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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00008
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: October 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00008

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Editor's Mailbag
        Page 2
    Main: Community News
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main: Diving
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Power Boating
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Sailing
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Fishing
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Main: Waterfront Heritage
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Main continued
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Main: Waterfront Cuisine
        Page 18
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 19
    Main: Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 20
Full Text


Volume 1 Issue 8


October 15-November 15, 1984
Circulation 20,000


Resource Alert


Schipperke


Fishing


Power Booting


=4Zvlk 'It TIPP


320 S.W. 2nd St. Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33312 (305) 524-9450


B~li~Wle"f~l~BXe~s~'~


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WATERFRONT NEWS


"WHEN YOUR SHIP COMES IN..."
AT THE BOAT SHOW
By Sheila Lynn
Twenty five years in the making, the 1984 Fort
Lauderdale International Boat Show is to be the
biggest and the best ever. Being held during the
first week in November at Bahia Mar, and
estimated crowd of thousands will storm the site
with their "OOH'S and AAH'S". Whether an
interested buyer, or just an impressed
vacationer, the Boat Show has something to offer
viewers, one and all.
While visiting the docks at Bahia Mar, you might
stop to consider the painstaking work that is
behind the beauty presented to you. From one fine
line on a draftman's table, to the polished
product, each and every step towards finalization
is carefully nurtured. Each calculated inch is
checked and rechecked for perfection. No flaw is
left behind for question. Hour upon hour is spent
in the duration of this process,. with almost a
hundred people involved in various stages of
operations.
Phase One: Design and Detail. The first stage of
processing is to formalize an idea. Upon
consideration, this is perhaps the hardest phase
to grasp, since there are only drafted blueprints
to visualize the said product. Absolute accuracy
is essential, as it is from these prints that the
builders perform the ardiuos task of piecing
together the materials for the finished product.
Using the guidelines that the designer has
supplied, this brings us into phase two.
Phase Two: Building per Specifications. Shipyards
around the globe are filled with many talented
craftsmen. These are workers who have
dedicated their lives to performance, and the end
results, more often than not, are absolutely
breathtaking. With materials and long hours of
labor, hulls are carefully formed. Sanding,
sealing and protecting are just a few steps that
these workers follow with the utmost accuracy.
In some instances, modifications to designs are
'-"-Fues4ted, and often some reworking is involved.
This time and extra effort must also be taken into
consideration. Electrical wiring, appliance
installation, light fixtures, almost every item
imagineable aboard a boat is in one way or
another tied into the process of building per
specifications.
'Phase Three: Decoration. When the exterior and
under-hull work is completed, the vessel is now
ready for interior decoration. The tasteful and
consciencious work that is involved in this
process stems from the various supply houses
around the world. Hand-painted fabric, carpet,
and other various interior design materials are
purchased with the meticulous eye of the
decorator. Working hand in hand with the
laborers involved in this process, installation is
performed under a watchful eye, leaving no
detail too small for perfection.
Furnishings are also part of decorum, and each
vessel is designed with the best of taste. Whether
a seamstress, or supplier, there is definitely an
air of "confidence" in the process of decoration.


FORT LAUDERDALE, FL-The largest in-water
boat show in the United States, The Fort
Lauderdale International Boat Show, will
celebrate its 25th Anniversary from Thursday,
November 1 through Monday, November 5 at
Bahia Mar Hotel and Yachting Center.
The show has come a long way in those 25
years, making stops along the way at Pier66, War
Memorial Auditorium, Dania Jai Alai, Port
Everglades and on the banks of the New River.
The show was designed to allow
manufacturers, distributors and dealers to
exhibit and sell boats in one place at one time.
Today's show with more than 700 in-water and on
land exhibits has earned the reputation of being a
truly international event with exhibiting
companies from Europe and the Far East joining
our Nation's leading manufacturers and dealers.
This year's show promises to be as impressive
as any previous show. From rowing shells and
dinghies in the modest price range to sportfishing
boats and sailboats to yachts valued at3 million
dollars, visitors can plan on a full day of
exploring and shopping.
Several special events including exclusive
sportswear fashion shows, live musical
entertainment, diving,fishing and cooking clinics
are scheduled throughout the five day
extravaganza.
The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show is
sponsored by the Marine Industries Association
of South Florida and managed'and produced by
Yachting Promotions Inc., in Fort Lauderdale.
The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show
will be open from noon to 10 p.m. Thursday,
November 1 and Friday November2:10 a.m. to 10
p.m. Saturday, November 3: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday, November 4; and noonto6 p.m. Monday,
November 5.
Admission is $6.00 for adults, $2.00 for children
6-12.


On impact, the reflection of decor to the hull
design itself gives the vessel it's own character.
Laced from stem to stern with impecable taste,
she is now definitely a finished product, and one
to be proud of.
Phase Four: Scrub-Down and Make Ready. Upon
the arrival of a finished boat to a docking site at
the show, many boat crews are involved in the
preparation of vessels for the public. The
watchful eye of service managers and
supervisors make the process which would be a
lengthy one, flow smoothly. From mopping aft-
decks to polishing brass fixtures, not one area of
the vessel is left untouched. Even the actual
water-line is scrubbed on a daily basis for the
show. (Crews using flotation rafts bring soft
cloths and a lot of elbow-grease with them for this
step of preparation).
Phase Five: Presentation. Upon initial
presentation, the public is greeted by various


October 15-November, 15 1984
Volume 1 Issue 8


UALENUAH Ut- tVtNlEN
Date: Thursday, Nov. 1-Monday Nov. 5
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Thursday
12:00 noon-10: p.m. Friday
10:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Saturday
10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Sunday
12:00 noon-6:00 p.m. Monday
Location: Bahia Mar Hotel & Yachting Center
801 810 Seabreeze Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
Exhibits: Over 700 in-water and on land
exhibits have made this the largest
in-water show in the nation offering
a complete selection of boats and
marine accessories. Rowing shells
and dinghies to sailboats and sport-
fisherman to more than 30 yachts
over a million dollars each will
make this year's show an unfor-
gettable experience.


office staff from brokerage houses throughout
the Marine Industry. (Let's not forget the piles of
paperwork that must be involved in such a
lengthy project!) From secretaries to the selling
brokers, daily routines are a formal part of this
fantastic configuration.
When showing the final product to you, the
public, months and months of long working days
fall into place. Your critical eye and reaction is
completely monitored by various personnel
throughout the stay of the show. It is your
response and attitude that provides these
credited workers with a sense of pride. Pride in
good judgement, taste and a job well done. So
when you are viewing the inventory of the
International Boat Show here in Fort Lauderdale,
remember the steps it took to bring to you what
you now have the privelege to see. Perhaps it will
,make waiting for "YOUR SHIP TO COME IN" a bit
less sullen and a bit more spirited.


1965 BOAT SHOW


FORT LAUDERDALE
INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW


L -~ ~, I


1976






2

Dear Editor:
Your "Mailbag" for September 15-October 15
reports a horror story in the boat donation field where a
boat donated toI ea Scouts was neglected and sunk. It
notes that the nationall Yachtsmen's Association
waasaking t iols and warns interested parties.


ones now under"'pblF'd crutiry.' i is an organization of
Coast Guard licensed professionals interested in
boating safety. As an admiralty attorney and retired
Navy Captain, I may serve only as an associate
member.
IYA's activities have included boating trips and
presents for the underprivileged, maritime college
scholarships, and such things as sponsorship of Sea
Scout Ship No. 332. If the boat your reader complains
about had been donated to the IYA, our marine
surveyor members would have evaluated it to make
sure that it was safe and appropriate to the needs of the
Scouts before it would have been used for that
purpose. Then, we would have approached our
membership...several local yards and marinas are
associated...for free dockage.
We agreed to sponsor this particular Sea Scout troop
only because someone like John Ziegler is the leader
and. because our members have the expertise to
instruct these young Scouts in every phase of the
operation and maintenance of a vessel. If the SeaScout
troop involved in the prior incident had had this same
expertise and leadership, a better result would have
followed. No boys of Scouting age are equipped to own,
maintain, and operate a boat without supervision. The
Coast Guard constantly rescues grown men who have
not learned to respect the sea. What is required is the
respect that comes-from years of smooth, uneventful
passages interspersed with seconds of sheer terror
from sudden storm, the unforeseen machinery or-
equipment failure, or the collision at sea.
Your reader has a valid complaint against an
unidentified group of young Sea Scouts and their
leaders, but did she go to meetings to evaluate the
group in question to see whether they were capable of
operating and maintaining the donated boat? If they
were riot ready for this, there could have been loss of
life as well as loss of the boat. I certainly wish your
reader had checked out the IYA and ship No. 332 before
she unfairly compared them to the group.

Yours truly,
Edward R. Fink
Admiralty Attorney
Associate Member-I.Y.A.
Editor's Note: The South Florida Council has no record
of a Sea Explorer Ship ("Sea Scouts") operating in Fort
Lauderdale between September 1980 through
December 1982.


M AILB ,. 320 S.W. 2nd Street
MIVnlBAtG: Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33312


Volume 1 Issue 8


October 15-November 15 1984


Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc. 1884

"WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft.:Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450

Published by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney
Laurie Cahill
*: Julie Gepfrich
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich Bob Lo
Jason Welles Lee Je
Andrew Moyes Swen
Bud Alcott Matt N
Scott Moore Fred C
Darin Gleichman Todd(
Kelly Alcott Dennis
Jeff Prosje John I
Devon Ziegler Charle
Patrick Gillis Max M
Tom Fogarty Chris
Dan Fogarty Doug


oucall
,nsen
Neufeldt
loore
lastonguay
Clarke
s Bryant
Metzger
es Metzger
Miller
Lazure
Channel


WATERFRONT NEWS


Dear Editor,
For some time now I have been painting custom
needlepoint canvasses for shops and friends in the
area Recently I decided lo create my own line of
Nautical designs. I included in them the scant few
miniureheads-.l'had seen on Vah'ts and iin.boks.W.en,


awash in the hustle of modern aays. I am gaa ine
interest in such things are not totally abandoned.
Perhaps with Mr. Hammack's help I can do my part in
keeping the traditions of the sea and the men and
women that navigate her alive.
Sandy Hoffman
Ft. Lauderdale

EDITOR's NOTE: Bob Hammack reports from his home in
St. Louis, Missouri that he is doing further research on
the subject of figureheads in hopes of finding sources
of information in the southern Florida area. However,
so far the best sources he knows of are: the National
Archives at the Library of Congress in Washington,
D.C.; and S. T. Preston's at Greenport on Long Island in
New York. If any readers can help Bob and Sandy let
the WATERFRONT NEWS know.


Editor:
The South Broward Citizens for a Better Environment
(So. Bro. CBE) has filed a petition for formal hearing
(Attachement 1) in response to the Department of
Environmental Regulation's recent issuance of intent
to permit on the dredge and fill permit (Attchement 2)
for the proposed county incinerator and ash dump at
St. Rd. 84 and 441. The petition calls for a formal
administrative hearing prior to issuance of the actual
dredge and fill permits by DER and could tie up the
project: for over a year including time for appeals. The
petition cites failure by DER to properly assess the
impact of the proposed project on the water quality,
fish and wildlife, and particularly, the manatees living
in the area of the site, Further, the petition holds that no
proper study has been done on the combined effects of
the incinerator, landfill, and 1-595. One issue of special
concern is that the limited environmental assessment
performed by DER (Attachement 3) is not only
extremely sketchy, it is in fact overtly negative toward
the project. This assessment, performed by Steve
Burian who has since left DER, reaches a definitely
negative conclusion stating "The potential
mismanagement of wastes, failure of the leachate
collection/containment system, cross contamination
of the stormwater and leachate system and a multitude
of other problems which could occur at this facility and
have occurred at other resource recovery projects,
suggest a high probability of some sort and/or long
-term negative impacts to water quality." Yet DER is
willing to ignore its own study and allow the county to
damage the water quality.


DISCOVERY CENTER HOSTS
"THE VISUAL ART OF MUSIC"
By Joy Bedick
FORT LAUDERDALE- The Discovery Center will host
the exhibit "The Visual Art of Music", November 6-
January 31.
The exhibit features paintings by Ruben Varga, a
blind violinist and composer. The paintings are
accompanied by music by Varga himself, available to
the viewer/listener through sets of earphones. This
exhibit challenges visitors to hear the paintings and
see the music.
"The Visual Art of Music" was conceived by Dr.
Leonard Greene, president of the Institute for
Socioeconomic Studies, and developed by the Hudson
River Museum in New York.
The Discovery Center will host "Seashell Chimes"
workshops at various times throughout November.
To make music from the sea, participants will
choose various shells and create unique seashell
chimes.
The Discovery Center will host the following free
films at 3 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday throughout
November:
November 3-4 ................... "Musicmakers"
November 10-11 .............. "Music To Live By"
November 17-18 ........ "Another Kind Of Music"
November 24-25 ..................."Really Rosie"
The Discovery Center is located at 231 S.W. Second
Avenue. Hours are 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday. For more information, call 462-4116.


EDITOR'S MAILBAG

So. Bro. CBE intends to fight each of the 29 permits
the county must obtain to complete this project. "Our
goal is to delay the county every step of the way until
we can force the commissioners to consider more
rational alternatives. There are viable alternatives to
the air. polluting method of burning wastes .
t *h: ,. i. of burning ...


concerning the procedure the county has chosen to
obtain the permits necessary for this project.
Specifically, by obtaining the permits one at a time the
county runs the risk of beginning to work based on one
permit when future applications for other permits
might be denied, causing the initial work to be in vain.
Other regulatory agencies will also be challenged if
they permit the project. Currently, there are different
restrictions required by EPA and the Army Corps of
Engineers concerning various aspects of this project.
For example, while DER requires that all mitigation be
completed with a year of beginning dredge and fill, the
EPA requires that all mitigation be completed entirely
before any actual project work can begin (See
Attachement 4). Contrary to county claims, none of the
permits required for this project has actually been
issued.
Air Quality permits are of particular concern to So.
Bro. CBE since the DER has openly admitted that they
do not know the long-term effects of dioxins and yet do
not have the funding necessary to research the issue
properly. The So. Bro. CBE holds strongly that until
adequate testing of dioxins can be performed, the
county should defer any expensive projects which may
rendered worthless in the event such studies have
negative results. The EPA is currently initiating in
depth studies of dioxins. One recent finding says that
dioxins can be essentially eliminated by raising and
maintaining the temperature in a mass-burn facility
and all the way up to the stacks to a level of 1600
degrees centigrade (See Attachement 5). Unfortunately
this solution is not possible at the St. Rd. 84 and 441 site
since the stacks will be under the flight path of the Ft.
Lauderdale/Hollywood. International Airport. If the
EPA should begin to require such high temperatures in.
order to minimize dioxin emissiofsrr,thiS-site would
then be a waste of the taxpayers money.
Unfortunately, under the law, citizens groups such
as So. Bro. CBE must-take the regulatory agencies and
the county to court in order to get them to properly
investigate the negative effects of the project on the
water and air quality in Broward County. So. Bro. CBE
attorney Larry Gore estimates that more than $20,000
will be necessary to fight the first permit, including
filing costs, studies, and expert witnesses. Steve
Simmons is confident that the money will be raised but
admits that it is a long & slow battle. "We need all the
help we can get. We're currently having weekly garage
sales, holding a drawing for prizes, and soliciting
donations from homeowners and businesses. Given
adequate funding, we can and will win this fight" says
Simmons.
South Broward Citizens For
A Better Environment


Help For Injured Wildlife

THE WLD BIRD
CAE CENTER
S.P.C.A. of Broward County, Inc.
P.O. Box 4761, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33338
3200 SW Fourth Avenue (305) 524-4302
Weekdays
9.00 m. 4:30 p.m. Tax Deductible Donations
Weekends
9.00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.



