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 Main
 Main: Editor's Mailbag
 Main continued
 Main: Heritage
 Main: Diving
 Main: Power Boating
 Main: Fishing
 Main: Sailing
 Main: Habitat
 Main continued
 Main: Classifieds


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Waterfront news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00013
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: March 1, 1985
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00013

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Editor's Mailbag
        Page 2
    Main continued
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Heritage
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Diving
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Power Boating
        Page 12
    Main: Fishing
        Page 13
    Main: Sailing
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Main: Habitat
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Main continued
        Page 18
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text






















































SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

March 17 18 19 Spring EQuinox 20 Ne on 21 22 23
Hollywood Sportflsh Gulf Stream Sailing
St. Pat's Day Johnnie Walker Lup Club Mtg., Big Al Walker Cu Owners/ Sailing Club, Lake,
parade down Los Olas Early Birds Party guest speaker, D.A.V Skippers Formal 2nd Race, 2nd Series
Ft. Loud. Yankees vs. Houston @ Montego Ba Y.C. 7pm Hall, 2118 Scott St. Dinner Marguerite's Ey. -CC modofeo sCUp
e-rc-ury e-atta LYC Ft. L.'s Yankee Stad- F.YUM.A.-M gT 7:30pm Johfnnie WoTker CUD 5ndy w e Ocean Race CU
GSC 3r Race,2d- lum. 7:30 p.m. Muriel King, Young Harborlights Rest, in Beach Prty, Sewinds piano, Musicians tas Ulas-At-es
Series Ocean LYC Comiiidbre' Mt.- Circle, Hollywood Dania Montego Bay, pm Exchange, Ft. L. thru March 27
+1.8' +1.7' +1.9' +1.8' i+1.9' +1 .9 +2.0' +2.0' +2.0' +2.0' +2.0' +2.0' +1.9' +2.0'
0006*0615"1243*1828 0057*0703*1328*1916 0143"0744*1410*1958 0225 0818 144582037 0300"0852"1517"2112 0335"0924 1550*2146 0l10"0954"1622"2222
.121__ ,-n-0.1-0.2' -0.2' -0.2' -0.02 -0.2' -0-3' -0.1' -0.3'
24 25 26 27 28 1st quarter 29 30
1985 Spring Rodeo
Orange Blossom Fest LYC, Ladles' Special Davie Rodeo Arena
Davie Pete Harris & Countr Luncheon thru March 31st Hot Air Balloon Race
LYC lMerfcur ResaIts Mellow Rock Band at Tnt. SinTfilh-SnTor AsintLe Musc. Ex hT Tree Tops Park
P.A.C.E. presents the Beach Theater Olympic Championship Great-Issacs Race FtT ,EadrdaTe
Nestor Torres, flute Randy Bernsen, jazz Clown Softball Game under the Stars, Regatta at Miami Y.C, Gulfstream Sailing Street Dance, South
Young Circle Musician Exchange Nova Sports Complex Hollywood thru March 31st Club, thru 31st New River Drive 4-11
+1.86 +1.9' +1.7' +1.8'6' +15' 1.6+1.7.6' +1.4' +1.6' +1.5'
0443*1025"1656"2257 0517*1114 1730*23365 TM 05541132"1807 0017*0636*1211*1850 0114"0726*13001.943 0200"0825"1401"2046 0307"0931"1514"2158
0.0 -0 +n I' -0 TIDE +0.1 1-0 +0.4' 0.0 +0.5' +0.11-' 4 1 +0 V' +n 1'
31 April 1 2 3 4 Ful mon 5 6
So, Fla. Women in
Jazz, Musicians Yanks vs. White Louie Bellson
LYCe Cruise Partic- tdn Sox, Yankee Ft. Pierce Boating & Musicians Exchange
nation Awards Party hibit, Bldg 0n Stadium, 7:30 pm Fishing Show, thru MbonlTgrt-Gourmet
?aEk~eC vs, Boston- Broward Communit Yanks vs. Boston
YankeeSta vs? ston Broward Community Yanks vs. Boston EasterTgg Hunt April 7th, Stuart Canoe Trip, Hist.
Yankee Stadium 1:30p Central Yankee Stadium 1:30D Perry Park, Miramor Civic Center Museum of So. Fla.
+1.7' +1.6' TIDE +1.8' +1.9' +2.0' +2.1 +2.2' +2.4' +2.41' +2.6' +2.5' +2.7' +2.5' +2,4'
0411*10i00*624*2303 Tj 051411371729 0003060712 321.: 0059*0656*1322*1929 150*0i 1410*2011 j 03 015
+0.4' 0.O TIDE +0.1' -0.2' -oi' -0.4' 0 5' -0.7' -0.6' .0.8 -0.6' -e
S8 9 10 11 Lastuarter 12 13
Health Fair
Holiday Park Act. Ct. LYC Cnange of Commana
Hroward CoT ArchT Soc SC 3rd Race, 2n Ser
Historical Museum Broward Native Plant General Mtg, 8Dm, in Lake-
of So. Fla. Spring Society, 7:30 p.m. County Comm. Mtg. Rm. Sand -SuTpfer Contest
Break Workshops Lauderdale Yacht Collins Community Ct 4th Floor, SW 2nd St. South Beach, Ft. L.
LYC, Mercury Regtt Break Workshops Club's Annual Mtg. Oakland Park LYC Ladies Lunch & Andrews. Noon
LYC, Mercury Regatta Thru April 12th
+2.0' +1 .7' + .9' +1.6' +1.8' +1.6'
+2.5' +2.6' +2.3' +2.5' TIDE +2.1' +2.3' +. 9' 0130075"i412 0237'908 14'*?1. 0351.8'22 *08241
04i161002"1634*2240 0506*1049"1724*2332 e 0558"1141*1817 0028*0655*1237"1916 01300258 i41 2022 07090 4 .31 1 2216082241
000 34-70.1I' +0 3' +011' +0.4' +1.1'
14 15 TIME ADJUSTMENTS TO TIDE TABLE
Sp .rp Hioh Water Low
GSC/HISC Invitation F_,H3 Hillsboro Inlet- -31 Minutes -50
PaTm-BeachRace, l.. Bahia Mar------- -20 ........ -1S
EYC Mecr_ Re egatta Broward Comm. College -- Port E~rn ades- -5 ......... -62
HiftT Ruseum-lst-Ann azz Ensemble BCC 8pm or E rl s- -5 .
Te 1;+ T ID Tf L S Dania Cut-Off--- +45 ........ +28
iv1 +1.7 14*2 e4, e g Davie Bridge--- +40 .... +40
Baseline: Andrews Avenue Bridge over New River a123t m1714"23eanow water, Eastern Stan546dar216d Time07

Baseline: Andrews Avenue Bridge over New River at mean low water, Eastern Standard Time.






WATERFRONT NEWS


EDITOR'S MAILBAG


Dear Editor,
In the recent past this office and the Police
Department has received complaints of noise
created when the wind blows a certain direction
across slotted stow-a-way types of sailboat
mast. If you have ever experienced this noise you
can understand that while, in some cases, it is
loud it is surely annoying.
While there is a device made to stop such a noise,
in some cases it is not being used. As your paper
serves principally the boat owner and waterfront
property owner, I would think a brief article about
this problem and solution could well serve your
readership and possibly put an end to some of the
problem.
Very truly yours,
-Jack C; Hornor
Supervisor of Marine Facilities
City of Fort Lauderdale
Editor's Note: What follows is. a letter
WATERFRONT NEWS received and printed in
March of 1984. It is reprinted in light of Mr.
Hornor's query.
Dear Editor; Please bring it to the attention of
your sailboat readers who'own the new type of
* mainsail "inside-the-mast" furiing-there is a way
to remedy the most disturbing noise created by
this new system.
When the wind blows (even just a breeze) the
groove that is still partly open in the mast when
the sail is furled, creates a flute effect, like a
musical instrument, or like one blowing across an
open bottle...only a thousand times louder. This
wailing and howling is pure torture to the
surrounding neighborhood.
Any sailmaker will make you what they call a
"Flute Stopper". This is a narrow strip of canvas,
hoisted by the halyard and fastened to the mast to
cover the groove. If you wish it is simple enough
to make one yourself.
Attention to this matter will certainly be
appreciated by we nearby house-dwellers, who
will be able to once again open our windows and
also get a night's sleep.
Sincerely yours,
Gloria Marshall
Fort Lauderdale


Editor:
After conversations with attorneys, we feel the
County legal.staff and the County commissioners
have violated several laws and judge's rules.
1. The TEFRA hearing on the bondvalidation was
a sham and a violation of Federal laws. A public
hearing Is mandatory and must be attended by the
elected officials. The TEFRA hearing, on
December 10, 1984, was conducted by a hired
county employee and an attorney, no elected
officials were present.
2. The bonding resolution was voted on and
passed by the County Commission before it was
presented to them or even written. Why did
Commissioner Grossman refuse to vote on the
bonding resolution? Did she know it was irregular
and illegal?
3. The bonding resolution, all 300 plus pages,
refers to the bonds being issued under Nos. 159
and 166 rules. Judge Pollen specifically ruled the
bonds could be issued only under the 166 ruling.
Judge Pollen refuses to act on this infraction of
his judgement because the litigation on appeal is
at the Supreme Court level.
4. The put or pay contracts being pushed on the
cities of Broward County by the- Counrty
Commissioners is a violation of monopoly laws,
the same laws that the S.E.C. enforced on Waste
Management's attempt to purchase all of Signal
Resco in Florida.
5. Unicorporated Broward County residents pay
one real estate tax bill which includes the
garbage fee. This real estate tax is accepted by
the IRS in toto as a deductible tax. The 159 bonds
can not be paid with ad volorem tax money so this
garbage tax can not be used to gaurantee the 159
bonds.
It seems unfair that we, as citizens and
taxpayers,.should have to fund lawyer's fees and
a Federal Court bond to have these flagrant
violations of the law brought to the attention of
the Courts.
Philip W. Beck, Vice Pres. 2536 Marathon Lane
Ft. Lauderdale, fl 33312 :.
305/587-3322 -
South Broward Citizens For a Better
Environment, Inc.


Editor's Note:
So. Broward Citizens for Better Environment will
meet at New River Middle School SW 31st Ave. &
Riverland Rd, Wednesday, March 20th 7:30 pm.
There will be an update given.


Editor:
In reference to Bill Lange's articles on E.P.I.R.B
(Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon)
issue 11 and 12 of the Waterfront News, many
boat owners don't check the mercury switches to
see if their E.P.I.R.B.'s are accidently on.E.P.I.R.B.
alarms cause the civil patrol & Air Force to search
until the source of-the "beep" is located. A high
percentage of these "beeps". are false alarms.
E.P.I.R.B's should be handled with extreme care.
Also, boat owners should check their E.P.I.R.B.'s
to make sure the batteries are still good.
Capt. Irwin Lenz
Civil Air Patrop
Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
Editor's Note: Bill Lange checked with the FCC and
reports that the agency reccommends regularly
checking the E.P.I.R.B. switches and batteries to
avoid costly false alarms and potential tradegy.
Bill and the Waterfront News appreciates Capt.
Lenz's tip.

Dear Editor:
Read Nedda Anders article on the Historic Bryan
Homes Restauraunt and strongly disagree with
her. I visited Bryan Homes about a year ago and
enjoyed the charm and character of the
restaurant, but found the food mediocre at best
and the prices exorbitant. Of course my order was
not prime sirloin steak at $35.50 so perhaps I
shouldn't expect too much.
Rick Banach
Ft. Lauderdale


LEADERSHIP BROWARD
PROGRAM SELECTS LEADERS
by Diane Watts
In preparing for the continued success of the
Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Chamber of
Commerce's leadership program,. Leadership
Broward; the Chamber recently announced the
selection of leaders for the program's fourth
class.
The Leadership Broward IV Chairmen include
Program Chairman, Jon Levinson, Engineered Air
Corporation and REL Enterprises; Vice Chairman,

Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc. 1985
ISSN 8756-0038
WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


Published by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney Laurie
Ad Specialists: Ilene Levy
Donna Phillips
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich Blake
Jason Welles Lee J(
Andrew Moyes 'Swen
Bud Alcott Matt I
Scott Moore Craig
Darin Gleichman Todd
Kelly Alcott Nicole
Jeff Prosje John
Sandy Sharrow Charli
Patrick Gillis Paul E
Louise Miller Chris
Tiffany Lazure Doug


Cahill


Barber
ensen
Neufeldt
Moore
Merry
Clarke
SSanese
Metzger
es Metzger
Barlett
Lazure
Channel


Michael Curran, First Lauderdale Securities;
Curriculm Chairman, Carol Wiggin, Fulton
Insurance; Selection Chairman, William Hall,
Broward Community College; Study Group
Chairman, Court Lantaff, Southern Bell and Chief
Executive Officer Retreat Chairman, Jack Latona,
Houdille Industries, Inc.
"Leadership Broward IV will be a very exciting
program," said Jon Levinson, Leadership
Broward IV Chairman; "With the assistance of
additional Leadership Broward Alumnus the
program will continue to become more refined."
Leadership Broward is a program which
prepares and builds leadership resources within
the community. Each year, Leadership Broward
seeks applications for one core leadership class
from all sectors of Broward County and selects 50
men and women to participate in the ten-month
program.
Criteria for selection includes demonstrated
leadership skills and community involvement,
relative to age opportunity, and a willingness to
invest the time required to complete the program.
Efforts are made to select participants who
represent a broad cross-selection of Broward
County in terms of occupations, sex, age,
interests and geographical locations. The
diversity ,of the participants' perspectives
generates much of the most meaningful personal
interactions and mutual learning in the program
and assures the community of diverse leadership
resources needed for representation on its
community-owned organizations.
This core program consists of a weekend
retreat in September, on day-long session each
month designed to increase community
awareness and to develop new communication
networks and a study group presentation/
graduation Weekend Retreat. Each seminar
presents a major area of community concern,
such as Broward's History; economy,
government, arts, social services, education and
criminal justice systems. The retreat provides
exercises which explore the dynamics of group
processes.


