service station fuel tanks sunk in
1983.
COREY N' CHRIS' REEF Depth: 244' Loran C:
14274.2, 62093.4. A 130' dredge sunk off Pompano Pier
May 18,1986.
CRUZ DEL SUR Depth: 230' Loran C: 14246.2,
62121.1 A 257' German freighter sunk in a joint project
with:Metro DadeCountyon Dec 19,1986.
DANIA PIER EROJACK Depth: 10-20' Loran C:
14253.2, 62121.0 Thousands of concrete erojacks which
extend considerable distance in an east-west direction.
F.L.A. REEF Depth : 388' Loran C: 14269.2,
62097.5 A former 144' U.S. Navy minesweeper sunk on
July 8 1986.
GROUPER GROTTO Depth: 150' Loran C: 14263.6,
62104.415 fuel tanks in five groups of three, opened on
either end. Also concrete culvert, 60" barge, dredge pipe
and equipment
HARBOUR TOWNE ARTIFICIAL REEF Depth 70' Lo-
ran C: 14265.2, 62106.3 This 95' steel sailboat, sunk on
Nov 21, 1987, lies 100 feet south of the Jay Scutti.
HOG HEAVEN Depth 64' Loran C: 14262.7, 62108.7
A 180' barge sunk on Sept 19,1986. Also two smaller
barges.
HOUSEBOAT WRECK Depth: 83' Loran C: 14263.7,
62107.0 One of the original wrecks, sunk in the 70's, this
50' houseboat lies in a system of patch reef.
JAY DORMAN REEF Depth 78' Loran C: 14273.6,
62096.1 A 130' steel schooner built in 1938 was sunk on
Feb 28, 1988. This reef lies 200' south of the Qualmann
Tugs'and Rodeo Rivers' Reef.
JAY SCUTTI REEF Depth: 67' Loran C: 14265.2,
62106.3 A 97' former Aruba harbor tug sunk on Sept 19,
1986.


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JIM ATRIA REEF Depth: 112' Tope of wreck: 77' This
1961 Dutch built freighter, sunk Sept 23, 1987, is lying on
its side.
LOWRANCE REEF Depth: 180-210' Loran C:
14272.8, 62095.3 This 435' freighter, the largest arti-
ficial reef on the Atlantic coast, was sunk March 31, 1984.
MARRIOTT REEF Depth: 70' Loran C: 14261.4,
62109.8 A 1945 C-54 airplane, sunk Nov 23, 1985, has
been heavily damaged by a ship's anchor.


MERCEDES I Depth: 97' Loran C: 14265.2, 62105.2
This 197' German freighter, sunk March 30, 1985, is the
most famous artificial reef in the world.
MILLER LITE Depth: 155' Loran C: 14274.5,
62094.1 This 186' freighter, built in 1957, was sunk May
17,1987.
OSBORNE REEF Depth: 60'-65" Loran C: 14263.3,
62107.9 60' barge, scattered tires, other barges, fuel
tanks, 300 tons concrete culvert.
POWELL BARGE-DB 24 Depth: 314' Loran C:
14363.5, 62104.6 This derrick barge was loaded with ce-
ment mixer drums and sunk on Apr 10,1986.
REBEL REEF.Depth: 110' Loran C: 14267.1,62103.0
A 150' Norweigian coastal freighter sunk July 16,1985,
RENEGADE REEF Depth: 190' Loran C: 14273.4,
62094.6 A 150' Dutch coastal freighter sunk July 10,
1985.
RIVER BEND REEF Depth: 98' Loran C: 14263.9,
62106.4 Seven wood vessels, all in 30' 50' range in size.
ROBERT B. JOHNSON REEF Depth 230' Loran C:
-) 14274.3, 62093.3 On May 15,1988, the Robert B. John-
Sson was sunk offshore of the Pompano Pier. This 230'
freighter is dedicated to America's Viet Nam veteran.
RODEO DIVERS REEF (Qualmann Tugs) Depth: 78:
Loran C: 14273.6, 62096.3 Consists of two tugboats and
several smaller boats.
TEAMO Depth: 215' Loran C: 14261.8, 62106.6 The
100' wooden sailboat was sunk May 16,1985. Also sunk at
this site is the 65' ferro-cement motoryacht, Stardancer.,




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TENNECO DEEP REEF Depth: 190' Loran C:
14247.3, 62120.9 Two 80' high oil rig jackets sunk Oct 3,
1985.