LAURIE CAHILL
SIGS (305) 7632186




& SIGNS


Yochr Lettering
Custom Graphics


Wood Signs
Interior Graphics







COMMUNITY NEWS

MANATEE DAY... LOCAI
Sunday, November 4th BOOK
By Judith Delaney By Mai
The Broward County Audibon Society with the Port Mary
Everglades Authority invite you to attend Manatee entitled I
Day: a celebration of the lives of manatees. Co- highly re
sponsors include: Burt & Jack's Restaurant, Wendy's of historic
Broward County, Coca-Cola Bottling Company of The wr
Broward County, Channel 7-WSVN, Miami Seaquarium geared t(
and Planet Ocean.. hand dra
The free event will be held in Port Everglades at natural h
Terminal #24 next to Burt & Jack's, Sunday, November sanctuary
4th from 10 AM to 5 PM. Festivities will include: live interested
entertainment, exhibits, films, manatee experts from recent ar
around the state, a manatee art show and arts & crafts. Ms. Ur
Among manatee experts to speak will be: Dr. Jesse very skil
White from the Miami Seaquarium (and recently evolved f
published in National Geographic Magazine), Dr. Dan where sp
O'Dell from the University of Miami, Renee Priest of some h
Jimmy Buffet's Save the Manatee Committee, Pat Rose adoring
with the Florida State Department of Natural Seaquari
Resources, and the Planet Ocean Pilots. Providing live Florida
musical entertainment are: John Day (acoustic guitar), establish
Steve Duell, Peter Harris, and Jill Jarboe and resci
(environmental songwriter). Sierra Club, Week of the The in
Ocean, F.P.&.L., South Florida Water Management giants fr
District, Port Everglades Authority and the through
Environmental Coalition of Broward County are among conscious
the exhibitors to be at the Maffatee Day. the purp
Rick Baquero, an internationally known sculptor; in Novembe
conjunction with the Arts & Science Foundation of Ms. Untei
Southwest Florida will display his work "the Vanishing questions
Floridian". Jimmy Buffet, Chairman of the save the
Manatee Committee, encourages you to attend
Manatee Day, Sunday, November 4th at Port
Everglades.



GRABBING YOUR PIECE
OF THE MARKET
"GRABBING YOUR PIECE OFTHE MARKET," a two and-a-
half hour conference will be held Wednesday, October
24, from 3 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. at the Chamber of
Commerce building, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield
Beach. Local marketing executives will discuss the
part marketing plays in small business and how to
obtain: a fair share of the market. There is a $3.00
registration fee and reservations are required. Call the
Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce at 427-1050 or
the FAU Small Business Development Center in Fort
Lauderdale at 467-4238 to make a reservation.
For information concerning special facilities
available to the handicapped, please call 467-4238.
The conference will be presented by the Florida
Atlantic' University Small Business Development
Center and the U.S. Small Business Administration, co-
sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Deerfield
Beach. The Center is an FAU affiliate which provides an
ongoing training program and free counseling for
owners of small businesses who can not retain private
consultants.


DECKS BY DAVIS
CUSTOM WOOD WORK
Decks*Benches*Planters*LotticeseTrellises
DockseUJooden PilingseFences*Gazebos


DECKS BY DAVIS
TONY DAVIS 2180 S.W. 28th WAY FT. -AUD. 33312
Licensed and Insured

581-8109
OUTDOOR REMODELING
OUTDOOR ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS


October 15-November 15, 1984


L AUTHOR PUBLISHES
ON MANATEES
rsha Rose
Unterbrink's 44 page, softcover booklet
MANATEES: GENTLE GIANTS IN PERIL, is a
recommended exposee on Florida's resident,
Ily unique water mammal.
iting is clear, concise, straight forward and is
o all age groups. The booklet includes many
awn pencil sketchings of the sea cow in it's
habitat as well as maps detailing their principal
ies throughout Florida. Furthur reference for
d parties is supplied by a bibliography of
tides and books.
iterbrink, through her descriptive writing is
Iful in endearing us tc these docile creatures,
rom a long past era. Siie introduces vignettes
specific manatees are rescued, usually from
uman-induced peril, given appropriately
names and eventually nursed back to health,
um, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and
Power and Light are a few of the
ments we can thank for their help in research
ue operations.
iportant theme of preserving these gentle
om ominous extinction is the recurring motif
out the book. Raising the public's
sness about these animals and their plight, is
lose of Manatee Day slated for Sunday,
rr4th at Port Everglades from 10 AM to 5 PM.
rbrink and her book will be on hand for.further
s or discussion. Hope to see you all there.'


Ms. Unterbrink is a family woman and a Ft.
Lauderdale resident. She has previously written a book
on JAZZ WOMEN AT THE KEYBOARD and her next
publication is to be WOMEN COMEDIANS.

Marine
Lumber &
SPlywood


7 2945 State Road 84

R41NE LU 584-8558


(305) 584-6361


,'arinc ^plolstering
ALL KINDS OF VINYL &
OTHER FABRICS
500 S.W. 21 Terr.
Bay 108A
Patio, Bars & Stools Ft. Lauderdale. FL33312







4 Y





KEYS
"PANIASYPESl8
I-- October25-28----
KEY WEST PREPARING FOR
FANTASY FEST '84
KEY WEST, Florida Keys...Revelry and excitement will
reign in this island city d'uino four days in late October,
when the spirit and colorful activities of Key West's
Fantasy Fest 84 capture thehearts of visitors and
residents alike.-
Fantasy Fest, which extends from Thursday, October
25 through Sunday, October 28, goes far beyond the
traditional Halloween celebration in fulfilling the
Southernmost City's answer to New Orleans' Mardi
Gras and Rio's Carnival.
This year's festival, according to Co-directors
Michael Whalton and Perri Halevy offers a frenetic
galaxy of activities.
Fantasy Fest will be centered around Old Town Key
West, where 19th century gingerbread homes vie for
attention.
The Festival kicks off at 5 PM, Thursday, October 25
with a "Food Fest Fundraiser" on Duval Street featuring
the culinary delights of Key West's leading chefs. That
evening at 7 PM Marriott's Casa Marina, 1500 Reynolds
Street, presents a "Sunset Applause Concert" featuring
noted composer- and singer Peter Allen.
At 10 PM it's the popular "Pier House Pretenders in
Paradise" Costume Contest with contestants vying for
cash and prizes. The Pier House is located at 1 Duval
Street.
Thursday activities wind up with an 11 PM "Toga
Party" at Sloppy Joe's Bar, 201 Duval Street.


WEEK OF THE OCEAN PRESIDENT
WINNER OF NATIONAL CITIZEN -
AWARD....
Cynthia Hancock, charter president of the Fort
Lauderdale-based ocean awareness organization,
Week of the Ocean,. Inc., has been honored by the
National Marine Education Association as recipient of
its James Centorino Award for 1984. The award was
presented at the NMEA Conference held at the
.University of Victoria, British Columbia.
Recipients of the award must be professionals, but
not classroom teachers, who have demonstrated a
minimum of five years service and leadership in
marine education.
Hancock was cited for her development of a campus
event into an organization now serving the nation with
a National Week of the Ocean proclaimed by President
Reagan recently as Public Law 98-274.
Locally, Hancock was named Woman of the Year in
Communications 1980 by the Atlantic-Florida Chapter
of Women in Communications and was recipient of a
Woodmen of the World Insurance Society
Conservation Award.
Hancock and the original task force which developed
the area Week of the Ocean Festival recently
coordinated by more than 70 business and non-profit
groups and observed by more than 60 county schools
also received a national Clarion award presented by
Women in Communications, Inc. (The World We Live In
category.) 1981.

1976 2076


CENTURY

Insurance Agency, Inc.
S Personal & Commercial
DENNIS J. & MARY DeROLF
6908 Cypress Road Office: 792-1074
Plantation. Fla. 33317 584-1400


On Friday, Marriott's Casa Marina repeats its 7 PM
"Sunset Applause Concert" with Peter Allen. The Strand
Theater, 527 Duval Street, presents a "Strandasy
Fantasy Concert" at 10:30 PM. At midnight, The Copa, a
local night club located at 623 Duval Street, will stage a
"Master of Madness Ball and Star Concert."
Saturday begins with Zayre's Children Costume
Party at Key Plaza on North Roosevelt Blvd.
The Old Town Street Fair along Duval Street from
noon to 6 PM features an outdoor festival filled with
activities; events and concerts. The corner of Duval
Street and Petronia Street will be the site of the
Bahamas Village Celebration with Bahamian foods,
limbo contest and music.
La Terraza De Marti, 1125 Duval Street, stages a 4 PM
"Dancing-in-the-Street Tea Dance at La-Te-Da" and at7
PM the Body Shop Fitness Center sponsors an "Ocean
to Ocean Duval Street Dash." Organizers will mark a
one-mile race course from the Gulf of Mexico to the
Atlantic Ocean.
At 7:30 PM the Fantasy Fest "Grand Parade"'," the
festival's largest and most colorful event, will move
along Duval Street. Tens of thousands of spectators
will focus their attention on bizarre floats and revelers
decked out in uncanny coctumes.
After the parade, at 11 PM, the Pier House has
scheduled an "Amateur Walk-On Costume Contest" and
numerous Duval Street bars and clubs will stage
Fantasy Fest parties.
Sunday, the final day, Burger King sponsors a
Children's Day 2 PM at Bayview Park featuring a
carnival and costume contest for kids.
For more Fantasy Fest details call (305) 294-8585. In
Florida contact the Key West Visitor's Bureau (toll-free)
at 1-800-432-5330.

PEACE DAY '84
Sunday, October 14, 1984
The South Florida Peace Coalition invites you to
celebrate Peace Day '84 at St. Thomas University with
keynote speaker Dr. Benjamin Spock. Performing live
will be international recording artist Richie Havens, of
Woodstock fame, and South Florida reggae band Roots
Uprising.
The festival includes an interfaith service,
international food, children's entertainment and more.
It all takes place Sunday, October 14 starting at noon at
St. Thomas University (formerly Biscayne College) at
16400 N.W..32nd Avenue, Miami. Admission is free;
donations are welcome.
Peace Day '84 is sponsored by The South Florida
Peace Coalition as part of a nationwide nuclear freeze
weekend.


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Account Executive


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IN HURRICANE DIANA's EYE
By M.G. Swift
"...running amok over many speed bumps at
several hundred miles per hour...the eye's wall
of clouds is awesome, atleast 50,000 feet
straight up and down...In the eye the ride is
smooth...Smoke ring clouds and rainbows
parade past my airplane window...blue skies
above..ibelow, the seas look like something out
of Homer's Iliad: thousands of fifty foot waves,
confused and crashing into each other like so
many dodgem' cars at a county fair, or like white
whales spouting spray and in passionate
heat...this place is surreal,,,I wonder how many
poets have ever been here before...
11SEP84 0430 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) 25.77N
80.13W
Sitting under a mercury vapor light outside the
airfield guard post, I am waiting to, perhaps, interview
a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administratio
pilot, fresh from nine hours of flying through Hurricane
Diana off the Carolinas. I hope to fly there myself, but I
fear I've missed my flight. If nothing else, I can talk with
the fellow I interviewed in a story in August.
Next N.O.A.A. flight to Diana is at 1000GMT, five and
one half hours away. I think I'll go to the all night 7-11
store the airfield guard told me about, and get some
donuts and something totlrink.
0730 GMT (3:30 a.m. EDT)
I discovered the N.O.A.A. communication center
adjacent to hangar and the guard house. I'm sitting
here next to the N.O.A.A. radio operator who is in direct
contact with the agency plane currently flying recon'
through the hurricane. A ground man and the radio
-person aboard the P-3 Orion aircraft are periodically
changing channels to. attain better reception. The
transmitions sound very poor to me but the ground
operator is able to sift Diana's vital statistics (wind
speed, barometric pressure, location, drift speed and
direction, etc.) out of the static. He writes this data
down to relayed to the National Hurricane Center
across town in Coral Gables.
0830 GMT
Dr. Jim McFaddan, Chief of Heavy Aircraft Group
Office of Aircraft Operations-N.O.A.A. in Miami, has
arrived at his office down the hall from the radio room.
I've introduced myself to him reminding him I did a
feature on one of his pilots. Dr. McFadden recalled the
article and pointed out I'd mistakenly written that a
N.O.A.A. aircraft had been lost in the past; it was infact"
a military plane, not one of N.O.A.A.-O.A.O.'s.
I fear I may have lost my seat on the next flight out.
Dr. McFadden is studying the crew list for the 1000
GMT flight to see if I can be squeezed on board. There's
already a reporter and camera crew from NBC-TV/New
York and a print journalist from Charlotte, North
Carolina slated to be on board along with the flight
crew and ten scientists. 0900 GMT
0900 GMT
The good doctor found me a seat. Let's go for it!
0940GMT
On board the P-3 packed with instrumentation,
video screens, computer hardware and some of the
best pastries I've sampled in a while. It is cold, for the
computers no doubt. Technicians are confering and
checking read-outs.
Captain Noble gives the press and visiting scientists
a briefing on the plane's particulars and flight protocol.
The cocky New York network jock jokes about the food
served on board (actually, as I noted earlier, it was
damn good) he's done this before and laments the lack