BOATERS BETRAYED IN
FEDERAL BUDGET
by Michael Sciulla

The nation's boat owners and anglers who agreed
last year to pay added federal user fee taxes to
support state safety and conservation programs
have taken it on the chin-twice-under the
Administration's recently unveiled budget.
Unless the Administration's decision is
overturned, over $50 million will be lost by
millions of Americans who pay federal marine
fuel and fishing tackle excise taxes. Congress
last year mandated that these user fee taxes be
deposited in a new Aquatic Resources Trust Fund
and distributed to the states for boating and
fishing purposes. The Administration is refusing
to release the funds.
To add insult to injury, the Administration is now
also proposing that boat owners pay new Coast
Guard user fees directly to the federal
government.
According to the Federal Budget, the Department
of Transportation (DOT) will be seeking a total of
$236 million in FY '86 rising to $476 million in FY
'87 from the nation's recreational and commercial
boat owners. DOT officials could not say how
much of these total amounts they would expect
recreational boaters to pay.
Although specifics on the Administration's user
fee proposal have yet to be announced, DOT
officials say they expect their plan to be similar
to previously unsuccessful proposals made from
1981 to 1983 and rejected by Congress.
Under proposals floated by DOT during 1982,
boat owners would be required to pay from $22 to
as much as $200 per year depending on the size of
a boat. Boaters would pay these taxes at their
local post offices and get a sticker to place on
their vessel. The Coast Guard, in turn, would have
to divert its limited manpower and equipment
resources to enforce the new program.


I





Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985

SOUNDING THE WATERFRONT
Question: What do you think about the City of Ft. Lauderdale's
crackdown on live-aboards on Hendricks Isle????


3
BOATER ENTRANCE FEE FOR
LLOYD STATE PARK
For over 10 years boat visitors entering John U.
Lloyd Beach State Recreation Area via Whiskey
Creek have enjoyed a luxury other visitors
haven't--free admission and total use of the
park's facilities. Beginning the first weekend in
March, however all props came to a stop as
boaters entering the park are paying the $.50 per
person entrance fee. The fee will be charged on
Saturday, Sundays, holidays during March,
April, September, and October, and full-time
during May, June, July, and August.


ASSISTANCE For SMALL
BUSINESSES
"How to Obtain Financial Assistance for Your
Small Business," a free business conference for
owners and potential owners of small businesses
will be held Wednesday, March 13, 6:30 p.m. until
9 p.m., at AmeriFirst, 998 South Federal Highway,
Boca Raton.
Subjects to be covered include methods of
financing, how a loan officer makes an approval
decision, how to prepare a loan package and how
to manage your funds after obtaining a loan.

The conference is sponsored by the Florida
Atlantic University Small Business Development
Center, the U. S. Small Business Administration
and AmeriFirst. There is no registration fee but
reservations must be made by calling AmeriFirst
in Boca Raton at 368-2882 or the Small Business
Development Center in Fort Lauderdale at 467-
4238. The Center will also provide information
regarding facilities for the handicapped.


=4


* !I


1--

--I


Pianist
'-4C


Lek i


Instruction 527-4587


.Stabilizer Services
Custom Interiors
Enclosures
Flying Bridges
Custom Carpentry
Outfitting
Fiberglas Repairs


Ft. Lauderdale
1517 S.E. 16th Street
(305) 462-2822
40-Ton Lift


* Restoration of Fire or Water Damage
* Secure Undercover Storage
* Electrical Services
SEngine Work
* Welding
* Hydraulics
* Refinishing
* Bottom Work


Palm Beach Gardens
PGA Blvd. & Intracoastal
(305) 627-0440
60-Ton Lift


Ft. Lauderdale
2491 Highway 84
(305) 587-4000
80-Ton Lift


CABLE

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INC
Our qualified people
make the difference ....


PLEASE CALL ONE OF OUR LOCA TIONS
FOR FREE ES TIMA TES
Offering The Following
Professional Service To
The Yacht Owner:


Three convenient locations to serve you.


I


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MEOW


p,,~aUai ~~rs Q~a t
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WATERFRONT NEWS


BOAT SHOWS
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL--Yachting Promotions,
Inc., has announced its schedule of boat shows
through 1985. The schedule is as follows:
-March 14-17: Suncoast Boat Show, City
Island, Sarasota, FI
-May 9-12: Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat &
Sport Show, FI
-Oct. 31-Nov. 4: Fort Lauderdale International
Boat Show, Fl
-Dec. 5-8 St. Petersburg Boat Show, FI
Each show features a unique showcase of
sailboats, powerboats, yachts, boating and |
sporting equipment, and a variety of marine
related products among its numerous exhibits.


Marine
Lumber &
Plywood
SHardwood. Plywood.
a Million g& Custom Cdrpentry

(oNE LU (305) 584-8558
2945State Road84 Ft. Lauderdale, FL33312



TEAK

SPECIALIST

*Varnish

*Yacht
Refinishing

*Genera I
Maintenance


by Captain
Frank


S&S MARINE


525 6211
(a tape may answer please call, I'II call back)


MARINE FLEA MARKET ANNOUNCES
1985 DATES
Dania, Florida, U.S.A. April 19, 20 and 21,1985,
have been announced as the dates for the 7th
Annual Marine Flea Market. The natiorfally
acclaimed three day event transforms the Dania
Jai Alai Fronton parking lot into the world's
largest nautical swap shop. Last year sellers
from up and down the East Coast of the United
States occupied more than 300 booths selling
every imaginable kind of boating item from
anchors to zincs and fine shark tooth jewelry to 5"
manilla line.
The Marine Flea Market, originated in 1979 by
LBE Marine, Inc., has established itself within the
marine industry as the ideal place to sell marine
equipment and other boating related items that
have been gathered in inventory as a result of
obsolescence, model changes, over ordering or
minor damage. Because the Marine Flee Market
occurs only one weekend a year, it allows the
major boat manufacturers the opportunity to sell
large quantities of teak, upholstery, instruments
and accessories that they would not be able to sil
through normal channels. Small groups of
private individuals rent booth space to sell the
"nautical treasures" found while. cleaning out
their garages and dock boxes of accumulated
boat parts and fishing tackle. According to Al
Behrendt, President of LBE Marine, "The buyers
love a good deal and the sellers enjoy turning
their unwanted marine items into cash.

During the past few years, a growing numberof
boat dealers and private individuals found that
the Marine Flea Market is an excellent place to
sell used boats. The large crowds visiting the
Marine Flea Market come from all parts of Florida
and the Bahamas and they come for one reason--
to buy! It is because excellent sales that the vast
majority of sellers return year after year and they
begin reserving selling spaces as early as
January.
The Marine Flea Market offers everyone with
an interest in boats or things nautical a relaxed
and casual atmosphere to browse through more
than 300 sales booths covering eight acres. Free
parking and a spacious food service area mean
that buyers can take hours to inspect the
merchandise and negotiate an agreeable price.
As the Marine Flee Market's slogan states, "The
dickering and dealing are part of the fun."
The original Marine Flea Market, now in its
seventh consecutive year, will open to the public
at noon on Friday, April 19th, 9:00 AM on
Saturday, April 20th and Sunday, April 21st.
Admission for adults is $2.00, children are free
and there's acres of free parking. Sellers admitted
by advanced registration only.


Ii


II.*


L Qold Coast Hydraulics
Formerly Hydraline

Hose's Made to Order

IMPERIAL EASTMAN Hydraulic Hoses & Fittings

Silicon Turbo Connectors

PVC Tubing Wika Gauges Apollo Ball Valves
HydraulicOil IndustrialHose QuickCouplings
Fuel Lines PVC Rainsuits* Racor Filters.

SALES SERVICE REPAIR

GOLD COAST HYDRAULICS
2617 S.W. 2nd AVENUE
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33315
305-525-2440
M-F 8-5 /Sat. 9-112


FT. LAUDERDALE SPRING BOAT
& SPORT SHOW
by Maria Marion
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL-Thesecond annual Fort
Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport Show,
combining.a sports and nautical theme, will open
at Bahia Mar Hotel and Yachting Center May9-12.
More than 200 exhibitors will showcase the
finest in sporting equipment and apparel,
nautical furnishings, electronics, engines,
luxury cruisers, sportfishing boats and house
boats. Many of the top boating manufacturers
will have exhibits in the show.
A large tent will decorate the main entrance
with on land exhibits that include sports and
marine related equipment, accessories and
electronics. Boats in every size and price range
on display in water and on land will be open for
inspection.
Area boutiques will present the newest lines of
spring and summer nautical and sports apparel
and accessories during several fashion shows
scheduled throughout the four day show. In
addition, several sports, cooking and.marine
related clinics and demonstrations are scheduled
throughout the show in the entertainment area.
Different topics will be addressed during each
session.
A variety of food concessionaires and a band
will also be located in the entertainment area.
The Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport
Show is sponsored by Marine Industries
Association of South Florida and managed by
Yachting Promotions, Inc. Yachting Promotions,
Inc., is also the producer and manager of the Fort
Lauderdale International Boat Show, the largest
in-water boat show in the United States. This
year's Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show is
scheduled for October 31-November 4.
The Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport
Show is enticing to both consumers and
businesses because it is one of the only shows to
combine a sports and nautical theme. Consumers
are introduced to the latest marine and sports
products while businesses kick off the summer
season with vacation promotions and increased
sales.
The Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport
Show will be open from Thursday, May 9 to
Sunday, May 12. Admission is $4 for adults, $2 for
children, and children, under 6 are free.
Bahia Mar Hotel and Yachting Center is located
at 810 Seabreeze Avenue just off A1A between
Las OLas Boulevard and 17th Street Causeway.


Charter The Wrecking Krew
Accommodates up to 140 guests
"* n Sni ---*.., I thb airh ft Are.


Weddings Ahniversaries Birthdays 0 Bar Mitzvahs
Corporate Meetings
Caterng and Bar Our extra roominess will
Service Arranged surpass all others
Oer 3,000 sq ft. Large salon and sun deck.
of deck area. s250 t sOO/hr
Winston Knauss Designer/Builder.
Call (305) 462-7411
s.%-.>zzz~aaa-?>aaaiaaaS^8S8


I a, 1. -


" TAXO "







Suncoast Q


Boat Show


SUNCOAST BOAT SHOW: March
14-17
by Maria Marioni
SARASOTA, FL--The third annual Suncoast Boat
Show featuring more than $7 million in
powerboats, sailboats and related marine and
sports accessories will dock at City Island in
Sarasota March 14-17, 1985.
More than 200 boats will be on display in water
and on land. Renken, Sea Ray, Phoenix, Wellcraft
and Jersey are just a few of the manufacturers
that will be represented. Engine accessories,
nautical furnishings, fashions and sport
equipment will also be exhibited throughout the
show grounds.
Several free fashion shows and sports clinics
and demonstrations are scheduled throughout
the four-day show.
The Suncoast Boat Show, with its outstanding
variety of exhibits and special events, has grown
in popularity over the last few years leading to
increases in the number of exhibitors and
increases in attendance figures.
The Suncoast Boat Show is produced and
managed by Yachting Promotions of Sarasota
Inc. and sponsored by the Marine Industries
Association of Manatee and Sarasota Counties.
Hours are noon to 6 p.m. Thursday, March 14;
noon to 9 p.m. Friday, March 15; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday, March 16; and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday,
March 17.
City Island is located between St. Armands
Circle and Longboat Key.


SOUTH FLORIDA USED BOAT
SHOW SALE
Starting this April South Florida will join
Annapolis, Newport and other major boating
markets with it's own in-the-water used Boat
Show & Sale.
The dates have been set for April 26,27 & 28 at
the Marina Bay Resort Hotel and Marina located
just west of 1-95 at the State Road. 84 exit in Ft.
Lauderdale. This location, midway between West
Palm and Miami, is convenient to all South
Florida boaters. Dockage for this in-the-water
show will be in Marina Bay's private bay off Ft.
Lauderdale's New River. In addition to permanent
and temporary floating docks, provisions have
been made for trailerable boats to be shown on
land. There will be tents with exhibits of
companies and individuals selling boating
accessories, electronics, services such as
insurance, used boat financing, boatyards,
marinas and other items of direct interest to used
boat buyers and sellers.
This will not be your typical boat show. To
begin with it is being billed as a sale, a place for
individuals to sell their own boats. New boats
aren't eligible so there won't be any manufacturer
or dealer displays. What you will find instead is
an unusually wide variety of boats of various
makes and descriptions including late model
production boats from Europe, Far East and
throughout the U.S.. There will also be custom
built boats and some homebuilt boats.


Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985






WATERFRONT NEWS


SAFETY OFFSHORE
by Bill Lange
As a skipper are you adequately prepared for
safety offshore? Whether you are sail or power
this applies to you and you may think at first of
hazards such as fire, floating objects, grounding,
weather, man overboard, and rigging or engine
failure.
Yes indeed, catching the record sport fish, or
covering the quickest racing course, or hauling
your passengers and cargo to the intended ports
are your primary considerations. But if you are a
good seaman you will be prepared for any
emergency, before the need arises to meet it. Are
you prepared to cope? You need the ideas, the
plans, the pre-thought and practised routines for
any possible aspect or variant. You need the
pieces and tools to do the job. And what if the
skipper is not available--what if you are suddenly
in command?
Most of these matters you'll haveto develop in
detail for yourself, to fit your vessel. Nautical
schools will give one the theory, the procedures,
the training and even some practise. But most
pleasure boaters hardly touch the topics, since
neither the USPS nor the USCG'AUX courses do
this. AT least the boaters' most useful tome by
Charles F. .Chapman,"Piloting,Seamanship and
Small Boat Handling", provides excellent points
on procedures.
Yet there is one emergency, for sail or power--
albeit rare, what are you going to do if you lose all
power?
Thinking of all types of vessels, here are some
aspects to include as they may fit yours.
Do not panic. Reassure your crew and guests.
Take steps to.secure everything on board. Give all
on board something to do. Take control since a
float of many days will require every bit of
whatever you have on board, ration water, etc. If
your vessel founders stay with whatever is
floating. A person in the water or even a skittering
inflatable becomes hard to find when not in the
debris trail. Any search for you will be centered
on the "datum", that is the probable position of
the distress incident or of survivors, corrected for
drift and weather impact, and derived from
whatever is known or can be assumed about you.
This disappearance because of loss of all
power is a good reason why you should always
file a float plan. First of all someone will start to
wonder where you are. Secondly, the USCG will
have details as to your type vessel, intended
course, etc.
If you are so lucky as to have a few seconds
warning of the imminent power failure get out
your radio distress call before the end. Always
have the MAYDAY form at your post so that the
proper facts will be aired first.
Always keep a running fix of your vessel's
position. A good percentage of distressed vessels
are erroneously reported and the search thus
misdirected.
As taught by the excellent USPS and USCG AUX
engine maintenance courses you may have all the
needed repair parts, the trouble-locator check
lists, the test gauges--but your power margin is
short if you do not get a start. And this can
happen whether your are in the Everglades, the
Gulf Stream or the Bimini archipelago.
For certain boaters a.power alternative might
be wind generators or solar generators but if you
are that inclined you'll probably also be well
equipped with the distress items about to be
mentioned.
Whether sailor or power boater you ought to be
able to jury rig. There have been quite a few
sportboaters out of southeast Florida inlets




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whose lives would have been saved it they had
been thus capable. My hat is off to one of the 15th
Street navy whose 22 foot runabout is so
equipped. In fact, he almost always cuts the
engine and raised that stubby rig so that he can
calmly troll. Smiling all the way back to
(Government Cut with his fuel) tanks still full.
If you lose all power what about your
floatation, or your hull trim when adrift? What
about your steering?
Many trailer-launched boaters say they are not
worried because their boat manufacturer says
there is full floatation built into the hull. Read
your boat warranty again. The USCG-required
foam floatation is only ,meant to keep the vessel
awash to provide a platform for rescue. The
floatation will not prevent submersion damage to
everything inboard. All aboard may easily
become casualties.
Vessels do disappear without a trace or a
reason. The horror stories which do become
known are because once in awhile there is a lucky
escapee from a sudden, without-warning sinking.
Huge commercial vessels have been lost when
there was suddenly"a hole in the ocean", meaning
a rogue type wave in relation to a super-deep
trough. Not even debris may be left, and the whole
sinking may take only 45 seconds. Quite recently
a highly qualified and capable crew, and their 117
foot vessel, foundered in less than sixty seconds-
thus no time to do anything-when the vessel-in
normal sea weather-was suddenly pooped by a
port quarter probably wind shear single blast.
The vessel sort of pitchpoled and cartwheeled. No
MAYDAY.
What if your loss of power is initially less
serious, but you are in a fog, or in a shipping lane?
And of course the loss of power could be either an
-engine powered or a sail powered vessel, maybe
even dismasted.
Many boat emergencies grow cumulatively
worse;, that is a fairly simple failure or defect, if
not detected or solved very quickly, becomes
disastrous. That is why skipper who notes an
unusual period in the vessel's movement, or an


Bob Baldwin City Hall,


unusual number of bilge pump strokes, or an
abnormal electrical quirk usually comes out on
top of the problem.
Some vessels are constantly rigged with a
man-over-board pole, with strobe light, sound-
device, and floatation device. This is important
under many conditions, and serves a dual
purpose if a vessel suffers instantaneous
disaster. For well thoughtout preparations I like
the way the problems are described in First
.Crossing by Malcolm and Carol McConnell but
also have used the Boatman's Handbook by Tom
Bottomley and Checklists for Powerboat Operation
by DeArmond, Jr.
Many of the boats seen without power by the
veterans of the 15th Street navy are solely so
because their battery went dead. Often it was not
acting well even at the waterfront! A reserve
battery is high priority for you, skipper, whether
you are trailer-boater, or marina-dunker, or
always afloat....even if you are 100% sail. Please
setup checks to be sure that extra battery is not
just a deadweight--this juiceless orphan appears
frequently.
Manual spare tillers/rudders, hand dewatering
devices, sea anchors/drogues are a must when
you find yourself adrift; or even sooner.
Once out the inlet it is mandatory that you carry
certain distress signals, and you truly should
have them even when on inland waters or the
Everglades. You need them day or night. Each has
their own particular use whether the SOS light,
the sighting mirror, the orange panel, the orange
smoke, the red handheld flares, or the red
rockets. Parachutes far more effective than
meteors. Do not count on your first meteors being
seen, far better to have six. All the above of
course do their job even when you have no power.
If you really value that chance of rescue, either
when you are without power or even worse
already floating in your PFD in the water, have an
EPIRB. Activated as it floats, this radio beacon
automatically signals where it is. The satellites
and the rescue craft treat this beeper as MAYDAY
positive until your case is solved.


7s


100 N. Andrews Ave.


For more information call 761-2060 or 761-2341!.
The winner will be announced at the NEIGHBORHOOD CONVENTION.
Ft. Lauderdale City Hall, APRIL 20, 1985.
0,/ 0,'' ~ 4~j~..


WEH1TED



LOGO




REWARD $250




Citizens' Crime Alert of Ft. Lauderdale,Inc.:


is in search of a logo!


LOGO will be used on stationery, decals, signs and
pamphlets.
LOGO may be black & white or color.
LOGO entries must be signed with name, address
and phone number.
LOGO must be submitted on or before:
pMarch 30, 1985 to Assistant City Manager-





Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985


STATES FIGHTING
INTOXICATION
At least 20 states may introduce boating-while-
intoxicated bills in upcoming legislative
sessions, according to a state-by-state survey by
the National Transporation Safety Board (NTSB).
The survey follows an investigation by the NTSB in
1983 that found that as many as two out of three
boating fataities may be related to alcohol abuse.
The agency asked state boating administrators
last fall to provide information on their state's
current laws.
Results show that 14 states have set a legal blood
alcohol content level, 23 states almost half -
require toxicological tests on boating facilities
and nine states can require boaters to submit to
tests for alcohol consumption or face penalties.
While virtually every state prohibits operating a
boat while intoxicated in its general boating code,
until recently few states gave marine police any
legal means to collect evidence or enforce the
law.
The most significant tool for officers is a legal
blood alcohol content (BAC) level. The survey
finds 12 states have adopted a BAC of .10 percent,
a standard widely used in motor vehicle law.
There are some variations, however, as
Maryland's BAC is .13 percent and Utah's is .08.
Another tool being sought is passage of implied
consent laws, under which police can ask boaters
to take blood, breath or urine tests for
intoxication. Those refusing can either be fined or
have their refusal used against them in court. In
states without implied consent boaters do not
have to take such tests.
The third key provision, toxicological tests on
boating fatalities, should provide a valuable
means for boating officials to understand what
role alcohol plays in fatal accidents. In 1983,1,241
people lost their lives in boating mishaps,
according to Coast Guard figures. Currently 23
states require the tests.
The federal government stepped into the alcohol
and boating issue last fall when Congress
approved a requirement that state boating
accident reports include information on whether
alcohol was a factor and that state boatind
education programs include the dangers of
alcohol.
Congress also approved civil penalties of up to
$1,000 and criminal penalties of up to $5,000
and/or imprisonment of up to a year for operating
a vessel while intoxicated.
The NTSB also asked each state the results of
boating-while-intoxicated measures introduced
during the 1984 legislative session.Twelve states
introduced measures and five of those died. New
Jersey is still in its 1984-85 session and a drunk
boating bill there had not yet been voted upon at
presstime.
Florida, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and Ohio passed
drunk boating laws in 1984, while North Carolina
created a task force to study the problem, and
Wisconsin passed a law but exempted sailboats.
In addition, 21 states may introduce measures
this year with much of the groundwork already
laid by last year's effort. States where legislation
is expected to be introduced this year include
Albama, Colorado, Connecticut, District of
Columbia, Idaho, Ilinois, Maine, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New
Hampshire,New Mexico, New York, Ohio,
Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia,
Wisconsin.
Courtesy of BOA T/U.S. Reports







WE'L HA L- W



r4:T0 d


BROWARD'S RED CROSS PLANS
HURRICANE DRILL
Help celebrate Red Cross Month. March is the
perfect time to get acquainted.
The Red Cross has so many different faces. The
people who come for blood pressure readings
may not know about the active first aid and CPR
program. Someone who comes to the agency for
emergency food may never have heard of its'
hundreds of hospital volunteers. The Red Cross
is swim instructors to one and disaster aid to
another. And because the local Broward County
Red Cross, with almost 3000 volunteers, will
touch the lives of one out of four local people this
year, so it is asking you as neighbor to neighbor,
to get acquainted.
The Red Cross can only care for the community if
the community cares about them. So stop in to
see them or call about the many ways volunteers
can assist with services. The number to call is
581-4221 and let the receptionist know you want
to volunteer. They look forward to discussing the
opportunities with you.
The Broward County Chapter of the American Red
Cross in Fort Lauderdale is in need of food and
money for its emergency food program which
feeds over 14,000 people a year.
Canned food and dries food products are needed
as well as funds to sustain this service which is
the most comprehensive of its kind in Broward
County. Churches, individuals, clubs, businesses
or other organizations who would like to conduct
a food drive to benefit the need in this area should
call Chuck Gregg of Emergency Services at the
Red Cross.
Finally, the Red Cross is planning a mock
hurricane drill designed to train or retrain
volunteers using miniclass and workshops.
Topics covered in this weekend exercise will
include mass care (feeding and lodging) and
damage assessment.


PRODUCE


WATER SYSTEMS
* Fresh-Water Pumps
* Hot Water Heaters
* Watermakers
* Filter Systems
* Wash Downs
CANVAS
* Bimini Tops
* Enclosures
* Fly Bridge Covers
* Windshield Covers
* Equipment Covers

DECK ACCESSORIES
* Windlasses
* Davits & Chocks
* Tide Ride Steps
* Ladders
* Fish Boxes
* Dunnage Boxes
* Masts & Arches
* Chairs
* Bait Wells
* Outriggers
* Rod Holders


We'll Travel
Expert Raritan Head Repair
You Tried The Rest Now Call The Best


AN"
ALL \i iR L~~I FNTEED

JERRY OLSON & '.
RON HANSEMAN P.O. Box 791
462-0436 FFt, Lauderdale. FL 33302


AND YOUR BOAT!
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(Fort Lauderdole's)
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EQUIPMENT
Wire & Cable (Spooled or Cut) Custom Panels & Engraving
Battery Chargers Switches
Shorelines & Adapters Transformers
Circuit Breakers Converters
Panel Meters Inverters
Wiring Devices Capuc Systems
Light Fixtures Enclosures
SERVICES
Electrical & Electrolysis Surveys Modifications
Repairs New Installation
(Established 1950)

Ward's Marine Electric
630 S.W. Flagler Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, FI 33301
(305) 523-2815


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Professional Service On
the Enclosed List
of Products....



TS WE SELL & SERVICE...

ENGINE & APPLIANCES
MECHANICAL Refrigerators
SYSTEMS Freezers
Stabilizers Ice Makers
Steering Exhaust Hoods
Synchronizers Compactors
Oil Change Pumps Micro Wave Ovens
Lube Oil Filters Ranges
Fuel Filters Soda Dispensers
Engine Alarms Garbage Disposals
Bilge Pumps Washers/Dryers
Approved Heads Central Vacuum Cleaners
Fire Extinguishers NuTone Food Centers
Air/Electric Horns Complete Air Conditioning
Windshield Wipers ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
Stereos
*- Intercoms
Inverters/Converters
Interior/Exterior Lighting
T.V. Systems
Battery Parallel Switches
o 110v/220v Shoreline Systems
Fire/Smoke Alarms
Docking Lights

CUSTOM WOODWORK
Anything Custom

111 Southwest 6th Street ,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301 w
Phone (305) 463-4307...
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~- I- -


AWAIWAVAVMPPARFAF


WWAVAWAWAF.WArArAFV/r~AFlf,,Wl






WATERFRONT NEWS


THE SAPONA
by James E. Sullivan
A landmark is any fixed object on the land or on
the seabed whose position is used as a
navigtional guide. One such a landmark in the
Bahamas is the concrete vessel Sapona aground
in 15 feet of water 4 miles south of Bimini, put
there to stay by the 1926 hurricane. The history of
the name Sapona etched on her stern has been
lost but it would be interesting to know for
sapona is Latin adjective for soapy water.
Sapona was one of the 17 concrete-hulled
cargo ships of some 3000 tons built in
Wilmington, N.C. to conserve steel and money.
During World War One the iron-rod reinforced
ships were cheap to build and the designers felt
they would be useful and last forever, or so they
thought. The problem turned out to be one of
displacement; they were too heavy and large for
their relatively cargo capacity. Following the war
they were stored in the ship-farms of Norfolk and
placed on sale.
The Miami developer, Carl Fisher, bought the
Sapona for $5000 and paid twice that to have her
towed to Miami. Fisher intended to ground her on
one bf the upper keys for use as a private club,
however, one of the conditions directed by the
Maritime Administration was that the vessel was
to be kept seaworthy, stranding the Sapona was
a no no. Fisher, tired of the regulations governing


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FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33301
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25 YEARS EXPERIENCE 462-6758


the Sapona, gave or sold the ship to a Bruce
Bethel for the cost of towing her off his property.
The Volstead Act of 1920 had brought an
unexpected era of prosperity for the Bahamas,
including Bruce Bethel, on of the merchants who
had come from Nassau to Bimini to supply the
rum runners with liquor. He needed a warehouse,
he towed the Sapona to Bimini-he had his
warehouse. The 1926 hurricane blew his new
house away from Bimini, grounding her in what is
called Barnett's Harbor. There was no getting her
off and she is there today although in the early
30s Bethel decided to convert her to a unique
nightclub and rename her All Alone. In 1935 his
dream collapsed when the Sapona caught fire.
Bethel gave up and returned to Nassua where he
died in 1950.
During WWII, American training planes based
in Florida used the Sapona as a target, dropping
blue bombs in her hulk. The blue bombs aboutthe
size of SCUBA tanks containing one hundred
pounds of sand and ten pounds of powder did
little damage to the Sapona but the 50 caliber
aerial machine gun fire has left visible pock-
marks on her hull. This activity irritated the
residents of Bimini who complained to the United
States and the practice stopped.
Now the Sapano rests quietly serving as an
attraction for spearfishermen in search of giant
grouper and crawfish, and as an excellent
landmark for the South Bimini waters.