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TENNECO SHALLOW REEF Depth: 105' Loran C:
14246.9, 62122.7 Located directly west of TENNECO
DEEP REEF, this consists of three oil production decks
and is a prime dive attraction. Both Tenneco reefs line up
with the Hallandale water tower directly in front of the ra-
dioantenna.
TRACOR DRYDOCK (Nova Deepwater Reef) Depth:
220' Loran C: 14261.2, 62107.4 200' U.S. Navy Floating -
Drydock AFDL-8 sunk June 22, 1982. Also at this location
are numerous Chris Craft hull molds placed by Bahia Mar
charter boats.
TRIO BRAVO Depth: 145' Loran C: 14264.6,
62105.0 Built in 1898, this 142' icebreaking tug was sunk
Dec 12, 1982.
Source: Broward County Environmental Quality Control
Board Erosion Prevention District as of May 25, 1988.




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Diving


WaterfontNews July 1988 23


Underwater Music Festival set for July 9

byAndy Newman ..
LOOE KEY NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY, Flori-
da Keys The scenic coral reefs at Looe Key National Ma- ".
rine Sanctuary will become the backdrop for an undersea
symphony aimed at snorkeling and scuba diving enthusiasts
on Saturday, July 9, at the 4th Annual Underwater Music
Festival.
Three hours of commercial-free music, selected by div-
ers to specifically enhance the underwater experience, will
be broadcast at 104.7FM from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m.
Special underwater speakers will be placed on five
boats located at strategic points on Looe Key reef, locat-
ed five miles south of Big Pine Key. According to Bill Beck-
er, coordinator of the event, the placement of speakers-
and their special design will create and etheral quality un- -
derwater.
"When music is broadcast underwater it seems to come "
from all directions," said Becker. "Because the sound is'
traveling five times faster than it does in the air, it has an '
unforgettable effect."
Musical styles to be played during the broadcast include" -,
island music, reggae, classical, new age, contemporary and '
even a few choruses of "Songs of the Humpbacked Whale"
for the many sea creatures who may be listening. .
SThis is one event where we will leave the site exactly as
we found it," commented Becker. He has prepared a series' .
of public service announcements, concerning protection of
coral reefs,that will be interspersed throughout the ,
broadcast.
"All divers enjoy the beauty of the sea, and we want
them to realize they have a responsibility to protect that
environment," he said.
Divers participating in the Underwater Music Festival
may charter space aboard boats from a number of dive op-
erators in the Lower Keys. Visitors and residents with
their own boats can launch at several public ramps in the
area.
Water temperatures in July average in the mid-80's
(Fahrenheit) and underwater visibility (contingent on
weather conditions) frequently exceeds 50 feet. Looe Key
NationalMarine Sanctuary is located five miles south of Big
Pine Key.


Angler names reef after uncle killed in Vietnam


by Pattarr
1988 Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo angler Karen Doyle
didn't catch any big fish or take home any big money in the
recent two-day tournament but she ended up with a 230-
foot freighter to name as reported in last month's Water-
front News. '
Doyle, of Fort Lauderdale, was the lucky angler whose
name was drawnduring the tournament to name the Ro-
deo's latest addition toits artificial reef site.
live chosen to name the reef after my uncle, Ronald B.
Johnson, who was killed in Vietnam in 1968," she said dur-
ing the Rodeo weigh-ins in May.
"I feel that this will be a fitting tribute to him," she
said, adding that she would like to dedicate the reef to all


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Docksside Service
sales, service -instlalations parts.



(3 ) 79 8700 3201 State Rd 84
(305),791- 0 Ft.Lauderdale. i.
AAL A, A_ A -AA


Vietnam veterans. The reef will now be known on all nautical
charts as the Ronald B. Johnson Vietnam Memorial Reef
(Loran-C coordinates 14274.3 and 62093.3) resting in
230 feet of water.
This 230-foot freighter is the second largest ship de-
liberately sunk off the east coast of the United States as
an artificial reef, according to Steve Somerville, artificial
reef coordinator for Broward County's Emvironmental
Quality Control Board.
Pompano can also claim the largest ship, the 435-foot
Lowrancej sunk by the Fishing Rodeo Committee in 1984 in
cooperation with Lowrance Electronics ofTulsa, OK, one
of the tournament's sponsors..
'The Rodeo has a tradition ofnaming its artificial reefs
after companies who have aided this tournament in its salt-


QUALITY SAILS BY
EXPERIENCED CRAFTSMEN








SSAS *. HARDWARE

CALL US TODAY FOR...
New &lUsed Sails o Sail Repoirs
S Complete Rigging Service 0 Hardware
J OCOQpMP Tops & Covenr.
WE AREIEREW WHEN YOU NEED US
"CLOSED SATURDAYS FOR THE SUMMER"
100 S.W. 15th Street, Fr. Lauderdole, FL 33315

