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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00028
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: June 1, 1986
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00028

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Letters
        Page 2
    Main: Opinion
        Page 3
    Main: News
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Heritage
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Sailing
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Spring Break
        Page 12
    Main: Hurricane Season
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Main: Hurricane Checklist
        Page 16
    Main: Fishing
        Page 17
    Main: Commerce
        Page 18
    Main: Power Boats
        Page 19
    Main: Safety
        Page 20
    Main: The Main Brace
        Page 21
    Main: Habitat
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Main: Food
        Page 24
    Main: Swimming
        Page 25
    Main: Classified Section
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text



















































SUNOA Y MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY' THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
Fjr- Tru rt.-r15 16 rr 18 19 20 summer soltice21
une Miami Boat Show gourmet Lanoeing o
Father's Day Beach lost day ugboat Annies, Dania young PeoDle's Fish
lve 920-8405 Boot Skylls Llass all City FtL 761-5419 Tourn. 7am Fig Tree
lye 920-8@405 Boot kves oLGourmet Canoeing 5:45
laml Summer Boat Sho Dania USCGAux 462-6987 urrer rs a scovery talna Sl Club 9 GSC Summer Cruise Park 791-2225
ulf Stream Sail Club Booting Course- US 'r.- 10-5 t-so, n-5 1 or 1 7 G otg Css Me Pena 792-1521 Msc. Exch.
omen's Inv, Race Power Squad 782-7277 u, waterfront museum 973-9341 or 491-3327 UL.GAux Eoating Class Mllke Pena 792-1521 onovon Musc. Ech.
om R r S 72-2 2-4116 Ocean Sound Band 3 pm 3550 Hollywood America' Outdoor Exoo Redross Shelter
>eaFair W/E Fest Dancing a Beach Th. irrrnes 3 us Ex Musc ExC.c., Ft.L. c,'-i.91q' jr ,79-31F. Fno\ville, NMMA 8a 1 :22i 8:
0259.0935*1535.2201 0353-1031.1 C0.-2302 l1-4- *.1129*1740 time 0002, 5-1: 1226-1838 0100-06441.1320.1934 0157-0736-1415-2029 0252-0831-15102121
+0.1 +0.2 -0.1' +0.2 -0.3' 10W +0.1' -0.5' o.o' -0.6' -0.1' -0.8' -0.2' -0-9'
FuI oI
22 Live Wires play a 23 24 25 26 27 28
Beach Th., Hlywd.
ighthouse Cove Board Hist. Mus, of SF, Red Cross Annual Mtg. So. Fla. Fishing ShoreShine Voyager
;ail Regatta 941-3410 summer program for ioon a Pier 66 581422 Classic thru 28th Project
tL Drift Dive AM kids starts today JSCGAUX boating Class lon-O-War Cup, Abacos USCGAUX Boating Class t,L. Senior Swim. Tenneco Platforms
}25-7877 So.Fla. Dive Solv. Army Day Camp 3pm, Rm.#220, 3pm 564-2621 Hollywood 454-6917 Open thru 29th ISHOF Dive 8:30a925-7877
onzi Concours Dele' 844 W. Broward, $40 )cean Sound Band Hope Town Marsh Har- Gourmet Canoeing a Jimmy Smith a Musc' By & Deering Estate
once Arrival Day thru Aug 15 524-6995 lusc. Exchange qor Reqqpt 564-2621 Coutry Grill- Weston Wh, thry 28th trip, pode 375-1497
../ i + .5 +2.2' +2.5' +2.2' +2.2' +2.1' high +2.2' +2.0' +2.1 +1.9', +1.9' +1.8'
0347.0926.1603-2213 0439-1020.1657-2306 0534-1117.1711.2358 0628-1213-1846 time 0052-0723;1311.1941 0145-0819-1412.2039 0239.0914.1513.2139
-0.3' -0.9' -0.3' -0.8 -0.3' -0.7' -0-3' -0.5' -0.2' -0.3' -0.2' -0.1 -0.1' +
Lost Quarter 29 30 1 2 3 44 5
S. Fl. Diver Fourth of July "M.A.SH. 4077- Bind-
So. Fla. Divers n nn thp Wounds"
Bonaire Trip 942-3950 Ci.yLights Regattoa tnup thExh Wounds"
)cer- ,riangle Race # Ae FoTITo Tes i m Fireworks on Holly- loan to Hiso MusE So
Z Stream Sail Club D-iiicng a Beahtl-m-ea- Wo braLIh 5p lan to HW Mus, So
aimi Dive Wreck/Dlve ter, lollywood,7:30pm measure Coy Regatta SCGAUX Boating Class Red Cross Disaster Lu.rl.Div ers Party 2 lami 6 mosWF3-lger9
22-2888 So.Fla.Diver Ileabi First a Musc. Ex. 64-2621 :30om LHP 971-0648 Relief Fill Up Day ree l T.rle, COY r Mci mos.i xc,3
1'' ., + 1.8' +1.6' +1.9 +1.6' +1.9
0. l 11-.il _'- L.i' 'i._ ll i 2 i i-.1 .-i L IiiI r O. LC~ u-:1 j--o il 'Ii.'u6-~9*.i.61940 0201.0732 1409*2022 024330814.1449.2104
-0.1+0 2' -0.1 +0 3 -0.1 low +0.4' -0.1' +0.4' -0.2'.. +0.3' -0.2' 2 +0.3' -0.3'

.6 NewMoon 7 8 9 10 11 12
Gulfstream Sail Club ulf Stream Soil Club 'ort Everglades Row- dolphin Dash Fishing Noreen Rouse Dive
Board Mtg. general Mtg. 8pm Hol- ing Club Mtg. 7pm New River Raft Race tournament kick-off Palm Beach AM
arasota Off-Shore United Civic Assoc. day Inn, Oceanside ity Annex 301 N. Organizing Mtg. 7:30 arty 6:30pm, Sea 741-9140 SoFIDivers
powerboat Race 7:30pm Loc:TBA urricane Seminar 1ndrews. 463-7035 4140 Peters Rd, FtL arden Resort 584-7178 Dolphin Dash Fish T.
tra Freeze 8am Museum Summer Session :30pm FtL City Hall .>o.FI.Divers Gen Mtg JayCees HQ 791-0202 ed Cross Shelter Weighin a NNN Seafood
81-5143 So. Fla His. Museum 61-5130 -ollywood HoJo's 7:30 Open to the public rainin 8:30am 2821 E. Atlantic
+1. +z.u 375 l, + .0o, +1.7 +2. +1.7': +1.9 1.-7' high +1.8' '+70 + .8'
0325-0856.1529.2142 0404-0935.1608.2219 0441 1015-1647-2256 0519-1113.1726-2333 0558-1139.1808 time 0011.0640-1224.1851 0052-0722-1314.1939
+0.2' -0.3 +Q'.2' -0.3' +0.2' -0.3' +0.1' -0.2* +0.1' -0.2' lOw +0.1 -0.1 0.0 0 0

13 1st J rr 14 15 TIME ADJUSTiErlTS TO-TIDE TABLEpf
High Water Low
icean Triangle Race#2 Boating Skills Class Phone (305) 524-9450 Hillsboro Inlet- -31 Minutes -50 NeWS0
ulfStream Sail Club JSCGAux Boating Class USCGAux Hollywood Bahia Mar------ -20 ........ -18
dolphin Dash Fishing 7:30 FtL. 463-0034 3550 Hlywd 454-6917
ournoment for C.P. ;ea Breeze n0 y; Port Everglades- -45 ... . -62
1 U I' +1 .8, +1 .8+I,++.1 '
0133.0801402032 02230901.15072129 0316.0959.1610 2232 Dania Cut-Off-- +45 ........ ..+28 124 S.W. 1st Avenue
-0.1' +0.1 -0.1' +0.2 -0.2' +.21 TIDE TABLES Davie Bridge---- +40 ........ +40 Ft LauderdaleFL33315
Baseline: Andrews Avenue Bridge over New River at mean low water, Eastern Daylight Savings Time Volume 3 issue 4 June 15-July 15, 1986
1_ Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co.. Inc., 1986






2 Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Uoterfront News Letters


Editor:
Re "Sharks" by Bryan Brooks: Waterfront
News: May 15 June 15, 1986; page 10.
Recently my husband and I were .;n a vacation
in Florida. We are both surfers. divers and
fishermen.
While in Florida, I picked up a nev paper called
Waterfront News. I started to read Mr. Brooks"
article in the diving section on sharks.
At first I became angered at what was being
said. I thought How can anyone promote such a
senseless killing of such an intriguing predator?
I realized a paragraph down thI Mr. Brooks
was being facetious about whai, he was writing. I
read on.
For years I have been interested in sharks. The
more I see of them surfing and diving, the more I
want to understand them.
I would appreciate it if you might suggest some
books or periodicals I could read.
I live on the coast of North Carolina where there
are many sharks. The more I know the easier it
would be to explain my interest...to back up
what I believe. I find it a subject few people know
anything about.

Janette Ramsey
Oriental, North Carolina
Bryan Brooks response:
Thank you for your letter responding to our
article: Many people have expressed a similar
view. One can only hope that before we
exterminate every creature on this planet, we
learn how important each and every creature is to
the other, that somehow we are all inter-relater to
each other.
One can also hope that with education we learn
to be what we are, all citizens of the same planet,
and we need each other. Somehow, maybe then
will Rambo, Cobra and kill melt away. One can
always hope.


Editor's Note: In Captain Bill Hard's "From This
Dock" column in the May 15-June 15,1986 issue of
the Waterfront News,.page nineteen, Capt. Hard
made some comments about gasoline prices as
found at marine gas docks as compared to recent
prices at street gas stations. Below is reaction to
Hard's opinions and the captain's response.

Dear Captain Hard:
In volume 3 issue 3 you pontificated on the
subject of gasoline prices at marinas as against


Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc., 1986
ISSN 8756-0038

laerfro t
0p News
1224 S W. 1st Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
Phone (305) 524-9450
PUBLISHED BY ZIEGLER PUBLISHING CO., INC.


"Editor:
Editorial
Assistant:
Illustrators:


John Ziegler

Ed Wiser
Teri Cheney, Lauri Cahill,
Bob Barrientos, Julie Gepfrich,
Lori Hlavso


Advertising Ken Simkin (Ft.-Lauderdale)
Specialists: Linda Newman (S. Broward & Dade)
Cy Malone (N. Broward & Palm Bch.)
Reporters: Nathan Roberts (At Large)
Craig Lusgarten (North Broward)
Jennifer Heit (South Broward)
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich, Jason Welles,
Bud Alcott, Scott Moore,
.** Darin Gleichmann, Kelly Alcott,
Jeff Prosje, Swen Neufeldt,
S Matt Moore, Patrick Gillis,
Todd Clarke, John Metzger,
Charles Metzger, Gail Johnson,
Steven Bunker, Richard Sutcliffe,
BOE.M.MW G Brett Anderson, Todd Reasoner
THE WATERFRONT NEWS welcomes stories, art and
photos. THE WATERFRONT NEWS is not responsible for
unsolicited contributions, lost or damaged photo
material. THE WATERFRONT NEWS retains first rights
only. Advertising rates are available upon request.


City streets, and you complained that marinas
wouldn't have an answer for charging more per
gallon.
When I grew up boating in the St. Lawrence
River, we used to go to one g'as station which had
a location such that they had pumps on the water
and the exact same pumps pumping from the
same tanks up on the street,, and they charged a
differential for the gas on the water. I used to
bitch about this until some years later when I got
in the marine business.
With "Captain" in front "of your name you
should realize there is a few differences between
a land gas station and a marine gas station.
Strictly aside from the cost of the land itself,
the taxes and all that, consider our fuel dock here
at Lauderdale Marina. That 350' of concrete dock
represents a construction cost for just the dock
of perhaps a half million dollars, and if I recall it
right we, spent $40,000 repairing that concrete in
the last year or so. In the front of that dock are
fender piling, which don't have too long a life and
which are. not infrequently broken by our
customers when they get a little older, which.
have a value of about $26,000. Feeding the gas
pumps is a relatively new installation in the last
few years of expensive tanks and expensive
piping, because the effects of salt water on this
equipment I am sure are well known to you. It
seems to me that this was about $150,000.
Because boats don't always park conveniently
close to the pumps, there is at the moment on our
dock some 500' of gasoline hose quite a bit
heavier than that used in an automotive place,
which hose has a high mortality rate because of
the way it is used.
Every month we lose a few hundred dollars
worth of dock lines which we have on our dock for
the convenience of our customers.
All'this is just a beginning. It does notcover the
necessary auxiliary structures, our dock store,
the 6 or 8 refrigeration units we have, the $15,000
dive air compressor, nor does it speak to the very
high maintenance costs of anything around the
salt water.
Finally, you compared marine gasoline prices
to self service prices at the street pumps. if you
would compare them to the full service price at
the pumps you would find that the discrepancy is
hardly as much as you have indicated.

Robert 0. Cox
Lauderdale Marina
Ft. Lauderdale.


Captain Hard's response to Mr. Cox:
I'm sincerely pleased that you have taken time
to respond to my comparison of gas prices dock
vs. street pumps. Until your response, my
inquiries have been put off and my phone calls
left on hold or unreturned by most marinas. This
resulted in a one-sided article as I could not get a
responsible reply such as yours at,the time of
printing.
Like yourself, I was raised on the water up
north and.love boating enough to have acquired
an Ocean Operatofs License. I totally agree with
you as to the added cost of running marina over
a roadside service station. The refrigeration and
air compressor is for additional business, selling
bait and air fills in competition with local tackle
and dive shops. This should not drive upthe gas
prices. Having a very good location, it is to your
best interests to diversify and I feel certain that as
a businessman, you made the right decision in
doing so.
My one complaint is that the vast majority of
marinas used the past gas price increases to
raise prices 50% over land stations. This is the
average price on brand name gasoline, not the
extreme high or low prices that can be found. This
50% hike is a far greater percentage over land
stations than marinas have charged in the past.
Granted the marinas have greater overhead and
maintenance and require a higher price per
gallon, but I believe the increases marinas require
should be percentage-wise, proportional to
increases charged by gasoline wholesalers with
proportional profit.
As one of the gas purchasing boaters, I feel that
this year the marinas have been a bit too hard on
the boating public in regard to gas profits. Am I
wrong?


Mr. Cox's Rebuttal To Capt. Hard's response:
I don't intend to make this a two way
correspondence session, but let me answer your
last question, asking whether marinas have been
a bit too hard on the boating public in regard to
gas profits.
First of all let me tell you that I am a consulting
engineer by profession, and I have done quite a
bit of consulting in connection with marina
design in the past when I have had more time. One
of the things that I have refused to do is to be a
financial planner for marinas and I have refused
to comment on the profitability of the many
marine schemes which have flowed through my
desk because I have tried to be honest all of my
life and there is no way that I could support some
of the figures that various entrepreneurs have
proposed to me.
Basically, marinas are very inefficient users of
very expensive land and almost any other use of
marina land would produce a higher income for
the owners, and this is especially true now that
you have to pay the State of Florida a bottom land
tax for rent.
You cannot name me a marina which has been
started and become financially viable just for
docking and fueling boats. It is only the
associated bars, hotels, and other businesses
which make them fly. With my City hat on, for
example, I well recall that we allowed Bahia Mar
to build the new hotel because without building it
they couldn't earn enough money to pay the City
an appropriate rental for the land.
The fact that the old marina where the Marriott
now is was converted, the fact that Pier 66 was
sold for its "shore side" values, and the fact that
there is no development of a marina in recent
years which has not been an auxiliary to some
kind of shore side development should show you
the truth of these matters.
Not too many years ago we had a depositcheck
which would have allowed us to retire gracefully
and sell out Lauderdale Marina to become a few
more acres of condominiums. The reason we
didn't is because of ourlong term interest in
boating, so that we decided to maximize the
potential of the property in order to allow us to
keep the marina and the gas dock. The result of
this was the restaurant which you probably are
familiar with and a concentration of a few other
boating activities so that we try to be what we say
we are in our .brochure, a nautical shopping
center. If 1 had sold out, the line of least
resistance, there would then be only two places
on the Intracoastal Waterway in the Yachting
Capitol of America which would have a
reasonably decent gas dock and you would be
even harder up than you are now.
You mustn't forget that when I came here and
opened Lauderdale Marina in 1948, there was no
gas available on the Intracoastal Waterway at all
in all of Fort Lauderdale and perhaps all of
Broward County, although there was one marina
where the East Las Olas Bridge is now and
(without gas).
We lost money on our gas dock for probably25
years. The margins were so low on fuel that they
were all used up on our basic expenses for labor
and the operation of just the dock. I grant you that
we are now making a little money on the fuel
dock, but percentage-wise no more than we try to
make in our store or any other commercial
operation. I would also remind you that we did not
increase our prices recently, for example, when
the gasoline prices wentback up another 4s or so.
I still think that you will find, on balance, that
we are not too bad compared with the full service
prices of fuel on the highway. I do know for a fact
that some of the stations on the highway are
selling some of their fuel through their self
service pumps at their cost strictly as a come on,
and obviously anyone with the basic built in costs
of a marina cannot afford to do this.
Fianlly you cannot separate the cost of the fuel
from all of the rest ofthe business which you do in
a marina. If you really made fuel stand on its own,
with all of the associated costs, it would be even
higher. The fact that we have the additional sales
on our fuel dock of hardware, sundries, fishing
tackle, etc., help the over all picture so that the
fuel costs can be kept reasonable.
I ,Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450