DEPRESSION DAYS AND RUM
RUNNERS
by Sue Moesly
Fifty years ago when depression days locked
the land into a stalled state of affairs men dug
their hands deeper into empty pockets and came
out with little or nothing to feed their families. The
wave of progress that had gilded the small river-
borderd town of Fort Lauderdale a rich gold had
crested and fallen unto a desolate beach.
Memorials to the boom times were all through the
town that once flourished when investors were
encouraged to come to South Florida to reap the
bounties that waited for them and their money.
The bounties Waited long and the investors
looked upon their unfinished projects with
despair. Canals dug through Rio Vista separated
the newly filled land from the town as no
approach roads had been completed to connect
them.
-There were no roads either to the jacknife
bridge that stood jawed-open on the
Interacoastal. It reached for the sky like a giant
sunflower seeking the sun for some nourishment
which never came. Everywhere one looked there
was a sight of a spent dream, all let go to tarnish
as neglected bronze fittings on a derelict yacht.
Despite the lack of progress along its banks
New River kept on running to the sea and through
the town that took pleasure in its being there. No
matter how hard the times folks were drawn to
the river, the river that had a sidetracked
waterway to Zona, or Davie as we know it today.
This dredged canal provided a way for the
farmers to get their crops to Fort Lauderdale's
market and the original stream to Lake
Okeechobee was also opened to make it
navigable for boats to reach the nutrient-rich
fields and return with their harvests of produce as
well as catfish.


-HERITRGE
New River was home to the commercial fishing
industry as well as the small charter fleet that
brought their catches to the city docks down by
the Andrews Avenue bridge. At eventide the
townsfolk would gather along the docks and be
entertained by the activity of the fishermen. At
least fish were plentiful in those days and a man
who took his living from the sea did so with some
assurance that his table would not be bare at
mealtimes. When times are bad folks seem to
gather together more and gain strength from on
another. Jovial fellowship is bound to happen
when one laugh begets another. The waterfront
around the Andrews Avenue bridge was a stage
set for happy events.
A young commercial fisherman who made a
meager but honest living discovered fringe
benefits were available to those who walked on
the shady side of the law, so the gloom was not all
doom for those who took advantage of the
prohibition days and had fast boats that could
outrun the Coast Guard. Fast boats in those days
did not belong to teenage youngsters whose
parents footed the bills. Anything going faster
than five knots was considered totally suspect
and Coast Guard Six Station located at Bahia
Mar's present site was upgraded to full capacity
to intercept and defeat the rum runners.
Local knowledge was a great advantage when
it came right down to evading the law by
skedaddling up and down creeks and finger
canals. Eluding the law was quite a game for
some and others turned their eyes the other way
when a chance witnessing might incriminate their
friends, or jeopardize those extra coins that
might jingle in their own pockets for being party
to the crime.
Our young commercial fisherman was involved
in the fringe benefits of the prohibition days and
even admitted to driving his shiney Jordan Blue
Bay roadster pulled right up into the Coast Guard
Six Station to deliver his order of moonshine.
Customers were customers and no questions
were asked, and fewer words yet were traded in
the transactions. Who would think that the nice
young couple ran a still, or suspect it to be buried
in that cypress swamp just east of where Margate
is today? And behind the squash field where the
old mule Beck tilled the soil? If folks knew they
weren't saying
They weren't saying either about their friend
who was out rum running one night. The story
goes that when he turned into New River as dawn
was cracking the Coast Guard noted the boat
moving pretty fast and set out a chase for him
Well, the fellow managed to gun his engines and
ran through the town with the greatest of
expediency. As he drew near Jimmy Ducane's
Boatyard at the bend of the river he saw that the
railway had been put on the water for an early
morning haulout, so he ran his boat right up on
the ways. Of course when the Coast Guard arrived
they saw the boat on the ways, but never
suspected that it belonged to the rum runner who
had eluded them.
Nowdays things would be different. There'd be
too many lawyers out looking for the offenders to
defend them and share their profits. Then the
judges would have to do something and folks
would scream and holler about their fringe
benefits being taken away and court costs
coming out of their pockets. Days back then folks
had a way of settling their disputes without all of
the fuss'n feathers being disturbed. Course they
did hang James Horace Alderman on August 17,
1929, two years after he had finally been
aaprehended for his encounter with Coast Guard
Cutter 249. He killed three men and seriously
injured two others. This truly bad man with a
violent life of crime hung from the gallows built
by base carpenters in the seaplane hanger until
he was dead.

W Holzb-ur (305) 522 6321
Shipwr;ght 523 9646

SOUTHl' FLORIDIA SIIIPWRIGH'i'S
If Its Matue u ,L'od W. i Make Itt



909 S E. 19th St. Fot Lauderdale. i-L 33316





Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985


US Coast Guard Eagle USA 14c


STAMPS AT SEA
By Bob Hammack
In few places is the lore of the sea and lure of
adventure more concisely logged than of the
world's postage stamps. Philatelists--stamp
collectors and students of postal history--see
tens of thousands of ships on stamps as an
outline of maritime history. Indeed they are.
Polish stamps alone parade a steady stream of
vessels from the earliest Phoenician galley and
Roman trireme to the Clipper Flying Cloud and the
freighter Kilinski. In fact, the latter was featured in
a set honoring the state-owned Polish Ocean
Lines. Orginally built' in 1944 by the California
Ship-building Corporation at Los Angeles, it was
called Mexican Victory, by the U.S. War Shipping
Administration until acquired and renamed by the
Polish government in 1947.
Poland's wide-sweeping merchant marine
issues generally balance off those less frequent
sets from other nations. The U.S. has added more
postal material in recent years. Of course, there,
are many ship stamps and cancels from the
Americas. Many of the Central and South
American issues use Columbus as their
mainstay.
The United States Merchant Marine was
honored postally in 1946 for its heroic
achievement in World War II. Composite
drawings of two "Liberty Ships", the James
Madison of Lykes Brothers, made up the single
ship design.
The sinking of the S.S. Dorechester in 1943 was
recalled on a stamp five years after the tragedy.
Built in 1926 for the Merchants and Miners
Transportation Company, the U.S. Army
transport carried the "Four Chaplains" who gave
up their life preservers to crewman. Called a
splendid example of "Interfaith in Action",
Postmaster Jesse Donaldson said that Reverend
Fox, Reverend Poling, Father Washington and
Rabbi Goode showed "not fearless abandon, but
steadfast conviction" by their unselfish act.
Not all such stamps commemorate deeds to
equal the act of the chaplains. But many recall the
heroism common to members of the German
Lifeboat Association which had been credited


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with saving 15,070 people since its founding
in 1865. Both the German association and the
Norwegian Seaman's Mission centennials were
celebrated on stamps. They began its operations
almost 125 years ago.
Seafaring nations such as Norway have paid
tribute with more than mere postal paper, though.
When the S.S. Baroy, the Sanct Svithun and the
steamer Irma were torpedoed, Norway issued a
semi-postal set to aid victims/of wartime ship
sinkings, and their families. A surtax was added
to three stamps picturing the sinking ships.
Similar issues inscribed "ZEEMANS-
WELVAREN" were sold by Netherlands Antilles
(Curacao) in 1952, and an estimated 40 percent of
the total revenue was earmarked for the
seaman's welfare fund.


AMERICA'S CUP


France's Societe des oeuvres de mer gathered aid
from postal sales in 1938 through 1942. The final
issue also coincided with the 600th anniversary
of the birth of Jean de Vienne, first admiral of
France.
Mediterranean areas have provided romantic
and legendary looks at sea-going life for
centuries. Greek vessels, from sixth-century B.C.


S"Mermaids"


"traders" and tenth-century B.C. "chelandian"
types to modern oil tankers, took their place with
Jason's fabled Argo in 1958. Italian issues of 1949
and 1950, while publicizing the European
Recovery Program, depicted shipbuilding and a
sailor steering a large craft. A later release
commemorates the 450th death anniversary of
St. Francis of Paola, patron saint of seafarers.
China Merchants Steam Navigation Company
freighter Hai Min made its postal debut before it
was a year old, and it reappeared' in 1962 as part
of the country's 90th anniversary tribute to the
company. A 1948 series for the 75th anniversary
celebration showed the Hal Tien which was
commissioned as the James L. McKay in 1943.
Philatelic tributes are hardly limited to
stamps. There are such things as pictorial
cancellations that contain ship designs. There are
also premiums on the cancels from some ships of
the 19th century as well as U.S. Navy cancels.
While stamp collecting is an enjoyable hobby,
the collecting of a full set of ships on stamps is a
clear impossibility. The most expensive single
stamp in the world is unique. It is the famous
"Penny Magenta" of British Guiana. At last
purchase it went for $280,000 and its present
owner calls it a million-dollar stamp. At least that
might be the asking price by Irwin Weinberg, its
owner. There is something fitting about the
paying of the $280,000 and the asking of
$1,000,000. The stamp is printed in black magenta
paper bearing the name British Guiana, a ship, the
denomination and the colony's motto, "Damus
Petimus que Vicissum" --it means "We give and
we seek in return".
The casual collector of ships on stamps could
come up with a great quantity of stamps for much
less--from the current U.S. items and foreign
stamps to a group of Liberian issues which
feature another popular craft, figureheads.


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2nd ANNUAL GREATER FT.
LAUDERDALE SHIPWRECK
SYMPOSIUM PLANNED
July 31 through August 3rd are the planned
dates for Second Annual Greater Ft. Lauderdale
Shipwreck Symposium. According to one of the
organizers, Bill Raymond, the four day event will
be based at Pier 66 Hotel and Marina and will
include: films, workshops, seminars,
archaeological instructions and dives to local
shipwrecks.
Many speakers from last year's symposium
are planning to return again this year. Mel Fisher
(founder of Treasure Solvers, Inc.), Alan Allbright
(an underwater archaeologist for the State of
North Carolina), Dr. Harold Edgerton (of M.I.T.),
Professor Gordon Watts (an archaeologist on the
Monitor wreck), Warren Reese (archaeologist on
the Whidah wreck reported on in last month's
Waterfront News) and Peter Throckmorton (world
famous shipwright and considered by many to be
the "Father of modern nautical archaeology) will
join local shipwreck experts like Raymond (a
marine geologist and chairman of the Adisory
Arch. Council of the Oceanagraphic Survey
Foundation) and James Dean (a noted local
author on Broward wrecks and artificial reefs).
Dean is also a member of The Marine
Archaeology Advisory Council with Raymond.
The council is a subdivision of the Broward
County Historical Commission which is
sponsoring the 1985, 2nd Annual Greater Ft.
Lauderdale Shipswreck Symposium.


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BRYAN
MARY
MICHAEL
CHRISTOPHER
PATRICK


WATERFRONT NEWS


SHELLY'S REEF
Together with the expertise of artificial reef
maker Steve Somerville, Broward County
Environmental Quality Control Board, boating yard
owner Shelly Lake and his son Gary are building a
reef off the Fort Lauderdale coast north of Sunrise
Blvd. Last month, in ninety feet of water the
thirty-eight foot wooden double ended sailboat,
Mary W. joined Embassador (a forty foot
commercial fishing boat) and Alice Linn (forty
foot sailboat).
Shelly's crew at River Bend Marine cleaned up,
towed and sunk all three boats with the guidance
of Somerville. Lake reports that it used to cost
$1500 to cut up such vessels for scrap. Creating
an artificial reef not only saves money but
provides environmental and recreation benefits
to the community. An excellent diving site, "River
Bends Sailboat" artificial reef's ranges can be
found in Shipwrecks and Other Artificial Reefs by
Dave Turbeville.



CAPTAIN BILL AND THE BOMB
by Bryan Brooks
In February of this year Captain Bill Cole of the
Pro Diver chaer char boat recovered another World
War Bomb just off the coast of Fort Lauderdale.
This is the second time in a year that Captain Bill
has recovered a similar object. On Saturday
February 16, Captain Bill had his charter boat just
off East Las Olas Blvd in about thirty feet of water.
As his divers were getting ready to enter the
water he jokingly told them to watch out for
bombs because he had found one there before.
A short while later a veteran diver Gary
Rogers came to-the surface with an object that
looked like some kind of bomb or rocket. The
object was heavily encrusted. Before it was
allowed on the boat Gary who is a munitions
expert identified it as a World War II 5.0 inch
aircraft rocket with a dummy nose fuse. Gary has
an extensive past in the army in munitions and
arm osboth as an instructor and researcher.
Rogers felt the rocket was probably fired at a
target towed off shore by the Navy during the
war. After the rockets were fired the targets were
either towed away or sunk later. Fort Lauderdale
at this period in its history was a deeply involved

--- --

DAY & EVENING
Classes Now Starting


UNDER SEAS SPORTS, INC.
Village Shoppes
1525 N. Federal Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
(305) 564-8661
M- S 8:00-6:00 Sun 8:00- Noon

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IN FORT LAUDERDALE
Sales Repairs Rentals
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by Bryan and Mary Brooks
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DIVING


Nk. I


Military town. The airport which now handles
international traffic and is in the process of being
enlarged was then Navy Air Station Fort
Lauderdale. The Port was a home port for many
military ships and the hotels on the beach. The
Lauderdale Beach Hotel and the Tradewinds
Hotel were taken over by Military Personnel.
Coast Guardsmen with dogs and on horseback
patrolled the'beaches at night. Legends persist of
the German U Boat that was supposedly sunk off
our shores.
Robert Lamb a veteran of the Navy in the Port
during the war recalled that on March of 1942 a
German U boat was caught on the surface
charging its batteries on a stormy day. Lamb
stated the sub was sunk and 10 crew members
gave up. The location was supposedly off
Pompano--somewhere.