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)f menu latitude. Noble directs us to the all important
'Doggie (Barf) Bags" hanging from the wall outside the
lead.
1000GMT
The plane is taxing down the runway. I can't believe
'm actually going to fly for eight hours repeatedly
through the eye of the most powerful force on earth-a
hurricane. The seat belt light is on
Ind I'm strapped in, sitting next to the TV guy. He'll be
calling the Today Show by radio/television patch in an
[our, he says.
Technicians are at their stations doing things I don't
luite comprehend: cloud physis, ODW, OPS, this radar
Ind that radar.
135GMT'31.50N 77.00W
Heading for Diana's eye. It is perhaps fifteen miles
vide. It is getting rough now, like running amok over
nany speed bumps at several hundred miles per hour.
)ne gets used to it: Adrenalin over-ride.
The NBC guy is talking to Jane Pauley. A visiting
scientist. Howie Bluestein from Oklahoma, is telling
ne about hurricanes and how it is that the rain causes
everything. Rain creates heat which causes wind and
these all feed on each other to create such a weather
systemm as Diana. Howie shows me how to change the
channelss on the video monitor at my seat,so I can check
in the various radars, statistical read-outs (wind
;peed and direction, longitude, latitude, time,
pressure). Cable TV eat your heart out!
155 GMT 32.550N 77.50W
In the eye. Winds 5 MPH; Barometer stands at 960
hillibars.
The seatbelt light is off for the moment in Diana's
iye, so passengers can move around the plane. We're
boking for the location in the eye of the lowest
pressuree reading. Blue skies, it is bright, reflected light
rom all directions at our altitude of 5000 feet. The eye
vall of solid gray clouds is awesome: 50,000 feet
least, they tell me, straight up and down, Venus,
perhaps. Very smooth ride in the eye.
200 GMT
Through the eye wall now and back to the parking lot
nd its speed bumps, again. We're looking for peak
vinds now. Winds: 131 MPH.
214 GMT
Radar techs' talk shop
Getting rough again. We must be approaching the
ye again. The closer we get to the eye wall the rougher
he ride, the harder the rain, the the blacker it gets till
e crack the eye and its eerie, stillness. Changing
channels on my video screen to the radar..yup, there's
he eye on the TV.
250 GMT
In the eye again. I assisted, rather ineptly with
luestein's monitoring of barometric pressure read-
uts. Howie is doing his thesis on tornadoes. He
recounted how what was left of 1983's hurricane Alecia
ended up aground in Oklahoma spawning several
sisters. Now he's here on the other end doing some
ross-referencing.
343 GMT 32.630N 78.40W
In her eye. Smooth. The clanks of falling seat belts
erald in the eye and the seat belt light going off. We
an move around.
Smoke rings of clouds and rainbows parade past my
indow. One has to crain one's head at the window to
ook up and down the sheer clifts of clouds.
Below, the seas look like something out of Homer's
liad: hundreds of fifty foot waves madly confused and
crashingg into each other like dodgem' cars at a county
air for LSD freaks, or like white whales spouting spray
nd in passionate heat.
This place is surreal. 5 MPH winds where moments
before and just a few miles in any direction we clocked
ops of 145 MPH.


1345 GMT
Leaving the eye...difficult to write...much darker,
rain lashes the windows and drums the fuseluge.
1346 GMT
Seat belt light back on...Rain streaks horizontally on
my window blurring the view of layer upon layer of
grey onion'like clouds. We're bouncing right along.
1526 GMT 32.91oN 78.17 W
Wind speed: 148 MPH. We're criss-crossing Diana
forming a grid over her with our flight pattern


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according to channel 8 on my video.
...These guys must have earned their wings flying
over the Ho Chi Minh Trail.
1600 GMT
The now and then wind sheer with it's sudden drops
tends to make this lunch of chicken and submarine
sandwiches a bit messy. No Pepsi cans by the
hardware please.
1714 GMT 33.20N 77.96W '
Wind speed.at gusts of 150 MPH.
1 wonder how many other poets have ever been here
before.
1824 GMT
Flying back towards Miami now. Its like the end of a
roller-coaster ride as your car rolls slowly to the
unloading platform. The letdown and the rush mix.
The TV newsman takes "takes" for the evening news.
Show business. And professional jealousy on my part.
1957 GMT 25.77oN 80.13W
Touch down and back to earth
POSTSCRIPT: Fear was overridden by the awe of that
terrestial factsimilie of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and a
confidence in a very competent crew and craft.
Ironically, I felt more secure on tha-P-3, than on the
ground weeks later waiting for Isadora.

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WATERFRONT NEWS


r


II


BROWARD'S ARTIFICIAL REEF
PROGRAM NEEDS DIVERS'
SUPPORT...
By Byran Brooks
On Thursday night September 13, Steve Somerville
from the Broward County Environment Quality Control
Board was the guest speaker at the monthly UnderSeas
Sport Club Meeting. The meeting was held at the
Ancient Marinerm the floating restuarant on South
New River Drive East and S.E. 5th Avenue.
Steve's talk was on the state of the Artifical Reef
Program in Broward County which his agency in
County government handles.
Somerville stated that the County has the money and
interest to establish more artificial reefs in the way of
old ships but right now lacks the derelict ships in which
to clean up and sink.
He believed that there were some old ships on the
Miami River but at this time he is unable to get them up
to Broward County.
He also stated that once theships are purchased and
towed here the Dive Clubs such as UnderSeas Sport
Club would have to help clean up the vessels to pass
Coast Guard Inspection so that they can be dropped
outside the third reef in water deep enough to satisfy
the Coast Guard and not too deep for the divers.
The last sinking of the ship Lowrance/Mazon was in
ten hundred feet of water and was put there for the
fisherman. Somerville said that their Fishing Club the
Pompano Fishing..Rodeo had gotten together with the
Electronics company named Lowrance and together
they were able to drop the boat in a suitable depth for
fishing.
Steve Somerville pointed out he would like the next
shiipto go to the divers but they would have to help the
County in cleaning it up.
Later Steve Somerville said he had talked to aides of
Congressman E. Clay Shaw to see if there was any
possibility of getting a surplus Navy ship from
Jacksonville. He said the aides seemed interested in
the idea. Steve wanted the ship for the divers to have
character not like some barren barge. The Navy boat
would definitely fall into that category.
The club members in attendance gave every
indication that divers indeed would be able to help in a
united way so that more ships could be sunk
benefitting both the environment and the divers.
The wreck of the tugboat Trio Bravo almost two
years ago was discussed by Somerville. He stated that
the boat ended up in almost 160 feet of water which was
a little too deep for safe diving. However on a positive
note the ship had been an instant home for both corals
and fish as slides taken recently from the wreck would
indicate.
Steve said that the Lowrance/Mazon had gone down
in good fashion and he complemented the Navy divers
who placed the charges that sent the 435 foot freighter
to Davy Jones Locker.
THe bottom line is that the County has the interest
and some money to sponsor the project but the diving
community would have to ban together forthe common
good to assist.
Somerville had some good historical slides which
showed the quality of fishing in days gone by. All
agreed that the past would never in all likelihood
return. The miles of mangroves which surrounded
most of Fort Lauderdale is gone probably forever and
the reef system was definitely effected in a permanent
fashion when Lake Mabel was turned into Port
Everglades but it is hoped that with the sinking of ships
along our coast line and more interest by government
in quality control for the environment that in some way
the decay of our fish and coral life can be turned


GETTING CERTIFIED
By Sam Rich

If you're planning to join the underwater
world of innerspace this summer, here are
some tips to help yoy select a proper course of
instruction...
INSTRUCTOR
Make it your business to meet the person who will be
teaching the course, or at least speak to him directly by
phone. All of the proceeding information is dependent
on his presentation and techniques. He will be the
biggest factor in the training and should be your most
important choice and consideration. Regardless of

standards, guidelines, requirements, etc., he will be the
decision maker, and he will decide whether or not to
certify you.
Seek information from him regarding his background.
Is he fresh from an instructor college or has he been
teaching for years? Are his methods updated or
archaic? What credentials does he possess and is he
adequately insured against an unforseeable accident?
Do you feel comfortable with him or her? Beware of
condescending attitudes or artificial assurancesofyour
success. Can he justify his methods of training by an
established principles of learning theory and practical
success? His he really answering your questions or is
he just selling?
Finally, is he worthy of your confidence and will you
feel secure with him in a situation where your safety
may depend on his judgment and professionalism? If
he satifies your concerns then give him the latitude to
exercise his professionalism. You must have complete
confidence in him because you will literally be placing
your life in his hands. His attitude towardyour safety is
of the utmost importance and you should do what ever
you feel is necessary to satisfy your questions and
concerns.

EQUIPMENT

Scuba diving, unlike other sports, is possible only.
because of life-support equipment. Quality should be
you primary concern. Your decision to.purchase, rent
or borrow gear will be directly influenced by your
instructor. All. courses will present a lecture on
equipment. Beware of sales tactics. Perhaps the most
difficult distinction a diving instructor must make is a
fine line -between educator and salesman. Most
instructor work for dive shops which depend on
equipment. sales to stay in business. For many,
instruction is a write-off which must lead to sales for
profit. That's the nature of the business and you should
be aware of it. However, in the classroom, your


GIVINGG


instruction should be objective and you should be
trained to operate the equipment and depend on it as an
extension of you while in the water.
Purchasing full scuba is not necessary as student. It
should be supplied for the entire duration of the course.
Your education should include how to discriminate
between different types, brands and functions of the
many choices available. In short, some education
should be directed at educating you as a consumer.
This is far cry from an instructor saying "Buy This
Because... I recommend it or I use It." You should ask
why and be convinced of real need and notegoorother
superficial reasons. Don't wind up standing on the back
of the boat with a thousand worth of gear and not
knowing why or how to use it. On the other hand, don't
ever dive without adequate equipment.
Most entry level courses include a supplied regulator,
back pack, tank and buoyancy compensator vest for
the entire course. You should except this as a absolute
minimum. You will be required to furnish your own
personal gear. This may include mask, fins, snorkel,
booties, gloves, weight belt and weights, but is not
limited to these items. Watches, depth gauges, slates
and. a host of related incidentals are usually not
required for training but may still be necessary for your
complete outfitting.
Supplied equipment should be first class, and having a
variety of type availble,you experience various designs,
operation and preference. One good way of checking to
make sure the equipment is properly maintained-
other than the obvious of asking to see the equipment
you get for training-is to keep a watchful eye when it is
time to rinse the gear after your pool session.-lf care is
haphazard and leaves you feeling like you hope you
are not the one to get that piece of gear next, then
perhaps you might be better off somewhere else.
To avoid finding out after the fact, a check with a prior
student may be very enlightening in this and many
other aspects of the course you're considering.
Equipment malfunctions are extremely rare in diving-
except when poor maintenance has been practiced or
inadequate equipment was used. The days of fire
extinguishers, home made regulators, guessing the
remaining air in the tank, and the Mae Westhavegiven
way to state-of-the-art, high-tech equipment. But as of


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October 1 5-November 15, :1984 .


yet no one has invented gear that doesn't need a fresh
water bath to remove the old briny.
TOTAL COST
When selecting your scuba classes you should
determine the total cost of the complete course.
Beware of hidden costs. Tuition may not include boat
charter fees, cirification documents, rental fees, text
books, air fills or all equipment necessary. Find out
before you are locked into a course what additional
charges made be imposed. Ask for a breakdown of
charges and don't accept a "package deal" unless it
covers total cost.
Dive trips necessary to complete your certification may
also require over night travel. Check, before you
register for the class if this will be the case and find out
how much travel, hotel, meals and charter rates will
cost.

DOWNUNDER
After all your class and pool work is completed the
adventures begin. The most exciting aspect of the
whole course is the diving. Diving, unlike many other
sports, requires substantial planning and advance
preparation.Dive planning should be the culmination of
your training. All the information and skills taught
begin to take substance; theory becomes practical
application and practice generates the relaxation and
enjoyment you will receive.
Schedules for diving should be agreed upon no later
than 3 to 4 weeks prior to diving.Inquire beforehand
whether you will have a say in where, when and how
the diving will be conducted. Find out if alternative
sites are available due to inclement weather and what
the policy is regarding missed dives, boats, etc. Many
.instructors charge make up fees due to rescheduling
difficulties.
Of concern to you is the depth of which you will be
going and the types of diving you can anticipate. Basis
courses are very limited in diving experience gained
(two-scuba dives usually to 30 feet), while Openwater
Certification usually depths from 30-100 feet.
Openwater courses progressively increase depth and
Skills learned during the course (five or six dives).
i jLocation, conditions, and objective of each dive is-also
S-critical. Will they all be off the same tiny stretch of
coast line or will a variety itinerary-be offered? Will you
be leaning sehreral types of diving such as beach
diving, boat diving and current techniques? Will the
'objectives be challenging and rewarding?
'Many instructors include a dive on a sunken wreck
S(exterior only) as a 5th or 6th dive. Some allow spear
fishing or lobstering and will offer instructings along
with your ordinary course subjects. A multitude of
.1_


possibilities exist in the instructor's mind. Make it your
business to motivate him by your enthusiastic
questions. Remember, make the most of your training.

OPPORTUNITY
After certification your opportunity to continue
training, diving, hunting, sightseeing, photographing,
salvaging, collecting, traveling, making buddies,
joining clubs, and even furthering or changing your
employment should be unlimited. Most certifying
agencies offer speciality training courses in most all
activities listed above and even advanced topics.
Rescue training, night diving, search and recovery,
advanced navigation techniques, marine identification
and spring, river and lake diving are all possibilities for
involvement requiring additional training, as are the
highly specialized areas of wreck diving, ice diving,
cave diving, and deep diving.
Leadership training should also be available if.you
desire to leave the realm of sheer enjoyment for a
professional status. Divemaster Certification leads to a
position of guide or group leader and is a working
certification practiced abundantly in the Caribbean.
Instructors all need assistance and diving needs more
quality instructors.
So, if you intend--to really get into the infinite sport of
diving, or even if you only want the basis to be able to
try it safely, explore the future possibilities the agency,
instructor and facility offer.
You never know, someday you may be writing an
article for future divers...

Sam Rich, a Certified N.O.A.A. Recompression Chamber
Operator and N.A.U.I. Instructor, is a noted underwater
photographer and author published in numerous
periodicals specializing in diving topics. Mr. Rich is owner
and operator of Adventure Divers and is a diving instruc-
tor for the City of Fort Lauderdale, Plantation and Broward
County Schools.