Opinion Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 -July 15, 1986 Waterfront Newus 3


Opinion:


Waterfront Agencies Help The Hungry And Homeless


by M.G. Swift

Last month several million Americans joined
hands in a symbolic gesture against hunger and
homelessness in this country. President Reagan,
rather defensively, suggested that the real
problem is one of ignorance. Reagan speculated
that the "have-nots" don't know where to go for
available aid. Perhaps in Reagan's lefthanded
way, he's correct. Maybe, too, we, "haves", are
ignoring the existence of these dispossessed, and
the people in private and public programs
struggling to deal with their circumstances.
We in the waterfront community have only to
look as far asthe Seventh Avenue boat rampto be
aware of the situation. The next time you haul out
your $12,000, plaything from the New River,
instead of putting your hand on your gun in
response to that bum n the seawall, drive four
blocks to the Salvation Army Center. Put that
hand on your wallet or appointment calendar and
volunteer some time or donate some of your bait
and beer money to the Army's efforts to get those
people off the streets and away from "your"
ramps and into adequate housing, clothing and
training programs.
If that dirty, sunburned "bag lady" under the
bridge kind of bothers you as your passing yacht
interrupts her monolog with her phantoms in the
shopping cart, consider a contribution to the
Henderson Mental'Health Center rather than your
individual retirement account this month. It may
be more constructive than paying $5 per head to
root for Rambo or Cobra as he kills communists
and criminals in the movies.
*
College students were not the only ones who
made the pilgrimage to Broward County's
beaches this past spring.
Joel M., aged'14 saved up $1000 from part-time
jobs and hopped onto a bus bound for Fort
Lauderdale, leaving Chicago and his mother
behind. Until his money ran out, Joel lived in a
motel and "partied". Later, he was broke and
sleeping on the beach. Thatwas better than going
home to his mother and boyfriends.
Dee Y., 17, of Broward County, was living on the
streets. Her mother had kicked Dee out of the
house. Dee was into drugs, alcohol, street life.
A morning beach walker found Joel asleep in
the sand. She told him about a place with a bed
and food, unconditional and non-punitive. Some
of the other street girls told Dee about a "safe
house" on the beach..



Letters

Gentlemen:
At a recent boat show, I picked up a copy of
Waterfront News, and was greatly impressed.
Please forward a copy of your rate sheet at the
address shown below. Thank you.

Laura H. Ernst
Pompano Beach, Florida

Editor's Note: Waterfront News has booths in four
"boat shows" throughout the year: the Ft.
Lauderdale Spring Sport and Boat Show at Bahia
Mar, South Florida Used Boat Show at Marina
Bay, Dania Marine Flea Market and Ft.
Lauderdale International Boat Show. Please call
or write, as Ms. Ernst did, to find out more
information about the publication.
Thanks, Laura, we appreciate your kind words
and look forward to working with you.
June 15, 1986, the Waterfront News is moving
into bigger offices located at 1224 S.W. 12th
Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315. Our phone
number will remain 524-9450.

c/o Waterfront News
1224 S.W. 1st Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315
or phone. 305-524-9450


Dee and Joel found their ways to Covenant
House, 733 Breakers Avenue in Fort Lauderdale.
This eighty-eight bed facility provides three
meals a day, sanctuary from the terrors of the
street, and a twenty-four hour staff in three shifts
to help young work on their situations.
"Throw aways", they call these children
products of homes broken, by drugs, sex,
violence and/or divorce. Fort Lauderdale is
warm, one can eat from the trees and sleep on the
beaches, so goes the word on the streets of
Chicago and Cleveland. And, until recently "Fort
Lau-tee-dah" had a typical tourist town attitude
towards this influx of runaways, according local
writer, John De Groot, "No problem. The beach
situation was like the Iraq Iran War; the media
was ignoring beach problems."
Covenant house's opening last year brought
awareness to the waterfront community of the
problems on the beach. Many local residents
bitterly opposed its opening, forming an
organization to fight the crisis center's existence
in their neighborhood. However, time has won
over many of Covenant House's former critics.
Covenant House is a not-for-profit agency in
need of shoes and baby clothing (many of the
runaways females are pregnant or are the mothers
of small children). Covenant House also need
Community support, meaning money and
volunteers.
The "Strip" and Covenant House are near the
Intracoastal Waterway and Bahia Mar.


Throwaway children are part of the waterfront
community. A problem that must be dealt with,
runaway children coming to Fort Lauderdale will
not go away.
Dee is working at a local hotel with hope of
renting an apartment nearby. She's "on a talking
basis" with her mother again. Joel is making
plans to go back north again.

Runaway and homeless youth at Covenant
House/Ft. Lauderdale are benefiting from
S.T.A.R. (Supportert to Aid Runaways) which
raised $8,000 with seven simultaneous charter
membership coffees throughout Broward County.
More than 300 people paid $25 each to help
defray food costs at Covenant House, which has
served over 73,000 meals since opening last
September.
S.T.A.R. members will have the opportunity to
help with other special events to raise money for
Covenant House which is over 90% privately
funded.


Editor's Note: For more information about the
Salvation Army call Ralph Carlson at 524-6992.
Phone the Henderson Mental Health Center, 791-
4300. Please contact Cathi Souckar at Covenant
House. For more information concerning S.T.A.R.
or about hosting a S.T.A.R. coffee on your yacht
or waterfrontihome, 561-5559.


f'ARI F


.............*.* .* .






4 Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 LLaterfront News N ew s


Local To Visit

Coast Guard Academy

by A.R. Letwin
Scott D. Osterling, son of Roger and Gail
Osterling, of Plantation Acres, Fl. has been
selected to represent Division III, U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary, during Academy introduction
Week at U.S. Coast Guard Academy at New
London, CT.
High school students being considered for
admission to the Coast Guard Academy are
invited too see first-hand what the academy has
to offer those interested in a challenging career.
Scott, an honor student, is a junior at Thomas
Aquinas,High School, Ft. Lauderdale.
The Academy Introduction Program,
sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary,
introduces specially selected juniors in high
schools to academy life in August.
Scott is sponsored by Ft. Lauderdale's Coast
Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 3-2, 7th Division.

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Local Inventor Makes Waves
at Lauderdale Marine
Advisory Meeting

by M.G. Swift
At the June 5, 1986 Fort Lauderdale Marine
Advisory Board Meeting, board members
convened on the New River in front of the City
Dockmaster's Office to witness a demonstration
of a new wake monitoring device for use along
the waterways of Broward County.
A local inventor, Sonny Irons, who himself
lives with his family on the North Fork of New
River in Fort Lauderdale, has developed a
mechanical device which can monitor "the actual


wake size regardless of the state of tide. A preset
wake height will trigger a loud (150 DBA) tone and
rotating beacon light to alert the careless,
unthinking boat operator to the presence of a
damaging wake caused by his vessel." The wake
height can be adjusted up or down.
Mechanically simple, Irons' wake monitoring
device consists of a "transducer of nominal 1.5
inche plastic pipe open at the bottom and
submerged 12 inches below springs low water At
the top of the approximately 10 feet long pipe is a
controlled vent for relief of tidal pressures, with
the control elements directly above that."
Two small power boats churned up the water
by the dockmaster's office. At first the alarm
wouldn't activate until the boaters really let out
on the throttle. Later, after Mr. Irons made
adjustments on his device, the wake alarm was
responsive to more subtle wake differences.
Irons' demonstrated two different sirens and
an amber flashing light.
The marine inventor believes that" an alarm of
this type can be further refined to produce a tool
which will be most useful in solving a very
serious problem facing waterfront property and
boat dwellers and owners."
The advisory board later reconvened at City
Hall to discussthe wake monitoring device, along
with reconsidering an extention of the "Idle
Speed-No Wake" zone north of the Las Olas
bridge to the Intracoastal Waterway, and
considered a request to increase dock rental fees
by Jamie Hart, City Supervisor of Marine
Facilities.
EDITOR's NOTE: Lreg Dellinger research-
ed and photographed this story by M.G.
Swift.


Legislature


Ends Sales Tax Exemptions,


Limits Boat Noise And Speed.


by Nathan L. Roberts

A bill that will cost boaters five percent more
for the purchase, docking, storage and repair of
vessels and another bill that establishes a speed
limit for the first time in Florida boating history
were both on the verge of passage by the State
Legislature as its two-month session wound
down to the last five .days starting June 2.
As Waterfront News went to press, the
legislature had still to act on a bill by Sen. Bob
Crawford, the House Majority Leader D-Winter
Haven, and Rep. Jon Mills, D-Gainsville, that
would wipe out a raft of sales tax exemptions,
among them existing exemptions on the purchase
and/or repair of boats. All.indications are thatthe
bill will pass. It was adopted by the Senate 27 to
17. It passed in the House 86 to 27 with changes.
As of June 2, it was back in the Senate for further
consideration before being moved onto the
calendar for a vote.
If adopted, the bill will not go into effect until
July 1,1987 and not until a 15-member commission
has examined the exemptions scheduled for
repeal. The bill provides for a report to the
Legislature by the commission when the House
and Senate convene again starting in early April
1987. The bill also requires the commission to
begin work on October 1 of this year.
Wholesale repeal of the sales tax exemptions
has been prompted by the State's need to make up
losses of federal income resulting from the
Reagan Administrations Federal cutback on
revenue-sharing with the states and from the
impending Federal budget restrictions mandated
by the Gramm-Rudman Bill.
A Senate staff analysis of the repeal bill's
economic impact is that theState would collect in
the neighborhood of one billion dollars inthe first
fiscal year of its operation. The staff analysis
notes that this is a conservative estimate
"because there are no reliable estimates for sales
tax revenues from a number of sources." These
sources include real estate property management
services, stockholder and financial services,
fishing boat admissions, candy sales under 25
cents, and more.


Repeal of the tax exemptions would also
benefit local governments, which would receive
additional revenues from the State exceeding
$89.3 million in the first year of the bill's
operation.
Starting October 1 of this year, the 15-member
commission would examine the exemptions with
a view to -recommending some for repeal,
recommending others for retention, and
suggesting changes that might be made to other
tax provisions to compensate for the loss
resulting from the retained exemptions. The
commission would be located in the Executive
Office of the Governor and would be funded out of
the General Revenue Fund.
The Marine Industries Association of South
Florida has urged its members to call upon
legislators not to cancel the sales tax exemption
on the sale of boats.
"Tell them the amount of your business
attributed to out-of-state (tax exempt) sales and
what effect the removal of this tax exemption
would have on your business, other marine
related businesses, and tourism, "the MIA stated
in a hotline message to its members. "If wedo not
nip this in the bud now, we will be facing that task
at a later date."
*A 30-MPH Speed Limite
A bill sponsored by Sen. Tom McPherson, D-
Fort Lauderdale, establishing a 30 mile per hour
speed limit on the Intracoastal Waterway within
the boundaries of Broward County and on the
county's other main navigable body of water, the
New River and its North and South Forks, was
passed unanimously in the Senate and was on the
calendar for action by the House in the five days
remaining before the session ended. If enacted,
this would be the first time the legislature had
established a speed limit on Florida waterways.
eLegislature Dampens Noisy Boatse
Sen. McPherson also offered a bill to reduce the
noise level created by power boats. He proposed
the bill following citizen complaints that boat
noise was getting to be excessive and had to be
regulated. A somewhat more comprehensive bill
on boat noise and other water-related matters
was proposed by Sen. George L. Stuart, Jr., D-
Orlando. Stuart is chairman of the Senate


Committee on Natural Resources and
Conservation and McPherson is vice-chairman.
McPherson withdrew his bill in favor of Stuart's.
It passed in the Senate 40 to 0 and in the House 112
to 0 with changes. When it went back to the
Senate, that body accepted the House-amended
bill 33 to 0. The bill, which is the first to forbid
excessive noise by boats on Florida waterways,
was signed into law by Gov. Bob Graham on May
27. McPherson will ask the Broward County
Commission to enact a noise control ordinance in
accordance with the state law. The law limits
noise from power boats to 90 decibels or a shade
higher than the noise given off by a large power
lawn mower when measure from 50 feet away.
Mufflers are made for virtually all sizes of power
boats. Costs range, for example, from $4,000 to
$8,000 for a muffler and its installation on a boat
with twin V-8 engines.
*River Beds Belong to the People*
Sen. McPherson was waging a valiant but
apparently vain effort to bring about the reform of
a 1963 land title law known as the Marketable
Record Title Act(MRTA). Originally passed by the
legislature to facilitate title searches, the law has
been used by cattle ranchers, phosphate miners
and other major land owners to claim publicly
owned rivers, streams, lakes and their
underwater beds as private property.
Sen. McPherson sponsored a reform bill, with
a companion bill introduced in the House by Rep.
Fred R. Dudley, R-Cape Coral. The House was
largely unsympathetic.
The issue was settled in mid-session by a
surprise ruling that came down from the Florida
Supreme Court holding that the MRTA could not
be used to divest the state of lands under its
navigable waters. According to the Department of
Natural Resources, Florida has some 660 lakes
and 6,000 miles of river.
In a 4 to 2 vote last month the Supreme Court
denied that the lands beneath navigable waters
were sold as part of the properties running along
them.
"The Supreme court has now foreclosed a
brazen attempt by private interests to grab land
that belongs to the people of the State of Florida,"
County Commissioner Howard Forman declared.





Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 5
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S Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 Jul 15, 1986 Waterfront News N e w s


Riverwalk Receives
Green Light
by Craig Lustgarten
The Riverwalk project was given the go ahead
at the last city council meeting, as the
commissioners voted 4-1 in favor of much of
Sasaki Associates conceptual plans.
The only dissenter, commissioner Jim Naugle,
registered his disapproval of a plan he thinks
needs more flexibility.
"My vote was not against Riverwalk." declared
Naugle. "It was against the city manager's plan
for its implementation."
Naugle, a proponent of river development since
being on the Marine Advisory Board in 1967,
doesn't agree with the city's spending plans for
the project.
The city manager's implementation plan calls
for $18 million in public improvements.
Commissioner Naugle thinks those priorities can
be met at half cost by requiring adjoining
developers to participate in the construction of
plazas and the other improvements along the
river.
Naugle stated. "I don't want to have the
taxpayers foot the whole bill for these
improvements; the surrounding property owners
should share in the expense."
Associate Planner for the project, Janet Larson
responded to Naugle's comments, saying "We
would all like the private sector to do the
Riverwalk, but I don't know if it's feasible."
Larson continued that the city is hoping to
secure money from a "bond issue" to make the
planned improvements along the river, which
include it's walkways, lighting, landscaping and
park areas.
Admitting that the Riverwalk plans may be too
specific with regard to land use, the city was
planning an upcoming workshop to acquire more
information from Riverwalk property owners as
to how their land should best be developed. From
that information, zoning requirements can be-
completed and the project can then move'ahead
toward construction.
Larson related that some new residential
development along the New River will be
necessary to sustain the area's growth: "We're
trying to figure out ways to encourage housing
along the river, because you need that to keep the
place active at night."
The major components of the Riverwalk plan
that were passed include:
an ampitheatre on Sw 5th Avenue and a
performing arts center on 7th ave.
a Brickell Avenue entertainment district with
rehabilitation of historic buildings.
housing of some kind on the South Bank near
Marshall bridge.
a public plaza at Andrews Avenue in front of
the museum.
"signature office buildings" along Las Olas
between Federal Highway and third avenue.
a major retail center to anchor the west end of
the Las Olas shopping district.
As part of the Riverwalk projects, The Fort
Lauderdale Waterfront' Property. Owners
Association has proposed that a downtown
marina be located on thetsouth side of the river
just west of Smoker's Park. Currently, that parcel
is used as a surface parking lot for the courthouse
and the County would like to build a multilevel
garage on part of the land and sell off the rest to
private developers for condominium
construction.
A waterfront marina would cost approximately
$2.5 million to construct, but would generate
close to $1.8 million annually for the City from
boat dockage fees.
FLWPOA spokesman Sonny Irons emphasized
that the marina's construction wouldn't cost the
taxpayers a cent, as money from a special
Federal fuel tax fund could be used for the project.
Furthermore,mon ies collected from dockage fees
could be used to finance Riverwalk
improvements.
Irons declared, "The waterfront property
owners feel the County and the City should be
doing everything possible to encourage people


that own boats to sail them to Broward County, so
they can spend their money here."
The Historical Preservation Board is also
attempting to get buildings along Andrews
Avenue declared landmarks so they can be
restored.
Naugle related that he considers the Andrews
Avenue/Brickell Avenue renovation "the heart of
the Riverwalk project."
"I envision people coming from Pembroke
Pines, Plantation, Coral Springs...from
everywhere to the downtown at night," said
Naugle.
The next major obstacle Riverwalk faces is its
financing. Three major methods of financing are
presently under consideration. The first is tax-
increment financing, which doesn't require voter
approval. The second is a general bond obligation
issue that would go before the voters in
November for their approval, thereby testing the
project's credibility with the public. The third
proposal calls for the establishment of a
Downtown Development Authority that would


Riverfront Urban
Design Study


M, -










specially assess the Riverwalk area's property
owners, many of whose property values will
increase because of the project.
Commissioner Naugle believes Riverwalk
when completed will compare favorably to
Orlando's "Church Street Station."
Naugle added, "What we need to do is to get
nightlife into downtown Fort Lauderdale again. If
we get people downtown after five, it's going to be
a very healthy thing."