Another old timer in Fort Lauderdale history is
Chuck Wall. Wall remembers seeing tankers sink
off shore at night sitting in the back of his father's
pick up truck. He remembers seeing the gun
emplacements at what is now Hugh Taylor Birch
Park.
Roy Wirshing an officer at the Naval Air Station
during the war described in lecture recently atthe
Fort Lauderdale Historical Society a small
German submarine which on occasion went into
Lake Worth and received food and other staples
from German sympathyzers. Wirshing also
described a student from his teaching days at
Deerfield Beach High school bring in a German
luger which the student claimed was taken from a
German U Boat. The U boat was supposedly to be
off shore from the Boca Raton Inlet.
The stories persist and grow into legends of the
frontier past in which Fort Lauderdale of another
time and age seemed a much different place than
the highly visible Condo Capital of today.
Captain Bill Cole and his mate take divers out
daily. Cole states that divers are always finding
neat artifacts from the past. The Fire Department
and Coast Guard warn if you find such objects
please contact the Coast Guard or Navy first.
However the knowledge that any dive off the
coast can bring the diver into direct contact with
Ft. Lauderdale's Military past is exciting. A past
of Torpedo bombers and Navy Hellcats flying low
over the shores of a sparsely populated Ft.
Lauderdale against an enemy out there-----
somewhere.


I- I


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Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985


MARINE TRIVIA---
by Bryan Henry ,


The Great Lakes hold 18 percent of the world's supply
of fresh water.


FLORIDA COOKING
By Nedda Anders
Last month (see Dining-Out restaurant review), I
mentioned the dinner given in honor of Stephen
Birmingham by the Book Group of South Florida.
Though we do have restaurants specializing in
such regional cuisines as Cajun, Tex-Mex and
California, eating places featuring all-Florida
cooking do not exist, or are a well-kept secret.
Perhaps there is no full authentic cuisine here, but
I have prepared my own versions of several of the
famous local dishes you can make in your own
galley.
BROILED FILLETS OF RED SNAPPER
Snapper is caught in all warm seas around the
world but it is certainly one of the great favorites
of Florida fish-eaters. It is moist and flavorful,
and I like it broiled simply with butter and served
with no added sauce. Cooked buttered rice is a
good accompaniment.
2 pounds red snapper fillets
Salt and pepper
Lemon wedge
3 tablespoons melted butter
2 tablespoons minced parsley


Line broiling pan with aluminum foil and place
fish in single layer on the foil. Season with se
and pepper, and sprinkle lightly with lemonjuic
Baste with butter. Set pan about 2 inches fro
heat and broil until fish tests done (flakes easi
when tested with fork), about 7 to 10 minute
Turning is not necessary unless fillets ai
exceptionally thick. Remove fish to platter. St
parsly into pan juices and serve at once over fisl
Garnish with half-slices of orange if you like, (
any fruit in season (carambola, papaya, mang
etc.) Makes 6 servings.
"FISH PRAYER"
by Sheila Lynn
Blue Gray-Misty Haze
This Diver Down...
In Meloncoly Daze...
Without wrinkle or Frown.
Color Flashes Past...
Eye's All around...
Soft Flutter of Fins,
Five Phathoms Down.
My Mind's Eye Suddenly See's
Now-Unrderstand-Silent Plea.
Phosphorus Gold-Silvery Foam
Begins vividly-Wildly to Roam.
Covering it's path, great swooping motion.
Thrashing their floor, invading their Ocean.
Wide eyed...
Frightful scene at hand.
Darting around...
Fearing. for the Land.


-WATERFRONT CUISINE. -


MASA-SAN
JAPANESE RESTAURANT
19355 N.W. 2nd Ave (U.S.441)
North Miami

by M.G. Swift
I was taking care of my friend's cat while he
was out of town for a couple of weeks last month.
No big deal but he really cares about his pet, so,
when he resurfaced back in Lauderdale he
insisted on taking me to dinner.
The place, Masa-San Japanese Restaurant, a
sushibar. Raw fish has never been one of my
secret passions and I must say I had trouble
swallowing the Teka-Maki (chunks of raw pink
tuna and sushi rice, rolled in black seaweed). It
must have been a mind game I was playing upon
myself though, because my friend consumed his
serving and most of mine with gusto. The next
course was Sunomono, seasoned raw conch and
crab. Perhaps because it didn't "look raw", I
enjoyed the Sunomono consuming the entire
bowl, along with the cucumber slices.
One thing that really stuck in my mind was the
care and artistry involved in preparing and
displaying the food on the plate. It was "pretty"
and looked like ittook a very skilled hand to make
it look that way.
Our waitress was not a Sumo wrestler (thank
god, I would have been thrown to the floor for not
eating all my Teka-Maki) or Giesha girl, but Laura
guided me through this culinary adventure with
grace, the lovely aspiring actress that she is.
We finished off our meal with a just dessert of
Ogura Ice Cream made from red soy bean tofu.
Will I go back? The prices are reasonable and
the selection is vast. So if you can't handle Teka-
Maki you can fall back on Kabayaki (grilled eel
with Kabayaki sauce) and still be cool. Sianora.


Prebake the pie shell for 10 minutes. Cool and
prepare filling: Separate the eggs. In a bowl, beat
yolks with lime juice, rind and milk. Set aside.
Make meringue: Beat egg whites with cream of
tartar till peaks form. Beat in sugar, 1 tablespoon
at a time. Stir a few spoonfulls of meringue into
the filling, then spoon the filling into the prebaked
pie shell. Top with the meringue, spreading to
cover the edges. Bake at 350 F. until meringue is
golden. Serve in wedges.


Riverside
Pub And Restaurant
A VERY SPECIAL PLACE FOR DINNER

BRUNCH ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY


602 S.W. 12TH AVE., FT. LAUDERDALE (305) 763-2151

LAURIE CAHILL
(305) 763-2186



& SIGNS


AVOCADO AND GRAPEFRUIT SALAD
2 ripe avocados
S2 ripe grapefruits, peeled and sectioned
12 imported black olives
Tomato French Dressing (recipe follows)
Cut avocadoes in half, discard pits and strip off
the peel. Cut halves into slices into a mixing bowl.
Add grapefruit sections, olives, and salad
dressing. Mix gently. Serve as is or on a bed of
crisp greens. Makes 6 servings.
PAULINE'S TOMATO-FRENCH DRESSING
My sister Pauline always said the secret
ingredient in her salad dressing is the sugar.
1/3 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons each catsup and vinegar-
2 tablespoons grated red onion
Dash paprika and salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Combine ingredients in screwtop jar and shake
well. Serve over the Avocado and Grapefruit
Salad.
KEY LIME PIE
You won't find a recipe for Key Lime Pie in
Escoffier's or any of the great classic cookbooks.
It does not.qualify as an example of fine baking.
But most out-of-state visitors would feel cheated
if it were omitted from local menus. Here--without
apology--is the one I serve my company. It is
made from limes growing in my backyard,not key
limes, but no Key Lime Pie maven has ever
seemed to notice the difference, if there is one.
Key Lime Pie is said to have originated in the Keys,
where limes and canned milk (rather than
fresh) are abundant. Maybe the word Key was
meant to modify Pie (Lime Pie from the Keys) not
Lime as in whatever variety you use, pick it when
green, not yellow, and do not add green food
coloring.
1 9-inch pie shell
2 large eggs
1/2 cup lime juice
1 tablespoon grated lime rind
1 can (15 ounces) sweetened condensed milk
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter
3 tablespoon sugar


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2 WAURTERFRONT NEWS


POWER SQUADRON BOATING
COURSE
by Larry Haupt
"Learn to skipper a boat with confidence" is the
caption below a picture of a young couple at the
wheel with a sailboat and power boat in the
background. The posters now appearing all
around town tell of the Boating Course given by
the United States Power Squadrons. "The
SQUADRON" is the name you'll see at the bottom
of the posters. The USPS is changing it's image in
order to attract more students to the free* public
Boating Course. *(All instruction is free. There is a
nominal charge to cover the costs of a 150-page
student workbook and other materials.)
The Boating Course not only has a new look but
improved content. The course has been
completely rewritten and updated. Here is the list
of topics covered on successive nights:
1. Know Your Boats
2. Equipment, Regulations and Safe Operation
3. Boat Handling
4. Elementary Seamanship
5. Charts and Aids to Navigation
6. Basic Navigation
7. Boat Trailering
8. Weather and Coastal Boating
9. Engine Troubleshooting (New this year)
10. Sailing (New this year)
11. Piloting (Optional)
The Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Coral Ridge, and
Pompano Squadrons give the course as is done in
over 500 local areas nationwide. In three classes
conducted this season by the Fort Lauderdale
Power Squadron over 150 students have
successfully completed the examination and
been awarded the Certificate that usually brings a
discount on boat insurance.
If only everyone skippering a boat on our
crowded waters had completed this or the Coast
Guard course there would not be so many
collisions on the ICW and boats burning with
gasoline fires.
The Fort Lauderdale Squadron Course begins
Tuesday, April 16 and runs Tuesday and
Thursday nights thru May 30. To join the class,
arrive before 7:30 April 16 at the New River Middle
School, 3100 Riverland Road. Following a lecture,
students go to classrooms where small groups
review the material with their Group Instructor.
Students are expected to read the Student
Workbook and complete multiple choice
questions on each section before class. The class
ends by 9:30. It is a most worthwhile family
activity; teenagers and older may attend when
accompanied by an adult. For more information
call 587 9168.



LEE CANVAS COMPANY

COMPLETE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR IDSIGN *


1915 S.W. 21st AVE.
S T. LAUDERDALE 33312 791-5196
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Ask Big Al...

Editor's Note:

Big Al prompted the United States Coast Guard
Auxilary magazine, The Navigator, to publish the
following advisory last month. Big A will be back
next month with more helpful hints for us all on
the Waterfront.


KEEPING OUT OF HARM'S WAY
Don't Use Automotive Parts.
While some marine engine components seem
overly expensive compared to their automotive
equivalents, there are major differences in the
environments in which they are designed to
operate. Some automotive fuel components
release fuel and vapor into the engine room and
some automotive electrical components emit
sparks. Fuel vapors do not accumulate beneath
the hood of a car, but they quickly reach
explosive levels in the engine room on a boat.
Prior to the publication of the Coast Guard
Electrical and Fuel Systems Standards, there
were no marine equivalents for many of the
automotive components described below. What
are the differences?
Alternators: A standard automotive alternator has
exposed electrical contacts that can create
sparks and ignite fuel vapors in the engine room.
On marine alternators, which must meet the
ignition protection requirements in 183.410(a),
the contacts are sealed inside.
Distributors: Automotive distributors create high
energy sparks internally that can escape through
a vent which permits the release of ozone gas.
Marine distributors are ignition-protected and the
vent has a flame arrestor device to prevent
sparking that could cause a fire or explosion in
the engine room.
Starters, Generators, Accessory Motors hydraulic
pump, tilt drive, etc.: These motors have brushes
and an armature which spark in normal operation
in an automobile. To meet the requirements of
183.410(a), the marine versions of these motors
are usually completely sealed. Marine starters
are also equipped with an additional seal
between their motor section and Bendix gear
section.
Starter solenoids: Each time the solenoid operates
it creates a high energy spark internally. A vent in
the automotive starter solenoid for the release of


522-5789


.POWER BOATING





0 oS




ozone, is absent on a marine starter solenoid that
is ignition-protected.
Carburetors: The float chambers on carburetors
are vented to permit the free flow of fuel into and
out of the chambers. On automotive carburetors
any overflow from the vents flows outside the
carburetor into the engine room. On a marine
carburetor the vents lead into the carburetor
throat so that any overflow is consumed by the
engine.
Fuel Pumps: Automotive fuel pumps have a vent
hole that will leak gasoline into the engine room if
the fuel pump diaphragm fails. The Coast Guard
Fuel System Standard requires that each
diaphragm pump must not leak fuel if the primary
diaphragm fails.
To someone who is repairing or replacing the
components mentioned above, the automotive
component might seem like a bargain, but have
you looked at the value of a human life lately?
From USCG Boating Safety Circular 57 & The
Navigator-(USCG)
IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH YOUR
BOAT, WRITE TO:

"BIG AL"
c/o Waterfront News
320 SW 2nd Street
FL Lauderdale, FL 33312
(or cal 524-9450)

Big Al will research your problem and answer it to the
best of his ability given the information provided.

(Big Al, a.k.a. Alvin Grodsky, is a Marine Engine Instructor
for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is an aircraft pilot and
former United States Marine Corps Engine Maintenance
Instructor and an Instructor of Engines and Maintenance
for the U.S. Government as a civilian. Al has over fifty
years of marine engineering experience, from steam on.)
Editors Note: "Big Al" informs us that Al Grodsky is
available to any clubs, groups or organizations
desiring guest speakers to talk on marine
mechanics and other marine topics you can
contact Al through the Waterfront News.


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FISHING
THE YOUNG WOMAN AND THE
SEA
by Bill Rhodes
Lee Kahn, a driving engineer for the Hallandale
Fire Department, had quite an outing off Port
Everglades recently. Alone in her 23 foot Mako
with her pet Doberman, she set out to catch live
bait off the beach.
After putting a couple dozen ballyboo in the live
well, Lee ran up off Birch State Park. She started
drifting in 250 feet of water with 20 pound
spinning tacke. Two lines were put out in
anticipation of hooking a Sailfish.
Early afternoon dragged on with little action
"but then it happened" (remember Sea Hunt?). A
large sickle shaped tail fin cut through the water.
The ballyhoo were jumping for their lives. First
the strike then the hook was set. Out of the water
lept this magnificent Billfish. Greyhounding, we'd
better call it "Dobermaning" across the surface,
the seven to eight foot fish stripped off over 200
yards of line faster than you can say "someone
start the engine". The problem was there was no
one aboard to help give chase. Except that is for
Doby who knew nothing of outboards. The only
thing to do was to tighten the drag hoping to slow
the monster down. Result--broken line. A real
heartbreaker.
Having worked at Reese's Taxidermy in her
younger years, Lee recognized the fish as a White
Marlin. Losing a great fish like this could make on
feel low.
But, Lee did not give up. Everything was
reorganized, new baits were put out and the wait
began. Nothing happened and around 5:30 she
decided to slow troll the live baits back to port
and. call it a day.
Another strike, another Billfish. This time of
course the engine was running and the anglerette
was able to give chase. Several unbelievable
runs caused the reel to heat up. Lee stayed with
him. Off the fish ran again, another long chase.
This battle lasted over three hours into
darkness. Luckily the sea was dead calm with
little breeze to speak of.
Finally, the fish was brought boatside. As luck
would have it on this day, it was a second White
Marlin about the same size as the first.The small
rounded dorsal fin instead of the large sail
revealed it true identity.