FT. LAUD. 522-6767
MIAMI 944-585
--~a^K^^?


water conservation efforts," explained Phil Maus, Rodeo
president.
"The Rodeo Committee felt that it is only fitting to
honor an angler," maus said, "since the fishermen actually
are the reason for the tournament, its success and its de-
dication to the saltwater environment"
The Rodeo has sunk at least six ships and other ap-
proved material since beginning this program. Artificial
reefs provide excellent habitat for fish to spawn, grow
and congregate, Sommerville said, thus providing more
fish-for future generations of fishermen.
All proceeds of the Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo tour-
nament and the Miller Lite beer sales at 4th Annual Pompa-
no Beach Seafood Festival go to saltwater conservation
projects such as this. -


(






Classifieds


---- ., ----s w --- - -
ISLE OF VENICE- Century East Apts. Century East Apts 100 ISLE.OF VENICE
Pool/BBQ/Cable/Laundry. Affordable, liveaboard welcome. Hot shower, Toi-
rates. Furnished apartments.523-2156 let,cable, phone, pool. 523-2156.
LAS OLAS ISLES- 1 bedroom efficie-' ISLE OF VENICE- liveaboards, up to
ncies, rooms. Pool, laundry, cable 52', pool shower, BBQ, laundry,
TV, BBQ, super location. Low rates, cable, phone. Low rates! 525-2223.
weeklv or monthly. Call 525-2223 L .


LAS OLAS ISLE OF VENICE- studios &
efficiencies. 1 & 2 bed apts. Nicely.
furnished. Pool & laundry facilities.
Call 462-5515.
ISLE OF VENICE SANDPIPER RESORT.
One-bed apts. & efficiencies. Pool,
BBQ, cable, laundry.
Call 527-0026
BANYAN MARINA APTS- 111 Isle of
Venice -*524-4430 Elegant apts *
Pool Cable Maid Service *
Special Rates for 2 Month Minimum
YEARLY APARTMENTS- spectacular view,
.from::$435. .Isle:of Venice 467-3512.
HENDRICKS ISLE efficiency plus one
b/r $350-425/mo. .Laundry. 728-9874.
YEARLY 3-ROOM COTTAGE- unfurnished,
for 1 adult. No pets. $310/month.
603.SW 9th Street, Ft Lauderdale.
SUPER LOCATION: waterfront apts*ef-
ficiencies. pool*j acuzzi*cable*close
to shops & beach*laundry. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Off Las Olas.463-7067


Davie DIVE SHOP & pool $1250 525-3016
For rent. Plot on DANIA CUT-OFF
Canal 133' waterfront, 216' back.
Water & elec. Opposite Playboy &
Derecktor Gunnel yards. 1-block from
Tugboat Annies. Viewable at 361 NE
3 Ter. Dania. For info cal 921-2934.
OFFICES,. SHOPS & DOCKAGE on New Riv.
Rent from 100 to 15;000 sq ft in-
growing Sun Power Marine Center,
413 :SW3 Ave,..Ft Laud 522-477.6.
Rent a SPACE IN A WELL EQUIPPED
WOODSHOP- bench, power & machinery
use, materials available for a
qualified marine carpenter $400/mb
&,tax, 6 mo. lease & deposit.
General Hardwoods & Millworks
2619 SW 2-Ave Ft Laud 463-2577.

Call, the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a ClassifiedAd. 524-9464