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I I i I I






8 WATERFRONT NEWS


IMPORTANT SAFETY ASPECTS
MANY SKIPPERS MISS
By Bill Lange
Probably true for any launching ramp, but speaking
of two I know best, there is chagrin, despair, contempt,
comedy, success, and sometimes drama where the
landlubbers mix with the small sea whalers. The
boaters (at least for now) denizens of this theater refer
to themselves as "the 15th Street Navy"...and rightly so
since almost all have a wide variety of background
involvement with things nautical.
But they are not going to impose on you and
probably feel that "experience is the best teacher."
They are truly forebearing.
Futhermore, the actors who take the launching ramp
plunge are per se "skippers". Now that land-life has
much deteriorated in most places, a "person's home is
a person's castle" may not always be justification for
one's actions. But aboard ship the "skipper" has
retained stature (even if I sometimes have to ask" who
is the skipper here?").
Now hear this, ye other strata of Waterfront News
readers. Oh, true live-it-upper of the New River and the
Venice of America, don't you also observe rather un-
skipper-like scenes at docks, or underway....even by
boaters who look down on the launching ramp types?
It is sad. It sometimes costs lives. For if the
mishandling of a vessel...the Coast Guard includes any
powered thing afloat from a windsurfer on up in the
nautical definition...is noticeable, the hidden, life-
endangering safety aspects are not. That is, until the
event happens.
Such as what? Lets put to paper here those matters
noted lots of time by the launch-observers or by the
persons who are volunteers to check a vessel for
safety. These comments will fit ye boaters of each
type...fro, skid-row to marina hotel, and also Florida
room and patio sitters or forklift valet parked
occasional sortiers (usually with innocent and
uftearful guests).
LIFEPRESERVERS (PFDs)
The less beautiful the boat the morethings are piled on:
top of PFDs (from anchors, to lines, to beer and soda
cases), The more beautiful the boat the cleaner are the
stacks of unopened new PFDs which may easily not fit.
the user or necessitate a calm period of time to unwind
the straps and figure out how to put them,on. Your
vessel must have one throwable (Type IV) PFD. It has to
be immediately at hand...that means tossable right
now. Your wearable PFDs must be readily available (
no unwrapping, untieing, unpiling), fit the user, in good
condition. Whether catamaran or sixty-four foot
Hattram why not go first class with your PFD? Have a
Type I to be sure that your head is held up out of water;
plus retroreflective material, plus a whistle, plus a
light.
HAVE A SPARE BOAT BATTERY
With tools. Check both batteries the night before. Too
much dockside grumbling is due to a no-start. Or
offshore here you'll drift over the horizon, likely lost to
this world.
FILE A FLOAT PLAN
Be sure someone reliable knows enough about.your
boating trip so that your non-appearance will be
recognized as abnormal. Your life may depend on their
notifying the Coast Guard. How long departed, type of
boat, number aboard, route?
FUEL TANK FAILURE
This is a hard one to handle. Suffice it to say that an
increasing number of boat fires or explosions, or of
leaks detected just in time by an observant skipper, are
due to pin holes developing from corrosion. Sure it may
be impossible to see the tank bottom...all the more
reason you must question its condition. Likewise
check tank top and sides for stress of flexing, for
trapped moisture, for unusual hardening or softening
of the material around the tank, for discoloration or
order. Call a professional marine surveyor.
CHOCKS
Without having kept count I'd guess that only one out of
fifty boaters uses wheel chocks when launching at a
ramp. Probably even fewer since there is many a busy
Saturday when I never see chocks. Yet at least several
towing vehicles a day tremble as though about to, slip,
and sometimes a crew person is yelled at to apply the
foot brakes in all haste. Several times a year a vehicle
slides back into the drink with or under the boat. Why
not use wheel chocks?


WARREN YACHT SALES
BROKERAGE CONSULTANTS FOR QUALITY YACHTS
LOCATED AT
ANNAPOLIS YACHT CENTER
1915 S.W. 21st Ave. Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 33312
DALE HAYS
P.O. Box 39345
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla; 33339 305/792-0225


I
And when recovering a boat the ramp is often green-
slick, the driving wheels too close to the water, or the
boat heavy with bilge water. The wheels spin, the
rubber smokes...a search is made for some scrap
material. Yet no chocks. Your rating from 15th Street
Navy is "galley hand, bottom class"....and what will
you fill in on the insurance claim?
HOW DOES YOUR VESSEL BOB?
In other words...know and constantly feel its rolling
period; the hull posture of your boat. Those who launch
forgetting to put in the plug should feel a problem even
before some guest "wonders if that water around my.
ankles is normal". Or if a crack has opened the
helmsperson should feel the sluggish hull before water
kills the engine or floods the cabin. A through-hull
fitting may give away. Many such leaks can probably
be controlled if you are alert, know where such weak
points may occur, and preferably have precut plugs
plus damage control materials.
SAFETY ITEMS WHICH ARE DATED
Certain items are dated and you must watch expiration
from a legal viewpoint. But it is really for safety since
useable life does decrease until full effectiveness is not
at hand in an emergency. Among these items:
a) VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNALS: Pyrotechnics
eventually will fail to fire. Keep outdated ones as a
reserve (the first three meteors are seldom seen). Date
of manufacturer and date of expiration are both
stamped on the flare handle and projectile case.
b) SOME FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: Most have a guage
which must show a full charge. Installed carbondioxide
tanks have a 12 month tag. Cartridge type
extinguishers have a tag valid for six months. Most
Class A fire dousers, such as soda and ash are tagged.


* DEF


STORAGE


FUEL DELIVERY


Reg.Gas $1.16 1.25 *

Diesel $1.04,t95oga
SDepending on Quantity
SALL TAXES INCLUDED
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
PRICES INCLUDE FUEL DELIVERY




-' .,j"'


* RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS
FOR QUICK SERVICE


* ENGINE & BILGE STEAM CLEANING & PUMPING


MIAMI/FT. LAUDERDALE/PALM BEACH
JACKSONVILLE thru COCOA BEACH


(305) 491-4795
(904) 756-2869


G. T. MARINE, INC.

DOCKSIDE SERVICE
(WE COME TO YOU)


FUEL TANK CLEANING
UEL r7
FUEL RECONDITIONING


POWER BOATING
Remember that fire extinguishers of hand-held type are
not super-simple. You must use one to learn the proper
technique...some recharge specialists. can arrange a
demonstration for you.
c) RESCUE LIGHTS: On personal floatation devices, or
on man-overboard gear are dated.
d) JETTISONABLE LIFE SUPPORT PACKAGES: Are
marked with:a testing date, usually twelve months.
e) EPIRBS: Must have new batteries every 24 months.
Better yet every 12 months. More on these in a future
article.




Frame's

Marine Service
Mobile Service
BOAT CLEANING MAINTENANCE
FINISH CARPENTRY PLASTIC GLASS
ELECTRICAL DIVING

525-6325

850 SW 12 ST.(Davie BIvd),FT.LAUD.,FL.


I I


INEW


-1






Octoberr 15-November 15, 1984


FORT LAUDERDALE HYDROPLANE
RACE...
GRAYSON/DAVID RACING in conjunction with the Fort
Lauderdale Professional Power Boat Racing
Association is staging THE CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE
HYDROPLANE RACE/FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ANN
STORCK CENTER on October 28, 1984.
The race features the worlds top drivers competing in 6
different classes of inboard hydroplanes with a special
invitational event for the WORLD GRAN PRIX
OUTBOARDS. This years race will be run North of the
Las Olas Bridge on the Intracoastal in a circular course.
Permits have been secured from the U.S. Coast Guard
and the Department of Natural Resources along with all
necessary governmental agencies.
The October 28th race wraps up in a grand fashion the
1984 racing season for the AMERICAN POWER BOAT
ASSOCIATION and the drivers will be seeking the # 1
ranking in the world.



OFFICE. 1500 S.W. 17th St.
(305) 525-4726 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

SUMMERFIELD
BOAT WORKS INC.
Complete Marine Repairs
TOM CORRELL PAUL WHITE
Manager Asst. Manager


WARREN YACHT SALES
BROKERAGE CONStILTANTS FOR QL'ALITY YACHTS
I OCAIED AT
ANNAPO.IS YACHT CENTER
1915 S.W. 21st A\e. Ft. L auderdale. Fla. 33312
FRED N. WARREN
PRESIDENT
P.O. Box 39345
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla 33339 305 792-0225


R. P. M. DIESEL
ENGINE CO., Inc.
2555 STATE RD. 84
FORT LAUDERDALE
FLORIDA 33312
Detmit Diesel 587-1620
Allison -

i J.. WESTEBEe CR co
It"~ ~IJ. H. WESTERsEKE EORP c


* INDUSTRIAL
* MARINE
* AUTOMOBILE
* HOUSEHOLD


DECORATIVE
PLATING


NICKEL CHROME GOLD BRASS
POLISHING & BUFFING

467-9751
518 S.W. 1 AV.
L Same location n 25 Yrs.


d-cO
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"Your a


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U0 WATERFRONT NEWS
10 I


USING A MARINE SEXTANT
By James E. Sullivan
The sextant is an instrument for measuring
angles between two objects. When used in
celestial navigation it measures the angular
distance above the.visible sea horizon to a body
in the sky (sun, star, planet, or moon). The
measurement is in degrees, minutes and tenths of
minutes of arc. By timing this measurement the
navigator can enter a book (the Nautical
Almanac) to locate the exact position of this body
on earth-the subpoint. The almanac will givethe
Greenwich Hour Angle (longitude) and
declination (latitude) for the body for any second
of time. This position may be plotted on a chart.
The navigator subtracts the sextant angle from
900 and draws this new angle as a circle around
the subpoint. The navigator is somewhere on this
circle. For example he measures 410 subtracts
from 900 to get 490 and uses this to draw a circle
of eaual altitude around the subpoint.
490
7z 41'.

A second and a third body can be measured and
timed to obtain a two or three circle fix or in the
case of the sun wait two hours between
observations. This method is now rarely used by
navigators as new methods have replaced the
need to plot the subpoint of the body.
In pilotage or coastal navigation the sextant is
often used to measure the two angles between
three landmarks to obtain an extremely accurate
position. The sextant is held horizontally and the
middle landmark is brought over to the left


SEVEN SEAS CRUISING
ASSOCIATION ANNUAL
MEETING PLANNED
By Ginny Osterholt
The SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION is proud to
announce that we will celebrate our 32nd anniversary
at our December 8, 1984 Annual Party in Lantana,
Florida. We are also proud to announce that our guest
speakers for the GAM will be John and Dorothy
Guzzwell, who will show their film on cruising the
South Pacific on board "TREASURE". The SSCA
gathering will be held at the New England Oyster
-nea s m u












landmark and the angle recorded, the right
landmark is. now brought over the middle
landmark and this angle is recorded. The two
angles are set on a mechanical device called a
three-arm protractor. The arms of this device are
then fitted to the chart by trial and error until all
three arms pass through the objects used as
landmarks. The navigator's position is found in
the hole in the center of the protractor.



* Competitive Discount
Prices
*Clstom Installation
*Quality ServiceX
AVALON MARINE ELECTRONICS TO
-- I--WA A POR
1&7 4 Instalatio








LIING '









SCHIPPERKE: THE PERFECT
BOATING DOG


October 15-November1 15. 1984


By John E.G. Simpson
Why not a dog bred especially for boaters?...the
perfect boating accessory!
There is such a breed, and as a matter of fact, has
been since the thirteenth century. Schipperkes,
pronounced, "Skip-per-key", are, and always have
been, exclusively boat dogs. It is a Flemish word,
meaning "Little Captain". Schipperkes originated in
Belgium before the fourteenth century. They loved to
ride on and guard the horse-drawn barges along the
Belgian canals. They're still used in Belgium as work
dogs, even picking up lines with their mouths,
transferring them from one barge to another.
Winston Churchill specified in his will that his
Schipperke ride the barge that took Mr. Churchill's
coffin down the Thames River. Schipperkes were first
in the USA in 1899, and the first registered by AKC in
1904.
A Schipperke is the idea, size for apartments and
South Florida homes, as well as boats. Not resembling
any other breed, it is tailless (sometimes at birth),
short-haired, solid black, sharp-looking with a strong
neck and back, and weighs from 10 to 18 pounds. The
coat is luxurious, thick and glossy, and is relatively
short, with a ruff around the neck and shoulders. The
coat needs no grooming other than an occasional
brushing to keep it clean and shiny. A skip's tiny feet
have no long shaggy hair, and so do not carry mud and
sand in the boat or home. Skip's are free from body
odor, a very big factor when choosing live-aboard
companions. Skip's don't even smell bad when'they are
wet! They are extremely active, and are capable of
getting adequate exercise in a small place.
As watch dogs, Schipperkes are excellent...and
faithful! Everything written about a Schipperke always
.-mentions that they are unaware of the limitations of
their size. Believe it! It has a fierce devotion to protect
the family. It feels a constant sense of duty and
discriminates carefully between friend and stranger.
Skips are tirelessly inquisitive busybodies, eagerto
investigate any source of sound or movement. They
are natural watchdogs with guarding instincts, taking
their guarding seriously, vigilantly protecting family,
yard, home, boat and car.
Tp top it off, Skips even have a long lifespan,
frequently living more than fifteen years.
Al in all, they're hard to beat, a perfect "Little
Captain" tfor every captain!
John Simpson is a math teacher at Dillard High School
in Broward County. For the past 8 or9 years, Simpson
and his family have been restoring their Choy Lee 27'
on New River's South Fork. The Simpsons also raise
dogs. /


BEACHSIDE.

BOARDSAILII
FT. LAUDERDALE


RENTALS & LESSONS
At The Sheraton Yankee
Clipper Hotel


It's Safe!
It's Fun!
It's Easy!

EXPERT INSTRUCTION REASONABLE
Beginners
Intermediate
Advanced


Open Daily


SUMMER HOURS 11-7 (come after work)
BLOCK TIME IS AVAILABLE
***NEW EQUIPMENT***
FREE AFTER SAILING C 2-173
DRINK WITH THIS AD OZZ / 74


"Mermaids" Marine Service Inc.
Lic. Specialists
Interior- Exterior _
.. ..c Cosmetics t .