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Volume 3 IssOk 4 June' 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 7




Docks Or Condos Or Both, Downtown
by Nathan L. Roberts


Imagine a condo supertower on the banks of
the New River complete with its own marina.
Imagine a super-marina only.
Imagine any of this on the sprawling 14-acre
site that is now -- and has been for decades -- the
parking lot of the Broward County courthouse
(across the street from it). Far-fetched?
Not at all. Plans and suggestions for
developing that prized piece of property were
presented Thursday, June 5 at a public hearing in
the Broward Governmental Center, 115 South
Andrews Avenue. Called by the County
Commission's Air Rights Committee,
Commissioner Gerald Thompson, chairman of the
committee, and Ray Carson, the county's Director
of Public Works, presided.
The county, of course, is not offering the
property free of charge.
As Commissioner Thompson told the hearing,
the county needs to realize money in exchange
for the property and it needs to use thatmoney to
expand both the courthouse and courthouse
parking.
Ray Carson told Waterfront News two days
before the hearing took place that "Whatever is
built on that property -- be it a condo with a
marina or a marina alone -- will have to produce
the highest dollar yield on that very valuable tract,"
adding:
"The county must have a parking facility to
replace the parking lot it sells or leases and it
must have a sufficient yield to build an addition to.
the courthouse that, among its other uses, will
accommodate the county offices eliminated by any
new development."
A number of offices are presently located on
the 14-acre site..
Estimates are that the property has a present.
value of about $40 a square foot. With a total of
560,000 square feet involved -- counting both the
parking lot and Smoker's Park that adioins it --
the land value adds up to $22,400,000.
Development, involving excavations and
constructions, would add millions more.
However, the return to the county would be on the
sale or lease of the land only, with tax revenues
on the new development to come later.
Commissioner Thompson noted at the hearing
that the county and the City of Fort Lauderdale
are cooperating closely on the prospective sale or
lease and on what will be constructed. The final
decision will be made by the County Commission.
Construction and other permits will be issued by
the city.
Carson, in his earlier talk with Waterfront
News, indicated the possibility that the county
might retain a part of the 14-acre site to build a
parking facility on the order the city's parking
garage just across the New River. Nothing has
been decided yet, he added.
City Commissioner Jim Naugle, whose views
were solicited by Waterfront News, said he
favored a condo and marina on the site.
"I would like to see a condo with a marina as
part of its package of amenities comparable to
the Plaza Venetia recently opened by Miami
developer Tibor Hollo on the banks of Biscayne
Bay just behind the Omni Hotel and Mall," hesaid.
"That would.be the ideal solution and would bring
the county the kind of money it needs for its
expansions.
"We need a condo on that spot to cut down on
crime, and we also need dockage." He noted that
a river condo would add to the tax roll and might
precipitate a building boom in the near southeast.
Naugle suggested that the county build its new
parking facility on the land it owns directly
behind the courthouse just east of the new jail.
Another who favors a condo-marina on the site
is James Brady, president of the Downtown
Council.
Others are more for a marina than an adjoining
condo.
Gary Peterson, an architect and planner who
helped the Fort Lauderdale Waterfront Property
Owners Association (FLWPOA) develop a plan for
a marina, termed the present time "probably the
last chance to.build a world class marina on the
'New;River- ..
-' *" '***-*rf'.i -t.-o. ^-A '.' < '*~i ^ t *'^"^ '.\."* t


I I-



--- .









"A downtown marina," he explained, "would
create a new sporting, social and economic
climate in the City of Fort Lauderdale. It would
stimulate the appearance of hotels, new shops, a
whole new scene."
He urged that the marina be built because of its
"long term impact," asserting that "we have to
think in the long term about such things as the
development of an area or a city. We have to think
in terms of 25 years and longer, not in a short-
term way."
Peterson said that what was needed in addition
to a plan for a marina was a "master plan" for
both the New River and its banks north and south.
He has already done considerable work on this in
connection with the Riverwalk project.The City of
Fort Lauderdale has incorporated part of his
proposals in its design.
Asked what a marina such as he has mapped
out would cost, including purchase of the land, he
demurred an opinion, asserting that"this was not
in his field of expertise."
He said a referendum might be a way of finding
out how Broward voters felt about public
financing of land acquisition and marina
construction if no developer or developers could
be found who had the funds to do it.
Sonny Irons, president of the FLWPOA, was
asked by the Waterfront News "what would be the
political impact on the Broward County
Commission if it donated the parking lot for
development as a marina." Irons, who wants the
land to be donated said that "95 percent" of
Broward voters would approve a gift of the land
from the county.
The concept of a marina located on the site of
the present courthouse parking lot has been


endorsed by the county and City of Fort
Lauderdale Marine Advisory Board and by the
Marine Industries Association of South Florida.
George Platt, former chairman of the Broward
Democratic Party's executive committee, said
that he favors riverfront housing development
between the new jail and the Rio Vista area just
south of Las Olas Boulevard. He suggested that
the housing be of the rental rather than the condo
type and that some of it be of the "mixed use"
variety combining office space and apartments.
He also suggested what he termed "competitive
proposals," that is, consideration of the best
proposals rather than the highest bids.


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8 Volume 3 Issue 4


June 15 July 15, 1986


Waterfront News


Heritage


Princess Ripoff, The Boatyard Cat


by Sue Moesly

"She's done it again," the tall blond fellow with
the scruffy beard ran out of his cabin as if Satan
himself had prodded him upward. Holding his
head with one hand and a winch handle as a
weapon with the ether he flew onto the finger pier
alongside his boat and ran towards the upturned
dinghy on shore.
"I'll get you this time, you bugger," and he
grabbed the gunwhale of the small yellow boat to
right it and expose the cat who was known to hide
underneath upturned dinghies.
But the black cat with the fuzzy tail was
nowhere to be seen and the anger of the Swedish
fellow was then vented on the bollard that had
tripped him when he suddenly backed up to have
a better look inside. Tossed on his backsides the
poor chap banged away at the metal cleat as if it
wore black fur and had large green eyes.
The irate raving did not go unnoticed by his
neighbors aboard their sailboats moored along
the quay. Either they were waiting to haul out or
waiting for some part or repairs to get them on
their way to wherever it was they were headed.
Still others living aboard were simply waiting for
their dreams to materialize. Meanwhile they
enjoyed the atmosphere that surrounds seafarers
who actually go to sea in small boats and spin
yarns about passagemaking and making
landfalls beyond far distant horizons. Many of
the boats flew flags of different nations on their
flagstaffs, for this was a do-it-yourself boatyard
and cruising sailors are known to seek out
hauling yards that allow them to do their own
work.
Cappy was one of those who dreamed about
going out to sea. He had lived aboard his
houseboat at the end of the line of boats ever
since the owner had dredged the drainage ditch to
carve out the marina which fingered off Fort
Lauderdale's New River. The short man with the
grey beard and slight limp knew his houseboat
was strictly for living aboard, but he kept on
thinking that someday an older boatthathe could
afford might drift into the yard.
Cappy was walking along the dusty road
behind the boats and towards the shower room
when the black cat crossed his path, jumped on
board the new ketch that had come in the
previous day and headed straight for the
aluminum dinghy turned upside down on its deck.
"What did you do this time, blackcat?" the eyes
behind a weatherbeaten face twinkled. He and the
cat were actually friends, but from a distance,
rather a code of respect they shared with one
another. "Princess Ripoff, and a likely name given
you by the Australian chap who claims you stole
the steak right off his dinner plate." Cappy was
glad he remembered to put water in the battered
hub cap underneath the seagrape tree. He told
folks he kept water for the birds and squirrels, but
everyone knew that black cat was the most
frequent visitor.
"I'll not tell on you girl," Cappy pulled the towel
tighter around his neck when the Swedish fellow
still in a tizzy about his head ran up to him.
"You seen that cat? You know the one? The
black skinny one with the fuzzy tail?" Sven
continued to rub his head. "She came through the
hatch this morning and landed straight on my
chest. "Startled me so I raised my head and
bumped the crossbeam a nasty blow."
"Can't say that I have," Cappy told a fib, but
knew that survivors stick together and Princess
Ripoff was a survivor. How she had managed to
stay so close and yet so far from the workers of
the yard as well as the transient yacht owners
was amazing. He did know that Bill, the
shipwright, sneaked her tidbits from his lunch.
Cappy was also a survivor. He had two ships
blown out from under him when he served as a
merchant seamen during World War II. One ship
had received a torpedo's direct hit amidships and
the other had foundered soon after fires set by
numerous aircraft attacks had set her ablaze.
Cappy talked little about his experiences, which
was strange for a seafarer, especially one who
could tell tales far taller than the sailors who
nowadays sail in tranquil waters.


Cappy kept thinking that someday he would
return to the sea, but aboard his own boat, and
she would have sails spread across her arms and
slide through the water like an elegant lady.
Money saved from his pension checks would
hardly buy a decent vessel, but nevertheless his
dreams kept the goal before him. He took one day
at a time.
Princess Ripoff was not so patient as her
human counterpart. She struck while the
opportunity presented itself and never waited in
the shadows until a handout was offered. Her
story is one that if she could talk would tell the
dreamers and the voyagers what it's like to be a
seafaring cat, for she came into the boatyard
aboard a large cutter that had been around the
world. Where she was born is as illusive as the
cat herself. Even her name was a mystery, for her
owners abandoned her when they sold the boat to
move ashore.
Cappy remembers hearing the owner of the
boatyard asking the couple about their cat. "Say,
Cap'n, about your cat, the black one. Aren't you
taking her? I mean you aren't just leaving her
here? I've got more cats than I need to keep the
rats away."


"Oh, sure, but we have to get a carrying case
and anyway she knows only boats and water,
and sailors. She'll be happier here until we can get
a car, then we'll come get her. I'll leave some cans
of cat food for her. She'll be all right. She's
survived many a dunkin' in the ocean and
indiscreet meanderings around foreign ports,"
the burly red-headed fellow with freckles and
sun-bleached hair covering his arms and legs
waved good-bye.


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H eri t g e Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News g


They never returned and it was said they went
straightaway back to California. The cat slept
aboard the cutter during the day and did her
prowling at night. When the boat departed the
yard with new owners, the seafaring cat found
other yachts to hide in and she kept on the move,
never staying on one boatfor very long, only long
enough at one old derelict sloop to have a brood
of kittens. When the cat food ran out she had
already learned by her wits how to. fend for
herself and the absence of the store-bought food
seemed only a matter of fate.
"Now, ain't that just the cutest kitten you'd ever
want to see?" The painter saw the first furry
creature that ventured into the storeroom one
day. He was pulling a can of topside enamel off a
bottom shelf when the ball of black fur seemed to
roll right before his hand.
"It looks just like the mother cat," the storeclerk
smiled. "We sure don't see that one around, that is
unless she's getting herself in trouble."
"She's a sly one all right. I wonder if she's
weaned this tyke? Have you seen any of the
others?" the painter picked up the.tiny kitten and
put it into a large cardbox. "My wife will like
this one."
And so Princess Ripoff by sending off her
offspring one at a time was able to make sure
they went into homes where they were wanted.
She never really considered herself'home'less, fo
she had all of those boats in the yard that she
could investigate. When one, two or three left,
there were always others to take their place and
she knew which ones had the best dinghies for
her escape hideaways.
When the wooden ketch with the classic
Scandinavian lines was towed into the yard there
were several sets of eyes following her as the
launch positioned the double-ender into the slot
next to Cappy's houseboat.
"Delivered right to my front door," Cappy heard
himself say out loud as he secured the
newcomer's lines. His eyes never left the old boat.
She had rust streaks running down her topsides
and the varnish on her cabin sides was peeling off
in curled flakes. Without sail covers .the sails
were exposed to the scorching sun. Stained with
waves of. dried-up salt, they hung in rough folds
around the scarred booms.
"You don't want this one, Cappy. She was
abandoned up the Miami River and we're only
bringing her here at the request of the trust
department at the local bank. She's part of an
estate," the towboat captain explained. "She
nearly sank on us just coming up the Intracoastal.
I hear she's due for the auction block, that is if she
can stay afloat till then."
But Cappy heard only that she was abandoned,
and his eyes slid past the abuse the seakindly
vessel had suffered through the past year. "I'll
take care of you now, ole girl. Never you worry."

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While Cappy walked the stained teak decks to
examine his future boat from stem to stern,
another set of eyes peered down from the
seagrape tree. The large green eyes looked
longingly at the clinker-built dinghy chocked
down on the ketch's foredeck. Fat and round with
enough room under the wooden seats to stretch
out and stay hidden. Only a slinky cat could
squeeze under the canvas covered caprails.
That night while Cappy dreamed about his
vessel Princess Ripoff went below to investigate.
She jumped straight from the companionway to
the floor and landed in water up to her chest, and
she knew immediately that something was very
wrong and she was very wet. She sprang for the
companionway ladder to escape what could have
been the last of her nine lives.
"What' cha doing?" Cappy hollered excitedly
when the wet ball of fur seemingly tried to crawl
under his bedcovers.
"Fell overboard eh? Want to be my friend now?"
Cappy smiled, but the cat pawed and scratched at
the sheet.
"What's wrong with you anyway? A distemper
fit?-Now get on with you. Go out and look for rats
or whatever it is cats do at night," Cappy was
astounded at the attention he was getting from
the cat that always veered away from people.
"Got something on your mind? Want to show
me what you caught?" Cappy finally rolled out of
bed and the cat ran out the cabin door, then
turned and looked back.
"I'm coming. Just got to get my pants on,"
Cappy stepped on deck and immediately noticed
that the deck level of his future boat was far lower
than she had been only a few hours earlier when
he had pumped her dry.
Princess Ripoff kept running back and forth
from doorto deck. She had delivered her message
and Cappy scrambled aboard the ketch to get to
the hand pump to keep her from sinking lower.
From that day on Princess Ripoff, the heroine
that had saved Cappy's boat, became his
constant companion. When the restored ketch left
the boatyard bound for endless horizons, her
topsides were gleaming, white and her varnish
was shiny enough to shave a beard in. Princess
Ripoff lay in the fold of the new sail covers. She
left behind her old name for now she was called
Tulip, like the blooming bright face of a new
Spring day. And the brightness shone round
about the seafaring cat and her master who were
returning to the sea.