79 ISLE OF VENICE- deepwater, elec/
water/phone/BBQ/shower/tv. 763-1695
YACHT DOCKAGE & MAINTENANCE SERVICE
ideal for absentee owners. 587-8984.
Las Olas Isle of Venice. Elec, water.,
pool, shower, laundry. 462-5515
ECONOMICAL MARINA- liveaboards from
$250/mo. Showers, laundry, restaur-
ant. DRY STORAGE for small boats
from $50/mo. Call 584-2500.
DOCKS STORAGE from $75/mo. Liveabds
welcome. Easy ocean access. Showers
Service. Repairs..'J&J Marina. 4550
Ravenswood Rd. Ft.Ldl. Call 981-2001
SANDPIPER RESORT 91 Isle of Venice-
dockage to 50'. Liveaboards welcome.
Water/elec,pool,BBQ,laundry,cable.
Call 527-0026.
524 HENDRICKS ISLE- prestige dockage:
Legally able to accommodate large
boats to 65' with live-aboards. Deep
water, beam to 18', parking, 220 &
phone hookup. Fantastic view & breeze
lo fixed Bridges. Net price depending
on length. Available July 1st.
Private home 463-0716
ISLE OF VENICE- sail only. 9' deep.
Up to 53', pool, shower, phone, BBQ
laundry, security. Adults/no pets.
10% off for no auto. Call 467-3512.
ONE BRIDGE TO OCEAN- up to 36'.
$250/mo + electric. Call 525-6150.
PRIVATE DOCK SPACE FOR RENT- 40'
deepwater hurricane hole. No live-
aboards, Elec/water. Call 583-8358.
DOCK FOR RENT- near Pier 66 RioVista
Elec/Wtr No Fxd bridges 51' Draft.
Call 728-8860.
421 HENDRICKS ISLE- livaboard for
two up to 36'. Deep water, wide slip
parking. Elec/water/phone hookup,
shower. No fixed bridges. Net $250.
Available July Ist.
Private home 463-0716
RIVERLAND OFF NEW RIVER. Night light
locked fence. Good security. This is
a lovely spot. No Live-aboards.
Call 587-8451.
HENDRICKS ISLE-Villas & Yacht Club.
Livaboard*Shower*Laundry*Cable*BBQ*
Phone*PATIO DECK. From $300/month.
Call 462-0041.


DOCKAGE: up to 60' (5'8" draft)
yater/elec. No live-aboard
Tel..587-0707
POWER BOATS WELCOME- full amenities
two car parking $375/mo. Hendricks
Isle east side. 525-3005 or 473-0769
37 HENDRICKS ISLE- live-aboard, deep
water, from $275/mo. Incl: utilities
shower, laundry. Call 728-9874.
HENDRICKS ISLE- yearly, live-aboard.
Low craft to 43'.,Berthed alongside.
Water & elec. Call 467-8371.
DOCK FOR RENT- no fxd brdgs, water
& elec. No Ivbds. Ldl Isles 587-4793
Dockage. available N. FORK NEW RIVER
Safe, secure hurricane hole, live-
aboard possible. Call 523-9351.

DOCK FOR RENT- secure deep water,
elec/water, no fxd bridges 792-5215
BEAU RIVAGE II APTS & MARINA-
9' draft sail only to 53'
Pool, shower, laundry, security.
Lower rates for storage,or no auto.
169 Isle of Venice/adults 467-3512..
ONLY 10 MINUTES TO PORT EVERGLADES
Sailboats to 45', water & electric
at dock. Call 463-2533 or 525-0923.
MODERN STATE-OF-THE-ART DEEP DREDGED
live-aboard boat dockage. Full power
water, cable TV, phone, independent
fire-line, beautiful grounds, assign-
ed parking. Laundry facility.
Rio Chateau, 124 Hendricks Isle,
Fort Lauderdale. Call 305-764-8914.
DOCKAGE- 80' & 60'.dock available
at private resort with many amenities
for the discriminating boater.
Call 3Oi-781-1A61 or 60m-R8Q-1250l


HOUSE-SITTER availa e fr coming
summer months. Secure for your
home plus some maint ce provided
by reliable insured andeferenced
person. Long-time t Laudresident
Call 524-9464
MARINE TRADE RELATED AREAS-Situation
multi-faceted 35-yr-old male
strong background mech. tech. envir(
16 yrs in mngmt .BA degree


Excellent ref. 30





HIRING! Government j'obs- your area.
$15,000-$68,000.:.
Call 602-838-8885 ext # 9121


The Fuel Oil Polishing Company of
SDelray Beach
wantsto know-
S-Is your boat a dock-sitter? Do your diesel
engines smoke? Algae, sludge, water,
Sediment. Any or all of these can be
,problems. Our patented "Petrovive"
systemuses E.P.A.-approved
"ENHANCE" biocide and fuel
A conditioner. Let us come to your
Sdock and make your boat a
SJ runner. Don't delay. Call today.
(407) 272-5807


Have you SUBSCRIBED to the
WATERFRONT NEWS yet?
S524-9450


LIVING ABOARD or just dreaming
about it? Subscribe to this unique
quarterly journal w/ facts, tips &
experiences of liveaboards & all
other boating enthusiasts. Only
$12/yr. LIVING ABOARD, 1148 Centre
St., Suite 312-TF, Newton Centre,
MA 02159
Is it true you can BUY BOATS FOR
$43 through the U.S. Government?
Get the facts today!
Call 312-742-1142 ext # 684.