:00


160OS.W


Boat Sitting Bright Work
Cleaning *
Captains Mechanics
Available
Gestimates Phone:
921-2063 463-5262


jj' i~3


f. llth Stmt. FTat auderdale. Florida 33312


NEW SAILS SAILCOVERS
RECUTS FAST REPAIRS
USED SAIL BROKERAGE
ON BOARD ADVISORY SERVICE
PICK UP & DELIVERY
RIGGING & FURLING SYSTEMS
INSTALLATION
SPINNAKER SOCKS


11


^A


ILBOAT


SOUTH FLORIDA'S 1ST SAILBOAT
FISHING TOURNEY ANNOUNCED
BY KIWANIS CLUB OF NORTH
BROWARD...
A sailboat fishing tournament is planned for
SSaturday, November 10, 1984. The tournament begins
with a kickoff party at Lauderdale Yacht Club (1725 S.E.
12th Street, Ft. Lauderdale), on Thursday, November 8,
from 7 to 9 PM. Awards are to be given Saturday
afternoon after the weigh-in at Lake Sylvia in Fort
Lauderdale.
The Sailboat Fishing Tournament will provide an
alternative means of competition amongst sailors:
multihull versus monohull, or racer and cruiser. The
results should prove to be interesting.
-Sponsored by the KIWANIS CLUB of North Broward,
proceeds will benefit the NEUROFIBROMATOSIS
Foundation. For more information contact Pat
O'Donnell at 941-4474 or 491-3490.


First Place
Largest Dolphin
Largest King Mackerel


Second Place
Largest BIlllIsh
Largest Wahoo


ENTRY BLANK
(491.3490)
*Entry Fee pr Boat 40.00
BoatNamre Size Make
Skipp erNaue Miaes Nan
Addits
Cit11tat Zip Tel.phoNm
HowdklyouhearaboutTon t? D NEWSPAPER D RADIO 0 APPLICATIONIPOST
0 Other
*Enlry tlnelldes:
Admloll 10s Kitk oil Prly lotP i llppr inad M&9I2 p"oplt
I ha rNd Rules aid ge to bldbid by Ithem
Skipper Malt
0.


S & M Sailmakers
522-7360


Full service loft.

Local sailmaker for
personal service.

We provide personal service to you in South
East Florida. We know how important your boat
is to you, and that's how we care for your sails.
The person who measures for your new sail is
the one who also designs, cuts and fits your new
sail. Now THAT'S IMPORTANT! How many other
sailmakers could give you that personal
service?


No question is to minor, be it new sails, sail trim, rigging, or discussion of your
sail inventory-we take the discussion seriously.
We use quality Bainbridge sailcloth. All new sails above 6 oz. are triple
stitched and all batten pockets are reinforced. To protect your sails we use
quality Acrilon for sewn-on and pull over sail covers in a variety of colors to
choose from.
We eliminate "gimmicks" in the sailmaking business that cost you more
money.
TYPEAILS CONDITION LUFF LEECH FOOT PRICE

Main Excellent 23.8' 24.9' 7.8' S115.00
Main Good 42.3' 45.4" 16.0' S700.00
Jib Very Good 31.4' 29.9' 7.85' S125.00
Jib Very Good 59.1' 57.5' 30.8' S1500.00
Spinnaker 1.5 Oz. Very Good 58.95' 30.75' S1200.00
Spinnaker .75 Oz. Good 35.6' 20.9' $375.00
*Brokerage Discount

Whatever your sailing needs, when searching for the best price and quality
construction, stop in, call, or write us for a quote. Send for a quote today.


name
address


phone
saiboat type
commenLs


send to:
S & M Sailmakers
101 S.W. 7th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301

or phone:
305-522-7360


--- --- --- 5 -- C -- --- -- I -- -


----~ ---- ----r- --- -L -- -L --


- -


,,


'I-<


^


TOURNAMENT


The KIWANIS CLUB OF NORTH 8ROWARD Is happy to sponsor what we believe to be South Florida' Firtl
Flahing Tournament open Io Sall BoSat ONLY. We feel the Tournament will provide an alternative mean tfor
competition amongst sailors. Mulllhull against Mnochull, or Racer g91lnll Ciulas. The results should provr to
be Inleresting. Profi Itrom Ihl event will benefll NEUROFIBROMATOSIS FOUNDATION.
The Tournament will begin with "SAILFISHIN- Kick ofi prlly a The Laudardale Yachl Club. Thursday Evening,
November 8lh, 7:00 900P.M. Meet wllh ethet Sallor., discuss your Iacltcs and enjoy complmlnntary food nd
beh. Complimentary fishing lure to be givn to li enlrntrs.Moldcrall Lues).
The Tournamenl weigh In will be held In Like Sylvia se section btlow on olher ilde), Saturday, November 10th,
12:00 Noon till5:00 P M.( Many ball Iom Plmn Beach. Broward nd 0Dad *alea have planned ,lft ups In Lak
ylvrll Saturday Night).
AWARDS







.12


GROUPER SCOOPER
By Bill Rhodes
A calm autumn day would be a great time to head
offshore to fish those fabulous grouper grounds off
Florida's West Coast. Being a member of the Hollywood
Sportfishing Club, I make the outing to Marco at least
twice during the late summer with several other
members, It's a good idea to make the long trip offshore
with other boats in case there is a problem. Thirty plus
miles out at sea without power, alone, can be a real
experience.
We usually stay at the Snook Inn located on Big
Marco Pass not too far from the open Gulf. The time of
day seems to make little.difference in fishing but we try
to leave the dock early as to beat the summer heat.
Often times, late afternoon thunderstorms kick the
seas up and send anglers back to port early.
A heading between 2100 and 2250 takes you to some
great grouper areas. The Gulf shelf has a very gradual
slope so a long boat ride is in order. Carry a lot of fuel.
Hard rocky bottom is found at almost any depth.
Around these holes and ledges lurk the Red Grouper.
Shallow areas are more frequently fished. Generally
speaking, larger fish are found further offshore. Some
shallow water wrecks can offer fabulous fishing if you
can locate them. This is where the Loran-C is a must.
Once you know the numbers of these "secret spots",
you can return to them with a push of a button.
The water depth increases about 2 feet for every
mile you run out into the Gulf. We like to star fishing in
around 60 feet. Turn the chart recorder on and look for
rises or depressions in the bottom. Ledges are
excellent areas to start fishing. A slight breeze is
favorable to move you slowly across good fishing
areas. Too fast of a drift keeps your bait off the bottom
and makes it necessary to drop back often. Drift along
until you start catching fish and then throw out a
marker.
A marker can be made by wrapping some heavy line
around a gallon plastic jug. A heavy weight is attached
to the other end of the line. Simply throw in the jog over
the side; the weight unravels the line from the jug. The
marker serves as a reference point from where you are
catching fish. When finished, pick up the jug and wrap
the line back around it for further use.
Plug or spin tackle is ideal with line testing up to 20
pound test. Heavy boat rods are not really necessary
because these fish usually run under twelve pounds.
Sometimes an occasional 20 pound red or black comes
around and becomes a real challenge on light tackle.


WATERFRONT NEWS


always happen. One time, I battled one of these "Brown
Marlin" for two hours because I had him hooked in the
lip!
While fishing for Grouper, I've encountered Kingfish,
Mackerel, Amberjack, a Sailfish, even schools of tiny
Dolphin plu other predators. After the fall migrations
begin each year it is possible to catch several species
on their way South. Finding a calm day to run far
offshore could be tough in the fall and winter.
Our outings to the Snook Inn have been a lot of fun.
We book the entire motel for a weekend and they even
provide us with a Fish Fry second to none. Our fish-
their trimmings. If you want a tight line and some tasty
fillets, try Grouper fishing in the Gulf.
Don't forget your ship to shore radio.
Pictured are Jerry Kerlin and Bill Rhodes gloating
over a days catch of Red Grouper.


Two or three ounce bucktail jigs are killers tipped with
a strip of squid or mullet. White glow worms with
twister tails on a jig prove to be excellent also. Small
live fish are hard to beat. Even large pieces of cut bait
work well. While drifting along, I'll take a small
spinning rod and drop a small cut bait to the bottom.
Tiny Lane Snappers and Grunts are easily caught and
make great live bait. We find that where Lane Snappers
are present you will usually find grouper. It is possible
to catch two or three Grouper on a single bait. Since
Grouper have gums and small teeth the bait gets
swallowed whole and many times can be used again
and again. Lane Snappers don't mind a bit!
The secret is to start the Grouper feeding. It seems
that once one is hooked up others come around and
strike anything: They actually compete for the bait.
Most often, you'll catch the larger, more aggressive
fish first. Black or Grey Grouper will come way off the
bottom to strike a bait on its way down. Many times in
a good area all the fishermen hook up simultaneously.
Beware of a lurking Jewfish. These monsters can
match the size of some foreign cars. As the Grouper
frenzy continues, one of these lunkers may happen by
and join you for dinner. A few Grouper could be missing
before long. I keep a large 6-0 ready for this occasion.
Hook a three pound live bait on and let him swim
towards the bottom. If Mr. Jewfish is still hungry you
may be in for a battle of your career.
Sometimes sharks join in the feeding also.
Monofilament leader around a 50 pound test is used
because Grouper have tiny teeth. If you hook up with a
shark the leader will probably be cut by sharp teeth and
you can go back to Grouper fishing. This doesn't


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October 15 -November 15, 1984


GALLEY NOTES
By Betty Metzger, R.D.
Getting hooked on fish?
The demand for fish is up. An ever growing number
of people who are watching their weight, cutting back
on fat and cholesterol, and trying to depend less on
meat are turning to fish. Not just because it might be
good for them, but it tastes good as well. A recent
Gallup-National Restaurant Association poll revealed
that 1 out of 5 people are ordering more seafood.
What exactly will fish do for you? What kinds are
best?
Fish and shellfish are foods nutritionists call
"nutrient dense". That is, they generally offer a wealth
of nutrients as compared with the fat and calories they
supply. For example, a 31/2 ounce cooked portion of
just any kind of white fish offers about 1/3 of an adult's
Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein, yet it
contains a small amount of fat and carries less than
100 calories. Moreover, theprotein in fish is more
easily digested than that of meat because fish has less
of the thick connective tissue that supports the
muscles of land animals.
When eating fish, the primary source of fat calories
is the butter, margarine, oil, sauce, or breaded or fried
coatings added when cooking. Canned fish packed in
oil carries double the calories and more than 5 times
the fat of the same fish in water.
Are you watching your sodium? Some
manufacturers have begun to eliminate salt for you by
offering tuna with about half the sodium. Fresh fish is
quite low in sodium. However, smoked dried fish is
quite high in sodium.
Fish vary in their vitamin and mineral content. Fresh
liver oils are high.in vitamins A and D but the flesh of
white fish is not a major source of either nutrient. Fish
is a respectable source of the B vitamins. Incidently, if
you eat raw fish, you may get virtually no thiamin
because of an enzyme that can make the vitamin
unavailable to the body.
Fish tends to be higher in minerals than meat. For
example, canned salmon and sardines provide calcium
because they are packed with the bones still in the fish.
Oysters, shrimp and clams offer more calcium than
most other fish. Clams are quite high in iron. Marine
fish and shellfish are reliable sources of both iodine
and selenium. And fish can provide significant
amounts of flouride.
According to a special report by Tufts University Diet
and Nutrition letter. Fish is being praised as a food to
protect your heart. Not only does eating more of most
kinds of fish offer an ideal means of cutting back on
heart-threatening cholesterol, fat, and calories, but
fish is rich in oils that may help to prevent heart
attacks. These special poly unsaturated oils, different
from those of vegetable origin,.are termed omega-3
fatty acids...technically named eicosa-pentaenoic acid
(EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). All fish and
shellfish contain them, but oiler, fattier fish are the
richest sources of omega-3 fatty acids.
A number of studies show that eating large amounts
of omega-3 fatty acids can decrease the tendency of
blood platelet cells, involved with clotting, to stick or
clump together. This decreases the likelihood of
forming clots that can block blood flow to the heart and
Result in an heart attack. The omega-3 fatty acids have
been shown to decrease blood levels of fatty
.triglycerides and cholesterol, both associated with
heart disease.
Since we don't know the long term effects of eating
large quantities of fish oil, it is probably in your best
interest to avoid fish oil supplements. If you want to
increase your omega-3 fatty acid intake, your best bet
is to do it with fresh fish.Tastes better, too! Even fattier
fish is lower in calories than most cuts of meat.
Shellfish, thought to be higher in cholesterol by older
tables, are being reviewed by USDA. The new tables
will not be available until 1985.
Selection. When buying fish and shellfish, use your
nose. Fresh fish and shellfish should not smell fishy, If
buying whole fish, look for bright, non-sunken eyes,
and shiny, resilient skin that springs back after you
poke it. The gills should be clean and red, not sticky.
Fresh filets are not slimy. They hold together tightly
and are not dry or curled at the edges. Once you get
your fresh fish home, wrap it in an airtight package and


keep it in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Fresh
fish will keep twice as long at 31 F. as it will 370F. The
fish should be eaten within 2 days.
Cooking Tips. When you're ready to cook fresh or
frozen fish, bear in mind that the number one problem
is overcooking, which dries and toughens the fresh
fish. The best rule of thumb is to watch closely for a
color change as it cooks. Raw fish appears watery and
translucent, while cooked fish looks opaque and white.
When the thickest part of the fish undergoes this
change, the fish is done and should flake easily with a
fork.
To get rid. of the stronger taste and lighten the color
of darker sections of fish, try soaking in an acid
marinade with lemon juice or vinegar. Wine, onions,
and tomatoes also cut the taste.
Low-fat, low calorie methods of seafood cookery
include broiling or grilling with little or no butter, oil. or
margarine. Try covering with low fat milk and cheese
says or smother with peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms,
onions, and herbs.
Safety concerns. Most popular fish are from the deep
sea and generally contain low pollution because of
dilution. Fresh-water fish may have more
contaminants. Fish eaten with bellies, such as oysters,
clams, mussels can contain contaminents and should
be bought from reputable dealers. Eating raw seafood
is like playing "Russian roulete". The roundworm
anisakis and its larvae can .cause serious
gastrointestinal problems.

We'll Travel
Expert Raritan Head Repair
You Tried The Rest Now Call The Best



ALL ARANTEED

JERRY OLSON&
RON HANSEMAN P.O. Box 791
462-0436 Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33302


13

Recreational Fisherman. Americans eat as much fish
that they catch themselves as they do tuna fish, the fish
consumed in greatest quantities...about 3 pounds per
person each year.
Let's go fishing!
Bon Voyage! Bon appetite!