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10 Volume 3 Issue 4


June 15-July 15, 1986


Waterfront News


Sailing


"What The World's Coming To" Oct.'86 To Feb. '87 The America's Cup


Perth, Western Australia -- Some call it the
premier event of the yachting world, others
expect itto be the most dramatic event in sporting
history.
Whatever there is no denying that Australia's
win of the AMERICA'S CUP in 1983, took the race
from sports pages, to headlines and front pages
of newspapers around the world.
Along with Wimbledon and the Olympics, The
America's Cup is now one of the best known
sporting events in the world. It's also shaping up
to be the most expensive!
It is well known that the current eight North
American challengers (six from the U.S. and two
from Canada) will spend between $5 and $20
million on their preparations to try to, bring the
Cup back home.
Meanwhile, down in Perth, Western Australia,
no expense is being spared as the city prepares to
play host to an expected 1.3 million visitors who
will travel there during the America's Cup
challenge series between October '86 and
February '87.
According to Walter Cronkite, Perth is
beautiful...it's the best kept secret in the
world...well it was! Perth is now fast becoming a
much talked about travel destination. Yachting
fans, sporting enthusiasts and adventurous
travellers wanting to see history made, or just
seeking an exciting time are looking to Perth and
the Cup series.
Whilst maintaining the natural beauty of Perth
(the sunniest city in Australia) and its surrounds,
which include 45 miles of white sandy
metropolitan beaches, developments for the Cup
have already cemented Perth a firm spot on the
tourism map and a hot topic of conversation
amongst the world's travel and sporting press.
Before Cup time, Perth will have quadrupled the
number of five-star hotel rooms, built a 300
million-dollar casino complex, spent $52 million
or upgrading the international airport, developed
a string of marinas along the coastline and
injected $50 million into the colonial port city of
Fremantle, a city, Cup syndicates will call home
during the challenge series.
All this, for a city of just pne million people!
During the trials and finals, festivals featuring
international artists, a wide variety of other
sporting events including the first one-million-
dollar horse race to be run in the Southern
Hemisphere, and America's Cup Ball, cocktail and
garden parties the list of activities is endless
and all will be staged during 1986-87..
It's been said a billion people will watch the
America's Cup races on television. Whether it's
hundreds of millions or a billion, whether
armchair sporting enthusiasts or just patriots
wanting to see the Cup brought home, the
America's Cup Race in Perth, Western Australia
will be a thrilling experience for any viewing






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America's Cup Dates


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Heat A-First round of America's Cup
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November 2-November 19, 1986
Heat B-Second round of America's Cup
Eliminations


December 2-December 19, 1986
Heat C-Third round of.
Eliminations


America's Cup


December 28-January 7, 1987
Semi Finals-Four yachts competing

January 13-January 23, 1987
Finals-Best of seven races with two yachts
competing

January 31-February 1987
America's Cup-Best of seven races


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Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 01


Tall Ship Sails For Liberty


Story by Al Plant
Photo by Julie
Special From


Sailorman


Star


The wind is just right as hand over hand the
sails are hoisted. A bit of salt spray slaps onto the
deck of the old schooner. Captain Joe Maggio is
pleased with how his vessel the newly christened
Heritage of Miami handles. This part of the trip to
the tall ships sailpast in New York harbor will be
the shake down. With some creaking and
straining before the wind the gaff rigged topsail
schooner points herself out of the Miami Harbor
and toward the Atlantic. The media people are on
board today and along side as well. The crew is
up for the shakedown to Port Everglades. Charlie
Murphy, the navigator is looking forward to an
easy haul up the coast to the Statue of Liberty
celebrations. First mate Dick Canfield and Rock
Weyrauch, Chief Engineer, are watching a
television camera boat. The camera won't work
and the crew signalsthat they'll be back with
another in a while, and back they go toward the
Miami shore. Pat and John, the remaining crew of
Heritage of Miami, are explaining some of the
ship's features to interested guests on board.
The ship is 70 feet long and was built by William


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H. Albury in 1963-64 in the Bahamas. She is a
stout vessel with the lines of an 1890's Pilot
Schooner. She outlasted a hurricane shortly after
she was launched and was driven up on the beach
near the Sand Bar Pub at Treasure Cay in the
Abacos. But back she went to sea following
repairs.
Sailing a schooner of this design is a job for all
hands. There are no winches to assist the crew to
hoist or trim the sailsits all muscle power and the
rigging is set with dead eyes and lanyards
instead of modern turnbuckles.
The Miami Harbor is in the distance nowand so
is the boatyard where she had just had a new coat
of paint applied and some other work done. Chief
Rock was just checking down the engine hatch
when he saw the engine was awash. It was
quickly discovered that the source of the sea
water was an exhaust hose that was left unsealed
after an old generator was removed during the
ships time at the boat yard. The flow was
stopped, but murphy law prevailed. The main
bilge pump wouldn't kick in. The back up pump
did and the bilge was dry once more. The.camera
boat returned and took its video footage.
Other than having to rescue one of the ladies of
the press who became locked in the head when
the door handle fell off, everything went well. The
Heritage ofMiamidocked that evening at Pier66,
the first port on its goodwill tour of the eastern
coast enroute to the Statue of Liberty sailpast.
The Heritage of Miami has been certified by the
US Coast Guard asa sail training vessel and upon
her return to home port she will take up her duties
as such. It's also hoped that she will be available
for charters as well, so that many more people
can taste the salt sir and feel the spray on board a
vessel whose design dates back to the golden age
of sail.


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For more information contact Jane Grant 522-
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Spring Break


Coming

Attractions:

The Breaking Of

Spring Break


f t.


' HIfcKMlAN


by Nathan L. Roberts


Is it possible that a movement is taking shape
here whose goal is to squash and eliminate
Spring Break on Fort Lauderdale Beach?
Is it likely that whatis on the minds of those
who favor choking the annual college
extravaganza is replacement by a different type
tourist -- the well-heeled. family plus the expense
account executive, each drawn here year-round by
a redevelopment of the beach into a string of glitzy
hostelries ala the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort,
and a convention center?
The answer to both questions is yes.
There appear to be enough high city officials,
major beach businessmen and a conglomerateof
lawyers, private property owners and condo
dwellers who are starting to pull together on the
idea.
The City Commission has a plan before it for the
construction of a 100,000 square foot convention
center. The proposed site is the Strip from Las
Olas Boulevard north that now includes such
midway/Coney Island enterprises as pizza
parlors, bars, a McDonalds, .a combination
variety drug store and a long row of nondescript
hotels/motels.
Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner John
Rodstrom makes no bones about what's afoot.
"De-emphasis of Spring Break," he says, "means -
redevelopment of the Beach."


Spring Break, he was asked.
"Sprin"g Break isn't going to end for a while yet,"
he replied. But ultimately it has to stop being what
it's been for some 30 years. The sheer numbers --
300,000 this year, 350,000 last year, and large
numbers the previous years -- are too much for
Fort Lauderdale to handle in a matter of six to
seven weeks. For as long as it lasts until it can be
replaced, it'll be a necessary evil. But it has to be
replaced."
Rodstrom explained that "what we're looking
for is an orderly, affluent, year-round flow of
vacationing visitors whose presence comports
with our conception of Fort Lauderdale Beach as
a world class resort.
"Imagine what that would be like compared to
the present rush here each day from late February
through early April of hordes of college students
flying in on People's Expressand driving in by car
-- armed with sleeping bags and tee-shirts in
order to crowd 10 and 15 strong into single
hotel/motel rooms and live on pizzas and beer?
"I think we've reached the point where we need
and deserve a qualitative change."
Rodstrom has many who agree with him, if not
with every word he utters than with his over-all
view.
Count among these Mayor Robert Dressier and
Commissioners Robert Cox and Jim Naugle.


Add Elliott Barnett, a prominent lawyer and
president of the Museum of Art.
Add Fred Taylor, owner of the 15 unit Wish You
Were Here Inn at 7 Birch Road, who likes the
students and deplores that some citizens "make a
field day of putting them down and applauding
their harassmentt"
Taylor described Spring Break this year as
"successful if somewhat shorter than usual. I had
less business than last year but I'm not
complaining. It was good for me and for the
students."
He said, however, that talk of replacing Spring
Break is not new, that he has heard it before and
that "it usually comes to nothing."
"If these talkers are serious," he said, "let them
do something; let them at least get started. In the
meantime, while Fort Lauderdale continues to
talk in its sleep, Walt Disney World in Orlando, the
cities of Miami Beach and Daytona Beach are
promoting tourism in a wide-awake, bang-up
way. Disney World has Fort Lauderdale beat 100
to 1. Miami Beach has us beat 50to 1.And the City
of Sunrise, right in our back yard, is planning a
cultural arts complex that will have a hotel and
shopping mall designed to be a major tourist
attraction."
"What we need, "Taylor emphasized, "is a
broad tourist concept -- not this or that catchy ad
or TV commercial but a concept that is world-
class in scope, range, projection and appeal. It'all
be talk until, as far a I'm concerned, I can see the
beach ball rolling."
There are dissenters.
Rob Aumann, manager of the 144-unit Howard
Johnson Lodge'at 700 North Atlantic Boulevard
(Rte.A1A) says that anti-Spring Break sentiment
"doesn't have a chance of getting anywhere."
"Fort Lauderdale Beach," he say, "is fixed in the
student mind as the place to be when colleges let
out for Spring Break. The grandiose day dreams
of some and the sour views of others are nothing
more than wishful thinking. It just won't happen."
While present hotels may be replaced by larger
ones and other civic amenities may come into
being, Aumann observed, "the college crowd will
continue to come to Fort Lauderdale because this
place has it all -- fine beach on a broad expanse
of sea, a generally ideal climate, lots of places to
eat, drink and be merry, and a national mix of
healthy, gregarious, fine-looking young men and
women. It's a place that can't be beat or denied."


Spring Break Busts Broken Down

by Nathan L. Roberts Students arrested on misdemeanor charges Accord
were, according to Cefkin, "treated as a special arrests t
One factor that has served to fan local group." He explained this as follows: "They were compare
resentment of and growing opposition to Spring booked but not finger-printed. Some had to post those of
Break is the highly publicized record of police bond and appear in magistrates court. Since none He not
arrests. Media reports -- press, TV and radio -- of the students in this category of arrests had arrests d
were that over 2200 were arrested this year. One committed serious or grand crime, they were students
was left with the impression that all were treated lightly. The idea was not to impact the whole.
students. They were not. criminal justice system." Althou
A check with the Fort Lauderdale Police "On the whole," he added, "this Spring Break compare
Department show the following: was the most controlled and injury-free Spring recorded
A total of 2506 persons were arrested between Break on record." cent, the
Feb. 21 and April 5. Of ttis number, 750 or less His statistics show that one student was killed $100,000,
than one-third were students -- most of them in a fall from a balcony and one was killed by a year's B
collegians, the rest a handful of high schoolers. motor vehicle, weeks c(
The other 1756 taken in by the police were a mix A run-down of the misdemeanor or arrests and tool
from Broward, Dade and Palm Beach Counties, produces a number of surprises. Drug possession weather
other Floridians, out-of-staters and Spring Break shows up negligibly. Battery (one person striking- contain
camp followers. Also, considering that 300,000 another) is even more negligible. So is fraud. Here strict en
students were here this yearfor Spring Break, the is the actual record. Days Inn
750 actual student arrests amount to a mere two- Of the 716 arrested for committing two days
tenths of one percent of the sum total of college misdemeanors, 241 were charged with disorderly capacity
visitors. conduct and 191 -- or 26.6 per cent-- for violating lines wai
This is not to suggest that the police had Broward County's new open-container law effect on
nothing to do. They did more this year than ever prohibiting open containers of alcohol on the still bett
before because enforcement was tighter as the streets, the beach or in motor vehicles. It was the and ice b
result of the open-container law, the no-parking law's first major test. "it's not
rule along the beach, fire and capacity Of the other misdemeanor arrests, 63 were for Fort Lau
regulations governing public accommodations and loitering and prowling, 61 for possession of As it u
police watchfulness over the outsize number of alcohol by a student under 21 years of age, 34 for year."
visitors and cars. trespassing, 32 for sleeping on the beach or in a
According to Art Cefkin, media relations car, 24 for urinating in public and indecent
specialist in the Fort Lauderdale Police exposure, 17 for possession of marijuana, 16 for
Department, a breakdown of the 750 student obstructing justice, 7 for petty larceny, 3 for
arrests shows that 716 were picked up for a battery, and one each for littering, resisting
variety of misdemeanor offenses and 34 on arrest, hitch-hiking, driving on the beach and
Sctarges, of having cpmmi,tt d a fel ony,. ,. .*.. defrauding an inokeeper. ..., ....
:-J",


ling to Cefkin also, the rate of student
:his year -- while larger in number --
favorably in terms of percentages with
1985 and prior years.
ed in this connection that of the 889total
luring the 1985 Spring Break, 287 were
representing just under one-third of the

gh hotel/motel bookings were down
d to last year and some merchants
business declines ranging to 50 per
local economy benefitted by upwards of
,000 (the final figure isn't in yet). This
reak was over a shorter period, four
compared to six and seven in past years,
k place during poor month of March
that brought shorter stays. The open-
r law, the ban on beach-side parking,
forcement of fire and capacity codes --
on Seabreeze Boulevard was closed for
s because of fire violations and Penrod's
was strictly enforced resulting in long
ting to get in -- had a noticeably negative
some but as one less observed, "This is
er that fighting my way through snow
back home." One student complained that
fair getting Daytona Beach weather in
derdale."
sed to be said in Brooklyn, "wait'till next
fOa


DID YOU FOLLOW-THRU ON
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524-9450

MiHE WATERFRONT
NEWS


12







Hurricane Season


Heed The Warning!!!

by Patsy West
HURRICANE! The very word conjures up a
multitude of images. For the South Florida
newcomer, HURRICANE! bespeaks excitement,
thrill, memorable hurricanes parties, a visit to a
windswept beach. For longtime residents who
have seen their share of "blows" HURRICANE!
means preparation, sometimes false alarms.
which nevertheless must be heeded, moving
boats to safe dockage, putting up shutters,
cleaning up debris in the aftermath. For pioneer
families, HURRICANE! means: Will it be as bad as
the 1926 storm??
The awesome 1926 hurricane has had no equal in
Southeast Florida. It has been and probably will
remain the benchmark for hurricanes in our area.
No one who suffered through the 1926 storm can
forget it. Everyone had a story to tell. The storm's
winds were never accurately checked, as the
velocity meter in Miami blew away after
registering 128 m.p.h. The abnormal tides rose
some 11 feet above normal high.
The storm hit Southeast Florida early
September 18th in a boomtime atmosphere which
had brought an influx of new residents, many
from Midwestern "dustbowl" states, who were
totally unprepared for hurricane conditions -
much less for the greatest storm in our history.
Housing was cheap and quickly erected. The.
damage in the aftermath of the 1926 storm was
excessive. Many were left homeless and there
were around 400 deaths. Little warning was given
and therefore no preparation was undertaken
proceeding this great storm.
In 1928, another massive hurricane hit South
Florida, zeroing in on Lake Okeechobee.
Everyone familiar with the Lake knew that the
levees were weak at best and that the Lake's
shallow water held a great potential for a
massive tidal wave. Once the hurricane was past,
many men from the Ft. Lau derdale area, including
Victor V. Bullock of the U.S. Coast Guard, made
their way by car and boat to aid survivors on the
lake. Their worst fears were realized. They found


,L~.* --~


E,


~WW~m~i.r I


Damage on the waterfront from the 1926 Hurricane,
Downtown Ft. Lauderdale. Courtesy of the Ft.
Lauderdale Historical Society. (5-5222).Destruction of

a disaster area. The levees had broken and wind-
driven flood waters had hit the towns of Pahokee,
Belle Glade, and South Bay. The few survivors at
Pahokee had lost entire families and were in a
state of shock. South Bay had fared better, as
over 200 citizens had weathered out the storm on
a dredge.
Belle Glade had been the hardest hit. 1928 had
been a very good year for the winter vegetable
market. As many as- 5,000 itinerant workers,
many Bahamian, were living in makeshift
housing. No census was kept, but at least 2,500
persons were estimated to have been killed or
drowned. The dead far outnumbered the living.
The recovery of corpses was the rescue worker's
major task.
When great farmland is involved, nothing can
stop the farmer. One year later, Belle Glade was 5
times larger than the previous year. The Hoover,
Dike system, a positive result from hurricane
disasters, will hopefully curb future disasters on
Lake Okeechobee. Weatherman, Grady Norton
came to Florida.in time to witness the aftermath
of the 1928 Hurricane on Lake Okeechobee, where
inadequate warning,had caught many in their
cars on their way to safety-only to drown in the


Downtown Ft. Lauderdale from the 1926 Hurricane,
September 18, 1926. (Looking south from the Andrews
Avenue Bridge).

floodwaters. Norton decided to do something
about hurricane a warning system. In 1935 he
became the first director of the newly formed
Hurricane ForecastCenter in Jacksonville. That
very year, the Labor Day Hurricane struck the
Florida Keys at 200 mph killing 409 persons, 244
of them World War I Veterans who were working
on the Overseas Highway to Key West. Because of
the Holiday, the weatherman's warnings had not
been heeded and a major evacuation was delayed
until it was too late.
It was Norton who developed the theory that it
was the high altitude air currents that steered
hurricanes. By utilizing radar, he had balloons
tracked at 60,000 feet for checking the future
course of the storms with great success! Hewas
able to give a 36 hour alert. Grady Norton allowed
South Floridians to breathe a little easier when
hurricane season approached.
The hammering on of shutters, empty shelves
in grocery stores, and boat horns blaring at
bridges are the physical heralds of today's
hurricane threats. We have been lucky, we have
adequate warning, but the storms are fickle we
are still waiting for the big one!!


Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450


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COVER ENOUGH
TO KEEP YOU AFLOAT?

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SVolume 3 Issue 4 June15-July 15, 1986 Wterfront News Hurricane Season


The Multiple Dangers Of A Hurricane


by Bill Lange
Can a hurricane catch you unprepared? It does
that to many who somehow do not recognize the
seriousness of the Boy Scout motto "Be
Prepared"..Otherwise they would right now be
discussing what to do about their boat with the
nearest Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla or United
States Power Squadron, and arranging for the
proper equipment as suggested by marine writers
of Waterfront News.
Can a hurricane catch you by surprise? No
way....if you are listening and looking. You have
got to listen steadily to the National Weather
Service 24 hour weather tape (on your VHF W
channel or 1-661-5065). Also Dr. Neil Frank of the
NOAA Hurricane Center will give advance
warning (on various TV stations) but his 1986
forecasts may have far shorter alert time than
recent years. The necessary weather satellites
and storm-hunter aircraft are in part inoperative.
Now lets look at the facets which you must
surmount.
If \you know about these meteorological
aspects of a hurricane you will know better what
points to listen for in the broadcasts, how these
points may specifically affect your boat and what
the symptoms you see of a storm purport.
As a skipper you have a multi-dimensional
problem. 1) strong and gusty winds, 2)
exceptionally high tides, 3) torrential and
buffeting rain, 4) perhaps a storm surge of the
water, 5) everybody wanting to move their boat at
the same time. 6) supply stores sold out and boat
insurance no longer obtainable, 7) land
evacuation movement and priorities preventing
boat movement.