24 Waterfront News July 1988


_ i







Classifieds


Waterfront News July 1988 2


I G n' rator :


SAILORMAN- World's largest and most
unique, new & used marine emporium.
Send for catalog. 350 East State Rd.
84, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
Call:305-522-6716 FL 1-800-331-5359
Beautiful NEW SPA- earthtone color
complete.w/turbo jets $800 421-6920
FLOATING HQME- 35'xl4';1BR loft,
sun-deck, a/c, custom design. Good
office or live-aboard. Needs work-
carpentry, finishing inside. Marina
Bay area dock. Best offer/trade.
Call 587-4653.
Exercise BIKE $40. Call 524-9464
DODGER & BIMINI:blue exceli cond.
fits 44' Gulfstar.. $100each 5247721
HRO SYSTEM 7 WATERMAKER- less than
2 hours use. Excellent condition.
$2100 oho. Call 946-7245.
DAVITS--4 pair, 3000 lbs. $300.
Phone after 6pm 764-1261.
Chicago PNUEMATIC AIR COMPRESSOR-
water-cooled. 275 C7M, 3-phase. Good
condition.Make offer call 728-9488.
GIRLS':ENGLISH BIKE. Call 791-4043,
SECURE YOUR BOAT-
No wiring, back-up battery system.
No obligation demonstration.
Call 432-8955 MS Enterprises.


DODGER IiTH FRAME- Bimini. Blue,
fits 44'. Ex1nt condn $100. 524-7721
DAVTTS"- -ddty new mobtorf. Prime
MAHOGANY- all-sizes. Call 491-1220.


CLARINET- new. Call 791-4043.








8* AVON REDCREST- unopened, brand
new,.$800 firm. Call 728-9474.
SEA EAGLE 11' DINGHY with 4hp Merc'
& many extras. $700 obo. Call Kevin
971-6102 days, 785-0894 eves till 10
FIBERGLASS DINGHY- cruise & carry
12.lbs. Outboard. $250. 522-5176,


PERKINS 4-108. Complete, rebuilt
head, inj. system. $600. ph 467-3348
DETROIT DIESEL*MERCRUISER*CUMMINGS*
CATERPILLAR*ATOMIC 4*WESTERBEKE*
YANMAR- new & used. Sunpower Diesel
Call 522-4775 (Jay)




.. MORGAN'S
MARINE DIESELNC
Detroit Diesel Onan Westerbeke Perkins
211 S.W. 27th Street
SFort Lauderdale, Florida 33315
Shop: 764-0365 Home: 587-4434


New Westerbeke generators boat show
prices! RPM Diesel Engine Co 764-6800
ONAN PARTS- new & record heads, camsT
blocks, manifolds, cranks, stators &
rotors. We have it! Don Hillman, Inc.
2501 State Road 84. Call 581-2376.


WESTERBEKE 15kw- never installed in
boat, zero hours. $7500.
Repower Systems 925-6302
WESTERBEKE 6.5kw generator- less
than 15 hrs. use..$2100 obo.
Call 946-7245 '(LHP)


FARYMANN 6kw diesel generator-
low-hour, like new. $1495.
Repower Systems 925-6302


WISCONSIN GENERATOR (1980) 25kw-
surge. 20kw atts 200 amp service.
10 hours total running time. $8000..
Call 215-968-5688 (7pm-12am)
ONAN*WESTERBEKE*KOHLER*NORTHERN LIGHTS
new & used. 3 to 50kw. Trade-ins are
welcomed. Sunpower Diesel.
Call 522-4775 (Jay)








46' CREEKMORE diesel.Offers 524-9464


- INTEREST- 41' KETCH long-distance
live-aboard cruiser. Call for inven-
tory.Has everything.Bristol 527-1458


NEW BOAT BUYERS
Before buying that new.
boat -call me- I WILL
SAVE you MONEY 462-7833

Survyor







MARINE SURVEYOR &CONSULTANT-
Pre-purchase & Insurance, Sail &
power. Wm.. Seager. .Tel 791-8628.
MARINE SURVEYOR- buyers & insurance
Surveys for both POWER &r SAIL.
Call Ed Rowe at 792-6092.
MARINE SURVEYOR & Consultant-
Capt. Boyd Hildebrand 925-4214 Ft.L.
MARINE SURVEYOR- prepurchase and
insurance, power or sail, fiberglass
wood, metal. Stem to Stern. 483-8318
-PASCOE & ASSOCIATES Inc.
All types of surveys
Since 1944 NAMS
Four certified surveyors
524-8661 nights 946-4436
MARK RHODESMARINE SURVEYOR-
buyers, insurance and evaluation.
Power and sail. Call 946-6779


L~ Il


..