QDFISHING- w
TOURNAMENT


Thm KIWANIS ClUB OF NORIH 5UOWAROi I. hnop Ity t O mf l .w wha bellnt lo bs Solth ftwia.. First
Fishing Tournaentol not 10 Soll Boasi ONLY. We lo. h Tournament will pionrld Antllanallns nna 10,
COsm00Olli 5Amogs51t IahOA. Moiill against MosllW RGI, 555 a llC,.,. hT he Is ult*osid gdOs to
bWinll"hing. Fmlll. 1it thlosost will barwill NIUROCIF5OISMAIS POUNDAOION.
YM ?oumn*alnwnl wll hrigln wilh a -SAiFiHIN 1 5 gassytuly .IThsl.ooda.dla 01,Y 1 ChtClub, Thursday lni
Nonams., lt,. 7?D I m P.M. Mae ewilh Oth11erSAM. 154-25 10W 110110 51Ad aoi" noMlglwaota l food An1
bea.. Complimenry fishing two to be51aglan to all anutatna. IMoldelt tiooIl
The Tournamenl twigh In will b hold:. In lab ke la tan smollOs balbl M ol0,11s1.ide). Saurdan. Nonwmbf IS0h.
l'IM Non,, iii,5.00 PM M. jug" sails P01at. Got. Bnw.,d And Dadi ras f."0010Plg80annd 155UPStIn 1.01
YlOl SatIday Nibght),
AWARDS


First Pllac
Lorgsal iDolphin
Larg King Mackerel


Second Place
Llrgest Bulllsh
Laigelt Wahoo


ENTRY BLANK
(491-3490)
'Entry Fee per BoatS40.00
Boadhasn Slo IdahiL
skippers NHens mat.smn
Addlast

Hwd 10. bo-lloswa0na N 0 NEWSPAPER (3 RADIO 0 APPLICATIOWIPOSIER
0 Oth1f
'Enl'y PFe eoeioO.
Admisslon to K icokail Party o, Sbppe "Mdato l(O21 o
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SaloaM ats,


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We have Hig
STechniciai
Professional
Sthe Encli
of Proi


PRODUCTS WE SELL & SE


WATER SYSTEMS
* Fresh Water Pumps
* Hot Water Heaters
* Watermakers
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* Wash Downs

CANVAS
* Bimini Tops
* Enclosures
* Fly Bridge Covers
* Windshield Covers
* Equipment Covers

DECK ACCESSORIES
* Windlasses
* Davits & Chocks
* Tide Ride Steps
* Ladders
* Fish Boxes
* Dunnage Boxes
* Masts & Arches
* Chairs
* Bait Wells
* Outriggers
* Rod Holders





.a,
*


ENGINE &
MECHANICAL
SYSTEMS
* Stabilizers
* Steering
* Synchronizers
* Oil Change Pumps
* Lube Oil Filters
* Fuel Filters
* Engine Alarms
* Bilge Pumps
* Approved Heads
* Fire Extinguishers
* Air/Electric Horns
* Windshield Wipers


111 Southwest 6th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 333(
Phone (3051 463-4307'


CO., INC.



Ihly Qualified
ns Offering
il Service On
osed List
ducts.... f




RVICE...

APPLIANCES
* Refrigerators
* Freezers
* Ice Makers
* Exhaust Hoods
* Compactors
* Micro Wave Ovens
* Ranges
* Soda Dispensers
* Garbage Disposals
* Washers/Dryers
* Central Vacuum Cleaners
* NuTone Food Centers
* Complete Air Conditioning

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
* Stereos
* Intercoms
* Inverters/Converters
* Interior/Exterior Lighting
* T.V. Systems
* Battery Parallel Switches
* 110v/220v Shoreline Systems
* Fire/Smoke Alarms
* Docking Lights

CUSTOM WOODWORK
* Anything Custom

01
S"


d."


MARINE ELECTRONICS SALES* INSTALLATION
SERVICE ENGINEERING
3229 SOUTH ANDREWS AVENUE F lRTr LA..!-LERDALE. FL 33316

305/167-2695 Booth
53 & 54


~il-------3~~-rr~.~lIrs~--~l~-l~~;l~







I" L


JJATERFRONT HERITAGE


LOG OF 'SHENANDOAH' YIELDS
STRANGE TALES
By Bob Hammack
Ship's logs hold strange tales, but few match the 13
month voyage of CSS Shenandoah.
Its assignment was to distrupt Yankee whaling'trade
in the Pacific; only incidentally did it become the only
Confederate ship to circumnavigate the globe.
Shenandoah fulfilled its mission by capturing or
scuttling more than 40 Union ships to the tune of $31
million lost in whaling and merchant trade.
Commanded by the tall, aristocratic Capt.'James
Iredell Waddell, a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy,
Shenandoah began its rebel raiding in October 1864,


when it was taken over by Waddell and a skeleton crew
in Madeira.
Bought from the British, it was built in Glasgow in
1863 as Sea King, and intended for trade in the Far East.
Instead, it did the reverse.
K U


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MAIL CENTER

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RELIABLE MESSAGE CTR FOR BOATERS
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527-1871
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Pompano Beach
943-4133


The skeleton crew was fleshed out with an
assortment of New Englanders, free Negroes, Malays,
Danes, Swedes, Australians and any other able bodied
seamen who could be pressed into service.
Apparently, the seamen decided to join the action
rather than be set adrift or put down in foreign ports.
Waddell was continually harassed by desertions from
his miscreant mixture.
Although there was British backing of the
Confederacy against the Union, Britain maintained the
guise of neutrality when it came to Australians.
Threatened by Melbourne police and the military,
Waddell in turn threatened to fight. That peril was
avoided by surrenduring some Australians aboard the
ship.
Waddell had sought repairs in Melbourne, but left
three weeks later with what he thought was an ever
dwindling crew. Instead he had acquired more than 40
"stowaways."
He had more than doubled his ship-jumping losses
suffered at the same port. He now had enough men to
man all his gun ports.
Despite the appearance of strength Shenandoah was
far from being a heavily armed destroyer.
Waddell had, at the start, only one small deck gun
which he used to threaten recalcitrant captains.
His arsenal grew as he captured more ships. Still, he
fired few shots, fought no battles and killed no man.
Waddell's previous command was some what
different. He was captain of the more famous
Confederate raider, CSS Alabama, which had been
blown from under him after it was attacked in a frenzy
of fire by several Union ships.
While he was its captain he had captured a ship
commanded by Capt. James Clark in 1863.
Now, two years had elapsed and James Clark was
sailing Nimrod in the Pacific when,for the second time,
he was captured and scuttled by James Waddell's
command.
The war had been over for a month when that
occurred. Waddell knew it, but pretended ignorance or
simply disregarded the news.
When Waddell captured the whaler William
Thompson, her mate burst into the boarding party. "My
God, man, the war is ended. Didn't you know that?"
Orris Browne, the boarding officer, asked, "Did Grant
surrender?" "No," came the reply, "the Army of Virginia
surrendered. The war is over."
Browne countered the comment, "The war will not be
over until the South is free."
William Thompson's captain produced a newspaper
detailing Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appommatox.
Unfortunately, the same paper carried the "Danville
Proclamation" by Jefferson Davis, president of the
Confederate States.
In it Davis told his troops to fight on. Even that
comment had been rescinded before Waddell got the
news of the war's end.
The news item failed to save William Thompson.
Waddell had found plans and charts of New England
whaling fleet aboard ships he would sink in Ascension
(Carolina Islands) harbor.
It also did not hurt the cause when a mate from
Abigail agreed to guide Shenandoah to the whaling-
waters of Japan and on into the Bering Strait.
Abigail was stocked with whiskey which Waddell
allowed his crew to consume in an alcoholic haze. He
had little choice in the matter.


SUE WHELAN
De oralqr
B.S., Saint Marys College
Notre Dame. Indiana


Sue has 10 years of experience in the Marine
Field, and has been with D.S. Hull Co., and
Cable Marine, Inc. for 5 years.
Sue's involvement locally in the Marine
Industry includes Serving on the Board of
Chamber of Commerce Marine Task Force
and Board of Governor's Gulfstream Sailing
Club. She has also published articles which
appeared in the South Florida Sailor, New
River Times and The Waterfront News.


/ ~-'/' !:

/ ,-
'9


,JBE OLD RI OF TEE "SHENANDOAB."
CAr"n WA~If.L (u BRm VA Wnmt). "LAwl Mr. PDAot, yo dm 't 2 int 1~ T b
Amerli ovr thn Elhbt KonlthlP Dul d l who'd oer a 'loUagt IU"P



From out of the haze, Thomas Manning, the
Baltimore mate of Abigail, led the ships out of the Sea
of Okhotsk off Siberia into the Bering Sea.
With Manning's help Shenandoah took two dozen
ships in one week, 11 of them in one day.

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*board any boat with pressure..
'water system. For demonstration
or more Information cal:

525-2645



RICH BEERS MARINE, INC.
TECHNICOLDTMRefrigeration Systems
HOLD-OVER SYSTEMS
CUSTOM REFRIGERATION
PLEASURE & COMMERCIAL
(305) 764-6192


P.O. BOX 14034
FT. LAUDERDALE. FL. 33302


RICH BEERS
PRESIDENT


Quality Yacht

Interiors...


Quality Marine Interior work requires
experience on and around boars as well as a
knowledge of fabric and color.
Sue Whelan, a 25 year resident of South
Florida, has owned and operated both power
and sail. She is familiar with the effects of sun,
sand and salt. Whether your vessel is a sport
fish, a charter boat, family cruiser or used for
elaborate entertaining each is carefully
considered.
A large Fabric and Carpeting showroom is
open 7 days a week at Cable Marine East. This
convenient location eliminates the expense of
outside contractors. Custom woodworking,
painting, appliance and accessory purchases
and repairs are available on the premises.
Cable Marine, Inc.
1517 Southeast 16th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(305) 462-2822


Custom Made
Fashion



0

Drapes
Covers
Bedding, etc.


mmv


call
522-508J





October 15-November, 15 1984


A score of ships with hundreds of prisoners became
a logistical problem for Waddell. He had torched three
in one day with five more fearing the fire.
A dozen longboats full of prisoners were towed
behind.
Although Manning of Abigail was a turncoat, the
captain and mate were far from it.
They broke loose in their longboat and rowed and
sailed nearly 200 miles across the ice-ridden sea to
warn whalers and other ships at Cape Bering.
When Waddell burned 14 ships in one steaming
blaze, its smoking billows signaled the last act of war
in July 1865-the last "battle" of the Civil War.
Waddell knew the potential for prosecution for "war
crimes," so he headed for the nearest British port.
Unfortunately, Australia was no longer"friendly," so
the nearest port was in England. That meant a voyage
of 17,000 miles around Cape Horn.
They saw only one ship in a navigational
masterpiece of 122 days duration, a feat that even
Waddell would recognize as "very beautiful" to sailing
master Irvine Bulloch.
It was one of their early landfalls that helped produce
Shenandoah's single stamp tribute.
They stopped briefly in the rocky island port of
Tristan da Cunha which a century later would honor the
visit with a 3-penny commemorative on Feb. 17, 1965.
The stamp pictures Shenandoah and another
unnamed ship of the type Waddell so successfully
scuttled, a New England whaler.
At journey's end, Shenandoah had circumnavigated
the globe.
In the meantime, though, it never touched a
homeport nor did it ever surrender to the Union.
Instead, Waddell chose to give up the ship in England
as a citizen of the Confederacy.
Had he admitted to knowing the war was over, he
and his crew could have been tried on charges of piracy
as citizens of the United States.
Waddell lived for 11 years after the close of the war
and became a captain of San Francisco of the Pacific
Mail Line.
Shenandoah was subsequently sold by the Britishto
the Sultan of Zanzibar, and she sank one stormy
evening in the Indian Ocean.
The Shenandoah log is housed in the archives of
North Carolina in Raleigh.


The Shenandoah towing prisoners from three burning whaling vessels in Bering's
Straits, June 25, 1865. -


"MARINE LUMBER & PLYWOOD SPECIALISTS"
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR OF
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SAND OTHER
QUALITY BUILDING PRODUCTS


WE'VE BEEN SERVING YOU SINCE '62


BRI( E PLYWOOD INCORPORATED


1441 S.W. 33rd Place P B Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33335
Telephone: (305) 523-1441 Box 22432 Miami (305) 949-3381.






16 "' WATERFRONT NEWS


Florida is a state of great natural beauty enhanced by
valuable resources. However, rapid development and
public misuse threaten to destroy the balance between
man and nature that now exists. The Florida
Department ,of Natural Resources, charged by law.
(Chapter 370, F.S.) with "the administration,
supervision, development and conservation of the
Natural Resources of the state," is sounding a Resource
Alert to deal with this threat. If Florida is to retain hope
for a secure future, protection of the environment is
vital.
The Resource Alert Program is now being operated in
keeping with the spirit of a specific Constitutional
mandate approved by Floridans in 1968: "It shall be the
policy of the state to conserve and protect its natural
resources and scenic beauty..." But we need your help
to enact this policy. You can protect the state from
misuse of the environment by reporting infractions of
state laws or regulations that protect public resources.
To report anything you believe, is-an improper use of
resources; please phone the Resource Alert Watch
Line..The information you deliver will be relayed
immediately for proper action. You are not required to
give your name;:
The following are examples:of infractions of state laws.
or regulations protecting public resources that citizens
could report. '
Saltwater Fishing Law Violationslsuch as:
* Taking fish or shellfish out of season
* Ignoring'.emergency -regulatory action (such as
oystering in closed areas)
: Taking of undersized shellfish or other marine life
regulated by law
Se.Using unlawful fishing gear to fish in Florida's
saltwater areas or spearing in restricted waters
,:*Using illegal fishing traps
i Selling or buying snook, a.Species. of Special
'Concernm or other gamefish
;' Using firearms or explosives to kill any food fish
* Using chlorine or any chemicals to take fish or
crayfish
.* Possessing snook during January, February, June
and July ,


Beaches and Shores Violations, such as:
* Destroying sea oats or other protected plants
* Digging up or otherwise destroying dunes
* Building seaward of the coastal construction control
line without permission from DNR .
* Illegal filling of wetlands
Marine Boating Violations, such'as:
* Speeding in regulated zones, especially those areas
set aside for the manatee.
* Failing to have a boat registration as required by law.
* Engaging in reckless boating activity
Marine Life Violations, such as:
* Harming or harassing the endangered manatee
:Breaking catch and possession laws
* Stealing turtle eggs or molesting laying turtles or
hatchlings
* Taking reef coral and damaging or anchoring on coral
reefs
Public Lands Violations, such as:
* Illegal land alterations, such -as illegal filling of
wetlands
* Using public lands, either on the surface or
submerged, without leases or permits, for any activity
* Illegal cutting of timber on public-lands
* Cutting of mangroves.
* Poaching on public lands
* Taking plants from state parks
Other areas of concern include:
* Unusual marine fish or wildlife kills, including
beached marine animals
S Fires on public lands that appear to be of unusual
origins
* Oil or pollutant spills or dumping
* Unusual shoreline alterations, either natural or
man-made


CABLE
MARINE
INC


.. ....... ... .... "I .......... li


Alice faraco
Tina Arrand


We'll clean I
yourself...