The Hurricane Center tracks each tropical
storm and when wind velocity reaches 55 miles
per hour assigns the storm a name. Seas under
that storm are dangerous, wave heights can be
great and sometimes waves are from conflicting
directions. Inlets are now non-navigable. So
before you are in the hurricane you have trouble.
As soon as the sustained surface winds reach
74 miles per hour the storm is called a hurricane.
This lowest strength hurricane is Category 1 with
winds up to 95 miles per hour. There are five
categories and the Category 5 has winds of at
least 155 miles per hour.
Reports on the hurricane are up-dated, at first
several times a day, and finally about every hour
or more. Normally the details you will hear are:
the location of the eye, the top wind speed in the
storm, its present direction of movement, a
forecast on any change in direction, the
barometric reading of the storm center, the
estimate surge height, possibly some information
on waves, and sometimes a statement as to the
type and distance of the hurricane's swirls out
from the storm center.
A hurricane is approximately round, from 300
to 600 miles in diameter. And visible from above
as a cloud formation in which the winds are,
always counterclockwise. Thus the cloud swirls
trail spiral-like away from the center, or eye,
which is the extreme low barometric depression.
Our local barometer pressure here is often from
29.94 to 30.30. A strong hurricane might have a
low of 29:33 and a surge of 15 to 25 feet.
The eye, a counterclockwise funnel may be 3 to
40 miles in diameter. Wherever the eye passes the
winds first hit from one direction, then drop to
7ero in a usually clear and cloudless sky, then


very suddenly hit full force from the opposite
direction. That "rabbit punch" strikes so quickly
that you can do nothing unless ready for it.
For reasons that are not scientifically clear the
track of a hurricane may unexpectedly change,
even looping on its self or reversing or stalling.
What you would like to know is whether the eye
is going to pass near you. Usually a hurricane
moves from 10 to 20 miles per hour and you
should plot the coordinates of the eye. Your
boat's location in respect to the eye determines
what wind strength, what surge height and what
waves or volume of rain will hit.
The maximum speed steady winds extend

about 30 miles out from the rim of the eye. Gusts
may exceed the speed by 25 to 50 percent. Lesser
yet destructive winds can extend as far as 250
miles from a hurricane center. A wall of
advancing strong thunderstorms may be hidden
in the hurricane clouds and tornadoes may be
spawned. Lightning is a usual danger.
The most dangerous quadrant of a hurricane is
the right front and the right of the track has the
worst seas.
Terrific wind strength results since wind
strength actually increases with the square of the
wind speed. Other writers in Waterfront News
have described what lines and anchors are
needed to resist gusting and reversing winds. You
can save your boat if you heed them completely
and if some negligent skipper's boat does not
plough you under.
Even when the hurricane's center may miss you
there is a major impact from dangerously
abnormal tides. On top of them the wave heights
are a function of wind speed and duration.
Finally, the water rise is often augmented by
the hurricane's surge. It is the killer -- for a cubic
yard of water weighs 3/4 of a ton. A foot or more
of rise of the ocean surface creates a water dome
as much as fifty miles in diameter. When the wind
drives this over shallower water it is forced to pile
. . ..- -






Hurricane Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15- July 15, 1986 UJoterfront News 15


upward and can become as high as 20 feet or
more. This appears in a matter of minutes. The
surge may be a few hours ahead of the eye, and is
most dangerous for about 50 miles from the eye,
in the quadrant where the winds blow ashore. A
general estimate of surge height (before it
reaches shallow water), by hurricane strength is:
Category 1:4 to 5 feet surge, Category 2: 6 to 8,
Category 3: 9 to 12 feet.
You will have to calculate the water rise impact
on your location. For example: to the high tide
add an abnormal 3 feet, then add the stated surge
of say 5 feet, then add maybe 50 percent to the
estimated wave height. This is the water
battering ram for which you are rigging.
May all your fenders be effective, may all your
lines hold and may your bilge pumps be
adequate.


Hurricane

Advisories
Tropical Disturbance: poorly organized rotary
circulation.
Tropical Depression: organized rotary circulation,
winds up to 39 m.p.h.
Tropical Storm: well organized rotary circulation,
winds 39-73 m.p.h.
Hurricane Watch: hurricane is approaching lana.
Gale Warnings: expect winds of 39 to 54 m.p.h.
Whole Gale Warning: expect winds of 55 to 74 m.p.h.
Hurricane Warning: expect winds of 74 m.p.h. or
more.
Emergency Hurricane Warning: storm approaching
land faster than forecast.
Category 1 Winds: 74-95 m.p.h.
Category 2 Winds: .96-110 m.p.h.
Category 3 Winds: 111-130 m.p.h.
Category 4 Winds: 131-155 m.p.h.
Category 5 Winds: 156 m.p.h. and upward
An advisory is an official announcement
containing storm data, such as position, track,
wind speed, forward motion speed and intensity,
issued periodically by the National Weather
Service.


Disaster Relief Programs
Hurricane shelter training courses will be
conducted by the American Red Cross June 21st,
July 12th and August 16th at the Broward Chapter
offices, 8:30 a.m., 2120 West Broward Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, Fl 33312. The south service center
will hold a class July 19th at 4733 SW 18 Street in
Hollywood.
On July 3rd from 12 a'.m: 12 p.m., Florida's
petroleum industry and the state's Red Cross
chapters will sponsor Disaster Fill-Up Day. Pump
locations participating will donate one penny per
gallon pumped on this day. Petroleum industries
will then donate and match penny for penny the
amount raised on this day.
This program was initiated in order to assist
the Red Cross raise funds for the Disaster Relief -
Fund. Due to a large amount of disasters in 1985,
the American Red Cross has spent $2 million in
Florida alone. Call the Red Cross at 581-4221.


Safe Harbors


NEW RIVER
Chinnock Marine
"First come, first served".
518 W. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.
305-763-2250
SOUTH FORK NEW RIVER
Lauderdale Yacht Basin
"200 covered, wet and 30 sailboat slips
available with 30 day rate, non-refundable
deposit"
1801 S.W. 20th Street, Ft. Laud.
305-522-3655
WEST OF 1-95 (Clearance 55')
Annapolis Yacht Center
"100 wet and dry covered slips and 15 to 20
sailboat slips (spars less than 55') with 30 day
.prepaid deposit".
1915 S.W. 21 Ave., Ft. Laud.
305-7924900
Sea Land Marine Basin
"First come, first served for 20-30 boats to
anchor in basin for a fee and 20 slips available
with.4 prepaid month deposit."
2700 S.W. 25 Terr., Ft. Laud.
305-792-9260


MIAMI RIVER
*Allied Marine
"Dry & wet storage"
2051 N.W. 11th Street
305-643-0332

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1583 N.W. 24 Avenue
305-524-3104


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Emergency Phone Numbers
Police, Fire, medical aid ................. .911
Broward evacuation information
(when hurricane watch is issued)..... 357-8454
Broward shelter information ......... 581-4221
U.S. Coast Guard (Ft. Laud.) ......... 927-1611
Florida Marine Patrol .............. 467-4541
Ft. Laud. Harbor Police .......... 761-5440
Ft. Laud. Docks & Waterways .......761-5423


522-8987/763-8596 ...... SINCE 1923
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1s Volume 3ssue4 June 5-July 15,1986 UoterfrontNeus Hurricane Checklist
I ,a


A boat owner/operator may be held responsible for
damages caused by his vessel during a natural disaster.
Normally the National Weather Service will issue a 24-hour
warning, however, in some instances only a 12-hour warning
will be given. Upon receiving this warning- the boat
owner/operator should immediately take precautionary
measures to see that his boat is properly secured. This
checklist is furnished as a guide to acquisition of required
safety equipment and safety procedures which, if complied
with, should reduce the possibility of the boats causing
damage. Itisstressed. however. that this does not necessarily
except the owner/operator from being held responsible
should his boat cause damage to another's property: nor will
the acquisition of required safety equipment and the following
of the suggested safetyprocedures necessarily assure that no
damage will occur to the boat or injury to its occupants.
1. PRELIMINARY ACTIONS
a. Hurricane Moorings should be located in
advance. Permission should be obtained from
appropriate persons. For keel boats, make
certain there is enough water.at low tide.
b. Practice Run should be made to check
accessibility, depth of water, bridges, locating
aids and/or obstructions to navigation and
objects to secure lines to or drop anchors.
(Remember, draw bridges may not open for boats
during evacuation procedures.)
c. Record and Keep With You the vessels registration
number (engine numbers, etc.) description, and
location where it is secured.
d. Inform the Local Marine Patrol or police officials of
your secured vessel's identification and location.
e. Vacations, business trips or other reasons for
being out of town during hurricane season will
necessitate your making plans with someone
knowledgeable of these procedures to care for
your boat, should the need arise.
f. Check your contract or policy with your marina.
Know your responsibilities and liabilities with
your boat and the marina.
2. EQUIPMENT
a. Lines of adequate length (several hundred feet)
and size (minimum 5/8") and preferably of nylon
(for strength and stretch) should be available.
Have more than you think you will need. Line size
will vary with size of vessel.
b; Chafing Gear for all lines should be used to
protect them from wear at contact points. Old
rags are very good. If water hose is used, be sure
it is large enough for line.
c. Fenders of adequate size and strength (old tires
are good) should be well secured to your boat to
protect it from other boats, sea walls, etc.


d. Radio Equipment receiving weather information
(NOAA Weather Radio) and communications
should be available.
e. Anchors should be oversize (twenty five pounds
or heavier) and all methods to improve holding
power should be used.
f. Fuel Tanks should be keptfull, if possible, during.
hurricane season. There is no time or supply
available just prior to a hurricane.
g. Batteries should be kept fully charged. An extra
or spare battery would be a good idea. Keep bilge
pumps in working order.
3. SECURING THE BOAT
a. Prepare, in Advance, A Checklist of things needed
to secure vessel. Assemble equipment and
supplies and keep them together.
b. Large Trees may be used to fasten vessel.
Ensure that they are alive and have a good root.
system. Some may be stronger than man-made
pilings. Be sure to check the strength of things
you tie to.
c. Tides can reach heights of 10 to 20 feet above
normal, particularly when it backs up into
waterways. When securing lines, take care to
consider this. Your boat could be pulled under or
be damaged as the tide rises.
d. Wind Direction reverses itself in a hurricane.
Secure boat for all directions. (Use more than one
anchor).
e. Strip boat of all movable equipment such as
canvas, sails, dinghies, radios, cushions and lash
down all you cannot remove, such as tillers,
wheels, booms, etc.
f. Seal all. openings (air conditioning duct tape is
good) to make boat as watertight as possible.
g. If you leave your boat on a davit, open the boat
drains before securing.
4. SECURING A BOAT ON TRAILER
a. Place Wooden Blocks between the frame member
and the axle inside each wheel. Let about half the
air out of the tires and then fill the boat 1/3 full of
water to help hold itdown. The blocks will
prevent damage to the springs from the
additional weight of the water.
b. Tie your boat and trailer down securely to a
strong object such as a telephone pole or large
tree, using heavy duty line.
c. If Boat Cannot be Secured in this manner, remove
the boat from trailer and partially fill it with water
to reduce its vulnerability to high winds, and tie
the boat trailer down.


5. HURRICANE WARNING
a. Leave early for safe harbor. Be sure not to block
the passage of other boats in the waterway which
have moorings further inshore. Co-operate with
other skippers in securing their boats and assist
them as long as safe and prudent. Follow the
directions of the police. Remember, there may not
be room for your boat at the last minute.
b. Do Not Stay Aboard. Even small hurricanes with
sustained winds of 75MPH have gusts of 110 MPH
that would blow anyone off the deck. Rescue
efforts are impossible. If living on board, do not
stay on board! Seek safe shelter on land.
c. Do Not Attempt to Leave the Area, unless you have a
fast boat and are prepared to travel long
distances in rough weather.
6. AFTER THE HURRICANE
a. Check for damage to boat and equipment before
moving.
b. When Proceeding to home port, watch carefully
for obstructions, loose debris in the water, etc.
Markers and other aids to navigation may be
missing.


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Fishing Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 -July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 17


First Ladies Annual

Fish-Off

by Rachel Leach
Very early on Saturday morning June 14th,
several of South Florida's finest anglers will
climb into their boats, start their engines and
head out through Hillsboro Inlet for a day of
tournament fishing. At 8:00 A.M. these anglers
will drop their hooks in the water and settle back
in their fighting chairs for a hard day's work of
fishing. But wait a minute. What's wrong with this
picture? There's something very different about
this particular tournament and its participants.
This is the First Ladies Annual Fish-Off. The
number one pre-requisite of this competition is
tht you must be female to be eligible 4or the
prizes. "O.K. We'll let the guys come along too, but
only as mates and captains. This time it's their
turn to cut the bait and fetch the beer."
No matter what your role is in a fishing
tournament, everyone has fun.
Especially in this one. The prizes include
cruises for two, trophies, equipment, cash
awards and even a trip for six onthe Goodyear
Blimp. So now that you're interested in
participating in this event, you can pick up an
application at most bait and tackle shops or atthe
Sands Harbor Hotel and Marina in Pompano
Beach. Late registration will be at the Sands until
8:00 P.M. June 13th. The entry fee is $60.00 per
angler until May 31st. After this date, it goes up to
$75.00. Every registered angler receives:: 1
barbeque dinner ticket, 1 door prize ticket, 1 T-
shirt and 1 gift bag. Your captain-and mates can---
enter the tournament for free with only a $15.00
entrance fee for the barbeque dinner.
The proceeds of the tournament will go to a
non-profit child abuse treatment program called
Kids in Distress. This is Broward County's only
comprehensive treatment center that aidsabusvd
or neglected children. Since June of 1979 the
people at Kids in Distress have provided special
help to these children. They house, feed and care
for them and in some cases where the child must
go to court, Kids in Distress will help with their
representation.
According to Sandi Booth, Tournament
Coordinator, the rules of the competition go
something like this. There are ten categories of
fish that are eligible for points. They are:
Amberjack, Barracuda, Bonita, Blue Marlin,
White Marlin, Dolphin, Grouper, Tuna and Wahoo.
The tenth category is Sailfish but only one
sailfish will be allowed per angler in the interest
of conservation. Kingfish is another popular
species whose numbers are on the decline;
therefore, this fish will not be allowed to be
caught in the tournament at all. There is a ten
pound minimum on all fish caught. An angler gets
one point per pound with a fifty pound maximum
on a single species. Since June is a great month
for Dolphin, our lady anglers will probably have
to make an honest effort not to go over the fifty
pound limit in this category.
The kick-off party at 6:00 P.M. on June 13th at
the Sands Harbor Hotel and Marina will start
everything off right. Then after the weigh-ins are
over on Saturday, the barbeque dinner will take
place to award the prizes to the winning anglers.
If you can't be in the First Ladies Annual Fish-Off
this time around, be sure to pick up next month's
edition of the Waterfront News. This reporter
plans to be one of those winning anglers. In my
next article I'll give you all the winning results.
For more information about the Ladies Fish-Off
call 942-9100


GRADY MARINE
CONSTRUCTION, INC.
tnr1 -- 10AD 1V A TT MTV


Wanted: $10,000 Reward For Heaviest Dolphin And Wahoo


The South Florida Fishing Classic is offering a
$10,000 reward for the heaviest dolphin and
wahoo each caught during the tournament
scheduled for June 27 and 28, 1986 at one of four
inlets in South Florida.
Fishermen can choose to fish from Palm Beach
Inlet; Hillsboro Inlet, Pompano Beach; Port
Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, or Government Cut,
Miami when they enter the Fishing Classic at a fee
of $250 per boat ($275 after June 13, 1986).
Besides the top prize of $10,000 each, daily
prizes will be awarded for the heaviest species at
each inlet in addition to secondary prizes overall.
The amount of these prizes will depend on the
number of entries.