'A.




FOR SALE- 2be'd 2bath condo. Conv eni
ient 15th St location complete with
dockage for 45.' boat. Call.462-6032
(leave messagee),
FORT LAUDERDALE- riverfront duplex..
ocean access,-2 BR's, one-,with glass
sliding-doors to yard & do'ck-. Car-
pprt,garage, laundry, clean.. Aval-
now. Assm mtg. $150,000. 564-4368.
WATERFRONT HOME St. Petersburg. :
.4-Bedroom 2Bathroom family hom&on',
deep water canal-.,Adjoins Maximo
'Marina. 10minutes by boat to Gulf.
.Available now. $157,500. Call.owner
at 1-813-864-3150.

ROBERT P. GARGANO
& ASSOCIATES. REALTORS

.(0)462-5770


..AS OLAS iSLES-DfEEPWAT R-Ro
Fixted B~ridges-3- bdrm, 2 ~batK .home
$325,000.
SNEW RIVER DEEPWATER -3+
bdrm, 4-1/2 bath estate Lhome on 1
acre'$650,000.
ROYAL MAIARINER Furnished,.Pent-
house Oond o, Spectacular Intracoastal-
& Oceanviews Dockage Available -
$185-9000..
CITRUS ISLES DEEPWATERL-
Duplex-Just Listed $1194.,900..
CITRUS ISLES -Just Listed 2 bdrm
Deepwater home 75' waterfrontt
$144,900.
'0 MAYA MARCA CONDO .Spacious.
bedrooni5, 2 bath located in prestigious
Harbor Beach with beautiful 6th floor
ocean anid Intracoastal view!! Largest
corner apartment in Unique building
with only 6, units per floor. JUST
LISTED $149,900.
RESORT HOTEL CONDO 2 bdrm,
2 bath furnished right on the Ocean -
generates income $155,000.
RIVER REACH CONDOS-SALES,&
ANNUAL RENTALSI Live on an Island
near downtown I Fort. Lauderdale on
the New River! 24 hr..security, golf,
tennis, sauna S, 3 pools and
unrestricted Ocean Access dockage
(owners only-as available..
1 and' 2 bdrms available from
$619,000 to $112,500.
SRiver Reach rentals also available.
MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTW~S AVAILABLE
KNEW WATERFRONT LISTINGS NEEDED"
w Ilve Qopiw~rduyamr
ROBERT P. GARGANO
& ASSOCIATES, REALTORS
1700 E. Las Olis Suite 204 Ft. Laud., FL
~(305) 462-5770
Living and Working on the New River


I


1'


PEGASUS CHARTERS: daysails, evening
cruises, weekends. 50' ketch, 5 dbl
cabins'. SCUBA. Call 525-3365







26 wtertont News July198 Classifieds

I FI CB
Marine^^H^BB^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H Sevie anvas^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^R" ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ T'ri^* t^^


ATLANTIC MOBILE MARINE REPAIR-
gas, diesel & electrical repair.
24 hr dock svc 978-1640.
CHAMBERLAND YACHT UPHOLSTERY-
reupholstery & custom work: autos,
home furniture, boat cushions & canvas
bedspreads, drapes, Tonneau cover,
renovations, etc, Call Lisa 527-1825
COMPLETE RIGGING AT YOUR DOCK
competitive prices, quality service
Ask for Ted 463-7100 ..
SUZIE Q Yacht Service for all yacht
-interiors, exteriors. Cleaning var-
nish refinishing. Excellent work.
764-5852
BOAT LETTERING BY CAROL- standard &
custom, gold leaf. Reasonable rates.
Free estimate call 922-0334/528-0877
COLUMBIA CARBURETTOR.ESTBLISHD 1949
262 SW 33 St FORT LAUDERDALE
NEED A NEW CARBURETTOR? MAYBE NOT.
WE ARE PROFESSIONAL REBUILDERS.
BRING IN YOUR CARBURETTOR FOR IN-
SPECTION. SEE US 1st.Call Bill at
523-5500.
PILINGS RESTORED- wood or concrete,
any condition.,10-year guarantee.
For brochure & free estimate call
Our 30th year! anytime 525-741.1
FUEL TANK CLEANING at your dock..
FLORIDA TANK & FUEL SERVICE.
Prompt service. No mess. 963-1775.
GENERAL BOAT MAINTENANCE- mechanical,
electrical, refinishing, woodwork.
Reasonable rates & professional work.
Call Jack at 467-3348.
YACHT REFINISHING & REPAIR- varnish,
painting, fibreglassing, re-veneer-
ing, general maintenance. Reasonable
rates, hourly' or estimate. 583-4990
PRE-SPACED BOAT LETTERING 3M vinyl
materials- gntd 7 yrs or replaced
:free! Installed in or out.of water.
Get 10% off with this ad.
Supergrafix computerized lettering.
1513-C No Fed Hwy Pompano (next to
Blue Lagoon) 782-2267 800-537-SIGN