Should you witness a violation or believe harm is
befalling our natural resources please phone the
RESOURCE ALERT WATCH LINE 1-800-342-1821 with as
many details as possible about the activity.
The Watch Line operates 24 hours a day. If you have
doubt that the law is being broken, call the Department
of Natural Resources anyway.:

FEQ Kiln Dried BURMA. TEAK
Quality, Service and Price
Make us your best choice



COMPANY

piece to. a 1,000 pieces


6851 S.W.21Ct.
Davie, FL 33317


472-1155


?a6m 7TdtAT Sua;fe'ia
We have many things BOATERS need:
Propane & Supplies
Brass Fittings; Head "
and Marine Suppl es .
2190 State Rl. 84
west of.. 1-95
Ft. Lauderdale west of 1-95
587-7990 ON
7Idays


j BOTTOM PAINTING SPECIALS]


NOW THREE FULL.

SERVICE LOCATIONS

FT.LAUDERDALE
2491 HIGHWAY 84
305-587-4000
80 TON LIFT
PALM BEACH GARDENS
PGA BLVD. & NTRACOASTAL
305-627-0440
60 TON LIFT
FT. LAUDERDALE
1517 SE 16 ST
462-2822
40 TON LIFT


I I i- i-


and paint your bottom cheaper than you can do it


Power/Sail


DOCKSIDE DESIGN
CUSTOM YACHT INTERIORS


527-0424


Power/Sail


Power/Sail


Paint .Under 40 Ft. 41 Ft. 59 Ft. 60 Ft. Plus
Bottom Coat $7.00Per Ft. $7.50 Per Ft. $ 8 00 Per Ft.
* Vinylux $8.00Per Ft. $8.75 Per Ft. $ 1025 Per Ft.
* Unlpoxy $8.50Per Ft. $9.25 Per Ft. $ 10.75 Per Ft.
Above includes haul.out and pressure cleaning.
Scraping of heavily fouled bottom extra.


CMOOR KING
The ultimate mooring system


AS SHOWN IN

yaching


WRITE FOR MORE DETAILS TO:
MOOR KING
2240 N.E. 62ND COURT
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33308
PHONE (305) 491-7570
* HEAVY & STANDARD ELIMIN
MODELS AVAILABLE PILING
* EFFECTIVE IN WINDS ALL ST
TO 100 M.P.H. TELES(


YACHTING/IJly 1984


WHAT DO THESE THINGS HAVE IN COMMON?

AIRCONDITIONING
MICROWAVE OVEN
COLOR TV
FROZEN MARGARITA
THEY DON'T HAPPEN WITHOUT A GENERATOR!
([ V I J.H. WriRutiKE CORP.
S ENGINES AND GENERATORS
DIESEL SALES SERVICE PARTS

FREE INSTALLATION QUOTES
COMPARISON PRICING ON ALL MAKES
NEW AND USED UNITS
ALSO WINCO PORTABLE GENERATORS
4 to 11 KW GASOLINE


SYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. BOX 22834, PORT EVERGLADES, FL 33335
(305) 462-3894
We Have The Power To Make Things Happen


IGadgets & Gilhickies
by Jack Smith
Mooring arms
Two impressive mooring arms made by Moor King.
hold off J.J. Curran's 11 meter Trojan at his
Ocean Reef Club home on Key Largo Fla.
EFFECTIVE ON ALL TYPES OF
BOATS FROM 16 FEET TO 92 FEET
IATES OUTSIDE DOCK SEAWALL, MARINA &
CONSTRUCTION PILING INSTALLATIONS
'AINLESS STEEL ELIMINATES SHALLOW
COPIC SPRING LOADED WATER PROBLEMS


~l;;l~ejEIJe=4~s~saes~4~p





October 1 5-November 15, 1984


see us at booth 126 in main tent -
PETER HARRISON



B-& B DOCK & DECK


2320 SOUTHWEST 36th AVE.
FT LAUDERDALE, FLA. 33312 565-0454


(305) 979-5700 Philip Vincent
(305) 979-5701


WELDING- BRAZING Q/
EQUIPMENT SUPPLIES

HAVCO EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLY CO.
1979 N.W. 55th AVENUE
MARGATE, FLORIDA 33063







IRS

INFLATABLE REPAIR SERVICES
124 S.W. 5th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
(305) 462-6208 ALAN R. HARRIS
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
Liferafts & Boats



2413 SUGARLOAF L '-.E FT LAUDERDALE FLORIDA 33312
587-4326


Greg Dellinger

Mary McDonei-Hennenfent
Steven Hennenfent


Mary & Steven's
Custom Graphics
Yacht Lettering
Gold Leaf
Sho-Cards


Signs


Page 474-8039




(Custom arinte iooibf working

SPECIALIZING IN COMPLETE
RESTORATIONS DOCKSIDE OR
DRYDOCK TEAK DECKING TOE
RAILS MARINE FURNITURE INTERIOR/
EXTERIOR DESIGNS

RICHARD GIAMBERSIO
r-.. --..... .- a(305) 428-5338
LICENSED & INSURED


SVu


1.4 ,-


Personalized
Gifts


EMBROIDERY
*CLOTHING
*GLASSWARE
FURNITURE
*PARTY SUPPLIES


(305) 561-4200

2756 N. Dixie Hwy.. Ft. Lauderdale
North of 5 Points on the east side of the street
See Us in main tent booth 133-135
Ft. Lauderdale Boat Show
U a .a s, v I nK1 1 fw wsw V


Pool, dock and tennis huts,
gazebos, umbrellas and
awnings using genuine
imported thatching reed.


Mobilized Air
AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION


JOHN BASSO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
see us at booth 68


INSTALLATION
SALES S SERVICE

CHARLES LEE
MARINE


t N.k 1la~renn,--
* E-cepl-rjn l ir.:Iq I ri
Bu.il le: La-ll
Ur-urdlue 5 Yeacr Warranly
* No, Roinq g Sneodiilng a.i
Will Nol fIi1lrje0pd


4."7 -


ALL'S MARINE REPAIR
MOBILE DOCKSIDE SERVICE
INBOARDS OUTBOARDS STERN DRIVES


F- r In irrnil raljrn'I Irn.-e
yDr rihur Nrii i..r call
(305, 564 QOQf,'


AFRICAN SHADE INC.
152 N rih- 3rT 3jrd Sjr.-eI
Ft Laujdl.I3I,. FL 33334
P 0 B..,,23994
FIF L3ud.roale. FL 3330'


CARPENTRY CLEANING DELIVERIES *


DIVING


DOCKSIDE YACHT MAINTENANCE
DIVING SPECIALS S
Prop & Rudder Cleaning: '30.00
/ Bottom Cleaning: '1.50 & up/foot
'v. (length on deck)
Monthly Rates: on request
Prop & Zinc Changing 45.00/hour
Hull Inspection .0
/ Search & Recovery '30.00 in.
(24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE)
Dock Piling Restoration
COMPLETE YACHT CARE, PAINTING & REPAIR
BILL & ALICE CLIFT 522-6454


VARNISHING *. WAXING WELDING CARPENTRY


MARINE CORROSION
100 years ago it existed...
Now,.we know what causes it.


MARINE CORROSION
SPECIALISTS


Established
1950


BOAT
SHOW
BOOTH
240-A
& 241
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
CHARGERS SHORELINES


SURVEYS REPORTS BONDING SWITCHES a TRANSFORMERS
CATHODIC PROTECTION MOTORS ALTERNATORS
EQUIPMENT. CIRCUIT BREAKERS
SYSTEM INSTALLATIONS CUSTOM ENGRAVED PANELS

Ward's Marine Electric Inc.
630 S.W. Flagler Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 (305) 523-2815 or 524-7210


17


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--- -~~~


10






is ( WATERFRONT NEWS


WATERFRONT CUISINE


FOOD FROM YOUR GALLEY
By Nedda Anders
What a sweet pleasure it is to sail off on your boat this
mild autumn day! The weather is perfection. Your
favorite mate is at the helm. You've left most of your
worries behind you. And because you always provide
such good food (no bologna sandwiches when you're in
charge of the menu), you never lack for companions to
share your on-the-water paradise. For today's cruise,
there are six aboard, and I have provided an amplitude
of dishes with great latitude for you to omit one or two
of them depending on how long you'll be afloat. For
example, you could omit the veal roast and focus on
the pasta or the bread and cheese as main course. Or
keep the veal but dispense with one of the other dishes.
Whatever choices you make, you can prepare them in
your home kitchen and carry them on board because
they carry well.
BAGUETTE FILLED WITH TOMATO AND CHEESE
Start with a good baguette or loaf of French bread.
Carry along wedges of brie, a creamy goat cheese, or
homemade mozzarella cheese. Add a pint of
wellwashed cherry tomatoes. Pick up a small basil
plant at Publix or any nursery, rinse the leaves under a
sink spray and carry it on board. Your guests help
themselves to bread, cheese, tomato, and a leaf or two
of crushed basil. (That basil plant will last, given light
and water.) Serve with a bottle of robust red wine so
everyone unwinds, then it's all hands on deck to work
on suntans.
SPICY BRAISED VEAL ROAST
1 boned and rolled veal roast, about 3 Ibs., see note
2 cloves of garlic
1 large sprig fresh rosemary, miced, or 1/4 teaspoon
dries rosemary
1 large sprig fresh sage, minced, or 1/4 teaspoon
dried sage
Freshly ground pepper
3/4 to 1 cup dry white vermouth or other wine
1 to 2 tablespoons oil (just enough to coat bottom of,
pan)
With thetip of a sharp knife, make shallow cuts in the .
roast in about a dozen places. Crush the garlic through
a press or with a fork, and mesh with the rosemary and.
sage to make a paste. With the tip of the knife, insert
the paste into the cuts in the roast. Grind pepper over
the roast. Heat a heavy saucepan.about thesize of the
meat, add oil then brown roast on all sides.,Pour in31/4
cup of vermouth, bring it to a boil, reduce heat to
moderate, cover pan loosely with foil and let simmer
for about 2 hours, turning roast every half hour. If
necessary, add a tablespoon or two of wine or water so
that the pan juices do not dry out. Transfer veal to
cutting board and slice no more than1/4 inch thick,
.keeping shape intact. Carry on board wrapped in foil.
Delicious warm or cooled.
NOTE: I suppose you have a healthy respect for
prices, as do, and veal roast is not a bargain meat.
However, I buy it on sale at the Sunrise S & S Meat
Market on University Drive. At less than $2.50 a pound,
veal is not a bankbuster. (This is not a paid adv.)
COLD PASTA WITH BROCCOLI AND CARROTS
I spent the summer in New York, surely the carryout
food center of the world, and this was one of the many
ways in which take-out pasta was prepared. You can
use spaghetti or fettucini or a tubular pasta like
rigatoni, ^preferably made with durum wheat as
imports usually are.
12 ounces fettucini cooked until tender but not soft
1/4 cup olive oil or other vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, minced (omit if
fresh basil is not available)
.3 tablespoons parsley leaves, minced
2 zucchini scrubed, cut lengthwise in quarters, then
across.in dice 1/8 inch thick
2 carrots, diced
Salt and red pepper.flakes

Drain fettucini and transfer to large bowl for carrying
on board. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the oil. In large


"SPLICE-THE MAIN BRACE"
a food & drink guide

NATIVE FISH & HONEST BAR
By Maria Marioni
FORT LAUDERDALE...Shirttail Charlie's, a "Native Fish
and Honest Bar" restaurant, named after one of Fort
Lauderdale's most colorful historic figures, is the
newest waterfront restaurant along the New River.
Located on the south side of the New River, west of
the F.E.C. tracks, and across the river from the
Discovery Center, Shirttail Charlie's is part of the new
Riverfront Marina complex.
Shirttail Charlie was a Seminole outcast, banned
from his tribe, and forced to wear a "dress" that
amounted to extra-long shirttails. Charlie made his
living fishing, pan-handling and posing with tourists
for photographs in early Fort Lauderdale.
Shirttail Charlie's is open for lunch and dinner,
serving moderately priced seafood specialties with the
accent on native Florida fishes. The restaurant's
interior is decorated with old Florida memorabilia
including period photographs. A raw bar, pool,
dockside bar and comfortable decks with benches add
to the overall ambiance of the restaurant. The 25 slips
outside the restaurant accommodate the river traffic.
Access to Shirttail Charlie's is via the New River,
west on the New River from the Intracoastal Waterway.
On land, access is via Southwest Sixth Street, from
either Andrews Avenue or Southwest Fourth Avenue.
Take Sixth Street -to Southwest Third Avenue, turn
north and drive to the New River.


SHIRT TAIL CHARLIE...A
REMARKABLE REDMAN. OLD
TIMES ON THE NEW RIVER.
How the Waterway Was Named
Seminole legend declares that the New River sprang
up overnight, centuries after the creation of the world,
in response to the prayers of thirsty Indians. European
explorers and travelers praised the clear, swift stream.
Their native hosts remarked that it was a precious gift
-from ancestral spirits-and "new".


frying pan, add remaining oil and saute zucchini,
carrots, garlic, basil and parsley until vegetables are
just tender. Stir into pasta, sprinkle with salt and
pepper to taste. Parmesan cheese and diced walnuts or
pine nuts are optional additions.
FLORIDA FRUIT BOWL
One of the joys of living in Florida is the abundance
of native produce available here. Among the fruits
grown by one of my neighbors are cherimoyas,
carambola, papaya, litchi nuts, loquats, kumquate,
mangoes, not to mention a variety of citrus. If you can
beg or buy one or more.of these tropical treats, add
them to your fruit bowl along with wedges of peeled
cantalope, cubes of fresh pineapple and peeled slices
of kiwi. Crush some fresh mint leaves and add them to
the bowl. Serve with pretty plastic spears for self-
service. Pack a variety cakes along'with the thermoses
for hot and cold drinks. Diminitive French pastries,
Rich dark chocolate cake, Chocolate truffles, Apricot
or apple strudel. If you have a favorite bakery for any
of these goodies, please let me know. Write to-Nedda
Anders, c/o the Waterfront News.