Dolphin Dash Fishing
United Cerebral Palsy and TripleM Seafood are
hosting the first annual DOLPHIN DASH FISHING
TOURNAMENT, Saturday and Sunday, July 12-13,
1986.
Grand Prize of an Aquasport 170 Osprey
w/Mariner outboard and trailer will be awarded
to the largest dolphin landed.
Fabulous merchandise and trophies will be
awarded in 10 other categories, which include hi-
pt. overall, woman, junior and midget anglers.
There will also be a family division. Door prizes
include get-away weekends, dinners, and
merchandise.
Peter Ford, WSVN-TV/Channel 7's evening
anchorman, will be Master of Ceremonies for the
Awards Night.
This family tournament will be unique in that
only dolphin will be eligible for points. This helps
to insure that every angler has an equal
opportunity of winning a prize. Check out point


Also dependent on the number of entries is the
amount of money the Fishing Classic will donate to
local environmental conservation projects. One-
half of each entry fee will be earmarked for
saltwater conservation.
On May 9th, the Fishing Classic awarded $1500
to the Nova University Oceanographic Center to
provide seed funds for a graduate study of the
topic: Artificial Reefs and Fish Populations-Do
They Really Enhance Fishing Conservation?

For more information regarding the South
Florida Fishing Classic, please call 305-942-3204, or
write P.O. Box 50421, Lighthouse Point, Florida,
33074.

Tournament
for the two day tournament will be the Hillsboro
Inlet, with the official weigh-in at the Triple M
facility, 2821 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pomnpano Beach.
To enhance this special event, a Sunday
Seafood Festival is being planned. Local
businesses will be offering seafood and drinks to
the public at nominal prices.
The tournament registration fee is $100.00 per
angler with a maximum of 4 anglers per boat.
Junior angler fee (10-15 years of age) is $50.00.
Midget anglers (under 10) no charge. Registration
deadline is July 11 at the Kick-off Party to be held
at Sea Garden Beach & Tennis' Resort, 615 N.
Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach.
All proceeds from the Dolphin Dash and
Seafood Festival will directly benefit United
Cerebral Palsy of Broward.
For tournament registration forms or more
information, please contact 584-7178.


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1B Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 oterfront News Co m m erce


Waterfront News Moving To
Larger Offices

by M.G. Swift
June 15. 1986 Waterfront News will be moving
into new and larger premises at 1224 Southwest
1st Avenue. Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315. The
524-9450 phone number will still be good along
with a second line, 524-9464. The staff feels with
this change the paper can better serve its readers
and advertisers.
The new offices are one-half block south of
Davie Blvd., just east of the railroad crossing.
Look for the palm and mango trees on the front
lawn. There will be free mangos to Waterfront
News patrons while supplies last. Waterfront
News is moving into the former offices of Florida
Waterways, a regional marine magazine.
For the past two and one-half years Sir Speedy
Print Center has granted the Waterfront News
asylum at their print shop in Himarshee Village.
But the growth of both enterprises has prompted
this change. Waterfront News advertisers and
readers will still be accorded their 10% discount
at the Sir Speedy at 320 SW 2nd Street.
Again the new address effective June 15th is:
Waterfront News
1224 SW 1st Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
Phone #'s: 524-9450 (editorial)
524-9464 (advertising)
Come on by and check the place out.The staff is
excited and proud, and looking forward to
serving you even better than before from their
new facilities.

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Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450


Big And Small, All At Miami's Summer Boat Show


by Charles Johnson

Miami's Summer Boat Show, which has
doubled in size in the last three years and is now
the largest summer boat show in the United
States, will have its 8th annual run July 11-16 at
the Miami Beach Convention Center.
Summer visitors and residents from Cape
Canaveral to Key West and others from the
Caribbean and Latin America, will see and buy
from a quarter-million square foot air conditioned
facility as manufacturers and dealers offer
discount prices at model's year-end.
Again this year Miami's Summer Boat Show
will offer in-water exhibits of all types of marine
craft from 25 feet and up at the Miami Beach
Marina at MacArthur Causeway and Alton Road,
less than two miles from the Convention Center
with air conditioned shuttle buses provided free.
Another special attraction for nautical
enthusiasts in addition to discount prices, will be
the opportunity to sneak-preview some new 1987
boat lines from manufacturers and dealers
abroad.
The theme for the 1986 Miami's Summer Boat
Show is "Big And Small, See Them All."


The range runs from the queen boat of the
Show, a three-cabin 45-foot motor yacht to an 11
-foot runabout.
Displays will include hovercrafts, inflatables,
some sailboats, windsurfers, diving equipment,-
electronics and communications equipment,
fishing tackle, trailers, hoists, outboards and
accessories from bilge pumps to a portable
desalination system.
There will be finance and insurance
representatives present to complete and protect
new boat purchases.
Other items on display and for sale include
marine coverings, diving and swim platforms and
ladders, nautical clothing, deck shoes, yacht
embroidery, gifts and, accessories, binoculars
and underwater cameras.
Victor Logan, producer of Miami's Summer
Boat Show, has expanded hours this year based
on record 1985 attendance. Opening night, Friday,
July 11, will be from 7 p.m. to midnight; Saturday
from 11 a.m. to midnight; Sunday 11 a.m. to 9:30
p.m., and Monday through Wednesday, July 16,6
p.m. to 11 p.m.
Admission is $5 for adults, $2 for children 12-7
and free entry to those younger.


Pompano Couple Wins Boat Show Drawing


by M.G. Swift
Building a new house on a vacant waterfront
lot in Pompano Beach, Liz and Mike Philbrick
picked an opportune time to win the new fish
cleaning table -which was custom made and
raffled off by Decks by Davis at the Fort
Lauderdale Spring Sport and Boat Show. The
Philbrick's entry was drawn from over one-
hundred Waterfront News readers who stopped
by the-.Broward County marine newspaper's
booth and filled out a "reader's survey" at the
boat show last month.
Mike and Liz accepted their new wooden
fishing table from Tony Davis of Decks by Davis
and John Ziegler with Waterfront News at the
home of Liz's mother who lives just up stream
from the couple's building site. "It will go on our
new dock, once we've got it built," declared Mr.
Philbrick.
For spring and fall Fort Lauderdale boat shows,
Diane and Tony Davis design and build the booth
furnishings for the Waterfront News. Ziegler,
editor of the paper, remembering the folding card
tables and bundles of papers for chairs at boat
shows past, reflected,"The Davis brought us out
of the "Third World' of boat show exhibitors!"

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Laminate: Charts, photos,
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In the survey, Waterfront News' readers
indicated they wanted more fishing news. Many
wanted more classified ads to peruse through.
Currently, past and current advertisers and paid
subscribers to the paper are like-wise being
polled. Information gleaned from the surveys will
be reflected in future editions of the paper.

FRANK &JIMMIE'S
PROPELLER SHOP
Serving South Florida Marine Business tor 38 Years
ALL UNDERWATER RUNNING GEAR
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NEW SALES
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100 S.W. 6th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301


I






Po uw er Boats Volume 3 issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 1


Ask Big Al
Dear Al
Lately I can't get my boat to plane as well as
she used to. Engines rev up and the boat just digs
in. What can it be?
Fred
Dear Fred
What you are describing is usually caused by a
fouled bottom. I would haul my boat and check
the condition of my hull. I would clean and scrape
my shafts, props, and all the hardware. Make
sure that the props are not bent or broken. A good
coat of bottom paint and your boat will plane
again.
Al
Dear Al
Engine is loosing water from my fresh water
tank and I fill it everytime I go out. Can't seem to
find out where. Engine runs cool as long as water
is full.
Jack
Dear Jack
Does the tank lose water overnight, or only
while engine is running? If while engine is running
it could be a defective water pump slinging water
out of the bushing. A bad radiator cap could also
help to cause that problem. If you lose water
overnight, check all hoses and put a pressuretest
on system. I hate to say this but I would check my
oil for evidence of water contamination.
Al
IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH YOUR
BOAT. WRITE TO:
"BIG AL"
clo Waterfront News
1224 S.W. 1st Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
(or call 524-9450)
(Big Al, a.k.a. Alvin Grodsky, is a Marine Engine Instructor
for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is an aircraft pilot and
former United States Marine Corps Engine Maintenance
Instructor and an Instructor of Engines and Maintenance
for the. U.S. Government as a civilian. Al has over fifty
years of marine engineering experience, from steam po~


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Splicing, Roller Furling,
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(305) 942-7497

250 S.E. 8th Court
Pompano Beach, FL 33060


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Hollywood Boater Wins
FORT MYERS BEACH, FLORIDA, May 17,--Ben
Krammer, 32, of Hollywood, Florida, won the
Open Class in the third Offshore Power Boat race
of the season. Krammer, driving Team Apache, a
41-foot Apache Maelstrom powered by two 750
horsepower Apache/-Eickert inboard engines,
averaged 89.61 miles an hour over the 146.7 mile
course.
While this was nowhere near the record course
runs of over 100 mph set earlier this year, the
water was rougher at Fort Myers than at the
previous races.
Kramer, who also won the last race of the 1985
season, finished 17 minutes ahead of Molson
Indy, a38-foot Cigarette, driven by Lorne Liebel of
Toronto, Canada. Third place went to Willie
Falcon of Coral Gables driving Team Seahawk, a
38-foot Cougar. After three races, Falcon leads
the Open national high points race, with Bob
Kaiser of Grosse Points, Michigan driver of
Systems, second. Kaiser finished sixth today.
Krammer said of his big catamaran, "This cat
eats the competition. We had bumpy two to four
foot seas, but this boat bridges the waves,
perfectly."
The big time difference came, Kramer said,
"because early on somebody veered left and the
pack followed. We stayed on course and that
gave us a substantial lead. We throttled back to
90 and just tried to keep the equipment together."
In Modified Class, John D'Elia of Cos Cob,
Connecticut won, driving Special Edition, a 30-
foot Chris Cat, increasing his lead in the Modified
class national points race. D'Elia set a speed


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record for his type of boat in April by running the
Treasure Cay, Bahamas, at 103.04 mph. Second in
Modified was Baja Bandit II, driven by John
Sauselen of Bucyrus, Ohio. Third place went to
Jack Bishop in Smilin' Jacks.
Triple Threat, a 30-foot Shadow Cat, driven by
Wayne Vince of Bloomsburg, New Jersey,
running his first race of the season, won the Pro
Stock Class. Omar Elesgaray's Captain America,
a 30-foot Chris Cat, was second. Elesgaray, from
Miami, was second at Marathon, Florida, two
weeks ago and now leads the national point
standings in Pro Stock. Long Shot, driven by Ed
Colyer of Portage des Sioux, Missouri, was third.
In the Stock A Class, Miss Don 0, a 24-foot
Skater, driven by Felix J. Serralles III of Ponce,
Puerto Rico, won with Steve Carrier of Key Largo
second in Smooth Operator, a 24 Skater Tunnel.
Bob Erickson of Minnetonka, Minnesota drove his
Skater, AME 4000 Express, to third place.
Serrales and Carrier are tied for first place in the
class high points race.
Stock B class was won byFully Involved, a 26-
foot Corsa, driven by Joe Sorrentino of Sunrise,
Florida. In second place was Mike Britton of
Miami in a 27-foot Ultimate hull called Obsession,
and Bill Kaye of Chicago was third in Captain
Maintained. The Stock B race was the tightest of
the day, with less than a minute and a half
separating the first three boats.
It was the second win in a row for Sorrentino,
who races with Sk;p Kriner on the throttles and
his son Joe junior as navigator. All three are fire
fighters in the Sunrise Fire-Rescue Department.

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I


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______........






20 Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Uloterfront News Safety


Written Rules And Common Sense Afloat


If you consider the area just off your starboard
bow and forward of the beam to be the danger
zone, this can help you remember what to do in
most crossing situations. Simply, if your
powerdriven vessel is under way, in unrestricted
waters, a powerdriven vessel crossing from your
starboard bow has the right of way. This makes
him the stand-on vessel (formerly privileged) and
you the give-way vessel (formerly burdened).
With no other factors involved, if there is any risk
of collision, you must not attempt to cross his
bow, while he has every right to cross yours
safely.
But what if another boat is crossing from his
starboard' bow? Does he give way to, the other
boat while you're giving way to him, like some
form of nautical musical chairs?
No.
When there are more than two boats passing,
crossing, overtaking, or doing any combination,
Rule 2 takes over. Although the Rule might appear
so complicated that it seems to have little
meaning, it is vitally important. Many boatsmen
think of its two parts as follows.
The Good Seamanship section requires the
operator to take any precaution which may be
required by the ordinary practice of seamen, in
situations not specifically covered under the
other Rules of the Road. The General Prudential
section makes it incumbent on every boat
operator to maneuver safely in order to avoid any
dangers of navigation and collision. The General
Prudential section also authorizes the operator to
depart from all other rules as necessary to avoid
immediate danger.
Rule 2 not only applies to three or more vessels,
but also applies to two when they are in extremis
(about to collide, or seemingly about to collide),
or even one boat in danger of grounding or hitting
a stationary object. In other words, the operator
of any vessel in extremis must maneuver to avoid
danger, using ordinary seamanship to fit the
case.


522-4018


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P.O. BOXES
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FORT LAUDERDALE
FLORIDA 33301


This makes the rule a hard taskmaster. In a
collision hearing, the operator of each boat must
be prepared to prove that he or she took action
under the rule. The bottom line is that the other
rules may give you the right of way at certain
times, but Rule 2 says that no rule gives you the
right of way through another boat.
There does not have to be a collision, however,
in a passing or overtaking situation, for an
operator to be in violation of Rule 2. If your
actions in such a situation force the other boat to
depart from the other rules, and thus invoke Rule
2, you could be found guilty of placing that boat in
extremis.

Rule 2 RESPONSIBILITY

(a) Nothing in these Rules shall exonerate any
vessel, or the owner, masteror crew thereof, from
the consequences of any neglect to comply with
these Rules or of the neglect of any precaution
which may be required by the ordinary practice of
seamen, or by the special circumstances of the
case.
(b) In construing and complying with these
Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of
navigation and collision and to any special
circumstances, including the limitations of the
vessels involved, which may make a departure
from these rules necessary to avoid immediate
danger.



This issue of WRITTEN RULES AND COMMON
SENSE AFLOAT was reviewed by Captain Ron
Wahl, Director of Sea School. Captain Wahl is an
authority on laws and Coast Guard regulations
affecting maritime licensing; and has been
accepted in the Federal Court system as an expert
witness for cases involving Rules of the Road,
and Radar.




don hillman, inc.
2501 State Road 84
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33312
(305) 581-2376
Miami 944-6613


Using A Watch As A

Compass?

by Capt. Don Olsen
It was mid-afternoon in Hurricane Hole Nassau,
Bahamas. I had just cleaned up the 65' yacht I was
Captain on when an old conch fisherman by name
of Johns stopped by to shoot the breeze. He was
amazed at the elaborate navigation system with
all its instruments on board and after explaining
how some were used he looked at me and said
he'd just stick to his watch for navigation. This
puzzled me so I asked Johns to explain.
He slipped his scratched fake Rolex off his
wrist, but assured me that one could use any
watch with an hour hand and the correct time.
Johns then aimed the hour hand (the small one) in
the direction of the Sun and told me, "once you're
aimed at the sun you split the difference between
the hour hand and straight up 12:00 and that
direction is due south, then you can easily figure
out East, West and North".
I have tried Johns method of navigation in
many ports of call and checked it with the ships
compass and it has proved to be quite accurate.
(U.S.A. time 1-900-410-8463)
Don Olsen is a
professional yacht captain licensed by the U.S.
Coast Guard for over ten years.


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Inquiries Invited We Ship Anywhere

GULF PLATING INC.


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BOATERS Can Use!
Propane stoves & refrigerators
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Electrical & plumbing supplies
Aluminum propane gas tanks & fittings
Chemicals
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Extensive supply of brass fittings
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518 S.W. FIRST AVENUE
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. 33301


Int'l.
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Jax.
-393-9622


"


-- --- ----


I







NM aain Brc ce' Volume 3 issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 UJoterfront Newus 21


9th Annual New River Raft Race


COMMERCIAL
BATTERY
SYSTEMS, Inc.
1337 S.W. 20th Terrace
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312
1/2 Block West of 1-95 on Davie (Behind Exxon)

SPECIAL PRICES ON
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CALL 523-0909 or TOLL FREE 1-800-551-4300

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CALL 462-9249 33315

.^

Set For September 7th
by M.G. Swift
The Fort Lauderdale JayCees have set the date
for the 9th Annual New River Raft Race. Sunday,
September 7, 1986 is the date and the Seventh
Avenue boat ramp is the place. Leave your
balloon launchers at home, say the organizers.
Speaking of organized, the JayCees will be
hosting a planning meeting open to all interested
parties for this ninth annual raft race at their
club house, 4140 Peters Road on Thursday, July


DOCKSIE YACHT MAINTENANCE
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DELIVERIES
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Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33335


524-6156


10, 1986 at 7:30 p.m. Parties with boats, ties in
communications and the media, and an interest in
helping to pull off one of the premier waterfront
events in Broward County should show up for this
organizational meeting.
Rachel Galletta, this year's New River Raft Race
chairman, is looking forward to the biggest and
safest event in it's nine-year history. For more
information call the JayCees or Ms. Galletta at
791-0202.

BEHIND EVERY GREAT RIG
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Phone 476-70051
467-7159


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Hurry I Place your Classified
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524-9450
ADVERTISE
in the Wat'd rot N60


Boats under 30'
sleep free.