EXPERT AWLGRIP PAINTER
12 years local experience, reason-
able rates, references. Ph 522-1191
Will CATER ANY OCCASION HOME/BOAT-
reasonable. Sandy 977-9219*720-9136
SEA WALLS SEALED & REPAIRED
DOCK BUILDING & REPAIRS
DOCK PILINGSRRESTORED.
DOCK&SEA WALL MNTCE LIC&INS.9685382


.ANVAS FACTORY- Flybridge covers,
Bimini tops, Mooring covers & Repairs
Mobile truck will perform work at your
site. Call 781-1970.
Try'CRUISING CANVAS of 1500 W. Broward
(Three blocks east of 1-95)'
Custom marine canvas, repairs, yard
goods & do-it-yourself supplies.
FREE.ESTIMATES. Call 467-2722 today.
ATLANTIC MARINE CANVAS- 100% mobile
prompt'quality workmanship 943-5541


MATE NAVIGATOR *'SAILMAKER for"
deliveries & offshore passages.
celestial navigation, loft quality:
sail repairs underway, provisioning
for passages & cooking.
Call Kim Sanders (305) 764-8191
YACHT CAPTAIN- 100-ton lic., power &
sail, all areas, charters, deliver-
ies or permanent position. Excellent ':<
refs. Cant Ed Wiser 305-977-3934.


CANVAS WORK. REPAIR. ALTERATIONS.
Pick-up & deliver.Reasonable rates.
Estimates. Call 524-9497.


MACS CANVAS for all your canvas
needs: repairs,marine uphlstry*covers,
boat curtains*seats*cushions*boat
tops*sling cushions. Call 978-0755.
NATIONAL CANVAS for all your canvas"
needs at 128 No. Fed. Hwy. (6th Ave)
Delray Beach, FL. Call 1-305-278-652.L3


, SUZIE Q YACHT SERVICES for all yacht
interiors, exteriors, cleaning, varnish
refinishing. Excellent work 764-5852
HULL CLEANING under water. Call Bob
leave message at 463-9810.
*BOTTOMS CLEANED-props,zincs,engines
Mnthly mntc. Call 587-6207 (24hrs)
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICES-
boats offices houses
S also prep & varnish work
Call Kathleen 462-0832
SCOTT'S CLEANING SERVICE, Inc.-
total boat care, bottom service,
free estimates. Call 925-7182.
No more Waxing! Boats, cars, aero-
planes. New teflon systems. 12 mth
warranty. We come to you. Free es-
timates. Apple Polishing Systems
Inc of Pompano Beach. Call us on
785-7741..


D&I TEFLON-SERVICES INC.
Specialists in yacht detailing,
varnishing, teak work. Protect your
boat exterior for a year with the
very best polish/sealant in or out
of water.
I, "Apple" dealer. Call for details
523-5145
AQUA MAIDS offers interior/exterior
cleaning, waxing, taking, grocery
shopping.. Wkly/bi-monthly/month.
Insured. 748-5936.
GLENN's BOAT CLEANING SERVICE- custom
S wash & wax, teak cleaning & oiling,
varnishing. Weekly & Bi-monthly ser-
vice. Call 305-783-6861.


VIA PANAMA by author. Cruising
Ports Calif. to Fla. 200,000 miles
exper. USCG Master 500 tons. Fluent
Spanish. Worldwide Capable;
fCaptain John Rains (619) 222-9028
LICENSED CAPTAIN/ENGINEER- mature
reliable. 30 yrs experience.
Capt Dick 305 480-9684
USCG Lisc. Capts. Cel. Nay. & Mar.
Surv. Deliveries & Skippers.for
hire. Capts. John & Eric 946-7086.
CAPTAIN FOR HIRE- USCG 100-ton Lic.
Deliveries &/or island trips. Exp.
fisherman. Call, Capt. Joe Kane
463-5586. ..


UNDERWATER HULL CLEANING,
Zinc replacement, prop-recondition-. <
ing. Call 563-0359.