SNews
Zlegler Publishing Co., Inc.
;/ 320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312


In Henry Flagler's day, only a century ago, the river
served as an east-west highway. Proud chieftains clad
in silver and scarlet used it to transport exotic bands of
squaws and braves out of the deepest marshes of the
Everglades into town for shopping. Pitching camp at
Frank Stranahan's New River Trading Post, not far
from the site of today's Riverfront Marina, the Indians
bartered furs, plumes and alligator hides for cloth,
ammunition and a liquid.the local Mikasukis called
"wyome"-firewater.
Traders were officially forbidden to satisfy the
redskin taste for whiskey. Commerce grew, however,
as did the number of unsober Seminoles on Fort
Lauderdale streets. Shirttail Charlie was the most
notable of these tipplers.
Charlie Tommie, a sort of southern Rip Van Winkle, is
among the best-known characters in Lauderdale
history. This genial drunk began life as the nephew of a
chief and a member of a distinguished clan. Later, as
schoolmarm Ivy Stranahan (Frank's wife) regretfully
concluded, "Charlie, like many other scions of great
families, came to grief because of fermented
liquors...and the softening influences of civilization."
Sober, Shirttail Charlie was an expert hunter and
athlete. According to reports in the Jacksonville Times
Union, he once captured seven adult gators
barehanded-"without the aid of guns, spear or knife."
Charlie seldom stayed sober. An outcast from his
tribe, he had committed obscure crimes-no one knew
specifics, though wife-murder was rumored-and had
been condemned to live alone dressed "only in his shirt
tails."
The varicolored skirts he adopted, together with a
sunny, outgoing disposition, made him a rare object of
curiosity among the throngs flocking south during the
boomtime Twenties. Most Indians were indifferent to
tourists. Charlie was not. He greeted arriving trains,
panhandled for tips, extracted "loans" and engaged in
minor thievery. He bathed only occasionally. When he
died, a street was named in his memory.
In Shirttail Charlie's era, fish abounded in the New
River. Tarpon weighing 100 pounds were common.
Shoals of mullet and other table fish were so thick that
several of Mrs. Stranahan's young pupils tried using
them as stepping stones.
Almost everyone owned a boat. Rafts-, sleek yachts,
one-cylinder smoke-pot runabouts, clumsy barges-
all plied the sweet, clean waters.


CONSULTANT WELLNESS
NUTRITIONIST CONCEPT

Betty W. metager, .D.
REGISTERED DIETITIAN


P.O. BOX 91
(305) 462-3456 FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33302-0091



463-FISH 400 S.E. 3rd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
(on New River just
West of R.R. bridge
downtown)



at
RIVERFRONT
MARINA


Custom

Nauticaf8ewl'ng6g Upholsteryr


c' Ll laLtrdilc


Free Estimates

Reasonable Rates



Call 792-4246


CAll Custom Furnishings
Curtains
Cushions
Fitted Sheets


'We Specialize In'Boat Interiors






CLASSIFIED


October 15-November 15, 19841
'19


APARTMENTS
VILLA NELSON 208 Hendricks Isle-
Well furnished Waterfront 1 bdrm
Apts. Pool, Jacuzzi,:Cable, Laundry,
ii 'lV 's . tr\< '1,, r' Af ci' "J -- --' ....


. 3.,- i 'WULas .. V t -!5 i a u L .;1 "- i
beach and Las Olas. Pool, Cable,
Phone, Laundry, Maid service, Deep
water dockage. For information or
Brochure call (305) 524-4430, Ban-
yan Marina Apartments, 111 Isle of
Venice, Ft. L. 33301.

DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
103 ISLE of VENICE So. Vista Marina
'Apts Deepwater, sailboats for live-
aboard or storage. Cable t.v., phone,
laundry & shower. Call 491-2468.
HENDRICKS ISLE Low craft to 40',
water & elec. Apts. also avail.
Call 467-8371.
N. Fork NEW RIVER- Power or Sail.
6' Depth, Water/220 elec., up to 50',
No Wake. 523-9351.
VILLA NELSON Apts., 208 Hendricks
Isle (on east side). Pool*Jacuzzi
Cable*Laundry*Showers*Gas/BBQ.
Live-aboard or Storage. Apts, wkly/
monthly also available. 463-7067.
BANYAN MARINA- 111 Isle of Venice.
8' Deepwater, up to 48'. Pool, Cable
Phone, Laundry. LIVE-ABOARD or STORE.
Apartments, wkly/mnly also available
Call 524-4430


FOR SALE
1983 Renken 20' Cuppy Cabin 2.6 litre
120 HP. OMC w/1984 Continental galv.
trailer low hrs., like new VHF radio,
search light $8750. O.B.O. must sell.
966-9867.
TRADE or SELL, Best Offer, '75, 30'
CATALINA, Atomic 4, 4 Sails,$25,900-
Radio & lots of extras. 462-3456
1973 Lyman, 24' Complete Fishing
gear, out riggers, all new covers,
radio, depthsounders. Any sensible
offer. Call 525-6221.
8' Sandkey Sailing Dinghy, Complete
w/sails. $500 firm. Call 522-7726.
Two horses, 1 thoroughbred & 1 quar-
terhorse. Call 472-2750.
AVON INFLATABLE 9.5' Dinghy w/motor-
mount, Oars, Bag, Foot pump. $395.
Call 1-395-7254 (Boca Raton).
1967 MORGAN 34' Sloop. Diesel, excel-
lent condition, many extras. $32,00.
Call 764-4543.
ONAN Reconditioned Diesel Generators
3KW, $1995; 7.5KW, from $2995; 15KW,
$3495. Repower Systems 462-3894.
FIVE- 18" Solid Aluminum Mooring
Cleats. Must see to appreciate.
Call Tom at 761-8753.
WESTERBEKE Diesel Engines 10-100 HP,
Generators 3-32KW on sale. Call for
pricing or see us at the Ft.L. Boat
Show. REPOWER SYSTEM 462-3894.
LOSE WEIGHT FEEL GREAT Ask us
how NATURAL HERBAL PRODUCTS Money
Back Guarntee Call Bob or Marilyn
at 763-3771.


FOR SALE cont'
SAILBOAT REPOWER, comparison pricing
on all makes, Complete installation
available or.-do-it-yourself instruc-,
_r-i ;, c-,._,"a'R P)Pnt l Y S(TIEMS -462-38q4..


MAGNUM 370 Sailboard, $600, Excellent
Condition.
4 HP Evenrude, weedless prop. $500.
Call 781-8037.


MARINE SERVICES
MARINE PLUMBER- Reasonable Kates.
Call 462-6308.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
PREP. for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE.
.Will teach same to seafarers for
$12. Call 462-2628.
PROFESSIONAL
TEAK SPECIALIST, Varnish & Yacht
Maintenance. Capt. Frank 525-6221.

.REFRIGERATION A/C Repairs-
Installations, 12v-115v, Engine
Drive Systems. Cash-M/C-VISA-"Pay
as you go"- Do it yourself Equip-
ment Available.
CUSTOM REFRIGERATION 527-0540
527-4.477.

Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3
-easy weeks, including MARINE Vocab.
INTERPRETING available.'564-6962 or
564-5822
MARINE PEST CONTROL-
Ehy pay more because you own a boat?
AT EASE pest Control.
Call Gary Easley 941-7272.
MARINE:SURVEYOR- Intensive, accurate,
and complete surveys for buyers and
insurance. Call Ed Rowe 792-6092.
DELIVERY & MAINTENANCE SERVICE. Fly
in & sail away! Enjoy your precious
vacation time. U.S.C.G. Captain pro-
vides quality care. 523-9351.
PROFESSIONAL TEAK SPECIALIST
Varnish & Yacht Maintenance
Capt. Frank 525-6211
RIVERSIDE BOAT REPAIR & SERVICES /
Mike's MARINE 3001 SR 84, Ft. Laud.
792-3660. WE DO IT ALL Dockside
Service Avail. Services & Repairs -
Gas & Diesel. Welding, Haul-out,
Canvas work, Painting, Carpentry,
SPECIAL BOTTOM PAINTING, Fibreglass
Electrical, IB/OB, Storage. Mon-Sat
NOTICE FREE Will haul away or re-
move your unwanted Boat or Yacht.
Call 782-6228.


REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE or Rent: CARRILLON MIAMI
BEACH OCEAN FRONT ROOM. $19,000
$5,000 dwn pays off in 7 yrs. or $500
rent/month. 305-553-8590 or 552-3717.

r 1976- 2076

B RAL ENTUR MLS

PROPERTIES, INC.
6908 Cypress Road Plantation, Fla. 33317

Dennis J. DeRolf Broker/President
. Office: 584-1400 Eve: 584-3735 J


(305) 462-5770 Ofc.
I (305) 527-1304 Eves. I
ROBERTP. GARGANO


ed Move Right In!
LANDINGS
Price REDUCED, Deepwater, 3 bdrm 2
bath, Extra Spacious & Private, BEST
PRICED, East of Bayview, Only $237,0OC
NEW RIVER
Deepwater Vacant Lot, Approx. 0.4
acre & 190' on river. Zoned R3A (25
units/acre) Multi-family. Live-aboard
permitted. Reasonable $135,000.
MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENCE- 2 bdrm/1 bath
& Efficiency, Zoned R3A w/ 90' of
live-aboard dockage. Assume mortgage
& owner will hold 2nd w/ only $25,000
down!
RIVER REACH
Dockage only $10 per foot per year!
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
1. Great Price & Owner Financing]!!
2 bdrm/2 bath corner, Only $74,900.
2. 2 bdrm/11 bath Great 3rd Floor
view overlooks Pool, Canal & Yachts
Only $73,900. Owner wants offers!
3. New Building- 2 bdrm/2 bath, 5th
floor view of Canal, Golf & Tennis.


MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"Ne wateAftonyt istings needed;
I have quatfiied buyeu!"
ROBERT P. GARGANO 462-5770 Ofc.
ic. Real.Estate .Broker Realtor.527-1304. Eves.

HELP WANTED
USED CHARTS of Caribbean Sea wanted
Call 763-9284 ask for Dick.
PART TIME to assist in YACHT REFINISH-
ING preparation. 791-6142.


WATERFRONT NEWS

ADVERTISING RATES:
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Each Additional Line ...... $3.00
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Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
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or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 20,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


I _







SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


T UR .''
THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


October 16 Las,, Quarter -17 18 19 2
IM etLrF Offshore iult L GeneI Mt Ft. Laud. Oktoberfect
eet 0 pm at Coconut at Snyder Park thru Antique Show Sale
Sa Ligt roe Siing Club Oc Holiday Prk Activ
(Fi;, a Grif- in Rd, USCAux Ciass o~ Boa Melbourn Oktoberfest
GL;est Speaker: Pat Boat mechanics with at Brevard Coamiuni.ti
O'Donnei, Chim o iig, Ai" Grodsky Cnilege thru Ocit, 23
EASTERN DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME S+ bo +.oac Fis.in. + D a_. IDer ,F +,3' +2.4' ..2..a +2,6'
-2.2' 04.._92' ... I 2' 4
BASELINE: ANDREWS BRG. @ MEAN LOW 01oi*o -I 0201"0843"15012127 011'0953"1608"2238 0o29'11 171523 40 0538"1214-l812
+0.6' +1.1' +0.6' +.7' +0.6' +0.7' 0.5
2T 22 23 24 25 26 27
Women's Yacnt Racin, Ft. L -.'e Grier F Laud.
Association Race eanrasyfest Or emi-A Bili.isi Bor'aiin A's
BY, C Y .. To n e B h ic r C c ilenge Cup .
Gctc'Der 28t0h Thru c:.28h at B c1In-dsurfei Beach
Fainy Wynette & Lee o:' ',e isc'yne
Greenwood ot SunrisF Ci;l 59n -52:"-
fiusical The3at re
+ 2.7' .8' + ,0' + .0 +3.3: + 1. ,3 +2.9: +3.' >2 8'
DI E +0.2 +0, 2' -0
28 29 30, s i31 November 1 2 3
Ft. LcUderd le
lane Plane Rac t, ud
Woody He'rmn' ? L [h, Boat Shon 'o, n Po rk ia' o ": iu
Pompano Beach urnderins :- ds t Bohi c -rnes Rci Ses n .vs:
Oktoberfest, P c. Musicians' Exch, thru No". th Be ns hi;r ,, -
Recreatiron Cencer
STANDARD TIME RESUMES
+2.' +2,5' +2,7' E +. + 2 :2.
0528" 1.38*1807*23L7 523 23K lO93.. r l K 231. E200. 0038 7...22. Qll0 35 i 0 i l3 [ ^1 7 -
r D n, .n f,' .r +r R' Ti -'-0.5' -0.9- 07 10.* 0 9 ... +0.8 +,
4 5 6 7 Fuii oo, 8 9 10
Maroncee DayE:;
'ort ive-gaes P oe ; i.he P'rk
Underdo 6e.6 Gamoo : : -c
Festival 04I th -. Ut, ,. ... .' n ^. h ',On
Yankee .Cl Dper
tn Ft. LGId

TIME +2.3' +2.4' +2.4' +2.4' +2.5' +2.5 +2.6' +2,5 +2,7' + .2.54 +2,7 2. 2,7' +2.!
T 0553*1219*807 0037 0631259f 8144 031 0-140 713 ?7' *9 9 L9" 07: *143' 1953 022o07"1' .7 025"0903"525"100 0331"0940"1602"2135
IDOEn n +0,7' +0.3' +0.G +0.2 +0.6 +' +0 .,6 c,2 +0.7'
11 12 13 14 frME ADJUSTMENT. FOR TIDE tABLL
High Water Low Woatc
Hillsboro !nlet----------- -31 minutes -50 min.
iu fsr e c rk i, Bah ia Mar ----------------- -20 min. -18 min.
Haillaond'e. thru 2Sc Port Everglades Inlet----- -45 min. -62 min.
Playboy (Dania Cut-Off)--- +45 min. +28 min.
Summerfield (S.F. New R.)- +40 min. +40 min.
+ 2.6' +2.3' 12.5' +"23' +2.5' +2.2 +2,4' Ti!E_
0407*1017*1639*2212 0448*1059*1721*2255 05331145*1810*-3, 0625"1238., 906 r,.
S+0.4' +0 8'1 T1