Book a room at the Bahia this season and
your boat (under 30') gets free mooring
foras long as you stay in the hotel. Which
might be some time, when you consider
what we offer: miles of ocean beach,
scuba, snorkeling, pool, our own arcade
of shops and memorable dining over-
looking the sea. We'll even give you
room service to your boat (ideal for
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May 1-Sept. 30. So, don't let it slip away.

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RESORT & YACHTING CENTER
801 Seabreeze Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
See your travel agent or call toll free
1-800-327-8154 or 305-764-2233.


Come by boat..."Eat, Drink, Shop
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Enter SeaFair's safe harbor dockage from the
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For additional information:

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For 31 Years
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!7i


9






2g Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Uoterfront Neus H ab itat


I DISCO UNT I ICE .


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Right in the Middle of Downtown.
FORT LAUDERDALE
MUNICIPAL MARINA
id yo kn-w that the Yachting Capital of the World has municipal marinas thal
damned near anybody can afford?
I is true...in two locations It is convenient to shopping and beaches
Smack dab in the middW of Fort Lauderdale there's an excellent facility. with over
4,000 feet of linear dockage juls
waiting for visiting yachtsmen. You
can ulilize this well-manicured
marina with its handy parking with
low munipal rates inclung pow
water and refuse service. W alk
sorts of ppotunities Stay for a
day or the season or cruise over for
a weekend
We also offer a neat, temporary =_ B
anchorage aea next da to world
fms BahiaMar Yachting Center.
And that only costs $6 perday No
wonder we're the Yachting Capital
of the World. ,....
And on the beach side of the ICW ..
there are 38 new docks with ,
available parking and nearby our
magnllcent beach. W-" ";, W
o CKW --. F or Inonon Pe Wnrite or Call
Call: v lERWA FORT LAUDERDALE DOCKS
o>-1 WATERWAYS OFFICE
(305) 761-! 3 14 lS New Rver Dnnast
Or) ., \ Fort Lauderda. Florida 33301
or VHF h 305) 761 5423
VHF-Ch. 9 'E Hldton Brown. Jr.. Dockmastr
*. -v


Opinion

Do It In The Dirt

by Marilyn Damon


A broad-based erosion-control program
funded jointly by the state and local governments
has won the endorsement of Governor Graham.
The Senate Natural Resources Committee
initiated Bill (S-432) to begin the effort. This bill
will require a surcharge in counties that have
Tourist Development Taxes. The bill requires that
1/4 of a cent of the tax collected on each dollar
spent by a tourist be placed in an erosion-control
trust fund to be controlled by the state's Division
of Beaches and Shores. This bill is both good and
bad. The T.D.C. will still use the majority of the
monies collected for advertising and tourist
development. I question whether promoting
cultural activities can be considered tourist
attractions. Our beaches are our most precious
natural resource and our biggest tourist
attraction. It seems to me that preservation of our
beaches, erosion control and beach revegetation


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are more important than convention centers and
museums. Development is already eliminating
and destroying many of our natural resources. On
the other side of the issue consider the fact that
the Division of Beaches and Shores promotes
restoration of beaches, mainly by pumping tons
of sand, to rebuild existing beaches.
However, restoration without revegetation is
only half the job. You can put tons of sand on a
beach, but to keep it there you need vegetation
with strong root systems to bind the sand and
hold it on the beach. Vegetation reduces wind and
water erosion and creates a pleasing
appearance. Senate National Resource
Committee Bill (S-432) is a beginning, but it needs
to be amended to stress revegetation along with
restoration. What do you think? Send your
comments to Broward Soil and Water
Conservation District at 6179 S.W. 45th Street,
Rm. 6173, Davie, FL 33314.
Its interesting to note that although the
Governor endorses (S-432) he arbitrarily
eliminated the soil and water action projects,
including the Hallandale Beach Project, from his
budget. The beach projects weren't even
considered for funding.


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1






June 15- July 15, 1986 UJoterfront News 2 3


A Lobster's Life In Maine


SOUTHAMPTON YACHT CO.
Marine Electrical Specialists
Repairs Supplies installations
Panels Surveys Rewiring
Trouble Shooting Electrolysis Analysis
Owner CAPT. JOHN DREW
Available for Sea Trials -Demonstrations
Absentee Maintenance & Refit Management
Phone 987-4678


3905 INVESTMENT LANE
P.O BOX 10662
RIVIERA BEACH FLORIDA 33404
(305) 863-RIGG


* Complete Spar Systems
* Lifelines
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& Service
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Distributors for:
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Ft. Iauderdale, FtL 33316
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Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
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SERVICE SINCE 1960
COMPLETE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM REPAIRS
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EXCELLENT RATES 771-5436


by Jennifer Helt
At Ihe Harraseeket Lobster Company in
Coastal Maine, a group ol lobstermen gather
together on shore swapping stories and drinking
beer Young and old alike, they have the rugged
look of men who have never punched a time clock
or sat behind an olfice desk In a place where
puritan values still prevail, lobstering is tradition,
reserved by territorial birth-right for members of
lobstering families.

"Sometimes people from other parts of the
country come up here and like the idea of
lobstering, so they give it a try," said a 20-year
veteran lobsterman of Freeport who asked not to
be identified. "But most do it because it's all they
know. Their fathers did it and their grandfathers,
and their fathers before them."

Children born into lobstering families learn the
trade early. From helping Mom knit nylon "heads"
for trap building to accompanying Dad on his
lobstering adventures, a child's education is
complete. By adolescence, many boys are fishing
on their own and pocketing the profits.

"Lobstering isn't only for the men," said the
Freeport lobsterman. "I see women out there on
the water, plugging away. Always have. Maniacs
(people born and raised in Maine) are hardy. They
know how to get along."

Beginning the work-day at dawn, Maine
lobstermen battle their way through the heavy
fogs, rains and cold temperatures that are
common-place year round. Some work part time,
meaning they fish during the spring and summer
months, then turn to jobs for winter employment.
For the full-timer, winter is the season for
building new traps and acquiring gear. Some take
a vacation and travel down southlto recooperate.

On Harraseeket River where the lobster
company is located, dozens of boats are out on
the water, fiberglass beating the wooden boats in
popularity. During the last few years many
lobstermen have switched to fiberglass because
of easier maintenance. "The best boat was the
Hampton back in the early years (of lobstering),"
em m e*******-e momom .****
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says the Freeport lobsterman. "Now that was a
real boat!"

Whatever type of construction, according to
Maine lore the typical lobsterman is as devoted
to his boat as a landlover to a rare classic car.
Custom dictates that boats should be named after
the owner's sons although the vessel is still
referred to as "she" or "her." Identifying colors
painted on the hull or on a buoy stuck up in the
rigging, are matched to the corresponding buoy
that's out on the water guarding the traps.
Technically, this is the law but here in Maine,
markings have more to do with moral
possession.

"Territory isn't something.to be taken lightly,"
explains the Freeport lobsterman. "Generally, I
make it a practice not to talk to the press. You'll
find most lobstermen won't say very much
because they're protective of their territory so
that outsiders won't try to horn in and grab the
profits of a good territory. You see, in this
business it doesn't pay to advertise."

Breaking the unwritten laws governing family
territory can result in an all-out lobster war. This
occurs when."outsiders" continually try to set
their traps "where they don't belong." War tactics
can range from a gun shot across the bow to the
actual destruction of a boat.

Feuds can exist on home turf too. In Freeport,
it's common knowledge that John and David
Caften, owners and brothers of the Harraseeket
Lobster Co., have been fighting for years. "No
different from the Hatfields and McCoys," says
the Freeport lobsterman. "Maybe even worse."

Despite feuds, territorial disputes, lobster wars
and all the other follies that plague the human
race, commercial lobstering endures. Increased
governmental regulations over the years have
deterred many potentials from pursuing the
profession, yet newcomers are still joining the
ranks. Some say "it's in the genes." Others call it
"the survival instinct."

By the way, the Freeport lobsterman never did
tell me his name...

aiobfoiorks Aor gou


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Volume 3 Issue 4






2 4 Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 UWaterfront News Food


Gourmet Canoeing
What a great way to spend an evening! Enjoy a
leisurely trip down the scenic waterways of Fort
Lauderdale and then enjoy a gourmet meal with
your new canoeing friends of one of the areas
finest restaurants. Trips will leave the scheduled
restaurant at 5:45 p.m. sharp. The trip fee is $10
per person and dinner costs are on your own.
Sorry, no refunds. The City of Fort Lauderdale
Park and Recreation is presenting this program
on the following dates at the restaurants listed
below:
June 26 The Country Grill Restaurant. Enjoy a
backyard tour of the beautiful homes in Broward
County's newest development in Weston. Then sit
down and relax in the pleasant atmosphere of The
Country Grill Restaurant and enjoy a meal from
one of their many selections, 2505 Windmill.
Ranch Road.
June 17 & 19 Tugboat Annies, Paddle east to
investigate a favorite mangrove area while
enjoying the wild life along the way. Return to
shore for a delicious meal at Tugboat Annies,
1000 N.E. 3rd Street, Dania.
One will canoe for about an hour then eat dinner
at the restaurant. For more information call Sibyl
Robbins at 761-5419. Make the trip fee check
payable to; City of Fort Lauderdale; mail to; Parks
& Recreation, Sibyl Robbins, 300 N. Andrews
Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301.



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BOATERS CHOICE BOATERS CHOICE
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S Special Price 10 Case + ? w#


Health Watch

Ciguatera Fish Poisoning


by Donna Hessman, R.N.
Ciguatera is the seafood poisoning most
frequently reported in the United States. Most
cases occur here in South-east Florida and in
Hawaii during spring and summer. Ciguatera is
associated with 400 species of fish, but the most
common fish that carry this toxin are large
bottom dwelling fish (Barracuda, red snapper,
amberjack, and grouper) caught near reefs
between latitude 350N and 35oS. Barracuda are so
frequently contaminated that Miami has banned
their sale. But how do these large fish become
contained? The answer is thru the food chain.
The poison is produced by dinoflagellates and
blue green algae that are eaten by small fish.
These small fish are then eaten by larger fish who
concentrate the poison. This process continues
until the largest fish with high levels of poison are-
consumed by man. One problem is that the poison
does not alter the taste, color or odor of the fish.
Another problem is that the toxin is so strong
cooking, heating, freezing or storing does not kill
it. Prevention of this disease would be to avoid
eating large, bottom fish caught near reefs
located 350N and 35S during the spring and
summer. If you did eat contaminated fish what


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symptoms would occur?
The illness usually develops within 1 to6 hours
but may appear within minutes or be delayed 30
hours after ingestion. Nausea, vomiting,
abdominal cramps and diarrhea may occur.
Muscle pain, sweating, chills, itching, pain in the
arms & legs, and burning pain in the feet have
been reported. Heat and cold perception can be
reversed. Symptoms can be more serious such as
blurred vision, temporary blindness, slow heart
beat, low blood pressure and difficulty breathing.
Death can occur 3 fatalities were reported out of
3,000 cases. There is no specific treatment.
Vomiting should be induced with Syrup of Specac
and catnartics given to empty intestines unless
vomiting and diarrhea have already begun.
The length of illness from Cigautera ranges
from days to months. Pain in the extremeites
have been reported to occur for years following
the initial poisoning. Avoid eating large bottom
fish caught in spring and summer off the reefs of
S.E. Florida between lat 35N and 35S.
Forewarned is forearmed against Ciguatera.
Thanks to Kathryn Welch from Broward General
Medical Library for her help with this article.


"Best Hot Appetizer
and Best Dessert 1986
Pompano Seafood Festival"


TRY OUR

BLUE

RIBBON

CONCH

FRITTERS

AND

KEY LIME

PIE
Find out why there are always-
more regular customers than
newcomers at Pelican Pub. The
seafood, and now the key lime pie,
are always fresh (never frozen)
and always first rate. The fresh air,
the unmatched tropical ferns and
informal dining is the way Florida
seafood dining is supposed to be.
The unique fish market allows you
to pick out tonight's entree and
then pick up tomorrow's dinner on
your way out.








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just off A1A-Pompano Beach
Telephone 785-8550
Lighted Dock Space On The Intracoastal


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(305) 792-8700 Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.






Swimming


Volume 3 Issue 4


June 15 -July 15, 1986


Waterfront News 25


4ic


jP A.
I
~h


19th Annual Ft. Lauderdale
Open Long Course Swim Meet

by M.G. Swift
The Fort Lauderdale Swim Team and the City of
Fort Lauderdale Parks and Recreation
Department are sponsoring the 19th Annual Fort
Lauderdale Open Long Course Swim Meet June
27-29, 1986. Sanctioned by the Florida Gold Coast
Competitive Swimming Committee of United
States Swimming, Inc., the meet will take place at
the International Swimming Hall of Fame Pool,
501 Seabreeze Avenue. Fort Lauderdale.
Preliminaries begin at 9 a.m., finals at 6 p.m.
-The meet will be open to all 1986 USS
swimmers and foreign athletes with propertravel
credentials. Swimmers will be limited to a total of
nine individual events, not more than three in any
one day.
For more information call the Fort Lauderdale
Swim Team at 764-4822.


Wave


Skiing


In Hawaii


by Marsha Rose
I recently went back home to Hawaii after being
away for six years. My brother, who has lived
there all his life, now owns a house there and
between his ultra-light, motor boats and scuba
gear, he is pretty well settled in. We grew up in
Kailua, right near the bay, that world renowned
capital of windsurfing. Kailua is also the home of
Robbie Naish, international windsurfing
champion and his family business. The Naishes
now have two windsurfing stores, one right near
Kailua Beach Park and one downtown Kailua,
directly across the street from their main
competition, Windsurfing Hawaii. Both the
Naishes and Windsurfing Hawaii promote their
own custom boards as well, as lessons, rentals
and other personalized paraphernalia. Needless
to say, windsurfing has been big inthe islands for
aboAten years and the Naishes has done much
to promote the sport locally as well as worldwide.
But then when you have a beautiful natural
resource like Kailua Bay on which to own your
craft, you can't go wrong. I had almost forgotten
how truly beautiful Kailua Bay is! I mean I have
seen beaches all over the country: Oregon,
California, Massachuchetts, Cape Cod, New York
and Florida and I have never seen a more idyllic
spot. Always an onshore breeze with a slight
chop (unless it's the winter highwind season),
powdery white sand and transparent green blue
Water with enough wave action to satisfy the
local bodysurfers and boogieboarders. The bay is
surrounded by a reef with coral heads that stick
out of the water at low tide which harbor a variety
of delicious goodies including spiny lobster and
eel, an island delicacy. Flat island is just a quarter
of a mile off shore, a short swim for even the most
inexperienced swimmers. Popoia, Flat island's
Hawaiian name, is a bird sanctuary and can be
walked around or sailed around in a matter of
minutes. And if you're lucky, you might spy a
Moorish Idol or a Yellow Tang darting among the
rocks on the backside of the island. During the
spring, you can hear an eerie cooing among the
low ground schrubbery imbedded in the lava
rock, but do not disturb; they are state protected.
Ocasionally, people will get permits to camp on
the island but it is mostly enjoyed by the locals for
fishing, swimming or pulling a hobie or
windsurfer up to.
Besides the ubiquitous windsurfers, an
occasional jet ski or ocean Kayak, there is a new
craft on the bay of late. It's called a wave ski.
Wave skiing is very new to the Hawaiian Islands.
It originated in New Zealand where wave ski
clubs abound and the sport has been popular for
over 16 years. Rick Naish and Larry Stanley from
Windsurfing Hawaii were exposed to the sport
two years ago while on a trip to New Zealand.
They decided to bring it to the islands and

,Call.the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450
T A./.'.,',; y,,,/..,;~,V*.Wll,7/, -,-! it'. *."./l.M;.'/ j k. .._ ,' (."/. .''.. :/, .;.'."t.


consulted with the Wongs, a Kailua family in the
business of making custom windsurfing boards
for nine years. Charlie and Eddie Wong have since
risen to the challenge of being the only craftsmen
locally making custom wave skis.. Wave Toys,
the name of their new company, are in growing


demand. The boards are approximately five feet
long and havetwo layers of fiberglass on bothtop
and bottom. It takes Charlie several hours to
shape the boards and glue up the blanks. The
shape and density depend on the body weight of
the customer and how much experience they
have at maneuvering water craft. The finished
product includes three skegs, a seatbelt,
footstraps, and a custom mold paddle with a
leash line connected to the board. Color and
custom graphics are up to the patron and
depending on how elaborate they are, the price
will vary. However, the straight ahead package
runs $550.00 with the paddle which is less than
any of the assembly line models on the market. To
give you an idea how popular the sport is
becoming, an International Wave Ski Competition
is being planned thiswinteron the North Shoreof
Oahu featuring South African and New Zealand
teams. I personally tried the board, not in the
context of surfing in waves where you seatbelt up
and can actually turn the board over and upright
yourself as in Kayaking, but just paddling out to
one of the twin Mokaluas off Lanikai Beach.
Besides being great exercise for developing
upper body strength, it was an exhilarating
experience being out in the middle of the ocean on
such a sea worthy little craft.
As I close my expose' on my beloved Kailua
Bay, I feel the warm evening breeze through my
hair and I view the sultry sunset with.the Lanikai
outrigger canoe clubbers rowing in unison at
dusk across the horizon, keeping alive the age old
-tradition that makes Hawaii, Hawaii.


clean and paint your bottom cheaper than
you can do it yourself...