Save money* Carry-in repairs on mo
marine electronic equipment. FCC
licensed**Serving Fort Lauderdale
since 1955*Dick Ross, 122 SW 5 St,


Ist


LAMAR 751-2986 or 462-0176 GELCOAT
27 YRS EXP- Fiberglass & Woodworking
Repair & remodeling, cabinetry.
Your dock or mine. Jack Anderson
462-6758.


REFRIGERATION AIR CONDITIONING
Repairs & Installation-- service ALL -
brands, 1 yr. warranty on BOTH parts
& labor, $25/hr., day or night, we
custom build most any type-of unit or
DO-TT-YOUR-SELF, we sell what you need
with free advice. MEETING YOUR COOL-
ING NEEDS SINCE 1977. Call Custom
.Refrigeration at .527-0540. i.

Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9464


*l0.e9 u,


1301 S.E. 22nd Avenue* Pompano, FL 33069


R413
SCUBA CLASSES. NAUI. Call 564-8661.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C &
USCG OPERATOR's LICENSE PREP. Will
teach same to seafarers for $12 per1
session. Call 462-2628.


I


Main Eecroic


~bP~xn~





Classifieds WaterfrontNews July 1988 27


If The" Shoe Fits Repair It" __"S'

-- "MODERN SHOE REPAIR
ESTABLSHED BOAT MINTAEBS. Floridas First Factory Authorized Repair Station
ESTABLISHED BOAT MAINTENANCE BUS.. Sperry Top-Siders, Sea Tracs
MICHAEs MARIE SERVIE f s Incl wholesale accts, bank acct, All Brands Boat and Sport Shoe.s Repaired
MICHAEL' MARIE SERVICEoff liceses,cop. seal& some Your Lottey l
custom woodworking, milling & yacht supplies. Call Jerry 525-0872.. Hrs. 9 A.M 5:30 P.M. Mon: thru Fri.
maintenance to the waterfront corn- 1421 S. Andrews Ave, (305) 524-9409
munity. Experienced.& dependable Ft. Lauderdale Fla. 33316 Est.1928
with complete shop & mobile. facility. .- --
Established in 1981. Call 765-1466. i r
CUSTOM MARINE, WOODWORKING .(QUALITY)"" Phone467-7005
467-7159
Richard Giambersio restores, renews,
rebuilds. Intrs.extrs. Call-791-8972 TRUE'S GLASS & MIRROR
B1NNICLE YACHT SERVICE- marine STRANAHAN HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1968
ar Marine Mirror & Glass
carpentry, cabinetwork, custom Ft. Lauderdale- will be holding its Marine Mirror & Glass
milling. Hardwoods, veneer & mica. 20th Class Reunion July 15-17. & Lexan Installed
Custom Wall Mirrors Table Tops A
'Complete shop facilities & dockside Window & Plate Glass
service. 22 yrs. experience. Call
523-9030.o .- For 34 Years 101 S.W 15th Street z
.. F. e"CHRIS", Ft. Lauderdale, FL 3331,
CONTRACTOR / CARPENTER
to make repairs to existing wooden structures
and other repairs. Inspection by appointment. r
Detailed firm bid and references required. IA CLASSIFIED AD CLASSIFIED RATES: r ADVERTISER: T i
Specifications for bidding can be obtained by In the: (35 character/line)
calling: First line $5.00 Name
667-3233 WATERFRONT NEWS Each Addiltonal Line $4.00 Address
or writing to: 1224 S.W. 1st Avenue city St_ ZIp
oSallyerJude Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315 Make checks payable to the Phone Ad Amount $
allye Jde 524-9464 Waterfront News
200 Edgewater Dr.
Coral-Gables, FL 33133
Bids will be opened June 28th. Funds for the
project are from the Florida Division of Historical I
Resources and the Department of State.

Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to I
laAe a' Classified Ad. 524-9464 l I ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE 15th DAY OF THE MONTH
1------ -------- -


Merrill-Stevens Dry Dock


OF FT. LAUDERDALE, INC.


AT

49aaylo ae,ania, 004
Tel. (305) 920-8771 Telex: 510-955-9841


FULL SERVICE YACHT
REPAIRS
60 TON TRAVELIFT .... VERY COMPETITIVE


WE'RE GOOD
WE'RE CLEAN
WE'RE FRIENDLY


AND WE'RE LOCATED
HERE JUST iNW SIDE
OF DANIA CANAL


- l
ROUN


CALL US

920-8771


EE A


BOTTOM

.PAINTIN


C ]NC


I CA RP TERS
E NI


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28' WaterfrontNews June 1988