Volume 2 Issue 1


March 15-April 15, 1985


The Gran Prix schedule for 1985 is:
Walker's Cay, Bahamas .. April 30-May 3, 1985
Treasure Cay, Bahamas ........June 5-8, 1985
Morehead City, NC...........June 19-22, 1985
Orange Beach, AL..........August 14-17, 1985
Destin, FL............. September 18-21, 1985
Key West, FL ............ October 21-24, 1985
Palm Beach, FL.......... January 22-25, 1986

Lee opted to release the fish so to fight another
day. The hook was carefully removed and the
tired marlin swam slowly away with the near full
moon reflecting upon it.
Two whites in one day off Fort Lauderdale. A
great trip. Congratulations for Lee and her
"crew".
POMPANO BEACH FISHING
RODEO STRIKES AGAIN MAY 17-
19
$250,000 in cash, prizes and trophies await the
many winning anglers in this year's Pompano
Beach Fishing Rodeo. Scheduled to run from May
17th through the 19th fisherman will have to pay
no boat fee with each drift fisher paying $85 to
enter. The entry fee for "regular anglers" is
pegged a $110 per fisherman. Rodeo organizer
Wade Horn, advises that there are over 150 ways
to win the entry fee back: Prizes in six fish
species, first through third largest catch, women
and junior categories, eighteen boat
manufactures will be reward for the best catches
on their boat, first billfish, and family.
A major rule change this year is a catch limit of
one sailfish per angler daily for conservation
reasons. Horn reported that a tag & release
system would not be possible in such a fishing
tournament as the Rodeo, last year821 anglers on
423 boats competed for $150,000 in prizes.
Mr. Horn said the Pompano Fishing Rodeo is a
"family participation" tournament committed to
conservation


13


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14

THIS ISN'T THE END OF
THE WORLD
by M.G. Swift
February 16, 1985-Miami Yacht Club-The sun
also rises. The gulls call to each other cutting
black silhouettes against a blushed horizon as


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WATERFRONT NEWS


they fly. A pelican sleeps on the water like a
sailboat nearby as if it too were at anchor. A
sliver of an old moon hangs at the edge of the
night soon to be swallowed by a crimson dawn.
The End of The World Regatta for multi-hulls
will be held today. Starting off Dinner Key, the
committee boat, Scuba-Rific will mark the end
down off the Ragged Keys.
February 17, 1985-Ragged Key I-An out island
41' Morgan (the press boat) is anchored off the
leeshore of this tiny sand island after meeting up
with the fleet here.
The portents of yesterday's dawn rang true at
least for the weather. However, the Perkins down
below slept in and continues to do so. The heat
exchanger's weather pump is leaking and the
crew has run a hose from the fresh water drinking
supply into the open exchange water cap.
Talk around fire centered on Dale & Diane
Barrett's thirty-seven foot Spindraft
catamaranm, Alii and how she edged out Cake
Walk. Florida Off-Shore Multihull Association
(F.O.M.A.) sponsored the regatta and Jim
Gardner's custom built thirty-four foot tri' is in the
habit of winning all such events. But Alii sailed


THE RIGWRIGHT
I N

JOHN L. ANTWEILER
Sailboat Standing Rigging and Lifelines
Splicing, Tuning, Installations
250 S.E. 8th Cour.
Pompano Beach (305) 942-7497


BOATING


U.S. COAST GUARD
AUXILIARY


The prudent skipper watches his wake. A big wake can easily
capsize a small craft or damage boats or property along the
shore. Boaters are responsible for damage, injury or death
caused by their wake. Always cruise around docks, and anchor-
ages and narrow channels at minimum speed.


.If you're trying to keep up with the Joneses, make sure it's
not Davey. Let the Auxiliary give your boat a free safety exam.

'U. S. COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

Dedicated to Boating Safety

... To gain skill in boat handling and seamanship, take advantage
of the Auxiliary's public boating education courses.

For information CALL: 463-0034
FLOTILLA 2, DIVISION III, DISTRICT 7
601 SEABREEZE AVENUE FORT LAUDERDALE, FL. 33316


A TIP FROM


- FLOTILLA 3-2


-SAILING



F.O.M.A.'s END OF THE WORLD
REGATTA RACE RESULTS
February 17, 1985

1st Place....... Ali (Dale Barrett-Coral Gables)
2nd Place Cake Walk (John Gardner-Ft. Laud, Fl)
3rd Place Starship (Tom Masters-Ft. Laud., FL)
SSource: John Payne, Scuba-Rific (Committee Boat)


passed the anchored Scuba-Rific ahead of Cake-
Walk. Scuba-Rific a multi-hulled dive boat and
Cake-Walk were designed and built by Gardener
and Pain at Nautical Engineering in Fort
Lauderdale where they design and build boats for
a living as well as for fun (see Waterfront News
Volume 1, Issue 1, page 1, "Tale of Two Boat
Builders".

SENIOR OLYMPIC REGATTA
by Sue Heyer
"A chance for old salts to race without having to
contend with bionic collegians"...So says the
Miami Yacht Club inviting folks over 40 to
participate in the 1985 SEVENTH INTER-
AMERICAN SUNFISH SENIOR OLYMPIC REGATTA.
This event will be held March 28, 29, 30 & 31st in
cooperation with Senior Sports International.
All Sunfish sailors aver 40 are eligible-both men
and women. No cheating-if you're 39 on March
28-forget it! You don't even have to own a boat.
Miami Yacht Club gang says "Buy, borrow, rent,
charter or sneak a boat and race with us".
It's some schedule if you want to do it all. There
are training clinics, practice days, but the serious
stuff starts Thursday, March 28th with an
opening ceremony at 6:00 pm. This will be
followed by a cocktail party and dinner at the
club.
The 1st Skipper's meeting is at 10:00 am on Friday
and then on to "Back to Back" racing all day-
better go easy at the cocktail party. Saturday and
Sunday the Skipper's meetings are at 9:30, racing
at 10:30.
This event will draw novice sailors, Sunday
sailors, & Ocean sailors.
Registration fees are $65.00 (early) and $75.00
(late). Sounds like alot but look what you get:
Dinner and Cocktail party on Thursday, "on the
water"; lunch Friday and Saturday; "T" shirts; 1st,
2nd & 3rd winner medals for each age group-
both gals and guys; dinner dance cruise Saturday
night; coffee and doughnuts each am and a "few
surprises".Guests extra.
You heed-a life jacket and a boat. If you don't
have a boat-they will try to find you one if you
give enough notice. AMF Alcort, the
manufacturer's of the Sunfish will bring some
down to charter. There's alot more information
about borrowing and chartering and everything
else. There are camp sites available at the club,
also with notice, hotel/motel info plus answers to
whatever you can think to ask. Here are the
numbers to call:
Peggy Seeley 10525 N.E. 2nd Court, Miami Shores,
FL 33138, (305) 758-4995; Mike Catalano, Home:
(305) 666-7591; Work: (305) 547-5200
All you folks that think pushing 50 is exercise
enough, get on down there-it should be a blast!


15 Years Experienc On

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ENCLOSURES. ETC.
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STEVE HUBBARD (305) 920-0162






Volme Isue1 Mrc 15Apil 518


AUXILIARY MEMBERS
CERTIFIED FOR SURFACE
OPERATIONS
In order to offer a higher standard of service and
quality to the boating public, the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary has introduced a new program that
certifies members as Crew, Operator, and
Coxswains.
The program, Boat Crew Qualification Standards,
requires members to not only be responsible for
the material in the manual, which is three and one
half inches thick and weighs 7 Ibs., but also
demonstration of proficiency in all areas, which
include Patrol, Search and Rescue, First Aid,
Seamanship, and Helo-Operations.
Ft. Lauderdale's Auxiliary unit, Flotilla3-2, based
at 601 Seabreeze Blvd., has announced that six of
it's members have completed the crew phase of
the program with two members already certified.
Appropriately the two members already certified
are the two ranking members, Robert Quail-
Flotilla Commander and Irwin Siegel-Vice Flotilla
Commander. The other four members, Walter
Kraak, Staryl Braisted, Ray Schnieder, and Bob
Barrientos, should be certified by the end of
March.
As the first group goes on to the next phase,
Operator, another group will start training as
crew beginning in March. Bob Barrientos, Public
Affairs Officer, who has gone thru the first phase,
told us: "The idea is simple. The Auxiliary's
primary mission is to promote Safe Boating and
we do this through Public Education in Safe
Boating Classes, Vessel Examinations, and
Safety Patrols. We're out there every week-end
and we've got to be right when our services are
needed. It's a matter of life and property at times.
The Qualifications Examiners are like Marine
Corp Drill Instructors, you can't wiz your way
through, either you do it right or you don't get
certified. If you can't tie a Bowline Knot then you
can't go on to the next task like demonstrating
how to hook up a long tow because you don't
know the proper knot to use."
"When we went through the First training session
in First Aid, our Flotilla took it one step further, we
.went through a C.P.R. course and now we have
somewhere around 22 members who hold C.P.R.
cards. The thing that's really note worthy is it used





IRS zo
INFLATABLE REPAIR SERVICES
124 S.W. 5th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
(305) 462-6208 ALAN R. HARRIS
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
Liferafts & Boats
I I !N1Ef


BOATING CLASS SCHEDULES FOR
1985
(Flotilla 3-2 601 Seabreeze Blvd Ft Laud
FL (next to Swinning Hall Fame)
11 Mar Sailing and Seamanship (sail) 80 limit
13 May Coastal Piloting (charting and ploting |
courseO 30 limit Must have certificate from BS&S
or S&S for this course
22 Jul Basic Skills and Seamanship (power) 80
limit
23 Sep Sailing and Seamanship (sail) 80 limit
All classes are held from 8:00 to 10:00 Mon & Thur
nights. A course will last 5 weeks. All courses are
full courses and students passing the final exam
will receive a full certificate. Classes and
instruction are free. There is a small fee for work
book.
Free Courtesy Marine Exams for a USCGAux Decal will
be given at the following places. Time is general.
Ft Laud CGAux Base Docks 9:00 to 2:00 Saturdays
(between Bahia Mar and Swimming Hall of Fame)
15th St Ramp general from 9:00 to 2:00
Saturday and some Sundays George English
Park Ramps 9:00 to 2:00 Saturdays and Sundays
Examiners are available to come to Marinas on
request.
For more in formation call 463-0034 or 564-7091


to be on the vessel that I serve on if we weren't
handling a call, we would just cruise around our
patrol area, now we spend our time practicing our
skills. When you see us in the ICW wearing life
jackets that doesn't mean we can't swim but
we're just sharpening up some skill, like a man
overboard drill."

FOR PLEASURE OR RACING CRAFTS

We make house calls!
SAVE TIME AND MONEY WITH OUR
MOBILE RIGGER.


Volume 2 Issue I


SUE WHELAN HEYER
Decorator
B.S., Saint Mary's College
Notre Dame, Indiana
Sue has 10 years of experience in the Marine
Field, and has been with D.S. Hull Co., and
Cable Marine, Inc. for 5 years.
Sue's involvement locally in the Marine
Industry includes Serving on the Board of
Chamber of Commerce Marine Task Force
and Board of Governor's Gulfstream Sailing
Club. She has also published articles which
appeared in the South Florida Sailor, New
:liver Times and The Waterfront News.


Quality Yacht

Interiors...


Quality Marine Interior work requires
experience on and around boats as well as a
knowledge of fabric and color.
Sue Whelan, a 25 year resident of South
Florida, has owned and operated both power
and sail. She is familiar with the effects of sun,
sand and salt. Whether your vessel is a sport
fish, a charter boat, family cruiser or used for
elaborate entertaining each is carefully
considered.
A large Fabric and Carpeting showroom is
open 7 days a week at Cable Marine East. This
convenient location eliminates the expense of
outside contractors. Custom woodworking,
painting, appliance and accessory purchases
and repairs are available on the premises.


Cable Marine, Inc.
1517 Southeast 16th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(305) 462-2822


41, I 1 1 -14'.


.March 15 -April IS, 1985


CATALINA SAIL CLUB
by Hilda Roberts
The February meeting was held at Commordore
Queen Brotman's home. Our guest speaker was a
Broward County intracoastal bridges supervisor.
The presentation was very informative. The
Catalina cup Race was held February 17th. A
protest was filed, results are not official as yet
pending decision February 23. Several club
members met Saturday at the Miami Boat Show,
then had supper at Mike Gordens. Up coming
events: The next meeting is scheduled for March
13th at- Galleria's Community Meeting Room at
7:30 p.m. A garage-sale is scheduled on March 9th
from 9 am to 4 pm at the Malloys, bring your junk.
The first race of the 1st series is scheduled for
March 7th bring your boat.
For more information call Gary Robert at 485-
4316.