Above Includes Haul-Out, Pressure Cleaning & Paint
Does Not Include Scraping


I tI 44 4 4 R+. 4, 4 a.~ a~-=r -. 4- ~ 4. 4 1 .......


The Swim To Ft. Lauderdale; Why
It Cannot Be Done by James Sullivan
Attempts to swim from Bimini in the Bahamas
to Ft. Lauderdale have all met with failure. Why?
The distance is less than 50 nautical miles (58
statute) certainly not an excessive stretch for
professional athletes. The direction (set) of the
flow of water in the Straits of Florida, usually
referred to as theGult Stream, is northward (008)
appearing to give the swimmer a lift in speed. The
drift (speed) of this water during the month of
August is shown by the Pilot Chart to average a
little less than 3 knots. A trained swimmer can
maintain 2 kts for a considerable distance, and if
heading north the total speed would be 5 kts,
however the swimmer must cross the straits and
must head southwest into the drift to compensate
for the water's push to the north and here is the
rub.
To keep from being swept north of FtL the
swimmer must set the course to the southwest
making a longer swim vector which in turn will
make a longer drift vector which in turn will make
a longer swim vector which in turn ......


_


rrr~


I







SVolume 3 Issue 4 June 15- July 15 1986 LWaterfront News Classified Section


LAS OLAS ISLES- 1 bdrm., efficencies,
rooms. Pool, laundry, cable t.v., BBQ
Super location. Low Rates! Wkly. or
monthly. Call 525-2225

FT. LAUDERDALE WATERFRONT 2bed room*
2 bath*Livingroom*Familyroom*All
appliances*New Washer & Dryer*New
Dock Available. Call 583-1171.


ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
ISLE OF VENICE- Live-aboards
Pool, Shower, Laundry, Cable, Phone.
Call 525-2223. Low Rates!
Dock for rent on the NEW RIVER
85' 14' LW*Water & Electric*No Fixed
Bridges Call 791-7596
LAS OLAS 103 Is.le of Venice deep
water liveaboard sailboat dockage.
Shower &-laundry facilities 491-2468
Dockage available up to 50' deepwater
no fixed bridges 40' dock..Elec/water
No liveaboards GALT OCEAN MILE area
Call 564-3504 after 6pm
MARINA BAY area Deep water up to 60'
50amp service etc. Reasonable. No
Liveaboards. Call 797-8915

Dock for rent- Deepwater, ocean
access, No Liveaboards. 524-3111
Immediate availability- 1SLE OF
VENICE. Deepwater dock, yrly/mnly
$200. Call 486-1949
Dock for rent- POMPANO with dolphins
$4 per foot includes water/electric
Ralph 943-8880
65' dock for rent CITRUS ISLES
Deep water No fixed bridges $300/mo.
Will split dock space 2-32' 525-9796.
45x11x6' dock 15th St. SE No Live-
aboards. 1 mi. to ocean. 524-2278
after 10a.m.
70' frontage 5'6" draught water &.
electricity Monthly or seasonal.
Ocean access*Secluded*Call 946-0'191
Dock for rent. CITRUS ISLES. No
fixed bridges up to 60'.
No Live-aboards. 467-3817.
LAKE SANTA BARBARA: New deep water
dock. No live-aboards. Elec. & water.
$250/mo. 942-0512 after 6pm.
BANYAN MARINA- 111 Isle of Venice
Deepwater Dock*Pool*Cable*Laundry
Furnish Apts. Avail.too! 524-4430.
90' dock avail. LAS OLAS ISLES
Wide & deep canal Call 305-522-7967
ISLAND dockslips 15' beam-9'LW Live-
aboard. Lg. one bedroom apts penthouse
poolside. Yearly. Cable, Laundry.
Call 467-3512.
Dockspace-FT LAUDERDALE-Orange Isle
New dock to accommodate 2 Boats&Long
or Short term lease. Call 583-1171
Dockage available at CITY OF HOLLY-
WOOD's NEW MARINA. Located at 700
Polk St. Adjacent to Intracoastal
Waterway. 24 hour security. Showers,
restrooms, full hook-ups, ice, annual
monthly & daily rates. Call 921-3035


DAVITS Oliver 8ton 491-1220 $1200
8' fibreglass DINGY $500
Call Parkins Marine 583-0688
SEXTANT-Davis MK 15 w/carrying case,
3x telescope, lanyard, 7 sunshades,
new condition, cost $100, your's for
$55. Call Ed 782-7495 or 764-7590
By owner-*Heavy Duty WELDING MACHINE
$125.*2hp compressor $150* 20pcs
marine panting drapes $400 or best
offer. Call 458-6399
Schaefer s.s.JIB FURLING SYSTEM com-
plete incl. 150% Genoa..All like new!
Hoist 43', foot 20'- fits 41' ketch.
Asking $1000. Call 566-3648.
10' F/G Cigarette replica. Seats 3.
Wheel steer, will pull skier. Excel-
lent as dinghy. Like new. $1000.
Call 566-3648.


GENERATORS- Westerbeke*Onan*Kohler*
Entec*Mariner: sold & installed at
competitive prices. Call for details
REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.
ONAN USED DIESEL GENERATORS 3,6,7- &
12kw available. Call for details &
prices. REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.


1973 LYMAN 24' Fibreglass, 225 Chrysler
VHF D/Sounder all'fishing gear
First Class! Trailer. Call 525-6211

Skip Field YACHT BROKERAGE 587-7320
10' f/i CIGARETTE replica. Seats 3.
Wheel steer, will pull skier. Excel-
lent as dinghy. Like new. $1000.
566-3648


33' MORGAN MOTORSAILER 1980 excellent
condition & well equipped for cruis-
ing. Has extra 50 gal. fuel & water
tanks*air*Westerbeke gen*roller furl-
ing sails. Linens, dishes, etc. Very
comfortable. Ft. Lauderdale 763-3388
527-4834 (eve).
MORGAN 41' KETCH- like new 750 total
hrs. $10,000 just spent, dinghy, A/C
Generator fully equipped, most
Beautiful Morgan afloat! MUST SELL!
New boat ordered. All offers consid-
ered. Call 565-0962.


MINI BLINDS custom designed to your
boat. All marine materials TEAK
blinds, REMOTE CONTROL SYSTEMS.
Treasures of the Forest 475-0114
VINYL LETTERING for boats, trucks,
frontage. 3M, prespaced, 14 colors,
pressure sensitive. Call 561-4337.


REFRIGERATION-AIR CONDITIONING RE-
PAIRS & INSTALLATION-- service ALL
brands, 1 yr. warranty on BOTH parts
& labor, $25/hr., day or night, we
custom build most any type of unit or
DO-IT-YOURSELF, we sell what you need
w/free advice. MEETING YOUR COOLING
NEEDS SINCE 1977. Call CUSTOM REFRIG-
ERATION 527-0540.


RIVERFRONT MARINA(dry store.)527-1829
SUMMERFIELD BOATWORKS-So.Fk.525-4726
ROSCIOLI YACHT CENTER,SR84,581-9200 '


CANVAS FACTORY- Flybridge covers,
Bimini tops, Mooring covers & Repairs
Mobile Truck will perform work at your
site. 781-1970.
Try CRUISIN' CANVAS of 1500 West
Broward Blvd. blockss east of i95)
Custom marine canvas, repairs, yard
goods & do-it-yourself supplies.
FREE ESTIMATES. Call 467-2722 today.


4th of JULY CHARTER Sail/Scuba/Wind-
surfing. 45' Sailboat. Licensed Capt.
Gourmet dinner Sun & Fun $800
Call Phil at 523-7878.


BOAT WAXING- Fiberglass Repair. Ex-
terior Cleaning, Teak, Paint. 920-7896
HULL CLEANING under water.
Call Bob leave message at 463-9810
MARK's SPARKLING BOAT & YACHT SERV.
Reliable,Experienced,dockside works
50% price of yard labor*Maintenance
& work agreements, seasonal/annual
rates. CLEANING, WAX, DETAILING for
sales, TEAK work & UNDERWATER work.
FREE ESTIMATES, call Mark 1-744-0308






Classified Section Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News 27


YACHT CAPTAIN Power and sail, all
areas, available for charters, and
deliveries, excellent references.
782-7495/764-7590 Capt. Ed Wiser


All UNDERWATER YACHT REPAIR 537-1550


James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C &
PREP. for USCG OPERATOR's LICENSE.
Will teach same to seafarers for $12.
Call 462-2628.

.


NORSEMAN MARINE- rigging 467-1407


'"MA^RIE SURVEYOR- buyers & insurance
Surveys for both POWER & SAIL.
Call Ed Rowe at 792-6092.
MARINE SURVEYOR pre-purchase &
insurance- Sail*Power. 20 yrs exp.
William Seager.
Tel. 791-8628
MARINE SURVEYOR & Consultant
Capt. Boyd Hildebrand 925 4214 Ft.L.


i NAUTICAL
EVALUATIONS 0
0 Marine Surveyor,
, Hull, Rigging, Sail & Engine

I (CALL JOHN FOR QUOTES)

(305) 493-5966
mqbw


r-DELIVERIE


/ -I-


Non-profit Christian corp. seeks
DONATIONS of COMPUTER, PRINTER,
COPIER, etc. New Freedom, Inc.
524-6156 (answering machine).
CREW EXPERIENCED- for local weekend
cruising & racing on beautiful 41'
KETCH. Your only cost is help with
maintenance. Call 566-3648.
-IELP WANTED- market vinyl, boat letter-
,ing to supplement income.while work-
ing in marine fields. Call 561-4337.

Reliable person will -HOUSE-SIT in
'your home; maintenance/security,
waterfront preferable. Call Ken
524-9450


-" r -'"




By owner Beautiful Lg 2/2 pool on
NEW RIVER CANAL, deep water. Enjoy
Fam Rm Lg Pool Patio, Gar. Assume
FHA 81,ooo. No Qual. Priced to sell!
Only $115,000. Call eves 523-7172.
Luxury FLOATING HOME *50'*2 Story
with 3rd level sun-deck*Jacuzzi*
Waterbed & many extras. $70000 reduc-
ed for quick sale $65000*
Call 974-0010 Evenings 733-3384

DEEPWATER OCEAN ACCESS *
GROWING PAINS?
TOO MANY CARS or TOO MANY KIDS!






4 ..

Your family is expanding...But your house isn't. This 5+
Bdrm., 4-1/2 Bath, 2 Story, Spacious HARBOR BEACH
WATERFRONT HOME has 4 car garage, plus MOTOR
COACH garage, and a 2 ballroom sized Rec. room, Pool
located on Distinctive large CORNER LOT on prestigious
ISLA BAHIA TER. ONLY $695,000.

AFFORDABLE 3/2 WATERFRONT
Plus 1 car garage & davits. Riverland Road area. FHA-VA-$114,900.
.Merrill Lynch Realty, MCK, Inc.
1497 S.E. 17th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316

BARBARA J. HAGGERTY, Assoc.
Specializing In Waterfront Real Estate

525-9532 (eve)/522-0700


Red Cross VOLUNTEERS NEEDED in
cipation of Hurricane Season.
Please call 581-4221.


anti-


BOAT SITTING- Licensed captain will
keep your boat clean, safe & secure
in return for liveaboard privileges.
Long time.Lauderdale resident with
excellent references. Call Ed at
782-7495 or 764-7590.

Holy Cross Hospital RED CROSS VOLS
NEEDED-- The Broward Co. Chap., Amer.
Red Cross, is issuing an urgent plea
for volunteers at Holy Cross Hospital.
Mail & flower deliveries, info desk &
ER. Full training is provided. Call
581-4221x13 or 771-8000x5171.
HELP WANTED- Advertising Sales.
Dade, Broward & Palm Beach
Call for interview 524-9450


DOCKSIDE YACHT CARPENTRY
Custom work* Mica*Teak*Hardwoods*
Renovations & Refinishing. 581-6506
MARINE LUMBER- Gen.Hardwood 463-2577
MICHAEL's MARINE SERVICE offers
custom woodworking, milling & yacht
maintenance to the waterfront com-
munity. Experienced & dependable
with complete shop & mobile facility
Established in 1981. Call 765-1466.

Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450
&MMP :+iS A "


SA CLASSIFIED AD CLASSIFIED RATES:
(35 characters/line) ADVERTISER:
in the: UATERFRONT NEWUS First Line ........................$..4.00 Name
In the: WTRFOEach Additional Line ............S3.00 Address
1224 S.W. 1st Avenue Make checks payable to the: City St._ Zip-
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315 Waterfront News 305-524-9450 Phone -Ad Amount S

I --1- ----




AV _____iSiG E i ID OTEMN

I i i T } 1 IIT
ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY OF THE MONTH
s^ ^ fi '^ t ^ '' ^ ''''~' t' 4i 't'..v'' 4c .f.'^1t' *'' -'* i 4 '^k t i f l; 44 4** *- ;.4 4 ty tt< ; Y t' ; .**,. 4 -. .- 44 4 4 I + .* 4 ,. i >


ROBERT P. GARGANO
r -_1& Associates, Realtors a
I i^ ~(305) 462-5770
or 462-5771
1700 E. Los Ols Blvd., Suite 204/Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
SPECIALIZING IN WATERFRONT REAL ESTATE
LMNG & WORKING ON THE NEW RIVER
CITRUS ISLES-Deepwater-No Fixed Bridges!
A. 3 Bdrm-Spa & Deck-60' Dock $124,500.
B. 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, Pool & Central air-$129,900.
C. 3 Bdrm, 2 pEloP airy floor plan on extra
deep canal-%3'O i
INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY-JUST LISTED-2'
Bdrm convertible 1-1/2 bath condo with FL room,.
new European kitch., custom imported Oak floors'
with a Million Dollar view I.C.W.- only $129,900!!!
LAKE SANTA BARBARA-Deepwater-No Fixed
Bridges-JUST LISTED! East of Federal. No expense
was spared on this 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath with Beautiful'
pool & deck area. Fabulous designer kitchen & bath
with Jacuzzi, etc., etc. ONLY $295,000!!!
VACANT LOT NEW RIVER DEEPWATER NO
FIXED BRIDGES!!! Single family or multi-family
zoned R-3A which allows for "legal live aboard"
dockage...$57,500. Only 1 left!
RIVER REACH CONDOS Deepwater, Ocean
Access, No Fixed Bridges!!! Ft. Laud. private island
featuring 24 hour manned security, golf, tennis,
saunas, heated pools. Deepwater, unlimited ocean
access dockage, only $10 per foot per year!
A. One Bedroom, One Bath-mid 50's to mid 70's.
B. 2 Bedroom, 2 Baths. From low 70's to $106,000.
C. Rentals also. available from $400/month.
NEW RIVER-Deepwater Estate-373' Waterfront 3+
Bdrm.,4-1/2 Bath situated on a Very Private Point1
Lot approx. 1 acre with 373' of waterfront. Featuring,
vaulted ceilings, fireplace, wet bar, Roman tub,,
pool, etc., etc. $650,000. Photo below:






..- -- --



i Call the WATERFRONT NEWS to
place a Classified Ad. 524-9450




Volume 3 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1986 Waterfront News


SNo Boat Too Big, No
Job We Can't Handle


COMPLETE YACHTING CENTER

* PAINTING MAJOR-RENOVATIONS
* GENERAL REPAIR *MECHANICAL *
DRY DOCKING COVERED STORAGE
254 PER FT. PARK LIKE ATMOSPHERE
SPECIALIZING IN MOTOR YACHT
CONVERSIONS.

a e..
p, ..'. ." "






EsaE
-- .~ .,. --,- ---------







Q L



We'll Meet or Beat ANY Legitimate
VHF-Channel16 Price in South Florida!
Monitored Marine
I! Investments, Inc.
1583 N.W. 24th AVE. il vestments, Inc.
S. rAIRPOKT EXPRE'wr Marine Diesels & Industrial
MIAMI, FL 33125 soD GnI og r
M4AM ,l FL 125 ,4,r-FLORIDA Engine Repair & Marine
IA. FL 33125 1YACHT Gears, Allison-Borg Warner-
EASTWEST EXPRESSWAY( Iro Capitol-Twin Disc
(305) 634 641 Cummins-CaterpillarPerkins
(305 63- 41 04 Volvo Penta Hydraulic Systems
( owa ) 5Travel service in the
S(BCountry and Latin America
SALES & SERVICE
1583 N.W. 24 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33125
S305/634-3317


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