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16


- -*_.: -e- -3.t -2
~~-z'.-~-~t~;~ u~ .haS.
ti


BREEDING PROGRAM
SUCCESSFUL
by Mary Unterbrink
An important event in manatee history took
place at Florida's Miami Seaquarium on May 3,
1975. For months, Seaquarium personnel had
been preparing for a newsmaking birth. Big Bull
and Mabel, two ,manatees which had been
captured and brought to the Seaquarium in 1957,
had lived in a large, oval seawater tank. When it
was learned Mabel was going to become a
mother, the couple were renamed Romeo and
Juliet and moved to a larger pool. Juliet was
watched carefully for months. Then one morning
Romeo and Juliet became the parents of a 70-
pound baby.
"Its a girl," veterinarian Dr. Jesse White proudly
announced.
Baby Lorelei was the first manatee definitely
known to have been conceived in captivity. The
homely, pudgy infant with squinty eyes circled
the tank, hugging her mother's side.
"She's gorgeous," said the curator.
Nine hours after birth, the newborn calf began
nursing. When she was 11 days old, she ate small

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pieces of lettuce. She enjoyed lots of attention in
the Celebrity Pool and grew into a healthy,
contented adult.
Dr. White's successful breeding program has
produced six manatee births. In studying why
manatees rarely reproduced in captivity, Dr.
White figured the animals' diet of lettuce and
cabbage was nutritionally deficient.
As an experiment, in 1972 he had put Juliet on a
special diet. She was given apples, oranges, and
bananas along with her vegetables. She also got
extra calcium, phosphorous, and multi-vitamins.
Thar experiment paid off first in the birth of
Baby Lorelei. Five years later in 1980, Juliet gave
birth to Lorelei's 72-pound sister, Brigette. In
1982, she had an 88-pound son named Brutus. She
gave birth to 75-pound Hurricane, another son, in
late 1983. Juliet's ability to reproduce in captivity
has allowed scientists like Dr. White to learn more
about sea cows.
Manatees are slow to mature and usually bear
young only once every three to five years. A herd
of manatee bulls stays with a cow for as long as a
month during mating time. In an abdomen-to-
abdomen position, the male impregnates the
female. He deposits sperm in her reproductive
opening. Gestation time takes about a year.
As soon as the calf is born, the mother manatee
raises it to the surface for its first breath of air.
Then she takes it underwater and brings it up
again every few minutes. The baby soon learns to
move its flippers and to surface for air.
A newborn manatee weighs an average of 77
pounds and is slate gray with a pinkish hue.
Within hours the baby begins to nurse, a few
minutes at a time, from milk glands under the
mother's flippers. The cow is very affectionate to
the calf swimming next to her.
By the time the calf is a month old, it can eat
small pieces of green plants. However, it


continues to stay close to its mother and nurse
about two more years. Mother and youngster
frequently talk to each other and play together,
performing somersaults, back dives, and head
stands. While resting on the bottom, the calf
usually lies on the mother's back or tail
When a human is sighted, whether on shore or
in a boat, the cow is careful to keep her body
between that person and her calf. In a
threatening situation, the easy-going manatee
can put on a short burst of speed by propelling its
tail up and down.
Until 1983, only single births were documented,
although twin births were suspected. In April
1983, a huge female weighing 2560 pounds was
killed in a boat collision in Duval County, Florida.
The body was retrieved from a canal in a
residential section of Jacksonville. During the
necropsy, scientists found twin female fetuses
weighing 87 pounds each. This exciting discovery
proved for the first time the possibility of twin
births.
At the same time, it was a sad occasion for
manatee lovers. As Robert Bonde of the U.S.Fish
and Wildlife Service (USFWS) pointed out, "Three
female manatees, on of them mature and healthy
and capable of bearing calves, were wiped out at
once."

Help For Injured Wildlife
THE WILD BIRD
CARE CENTER
S.P.C.A. of Broward County, Inc.
P.O. Box 4761, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33338
3200 SW Fourth Avenue (305) 524-4302
Weekdays
9:00 am.- 4:30 p.m. Tax Deductible Donations
Weekends
9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.


I


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-IBITRT


Manatee

HOTLINE



1-800-342-1821


Or Write:
Save the Manatee
1101 Audubon Way
Maitland, FL 32751



f


Manatees are devoted mothers and will bodily shield their young
ones from harm. N.o wonder they've been called "Madonnas of
the Sea"! In Guyana, South America, a local name for the
manatee literally means "Water-Mama.'
The winter of 1983-84 was a devastating period
for the already endangered manatee. The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service's Denver Research
Center in Gainesville, Florida, reported 33
manatee carcasses recovered from Florida
waters during January; another was taken from a
North Carolina river. Sixteen of these deaths are
judged to have resulted from the extremely cold
weather. Five resulted from boat or barge
collisions, and one was crushed in a floodgate of
a Martin County dam where several others had
died in the past. Ten deaths were classified as
undetermined because the bodies were badly
decomposed when found.
The mortality rate of manatees always goes up
during cold weather. Researchers say that in
cold-related deaths many of the victims are
young manatees, usually less than eight feet
long. They typically show starvation-empty
stomach and depleted fat reserves; whether they
Stopped feeding because of lack of a available food
or lethargy due to the cold is not known.
In any case, says, Patrick Rose of the
Department of Natural Resources, "When we have
so many natural deaths, it becomes even more
important to stop those caused by man."
Recently a Mana tee County Chapter of the Save
Our Manatee organization was established to say
"Amen to that. If you wish to join-or to help-
contact Pete Mitchell or John Stevelyat (813) 722-
4524.
Editor's Note: This is the second in a series of
excerpts from Manatees: Gentle Giants in Peril
by Mary Unterbrink, a Broward County writer.
Thanks again to Ms. Unterbrink and the book's
publisher, Great Outdoors Publishing Co., of St.
Petersburg, Florida for allowing the Waterfront
News to share Mary's work with-the waterfront
community. The book can be purchased at:
Undersea Sports (1525 North Federal, Ft.
Lauderdale), (Bahia Mar, Ft. Lauderdale), or from
Great Outdoors Publishing Co. (474728th Street
North St Petersburg, Fl 33714).Manatees: Gentle
Giants in Peril retails for $2.95 (plus $1.00 for
postage if purchased through the publisher).


I




































by M.G. Swift
Ignore the junk food containers and styrofoam
cups, try not to step on the broken glass or the
rusty nail, behold one of the best vistas of Fort
Lauderdale and the New River. The river bends
almost at a 900 angle just to your left. Straight
ahead one can see the railroad bridge pointing
skyward as if mocking the downtown skyline and
the Andrews Avenue Bridge looming whitely
I- -^r




























beyond the tracks. To the right is Chinnock
Marine's boatyard d a Norseman Marine's
rigging compound. The Marshall Bridge blocks
what would be a view of the fork in the river,
Sailboat Bend.
Some can ignore the trash and fish for crabs
like Mike Thomas. Not biting very good lately,
Mike says, only 3 crabs in five hours. Dumping
garbage in the water is hurting the river fishing,
theorizes Thomas.
Where some can ignore the dumping and
trashing of the narrow strip of city property
between 5th Avenue and the rivers seawall, some
like the women of Mermaids Marine Service could
not overlook the garbage afoot. So Gwen Grant
and Geri Beall along with Rochelle Minckler,
Donette Reynolds, Nan' Nebelthe boss' daughter,
Kellie Grant and other employees of the yacht
cleaning and maintenance firm decided to do
something about it.
During their lunch breaks, the mermaids picked
up 35 bags of trash in three days. After their
mountainoftrashhad extended the Appalachian
trail down to Fort Lauderdale, Southern
Sanitation and the city placed a large dumpster
on the site free of charge upon urging of Jim
Naugle president of the civic association across
the river and a candidate for city office.
Discarded tires, tree limbs, bottles, paper all
soon filled the large dumpster. The mermaids
lamented the fact that by tomorrow noon the
trash would "oddly" reappear.
What Wally Iveson wants is to lease the strip of
city land from his property, Norseman, up to the
bend to the north. He'd landscape it to
compliment the two story rigwright workshop











and offices he's planning to build on his property
where his current shop is located. No Alice's
Restaurant, a litter strewned lot would not lend
itself to the ambience Iveson will be attempting to
capture with his new campus. "Abuse of the New
River", Iveson fumes referring to the city's


Volume 2 Issue 1- March 15 -


20


stewardship of its' property there.
A few days later, after the dumpster had been
hauled away and the mermaids were off on
another job up river, the trash was back again in
force, as predicted.
'The city spends tax dollars to put begonias on
the median strip along U.S. One at 17th Street to
impress tourists, but one of the largest portions
of the tourism industry is the boating aspect, and
we show them trash instead of begonias here
along the river...this is so gross," complains
Gwen Grant of Mermaid's Marine. Why not city
docks there, ask both Grant and Iveson.





---
Jj -f *










available from Commercial News Providers"
am ammm, N* *Q
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40 00 0










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q= 4 ga- 0. m. 4 no* -

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17



W WEEK OF THE OCEAN

The Sixth Annual Week of the Ocean Festival
scheduled for April 27-May 5 will explore the
theme "Getting in Touch with the Ocean,"
according to Cynthia Hancock, festival chair and
cofounnder of the event.
"The festival's intention is to urge each of us
not to take the ocean for granted. There are so
many ways in which the ocean is interwoven in
the threads of our lives that merits at least a few
hours of our attention," Hancock says.
"Many of us came to Broward because.of its
beauty and the many types of recreation it offers
but caught up in the many responsibilities we
have, we may actually have little time left to
enjoy it."
Week of the Ocean activities explore recreation
as well as suggesting ways we can protect and
utilize its many resources. You can, for example,
sign up for the Fort Lauderdale Billfish
Tournament or try our windsurfing and scuba.
You can meet with area marine reps and local
citizens and explore issues such as how to
develop this area for an increasing population
and still maintain its delicate ecology. You can
clap your hands and sing a sailor's sea chantey,
sample unusual seafood delicacies or-bid bon
voyage to a group of hopeful sea turtles.
The festival which also serves as a model to
other communities wishing to honor the ocean is
held annually to coincide with National Week of
the Ocean, an event chaired by Hancock, Scott
Carpenter and seven other leading ocean
pioneers. "This year Week of the Ocean will also
distribute its premiere issue of a Festival
cookbook," Hancock says. "Award-winning
student recipes from preschoolers to seniors will
be included from the annual School Marine Fair
Seafood Contest held at the Galleria and also co-
sponsored by the Broward County School Board.
"By showcasing student art, creative writing,
photography and science projects from area
public and private schools, Week of Ocean
participants share their own personal
experiences and knowledge of the ocean with
each other," Hancock explains.
So plan to get some sand in your shoes this
year and enjoy the ocean, pull out a Masefield
poem or a Herman Melville novel. Try your hand
at scuba or snack on eel or squid. Getting in touch
with nature in an urban setting might just feel
good enough for each of us to pledge some effort
to keeping our ocean healthy and productive.
To obtain a Festival program, national poster
or to pledge support, send a SASE (self-
addressed, stamped envelope) to Hancock; Week
of the Ocean, Inc., P.O. Box 179, Ft. Lauderdale,FI
33302.


RV's Don't Float But








We Have Many Items
BOATERS Can Use!
Propane stoves & refrigerators
"NEW" 12-volt refrigerator
Electrical & plumbing supplies
Aluminum propane gas tanks & fittings
*Chemicals .
12-volt light fixtures
Air-conditioners
Extensive.supply of brass fittings
OPEN 7 DAYS PROPANEGAS

PALM TRAILER
SUPPLIES
2190 STATE RD 84
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA
(WEST OF 1-95)
.587-7990







E3 --JLaS S

OLASt



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Sponsored by The Mu m of Art
Fort Lauderdale, ida
Jim -


WATERFRONT NEWS


L


LAS OLAS ART FESTIVAL
Saturday and Sunday, March 23 and 24,1985, the
16th Annual Las Olas Art Festival will be held
from 10:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on beautiful Las Olas
Boulevard. The festival area, from the Himarshee
Canal to Federal Highway, will be closed to traffic
during the Festival. The event is free to the public
and is sponsored by The Museum of Art and the
City of Fort Lauderdale's Park and Recreation
Department.
The Festival has become a nationally recognized
show. Sunshine Artist Magazine, gave the
Festival the highest rating for Art Festivals in the
State of Florida. This year, we received over 1,200
applications, of which 260 were accepted. Artists
present (4) four 35 mm color slides of their work
and (1) one slide of their display area for jurying.
Each application is accompained by a $5.00 non-
refundable application and jurying fee and a
$125.00 contribution to the Museum which is
negotiated if the artist is accepted. Closing date
for applications was November 1, 1984.
STATISTICS, 1985 260 artists accepted from
applicants-91 from Florida, including 42 from
Broward, Dade and Palm Beach Counties. Thirty
one states and Canada are represented. The main
categories of the show this year: Painting,
Drawing, Graphics, Sculpture, Photography,
Crafts, Ceramics, Jewelry, Glass, Wood, Enamels
Paper, Feathers, and Fibre.


The 1985 judge will be Mr. Robert T. Buck, Director
of the Brooklyn Museum. Born in Fall River,
Massachusetts, Mr. Buck received his B.A. from
Williams College and his M.A. from N.Y.U., under
the guidance of Dr. Walter Friedlaender. Mr. Buck
has taught at the University of Toledo,
Washington University and at the State
University of New York, in Buffalo. The positions
held by Mr. Buck through the years have been at
the Toledo Museum of Art, and the Washington
University Art Gallery, and he subsequently
served as director of the Albright-Knox Art
Gallery in Buffalo for ten years.

Exhibitions including: "Sam Francis paintings
1947-1972." "Pollock to the Present" and "Homage
to Albers," have been curated by Mr. Buck. He is
also the author of the book Sam Francis, Paintings
.1947-1972. Robert T. Buck served as judge for the
Hortt Exhibition in our museum in 1980.
Total cash awards will be $4,900, including a
$1,000 Best In Show Award, one $700, one $500,
and nine $300 awards. Prize money is donated
primarily by the Las Olas Merchants'
Association. For any further information please
contact:
Mae Steinlauf ...................564-3688
Margaret Leiser ................... 561-1376


LAS OLAS ST. PAT'S PARADE
by Lynda Franklin
FORT LAUDERDALE--Round up your shillelagh,
gather up a shamrock or two, and come celebrate
the wearin'-of the-green at the Las Olas
Boulevard St. Patrick's Day Parade.
Groups and organizations wishing to
participate in the Parade should contact the Las
Olas Association at 463-5750. The parade will
begin at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 17th, and will
travel west to east, beginning at the Tunnel, along
Las Olas Boulevard.
City and county commissioners, all of whom
will earlier have been proclaimed Irish for a
Week; are expected to join the colorful
procession.
And, for anyone sporting a proper Irish brogue-
-of just a twinkle in their eyes--there'll be free
helium balloons awaiting them (green, of
course!).
The Las Olas St. Patrick's Day Parade is
sponsored by the Broward County Emerald
Society, the City of Fort Lauderdale Parks and
Recreation Department, and the Las Olas
Association.


CABLE
MARINE
INC


Bottom Painting
Specials!


We'll clean and paint your bottom cheaper than
you can do it yourself....
PAINT POWER/SAIL POWER/SAIL POWER/SAIL
Under 40 Ft. 41 Ft. 59 Ft. 60 Ft. Plus


$7.00 per ft.
$8.00 per ft.
$8.50 per ft.


$7.50 per ft.
$8.75 per ft.
$9.25 per ft.


$8.00 per ft
$10.25 per
$10.75 per


Above includes haul-out and pressure cleaning.
Scraping of heavily fouled bottom extra.


NOW THREE FULL
SERVICE LOCATIONS...
FT. LAUDERDALE
2491 Highway 84
(305) 587-4000
80 Ton Lift
PALM BEACH GARDENS
PGA Blvd. & Intracoastal
(305) 627-0440
60 Ton Lift
ft. FT. LAUDERDALE
ft. 1517 S.E. 16th Street
(305) 462-2822
40 Ton Lift


FORT LAUDERDALE STREET
DANCE & B-DAY
The city of Fort Lauderdale will celebrate it's
74th anniversary as a city on Saturday March
30th. Five stages for entertainment and food
vendors will be scattered along the south bank of
the New River between the Andrews Avenue
Bridge and the Federal Highway Tunnel, along
South New River Drive. Festivities will get
underway at 4:00 p.m. and sidewalks won't be
rolled up until 11:00 p.m. Fireworks, local
musicians, dancers and ethnic cooking will ice
the cake for this birthday celebration. Parking is
available. .


~Es
NbXRED SIGN COq,-.,-i
6IZZiiiiides Ae.Iftau

JOE iIES$NIANN'
:57247;3RV


Bottom Coat
* Vinylux
* Unipoxy







CLASSIFIED


Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15- April 15, 1985


19


DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant, DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.


NORTH LAS OLAS ISLES. 65' near Intra-
coastal. No fixed bridges. No live-
aboards. 764-2810 days, 462-2266 eves


ISLE OF VENICE- Live-aboards.
Pool, Shower, Laundry, Cable, Phone.
Call 525-2223
NEW RIVER-NORTH FORK 20'-40' power
or sail, $100/mo. NO live-aboards.
Call 523-3345.
LAS OLAS, Sea Island, Max 38', no
live-on. Water & 110, $180/mo.,
Call Brooks 761-8791.
100' of DEEPWATER DOCKAGE- near ICW
(NE Ft.L.), water & electric, No
Live-aboards. Call 463-0477 (days).
North Fork New River- 45', 4', water
& electric. LIVE-ABOARD DOCKAGE.
Call for'details at: 462-5770.
VILLA NELSON Apts., 208 Hendricks
Isle (on east side). Pool*Jacuzzi
Cable*Laundry*Showers*Gas BBQ.
Live-aboard or Storage. Apts., wkly/
monthly also available. 463-7067.

FOR SALE
TRADE or SELL, Best Offer, '75, 30'
CATALINA, Atomic 4, 4 Sails, $25,900
Radio & lots of extras. 462-3456.
WESTERBEKE 4-91 25 HP Diesel complete
with 2:1 gear & instrument panel,
$1750. REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894
2 Fuel or Water BOW TANKS 260 Gal.
each. Heavy Duty 3/16" Aluminum
Construction 24"x32"x74". Originally
on 75' yach at cosf of over $1200
each. Asking $550 each. 463-2577.
GENERATORS- New & Used Free Instal-
lation Quotes & Comparison Pricinq on
all makes. REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894
PERKINS 4107 Bobtail Engine, complete
& Running, $750. REPOWER 462-3894
'73 MGB restored. $4995. 776-7960
1982 O'DAY 37' Sloop. For Sale or
assume lease w/purchase opt. Main &
Working Jib, VHF, Depth-finder, Re-
frigerator. Days 473-8401; Evenings
748-1238.


2 WINDBOARDS. $400 each. 776-7960.


GOOD USED ONAN GENERATORS: 3, 7.5,
15 7 30 KW available at REPOWER
SYSTEMS. 462-3894.


HELP WANTED
SAILING CREW WANTED for modern 41'
ketch for local cruising & weekend
racing. Experienced only between
ages of 25-45. Fun at no cost if
you're a gung-ho sailor, just help
with minor maintenance. Call around
7 p.m. at 566-3648.
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS needed in Light-
house Point, Pompano & along Bayview
and A1A. Monthly. Call 524-9450.


JOBS WANTED--
USCG CAPTAIN 4-hire. Brian 776-7690



WANTED
Sailor seeks FEMALE CREW companion
for long cruise. Must be mature, fun
loving, honest, non-smoker, slender,
29-40, to compliment same: P.O. Box
# 2216, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33303


MARINE SERVICES--
MARINE SURVEYOR- buyers & insurance
Surveys for both POWER & SAIL.
Call Ed Rowe at 792-6092.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C &
PREP. for USCG OPERATOR's LICENSE.
Will teach same to seafarers for $12.
Call 462-2628.


GOOD QUALITY MARINE WOODWORK
REFINISHING & MAINTENANCE
Call Lee Jensen at 522-2189


REFRIGERATIQN-AIR CONDITIONING RE-
PAIRS & INSTALLATION-- service ALL
brands, 1 yr. warranty on BOTH parts
& labor, $25/hr., day or night, we
custom build most any type of unit or
DO-IT-YOURSELF, we sell what you need.
w/free advice. MEETING YOUR COOLING
NEEDS SINCE 1977. Call CUSTOM REFRIG-
ERATION 527-4533 527-0540.


MARINE ELECTRIC & MECHANICAL REPAIRS
at your dock. Call 753-9914.
LOCAL TRIPS & DELIVERIES to Northeast
& Great Lakes after April 1. Reason-
able Rates- Daily or Contract. Capt.
ROD CUSHING, USCG Licensed Master, 30
yrs. experience, Yachting & Commercial
Call 305-739-1995 between 3 & 7 p.m.
HAVE YOU CLEANED YOUR SAILS LATELY?
Give your sails a new life. We also
clean sail covers, bimini tops, awnings
of all types. Waterproofing available.
Call 491-3327 for a free estimate. THE
SAIL CLEANERS.
Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3 easy
weeks. SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER $98
INTERPRETING avail.564-6962 / 564-5822
Notice FREE- Will haul away or remove
your unwanted Boat or Yacht. Call
782-6228 or 781-0479.
BOAT WAXING- Fiberglass repair.
Exterior Cleaning, teak, paint.
Call Kim or Dawn 920-7896.
CHARTER 50' Ketch, day/wk. 776-7960
TOP QUALITY YACHT PAINTING & VARNISH-
ing. 23 yrs. experience in Ft. Laud.
Diving Service / Fiberglass.
Call Bill at 462-1888.

REAL ESTATE
1976 2076

"O OCENTURMLS

PROPERTIES, INC.
6908 Cypress Road Plantation, Fla. 33317
TRADE YOUR HOME. Owner of a 40' Sail-
boat, 3 cabins 2 heads, 7 months NEW.
Will trade for home. Here's your
chance to really live. Call Jack
Ennis, assoc. 752-0072 (Eves.)
MARINA RESORT APTS. Income from 3
deepwater boatslips & two units.
Owner must sell. $295,000. 584-1400
OCEAN ACCESS 4 Bdrm*Pool*Culdesac
lot with 2 canals, Plantation's
finest. $185,000 584-3735.

1 BDRM CONDO, Pvt Dock Space, Covered
Parking. Near Inlet. $57,000. KASLER
REALTY 763-4440, or eve's call Val,
associate 764-2942.
BUY NOW & SAVE. State resticting
building in Fla Keys & prices will
increase! 2 b home on unique Key
Deer Refuge deep water to Gulf and
Ocean fishing, sailing, diving.
Owner 566-9635, 525-0923.
KEY LARGO lot (Stillwright Pt.)- Canal
Sensational view, $65,000. Mr. Allen
463-8456 (work), 763-1357 (home).


/ (305) 462-5770 Ofc..- [-r
V (305) 527-1304 Eves., ML
ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR
1700 E. Las Olas Blvd.;Suife 204
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301
SPECIALIZING IN WATERFRONT REAL ESTATE
LMNG & WORKING ON THE NEW RIVER

HARBOR DEACH-Reduced..only $239,000!
Spacious 4 bdrm, 4 bath, 2 story with fireplace
& jacuzzi spa. Situated on Large Landscaped
Comer Waterfront Ocean Access lot. Walk to
private Oceanfront Harbor Beach Club.
CITRUS ISLES-Deepwater-Ocean Access
1 Meticulously maintained 2 bdrm with a
new kitchen. Realistically priced & owner may
CONSIDER FINANCING! Reduced ONLY
$108,000.
2. Deepwater 2 bdrm, Central A/C, totally
remodeled-Move Right In! OWNER WANTS
OFFER; assume 1st & owner 2nd.
LANDINGS-Deepwater
3 bdrm, 2 bath, spacious Living Room and
Private Fenced yard. Best Buy East of
Bayview...ONLY $237,000.
RIVER REACH
Dodage only $10.00 per foot per year
GolflTennis*Pools*Sauna*24 hour Security.
1. ATTORNEY ORDERS SALE! 2 bdrm, 2 bath,
corner apt. DRASTICALLY REDUCED $5,000-
$69,800 assumable mortgages, No points or
qualifying!
2. New Building-2 bdrm, 2 bath, Fifth floor
view of CANAL, GOLF & TENNIS!






.

Many Other Waterfront Listings Available!!!
"New waterfront listings needed...
I have qualified buyers!"
ROBERT P. GARGANO'462-5770 Of
Lic. ReaLEstate.Broker- Realtor .5271304Ev_e

DEEPWATER DOCK-3 BDRM 2 Bath, Split
BDRM plan. Realistically priced at
$95,000 or will lease $875 mo.
KASLER REALTY 763-4440 or eve's
call Va., assoc. 764-2942

VACATION RENTALS-
PARIS, FRANCE- summer apts., best
locations, reasonable rates, free
bus/subway. 475-0615.



WATERFRONT NEWS
ADVERTISING RATES:
Classifieds (35 Characters/Line)
First Line ................ $4.00
Each Additional Line ......$3.00
Per Column Inch............... 15.00:
Business Card ............ $30.00
Minimum Art Set-Up Fee .......$5.00
Insert Fee per 1000 ......... $15.00
(Maximum Size 8" x 11")
Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
524-9450 Ilene Levy
524-9450 Donna Phillips
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 20,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450






WATERFRONT NEWS
20


i I


Ij


ICOM M700 (SSB)
SINGLE SIDE
BAND


YOL
*1.6-24 Mhz
S48 memories $*
* Green LED readout
* 150 W PEP transmitter


M700
JR PRICE:
595.00


w/Maxcom Coupler
LIST: $2795.00
YOUR PRICE:$1875.00
w/Hull Coupler md
LIST: $3400.00 BCO
YOUR PRICE:$2495.00
.& r z -


King 8001
Raytheon 550
Sitex 797-C
Furuno LC-80
' Micrologic ML5500
Micrologic ML7500
Northstar 800
Northstar 800X


LIST YOUR PRICE


1095.00
895.00
1095.00
1395:00
1495.00
1695.00
2395.00
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I VHF ADIOS


Regency MT5500XL
Standard "USA"
Regency 6500
Standard "Maxi"
King 7000
ICOM M80
ICOM M8OC
Regency NC7200


399.95
450.00
469.95
499.95
499.00
699.00
749.00
1669.00


L(HAN-HELD


699.00
635.00
*quote
719.00
*Quote
*quote
1795.00
1895.00


SITEX EZ-7 LO AN

LIST: $777.00
YOUR PRICE:
$449.00

* 9 waypoints
* Cross track error
* Boat's heading
* Time, distance & bearing to go
* Course & speed made good





KING
1060

MICROPROCESSOR
* 4" chart paper
* Built-in water surface
temperature sensor
* Digital readout gives depth,
speed or temperature readings
* Able to interface with King 8001 Loran
* 50 Khz or 200 Khz


LIST: $759.00


239.95
244.95
264.95
289.95
*quote
429.95
454.95
899.95
*Call for Quote


Sitex A 300S
w/compass & speed
Magnavox MX 4102
w/compass & speed


YOUR PRICE:
$479.95


LIST YOUR PRICE
1495.00 1245.00
2145.00 1795.00
2495.00 2049.00
2995.00 2495.00


STANDARD


Horizon Vo!


* LCD display 6 weather channels
* All US & int'l Scanning
channels Splash-resistant
* Converts into* Channel 16 priority
2-station intercom,
or a 6-watt hailer
* 7"x7"x1" mounts anywhere
LIST: $599.00
YOUR PRICE: $329.95


Rafts


Call for quote

We guarantee
lowest prices
anywhere on
A L.:-# 1. I. a,


the


MoI


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Sea Lab 9000
ICOM M/2
Regency MT/1000
Standard HX/200S
ICOM M/5 (5 watt)
*After rebate


449.00
449.00
599.95
549.00
599.00


179.95
269.95
254.95*
299.95
349.95


Swift 737 (7 x 50)
Swift 781 (7 x 50)
Steiner (7 x 50)
Fujinon Mtr (7 x 50)
Steiner (7 x 50C)


STOP BY TODAY
BLUE DOLPHIN
(between Bobby Rubino's & Carlos & Pepe's)
1394 SE 17th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33316
(305) 763-3838


FREE CATALOG

WARNING!

* Don't be fooled into paying
extra for what the manufac-
urer does for FREE!
* All Units are manufacturer
(factory) tuned and calibrated.


WN385


"Prices subject to chain


Volume 2 Issue 1 March 15 April 15, 1985


76.50
122.00
315.00
370.00
685.00


43.95
69.96
189.95
279.95
419.95


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